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m GOi^VES REMOVED 


FROM PO WER IN PORTUGAL; 
LOSES TWO HIGH POSITIONS 


cmr EDmQfn 

Weather; Shbwrrs , - today, endtot 
tonight'- Partly -sunny ' lomSnw 
Temperature 'range f today ^4?70 
range- 65-73. Detmla -on. Page 35 


2 ax:ENT& 




Calls Plan Only Alternative 
to a Default— I Legislature 
Recesses for Weekend 


Way Seems Clear for 
New Cabinet With a 
Broader Line- Up 


By HENRY GINIGER 
?pro». in TM Mv \gft Ttaies 
LISBON, Sept. 5 — Gen. 
'asco Gongalves, who has 
>rced oat as -Premier of Por- 
igel a week ago because of 
■s pra-Communist leanings, 
as stripped of all authority 
night 

'Faced with open defiance by 
!e army and by the air force, 

J well as with opposition by 
*e major political parties, 
pneral Gongalres himself 
tve up his appointment as 
■let of Staff of the armed 
Jces. 

!n addition, a communique 
Jned by President Francisco 
y Costa Gomes announced 
fit General Gonqalves has 
ben dropped from the High 
uncil of the Revolution, the 
^licy-making body of the 
,]med Forces Movement, 
r Broader Cabinet Seen i 



..... 

• If : 

■■ ' v ■/ ..m 


AaoOttadPnsa 

Gen. Vasco Gongalres, former Portuguese Premier, arriv- 
ing at armed forces meeting in Tancos. He renounced 
his appointment as Chief of Staff of the Armed Forces. 

JobT otal in August Rose; 
Wholesale Prices UpO.8% 


By FRANCIS X. CUNES 
3Md>? to Tb* Hew rat Dub 

Albany, Sept 5— Governor 
Carey called on a reluctant 
Legislature today to approve his 
plan to prevent default in New 
York City, terming the threat 
an “unparalleled disaster” that 
would “paralyze vital govern- 
ment functions, endangering 
the health, safety and welfare 
of the more than 12 million 
people in the city and region.” 

But after objections from the 
Republicans that were more 
procedural than substantive, the 
Legislature recessed until Mon- 
day without taking action on 
the $2. 3-billlon plan, which 
would set up a state board to 
take over the city’s budgetary 
powers and mandate, severe 
economies. . 

The Senate majority leader, 
Warren M. Anderson, Republi- 
can of Binghamton, said his 
house needed more, time to pon- 
der the complicated plan. But 
he made no demands for major 
changes, and politicians in both 
parlies said the delay would not 
prove fatal to the bill. 

Only Alternative 

The Governor said he ex.- 


r '' \ • ^ 4 . 

; 


. ** • > .• - ., 




A Wan President Gives 
Address on Crime at 


■ :: " 


: iJ. 


;1 med Forces Movement. ( I The Governor said he ex.- 

r Broader Cabinet Seen j WASHINGTON, SepL 5-The nation’s job picture con-jP® 01 ^ measure to pass, em- 
^The sudden break to the !ong|tinued to improve somewhat in August, chiefly for expeti-]^ 2 ^ a 8 ain . * e warn ' 

Jnd frequently violent cnsis !enced workfirs> b inflationarj’ pressures worLned during 1 ” 8 for ■" J ns *’ lt ™ 
_er the presence or General,.. • — „ . > ^ M nunn P the only available alternative 

Valvu in the nulon'.'5* ™" th - "«' v »r !to default by the diy »nd a 

Eldership came tonight at the J °^ s [ Q H'A VHDQ ET? AD consequent widening Impact on 

ylitsn- base o? Tancos. SO if™ 1 P^ es wereboth made^^ A I Ultu TClM ithTSte and other localities. 

Jles north r,: Lisboa. The de> bIlc ^ *" the regular^ ** U1Ul j ..i^e feermg ambog politicians [ 

Jions made there appeared to -monthly statistical reports of; FUJI? A1IIT DV P)TVl h “" ying fr<Hn ^ Capitol this f. 
{en the way for the formation ; the Labor Department. ■ J Jj J (j j [ J afternoon was that to the" 

a broadly baspd Cabinet;. 7116 over-all unempIo>™ml ; . fabsence ..of major objections!, 

i!m PrftmiarJAci'mDto 'rate W 2.1 ai*tiullv linrTaiio.-'vl, T r ' » •»' .. ' ■ > ■ ■ J : _■ - j " 



_ pm«, 

Lynette Allce Fromme being handetdfedby security agents i* Shctunjehto. eaK-, after 
^ -ppht^l at RtrO. 



By JAMES M. NAUGHTON 

- ■ Hptci*; -to Tftr N*v VcTi Tizaai 

SACRAMENTO. Calif" Sept 
5— jA young woman painted a 
r .45-caliber semi ' automatic pia^ 
i; tol . at Presideat Ford, at dree 
" range today, but a Secret Serv- 
rice- agent saved the. President 
from pwabiehann by gpnbbtog 
the gun and forcing it from the 
r .woman's hmtL' 

A , Wute .House spokesman 
/said later In ihe day that the 
. pistol contained a magazine 
' With bullets in it, bat that there 
.was na bullet in the weaqxm'a 
dramber' .when ihe gun was 
V seized. 

The Woman was idenrifie& by 
the Sacramento police.es. lyn- 
ette AHce Frommfi, X6 y^rs 
old, who has been a follower 
" of Charles M. Mhnsbn, the lead- 
er of a group, convicted <rf mor- 
. dering Sharon Tate, the actress, 
/.and six others in 1969- 

Taken to U-S.<3oiurt 

■ Miss Frorame. Vfas 'ajrsigned 
/this afternoon in Federal: Dis- 
: tilcL . Court here on e charge or 
attempted assassination of the 
President. She was being heW 
-by tbe Federal authorities under. 

: !hond o£ $1 - aalBida. 

ft. 1 . Larry M. Buendorf, 37 years 

fc|ioW.;a in ■ 


/^f ^ j^ll as Mr. Ford w^ked 
D. MfcEAWJjEN • ' • ■/■ v /" y.Ji ‘ — “ aWay" from the woman, wtS « 


ent Costa 

to ^ btoh sixes ^'ho are^hSd! Wash ^< 5T0N. Sept. 5 — Hecht, a Bronx Democrat- a>i°f President Ford, wax one of sufficient eveidenbe,-. .jhte ^ 

the na\y ydlmg toco- ms ''h heads o? Mavors across lhe nation have he steered the measure through the earliest - and most, devoted thorities said. - - ■ ‘ .•- Se *^ 

ate with him. Tiie Prrti- , ei-imed. expressed fear of the impact Uie Ways and Means Commit-] followers of Charles M. Man- Since' Fchruaxy. .she and ah- V •>.' 

..facing aloa of power ^ ad news aoout prices a New york CJ woo[d tee with- an almost funereal iron, who became, a National other member of the fbnher « v M 

“f. * e ^\rZ tfjras ^ ^ in. «rof cooperation. symbo! or senseless violence communal band,.San^ Good. 


les arrived ; to o. the unemployment rate for 


UU!> «ULCI«^U HC luuua — yASHTVCTnM c 0 „. 

the navy idling to co- both sexes who are heads of ... ASH / SGT01 /, Sept. 

rJ?: H M . M hnirf e Mayors across the natio 


By MARTIN TOLCHIN moment vrith $750-toflijon l , ' year-old woman <^iarg^'ye?ter-[T}u^ chargft. was 
ii-ccuf ta na Krv T«i; nmtj said Assemblyman Biaton . G. day with the attempted murder reduced, 1 -then din 
UNGTON. Sept. 5 — Hecht, a Bronx D em oc ra t, a? of President Ford, wax one of sufficient eveidei 
across the nation have be steered the measure through the earliest and most, devoted thori ties said. 


- Seryice to Check Out 


dj air force defiance, aban-lc® 1 *! to the index of wholesale 
ned his week-long efforts to! prices. 


| eluding expected curtailment Speaker Stanley Sfeingut after a series of ritualistic mur- have iwen living in-Sacramextto WASHINGTON^ ^ Seat g A : la& fag passed the place wh«« 

l .1..- n | f SM.. rt»rc lOflO h;„ ™l u_Li__ ! t*. 


By BHEUP 5HABECOFF 

* SpvtMl tolbr Stw rnne ana 


Mr. Buendorf lfuf-cu his land 
as he seized t^e: weapon, pos- 
siWy on the cocked hammer. ^ 
The President Said ,lal&- (iikt;‘ 


St Tired and bowed, the ^ in . ind us trial commodities, chairman of the House Banking — dissolve 
id-r who had fought tena- ^ increase in wholesale pn-^j Currency Committee, pro- ntish over 


uy commander, withdrew ferent products. 

is own. Industrial Commodities 


is own. 

j r pro -Communist officers 


SSS of House Banldngl— dissolved into .partisan to- « - “J-J ***£*■ ' ^^to/yeax, Mr: Mat, totim W SCR2S before ^ 

» an to- ^L CuZTenCy Coa ! mittee * P 115 - ansh over the need to permit !5^ l0 L^S^ t LKAS^ r fs-serving a life sen- The Secret Service list, kept time, as the President ^ 

■es with P ° S t d , a KT reVe ^ P 2i. nt JT D * l J m ,0,M members to vote early “ tenCe ’ ^ transferr6d . ftw on computer tapes in Washing- walking the 150 yards IronTtbfc 

ZLrSSff ** h* home by sundown for ^ SAcra- ton,- is used to av^rt possible sS. Hotel to toTcapitol^ 

^ r,sca fy "JJ <at,es - Hw P™- Rosh ha-Shanah Jewish fS ^W.toSan Quentin, -near danger to the -President!^ : address the ; California Legisla- 

iposaJs rnduded an emergency holiday. San Twhciscp. -Efforts by Miss : But despite Its cotoputers, and tore and urge.a 

(hues to a preview of the heated said yesterday thit Miss f ronmiea7ul Gocid to visit despite a manyfold increase, m fort to curb rising violent crime'. 

" c ; a to^cceot Z ^ am Fromme y “w \een ** at both prisons have beettlnahpower and money since the] . The President was. unusually 


Pro - the Rosh ha-Stuu 
“cy holiday. 

^}y In a preview of 


2 . * , . . ... . ine oaa news on prices * * — aeoaie certain next week, the Fmmrw hurl htw armtoH oeeni^^wa auu uiuucy siua: me . me President was. unusuaUv 

ii. dropped^rom the High on the prices of “dustria! Democrats suddenly nSssed *SFSj a d^u “«■ ' ■' : ; ^ ^ ^ ^ as ^ “ 

'"Slnued oa Page 2» Column 3 commodities, particularly saso- ™ SflSBSr aw' k." ^ , ^Wious charges 'ntogiqg.frrim ^ ^mna.and.^ Qpqd.^dy. th^ Secret Service wm> speech. He said io reporters 

w - .-.. ■ ■■ — line and other fuels, electric j ^ __ 5J Contmned on Page 8, Column 2 drug possession and riettv.ihefi:^? de . news tw£> months- agojOWble today to prevent Miss afterward that he neither- 

( nowsr m«ai5 tMcfilpw and p.h^i Bona purchases coBSiaerea . ■ — „ “ ..j *..* iwhen they told an mterviewerrtohtoie from aDproachine with- hlntriw! r.aiffnrrtiftTia ■ fnr 


m _ . power, metals, textiles and che-] 

QgmierRabuiSees . , 

jl; « The rise of 0.6 per cent to, 

m.MWSlPIO C/UZflC£ the over-all wholesale prices! 
iLf n . ttt *»i p • I of mdusuial products was the! 


ff Pad With Syria^y 2 Dead M 3 Hurt 

* ! Au « Ust was .?!. ^ mon ; b !solvency and thus k*g> the 

risen 'substantially, SK 1 ** ^ BERNARD WEINRAUB . 

ff S ^ »»•*«• *“■=*■■ in - _ nother Mriod ' f direr tne muroc *P a ^' bo "_ market. hseetal nTultuwYoTt 

^RUSALEM. SepL S-Pre-2„to at riTSmorttel don’t think there ran pos- LONDON. Sept. 5-A bomb 
S Yitzhak Rabin declared 1^^ ^en they rose han£ s,bIy ** ^ qu f Uon ** exploded in the crowded lobby 
i^y tliat there was "virtually ,, ’ y [New York’s failure would be 0 f ^ London Hilton Hotel in; 

^chance" for an toterimj - - _ ! feit by every major city in Lane today, killing two 

Enement with Syria and indi- Tl J* | t ^ aI nu *nber of unem-| the Un 3ted states,” said Hans persons and wounding 63. seven 
, && ^ there was a differ- W?**™!* ! n August was: G> TinzIer> Mayw Q f Jackson- 5 serimST^- 
'/IS o( opinion on that »»ue °* ^*“**A* “j !,S l11to * FIa - ^ President The blast tore through the: 

the United States. were adu lt men * “ • million >f the Na tional Leag ue of Ci- lobby at 12^0 PJtf^- shattering 

Wi * _ w [de-rangmg interview Continuer on Page 6, Columns Continued un Page 9, Columns entrance. Hotel guests 

jgrdea for broadcast tomar- - . .. ■ ■ - — ■■ were thrown to the floor 

“■ Mr - Rab m offered a sober. __ „ . _ to the pavement outside. 

«R^"ErEiCBS Hunting Show Loses JXMSriffi 

Ad s After Gun-Glub Calls -Si'iiESS £ b S. b S 

^lr. Rabin based .,;s skepn-j of the lobby. 

r.u:.i about an agreement with] ij Scotland/ Yard declined to 

wa on three factors. The; By LES ’BROWN (speculate On the Identity of the 

he said, was the existence! M ore than half a dozen ad-;a recreational activity and con- (terrorists, although some offi- 
^Israeli settlements in tne vertUers withdrew their com-ltained graphic scenes of the rials believe that a fringe group 
,1 i5P n Hei £ hts conquered me rcials from last night's CBS! killing' of animals. of the Irish RepuUican Army 

Tjp Syria te 1967 ‘ Mr * i ^ a “ n telecast of a news documentary! CBS News has been receiving has been ■ respoiuable fbr the 
toe settlements "were on hunting after receiving calls [acrimonious mall from, gun ad- ■ 

■^'established in o rder to be.f rom y, e National Rifle Associ-jvocates around the country touted Pa^ 4, CoUima 3 

^^inued on Page 6, Columns! atom and a variety of gun and j since July, with the first an- - - 

. =! hunting groups around the; nouncement that' the program Bank and 3 Indicted 

*S. NEWS INDEX [country, according to a CBS; was in production Most of the . A Federal grand jury in 
R p ‘ Pj .j official. [writers seemed certain that the Brooklyn indicted the Secur- 

.. i* uc.i«j io-tij A network sales executive] program would arouse senti- ity National Bank and three 

pj Jl ^ ,s -“j w ho reported the withdrawals [meet against their right ta own of its former top officials on 

ii« . . / "/ii Kbusfin Pe l ^e tails were "clearly a; handguns: charges involving more than' 

-Nil- 3*H oc-EB . Wi campaign to intimidate the; The CBS sales executive, witlTf $200;000 to illegal political 

. ! .b ■ ■,:.Si= dverti5er '“ . . requested anonvmity said y&- confiibutions to the cazn- 

J -ti?* ®®" r,Hn V ie t,tK Um ® nl,r >'' continued on Page 37. Cohnun 4 Paigns of former Pres i den L 

TvSteia if; . rb ® Guns u ‘ Autumn : pro ' : = — — Richard M. Nixon and Mayor 

'liGr.fitij-r.-.ii'i.wuw «juuced and written by Irviriu. iius, Tyu.-ra« snam nut Beameand tovurious polil* 
,>. s »w7s!i-*,p^3 | Drasnin. concerned nunung as icai conuaittees. Page 22. ! 

/ ' ■ - ’ 


>w e _ bs . - - . Coatmaed on Page 9 , Column 2 drt} „ rx^e^irm m A news mbnUis- ago^We today to prevent Miss afterward that . he neither . 

Bond Purchases Considered. - w JSSTSl i£ 3 - ^ told an hrtervfewerrre^efr^ approaching with- blamed Califorilians ' for :tte' 

Officials of the United States n i m, . i. it, ^ she had been cdn-! U “ t tt ^^w«wedletters ^arm’slength -of toe President actions of ""one mdrviduai” 
mCerence of Mayors add , Bomb Blast* Lobby Mr. Manson to Wdcfc^fli VehW, nor would he penmt Z.- 

mber of ciues were explonng j , I J n Jf:U An . charges ' and had spcit only a|S^’ b 4 med ' fonner ™iafintt ; The. chief spokesman for Jhe event to deter him from nring- . 

e purchase of Municipal A t ItOlULOH H Ilf OR-, f ^ ar ■ [Richard M.TCxon ior his. 'fate service, John W. Warner Jf^ ling with spectators. 

2 Dead and 63 Hurt The murder Charge Was filed.^ 1 ^??^ ^ [would not commoit ihis after^ Witnesses who had /beers'. 

^ veoa OJIU oa nun in Stodrta(U ^ 1972 What lie called -a contarua-:. noon^about how Miss . Fromm® standing near .the red-halrea'.' 

^ . toe death of - a- lS-yeaiMjId.^^ ■■ to Eet f° dcse ^ woman said that she ralmly' 

2 P '“ g .° ‘ By BERNARD WEINRAUB , woman whose body was found . DHnn8r JfryMtMo nfc munter p^Mid«t . canyurg^a^pirtol drew toe weapoa from a purse. 

"I don’t think there ran pos- LONDON JsepL Y £^A*bomb under i bous? L where Continued wh ge 28 , CotarteS Qmtfam wl on Page 26 , 6 >tnmn 3 continued on Page 2 «, CplUmhl 


3 ^he year to conic. Rosh ha-j 
“nari, uie Jewish New Year,! 

this evening. • 

2lilr. Rabin based his skepti-| 
»Si about an agreement with] 
wa on three factors. Tire; 
he said, was the existence! 


NEWS INDEX 


Bank and 3 Indicted 

A Federal grand juiy in 


:u 

in^ 

Pt? 

1* 

Ut-ie; 

lar 

JK 

. 17 

Pun 

«■ 

f.'ilw DR P«pic 

JJE . . . 

14 

Clliiurin 

-N *!!■ 

5-S* 

OC-EB . 



hiMj 


.B 

Sper.- 

<a»*i2h 

a 

TiifU:-. . 

!»., S:ji? 





n' «. ^ itiiSB 

ihi C«*. Gill- 

...u- 

'..SB.*.' • . 

7_* E*-i Z^Tjrt K 

: . P^.;» ?i 



Prescdent Ford is surrounded by 



_ • t • * • . * *^ . 1 . • . • PzW I lOTtl uMliui l*.- - 

^««rts v fln the way to, Capitol inSacrtto^ito, Calit, *fter escaping harm ;/ J r 


a $ycH>\Q£y!. 












I GIGANTIC • 

marble & rug CLEARANCE 

• SOME 1280 

ffi- ^ BS to § j&- $gj£ feu pieces of marble 

at FABULOUS 

brgWfet .3jSm^ PRICES* 

S| *4iUl MARBLE TABLES 

? jEv«5& W-5 ifr flB man ? kwOT than fennfca 

&^Kklyir^ «UN WHILE THEY LAST: 

MANY COLORS 

MARBLE TOPS— 27 sizes 

15x15 now $8—12,99] 18x30 now $18-29.99 
22x22 now $18 16x46 now $29-43-99 

22" HEXAGONS now$18 20Vfex45tt. now$30 
18"ROUNDnow $10-17.99 18x60 now $22-59.99 
24" ROUND now $22-32,99 30" Bd. now’$30-60 
16x24 OVALS now $19 complete marble tables 
STRANGE & ODD SHAPES <fcoO 22x22x2l*hi 

NOW SI 8— 50 wood legs WHITE 


NOW $18— 50 I ^<5- wood legs WHITE 

narirn o a rnn wood, steel, wrought 

DAuCu U Ltuw" - iron, aluminum, chrome 

MODERN & TRADITIONAL Coining L 

MEDIUM AND SMALL AREA RUGS 

many one of a kind at CRAZY, MAD LOW PRICES 

$9— $17— $29— $'49— $72— $98— etc. etc. 


DELI VERY ADDITIONAL 

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The Lounge Chair now comes in brown tweed fabric $129, 
footrest $50. araterveraon in fabric $11 9, footrest $50. 

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THE NEW YORK TIMES. SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 6. 1575 — - - 

New Lisbon Regime Dims Luster of Estoril as Blueblood s 

■ |„ - „ tive with local charities and de Oilvef 

By MARVINE HOWE is trying to keep it up. but ways par# 


By MARVINE HOWE 

SK0A1 to Ttsa Kaw York Times 

ESTORIL. Portugal, Sept 4 
—Portugal’s Golden Triangle, 
stretches 22 miles from this 
luxury beach resort to the 
fashionable fishing village of 
Cascais and the lush green 
. mountain spa of 

The Talk Sin j££ re WorId 

°* War n and since, 

Estoril ^ Golden Tri- 

angle has been a 
haven where Europe’s un- 
crowned royalty, unseated 
aristocrats and the well-to-do 
retired have taken refuge. 
But now it is losing its lus- 
ter. The royal hunts, extrav- 
agant balls and lavish 
banquets have gone with the 

Portuguese revolution. 

The outcast nobility who 
have no place else to go are 
staying despite the upheaval 
that began in April, 1974, but 
the lives they are leading are 
now modest. 

Other bluebloods are leav- 
ing Portugal for a variety of 
, reasons: currency controls, 
seizures of property, the cha- 
otic school system. 

“They have nothing to stay 
for,” said a Portuguese aris- 
tocrat, who is thinking about 
going to BraziL “There’s no 
social life left in Portugal, no 
more special facilities and ■ 
above all no more respect for 
anyone.” 

Don Juan de Borbony Bat- 
tenberg claimant to the Span- 
ish throne, lives here on a hill 
in the flowering Villa Giralda 
'and maintains that he will 
stay until the situation 
changes in Spain. 

Don Juan, whose title is 



U J 


antra Press 

Don Juan de Borbdn y 
Batten berg’ maintains he 
will stay in Portugal until 
the situation in Spain 
changes. 







The New Tort Tlmeiy Serf. 6, 1WS 

Count of Barcelona, is the 
son of the last reigning 
monarch, King Alfonso XIII, 
who died in exile in Rome 
in 1941. The claimant set up 
his court in exile here in 


Ttam«s 

Umberto H of Italy pub- Magda Lupescu, Known 
licly insists that he has as Princess Elena of ku- 

no intention of leaving mania, in a 1931 photo. 

Portugal, but has been She still lives m Estoril, 
traveling a lot lately. leading a ver y quiet life. 

what was formerly the ’Es- Small Angel, near Sintra, but 
toril Golf Club hi .1946 “to he and his family have paid 
be near my people in case fewer visits lately, 
they need me." Former King Umberto H of 

For years he quietly pre- Italy, who has been living 
sided over his shadow court in Cascais since 1946, when 
until Generalissimo Francisco Italy became a republic, jn- 
Franco officially named his slsts that he has no intention 
son. Prince Juan Carlos de of leaving Portugal, but he 
Borbdn, as successor to the has been traveling abroad a 
throne. good deal, and when, he is 

The father is still pressing here he leads a retiring life, 
his claim, and because of that Umberto's sister, Giovanna. 
he is increasingly criticised the former Queen of Bulgaria, 

among the habitudes of the” tells friends she intends to 

Golden Triangle. stay in Portugal and make 

Prince Henri de Bourbon- the best of things. Her son, 

Orleans, the Count of Paris, former King Simeon of Bul- 

who is married to a member garia, lives in Spain and 

of the Portuguese royal fam- comes over for visits with 

ily, still owns the Quinta do his children. 

Anjinho, the Estate of the "Giovanna was always ac- 


tive with local charities and 
is trying to keep it up, but 
there's not much to be done 
in the way of welfare- work 
or benefit . bazaars these 
days,” a close, friend said. 
Just before Easter, the League 
for Unity and Revolutionary 
Action, an extreme leffet 
group, occupied the Caserns 
poor house; the Queens 
favorite charity, alleging 
that the old people were re- 
ceiving inhumane -treatment. 

“Giovanna was used to 
such things in Bulgaria and 
so knows how to talk to the 
bearded radicals." her friend 
said. “She took over the 
usual fruits and sweets for 
Easter and told the revolu- 
tionaries that what they had 
done was a good 
they were going to neip cne 

oJd’ people." , 

■ Yellow Damask Chairs 
The former Queen's only 
complaint was that after the 
revolutionaries occupied the 
(>scais country club they 

took its yellow damage 
chairs to the poor house. It 
was not practical, she tom 
her friend. “The old folks 
needed something that could 
be washed.” 

Magda Lupescu. who mar- 
ried the late King Carol of 
Rumania in 1947; after he 
left the throne, still lives in 
Estoril and is known as 
Princess Elena. Even before 
the Portuguese revolution 
she led a quiet life and is 
now almost never seen. 

The revolution has affect- 
ed Portugal’s national royal- 
ty more than the rest. Al- 
though the country has been 
a republic since 1910, the 
late dictator. Premier Antomo 


family, th 
many peop 
a monarch 
The Por: 
Dora Duart 
years old 
really asphi 
but his ol--?S 
Joao. Prin ' 
groomed U 
Aftertt 
take-over, 
prince is 
of the fami 
leave the c 
to be in F 
mored that 
plicated in 
tary plot. 

“The bai 
people are 
munist tak 
ticulariy th 
Hungaiy. 
Czechoslov. 
member o 
Austrian 
preferred 
name; 

She has 
years and 
hang on Kt 
the situatit 
“If the cflu , 
munist 111. ft 
tria. of cflfUi 
Many w * 
and Portm 
small cars 
themselves 
jeans becau 
of any kin 
adavs, she 
"The qu 
deterioratec 
“Most peo 
lot, and tf 
are afraid 
still got me 


Goncalves Is Removed From Power in Portugal I.T.T. Cuts Off Fi 

Bv ROBERT B. SEMPLE Jr. I 1 / designed to enhance Mr. jguese Communists by the So- 1 to relatively inexpensive Of "F Ortugal IS. 


By ROBERT B. SEMPLE Jr. designed to enhance Mr. guese Communists by the So- to relatively inexpensive 
special to -me New Turk Tima ‘ Soares’s standing within the viet Union. moves, such as inviting Mr. 

LONDON, Sept 5— Socialist Aimed Forces Movement, the Asked how the Europeans Soares to a conference in 
leaders from five European de- revolution’s ruling group, and could possibly match that fi- southwest France, 
mocracies met here today and. to hasten what the Europeans gure, Mr. Wilson replied: "Each If money can be found and 




V 


SptcW to Tit* s«w Vwn Ttafi 

LISBON. Sept. 5— The Inter-! The rea> 


in tones of both frustration perceive to be the increasing country will decide what it channeled to Portugal, howev- national Telephone and Tele- heavy losses 

and hope, pledged financial and isolation of the Communists can do " er ’ 411 th ®- lead “ s . h | re today graph Corporation has cut ofr increases af 

SSSs * ES SSK® arsss ssrj 

*SrT - 1 n u were Prime Minister Karold ers, either because they feel speaking for the group, feels it can’ no longer provide local banks . 

■ Z “J *£? W f^ Wilson, Premier Olof Palme of less inhibited by Portuguese said teitv/as “of the utmost effective management, support Government. 

mj* , So ^ re ^ Sweden, Premier Joop M. den law or because they have found importance to establish free- here. The I.T.” 

Socialist party leader in Portu- Uyl of ^ Netherlands and ways of disguising their contri- do ^pf the press in Portugal." ^Ve recognize that under the 3russels em . 

r>n^nZ f SrJS° Francois Mitterand. leader of but ions. There are two other shared present circumstances, we don t h ^"innir 

IT Soctafet.prty. Mi*. Brandis Social Democra- themes unong the Europeans. Save ..uffldent managmem! 


solidarity 1 ’ with Portuguese So- Aust na. who could not be pre- transferred by German politi- rilv SeC o nd ^ ev are prepared today in a telephone interview. Da " K * ° 
cialists but ruling out interfer- senL Prime Minister Wilson cians during visits to Portugal. start Ending large sums It was the first open act of where acces 
ence in Portugal’s internal af- acted ^ dost in his role as Similarly. Swedish Socialists 0 f Government money to Portu- protest by a large multinational nancin? was 
fairs. Labor party leader. are conducting a drive among »al if the political crisis is concern against the difficulties The Socit 

"The great amount of good- The members of the group party members to collect $250,- f ett ied to theirliking. of doing business in Portugal Luta tcrmcd 

will which the rapid decolonix- are united by their fears of 000. Millions more will be avai- h ° chaise » nce the revrtution of April 25. f 

ation and the elimination of ^Communist take-over fn Por- lable in cash and various forms ^ 1974 0ther fore.gncompmnes 

the fasefst regime have created tugal. But whether They_ can o f development aid-prefabn- SS ^ naA even^rintS ** p SS e ?!w he ^ 


tiiat have had problems here, “an attempt 


; ty of tne Portuguese people, - has no central treasury, ana a same guveminent mat metis v - -. id that - 

| the statement said in part This whatever financial aid it > can the spedfic^ions of Sweden’s ^ wo5d be^aban- JTJ- which operates several in danger ti 

.was a clear reference to the muster will coine from Socialist governing Social Democratic subsidiaries here, including a and that|M 

effective exclusion of Mr. party sources, not national party. noneo i anaiarge scaie aiawouro sheraton hotel and an dec- the unenfho 

Soares from the Government h^uries. The British Labor party, by ^ tronics factory with total^assets 300,000 wori 

despite the Socialists’ strong Moreover, Mr. Soares told contrast, is only now beginning 3C ? J,re ? a $10 ®: milIion m f fo ™ ed of 9 . mi “ l0 f 

showing in April’s electionsfor newsmen^that fmwjck law ™* fmrfs fiS-FigSS fSTSffi Z£ SSP&f 


Today’s show of sympathy Western sources have estim at- French Socialists, who support monej’. to neip tne rorcu- suspending au runner aavances me uov 
I from some of Europe’s most ed that as much as $45-million Mr. Soares but emare heavily guese with the Angolan refugee for current operational ex- said, “can n 

{prominent Socialists was dear- has been channeled to Portu- in debt, have limited thseives problem is onl y one. P enses - fining ecd.1 

— . - ■ ■ — ===== will enable 

• / . \ . • enterprises 

Gen. Goncalves Is Removed From Power, Losing Two Positions 

;; • still operatic 

rnntinuprf From Pawl coL 1 is from thne to time for There he discovered that the the General Assembly, mostly former Foreign Minister, who is erated^funds 
^ ’ its opinion, to meet. on the Gon- army men, who make up half with naval officers present, but most closely identified with the cording to 

Council of the Revolution along piiyos issue today at Tan cos, ? f the assembly, had met again also with some members of the document; Maj. Vitor Alves, an Standard El 
with General Gonsalves, and, a large military complex. M CTO ' anti-Gonsalves bloc. After Gen- ally of Major Melo Antunes. tr °" ic «fona 

apparently in The Line-tip a*« Th^ air fnron had fontrwed S LS5£? ^SThwI S JSTH 

mise, several opponents erf the ^ ^ ^ ^ fol]owed ^ suiL There ensued m angry ™ ni.lSru-nS replaced in July and a switches anc 

premier were also removed- President’s call each branch of scene: T ^ e President, Genial Cpimcu of the Revolution— one Q on g a ] ves supporter. ironic equips 

With these developments, the Tehees tawT G^lves, Genial Carvalho of the major pugoxs of the « to havrtr^ul 

council appeared to have been u£ d ™y' Td “r "SSS SS SSlS p was TIMOR LEFTIST UNIT *>»* 

restored to a position of su- force lined up solidly against ^ h ng. P P « reduced t0 24 from 3tL The REPORTF!) CAIN I Nr handth^Sh 
prerae power after mote than a General Gonsalves. They also matc j l ‘ . v _ navy kept six pro-Commurist LU GAINING T, 

month in which no one seemed oPP^ed the meeting or the as- Business Is Camed Out officers in the council and T 7 SSSfit is 

to be exercising any aufoority. ^ ground that not There were fears that toe purged Capt Vitor Crewo. He JAKARTA, Indonesia, Sept 5 uL 

Th a rminrii rpdured la«?t 811 ot . lts me ™hefs had been situation would grow mto is a former high commissioner (Reuters) — Forces of the left- crease hi toir 
The council was reduced last electB ^ fairly but hand-picked, something worse than mere in Mozambiqueand was one of wing Timorese Liberation Front L" * , 

month to an advisory body to a large degree, on the basis shouting: they were only par- tfte nine officers who spear- seekine indenm«iMr.fr, r !i nM . C pr °^ t to J 
when toe Lisbon triumvirate — of their pro-Co mm unist, pro- tially allayed by a statement headed toe drive a gains t Gen- * . ' 4 ^* BUUen ccior*’ortu- The I.T.T. 1 
the President, General Gon- Gonsalves views. Only the navy from a l ea der of the anti-Goa- era! Gongalves 'in July with a ° ue5 f_ i Qnor were reported to- company had 

I . ^ - PmUmf and Voc- n T m .^. 1 IUV tO be fflnnlna f ti V 


~.Y.-kA 


mm 


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ft 

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military power. . .v 

Tonight General Carvalho, 
who had been one of the lead- 
ers of the fight against Gen- 
eral Gon galves, "said simply: 
“There is no triumvirate.” 

Portugal has been caught up 
in a poltical crisis since July, 
when the Socialist party quit 
the coalition Cabinet, saying its 
members could no longer serve 
under General Goncalves. The 
Socialist departure — on July 10 
— was followed two days later* - 
by the withdrawal of the Pop- 
ular Democratic party. 

Those parties together polled 
64 per cent of the vote in the 
April elections for a Constitu- 
ent Assembly, which was to 
draw up a constitution. 

A Deal That Backfired 

Last Friday, when General 
Premier, he was named at the 
same tune to the top- military 
post. Instead of ending the bit- 
ter struggle, toe face-saving ar- 
rangement intensified IL 
A majority in the armed 
forces felt directly threatened 
by the prospect of having the 
controversial general in direct 
charge and in a position to 
purge his enemies in the mili- 
tary. 

The two breakaway political 

45 ™ mgrtn 5- “ parties, which had seen the 

mail suawaipnos v s. tekxitqxus Communist threat continuing in 

I Yf. 6XB*. 3te» J, new f arm w fth the shift in 

’wrrbU* «Ki Sunday, sui-in J62.T0 J3J.3J a new iorm WIUL me snux in 

wSS ir oms k.w it.i» posts, joined in opposition to 

a * nd * sr W atier' ctwwl the nomination of General Gon- 

nir Aaocutrd pi?** « enuiw ex«iou«ri* calves as Chief of St aff , 
to item tor Kpuuupuon ot «« am A week ago President Costa 

issued a call for the " 
tti General Assembly of the Armed 
\ vm mow, Forces, a 240-man group that 

f. 


_ ^ ~ ” _j| m0Sl or tne mu i tary — aenance frontanon. The rate of tiiree others were ization. ° remained- in I 

vested with top political and] — the President nonetheless The President went ahead held in abeyance. These were informs Other I.T.l 

. -went to Tancos this afternoon, with a kind of rump s«sfon of Maj. Ernesto Melo Antunes, the +«,„* * ” sources here said Portugal incl 
Carvalho, ,tnat font’s fighters, no™ lurm^J Indus 





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- m M ■* 


Color catalogue on request 





< ** v • 

-,4*- 


^ , ■ . . , " Assodiled Pibb ’ 

President Francisco da Costa Gomes of Portugal, rijght, and Vice Adm. Jos§ de Azevedo, 
designated as Premier, arriving at Tancos military base for meeting. 


.that- t- ronugai inci 

the Fronts fighters, now lu*B>cal Indus 
said to be in control of Dili, had trical Motors 
advanced to within 37 miles of J U JK 

the city of Vila Salazar. ThflettL^ 

rivti It> rL^f an ?£r, of tie Rabor fw 
j. . . Timorese Democratic businesses 

“SOS from Vila and “effectiv^^./J.V 
Salazar craUmg for outside help wage and v 
to evacuate personnel from toe ments.” ft 

The letter , I fW ■ 
The sources said the com- that I.T.T. W ft Vm i 
mander, ma message monitored maintain com; ft i m 1 
by Indonesian warships, specifi- nological reiiU 
rally aakal for help from the present opera 
ships that he said steamed taking present . * t 
along the nearby coast every account i ^ m » 
^y- ‘ The letter ’ 1 

M - R- Valence! I |f\ 
_ Australia, Sept, dent for Eui “W 

5 lAPJ The Australian govern- months, he sa ^ ® 

ment and the International Red officials have: r A i 
. Cross have suspended relief the Portuguese \ fl ] 
flights to Timor after a soldier dustry, Foreig! Wpl : 
forced toe pilot of an Australian bor to try to <■ ] 

An: Force plane to fly him and ing agreement ' 

« other Timorese to Darwin, has been read ; 

Policemen in Darwin detained "These acti ? 
the Timorese, who included said in concli; 

°toer soldiers and their families, taken pending! 
while the government consider- of efffectivc r* 
ed what to do with them. trol and the re i 
The soldiers were believed to conditions wh i 
be members of the Timorese us to cany bn i 
Democratic Union. itive 'Operation ■ 

Bid for Representation Junkets Set V> ' . 

WANTON fUPI> — The FREEPORT. - 

hJ 1 5 wish Congress has — Baiiaraasal 
*n ? ouse and Sen 31 ® to airline, has for 
grant tull Congressional repre- bier junket" fl 
sentation to residenLs of . the tween Miami 
District of Columbia. Washing- city. Total co> 
ton residents now have only a here anil back : 
non-voting delegate in the making the tr 
House of Representatives. -quired to gam- 



\d0 

feOR 

day 1 

sale 








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Has 


THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1975 


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n Partin*-;! /.r j 




Sudan Rebels Stage Coup \ 
But Loyal T roops Crush It 


Tt» Nmr tort Tunn/Erst. 4. tWS 


i jJ'. i . Ha Hew York Ttas/ttanrai Hue I — 

•; ie Cn Chi district of South Vietnam, 15 miles northeast of Saigon, marching in the capital Tuesday in 
;■ -^ay celebration. Saigon radio reports say that more than 600 factories have resinned production. 

n- . *"• * ' I streets m a demonstration of a *med with n-’r-hine r.,-,- 

Vietnam and Cambodia Are Stressing GainsiSSSzt 


KHARTOUM, the Sudan. 
Sept. 5 (AP) — Rebel army offi- 
cers seized the state radios ta- 
tion early today and announced 
that the Government had been 
overthrown, but the uprising 
was crushed within hours by 
loyalist troops. 

It was the second attempt 
to overthrow the Government 
of President Gaafar al-Nimeiry 
since he himself seized power 
in May, ’ 1969. The previous 
coup .attempt against him was 
_ed in July, 1ST71, by leftist 
cers and was beaten down 
in three days. 

j The fighting today swirled 
around the radio station, which 
is in Omdurman, across the 
Nile from Khartoum, and 
around army headquarters and 
the presidential palace here. 
It ended with a tank-led assault 
that recaptured the station. 

Vice President Mohammed 
[Baghier Ahmed first announced 
that the leader of the coup 
attempt, identified as Lieut. 
Col. Hassan Hussein Osman, 
had been “silenced forever.” 
and this was taken to mean 
he had been killed. 

Statement Reversed 

But later the Sudanese news 
agency corrected the Vice Pres- 
ident's statement, saying the 
colonel “was wounded and is 
receivin gtreatment at the mili- 
tary hospital in Omdurman.” 

Later, thousands of people 
marched through Khartoum's'- 



BERGDORF 

GOODMAN 


NEW YORK 


WHITE PLAINS 


Careens uc 

President Ximeiry 



T'J ' , 

>.* * .. 

£ Wt. • v 


Of 


Cl 'tc 
Port, 


gon, Bien Hoa, Danang, 

Nhon and Can Tho. 

Specifically, Cambodia has 
’2! ” ” j reported the resumption of op- 
. Ukn iera iion S in about 70 small and 
[* campm^isjinedhnn-sized industrial plants,, 
rid that Kfe’of which about 50 are in Phnom capital 
returning ; Penh itself. Ihav 

; This, together with recent Aether 


IDELMAN 

TUe, 

id. Sept 5 
and 


Qui textile mills manned by 2.700 
male and female combatants! 
and workers.” 

The rubber and tire factories, 
at one time among the economic 
mainstays “ 


guarding Government 
our erttirel m 8* brid * es - P 081 


are confident that QIU1E _ , 

i . or the radio station, 

people will be selfisuffkient | OT 

after this year’s harvest 


build- 1 i ngfor a signal at -nr.y h .'.id- 
office j quarters and file pr?s.'Jen:iji 
palace v.ere ro:.;c-d bv ic.vjlls! 


it also noted today in the routed. 


i Speaking on the radio a few trf . nn . 
hours after the rebels had been Th' Suum 


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= V ftnl riavc ^comments by Cambodia's Dep-iplant that 

. iUty Premier, leng Sarv, to West.- batteries for "the 
aio has an- 1 - - - — 1 




-TFelex-iu-red £&$■■■ 

Autumn's nubbiest nuance by 
Christian Dior. Neat as a pin stripe 
by day. Sheer devastation after 
dark. In black, 
navy, brown 
or French 
taupe nylon 
sandal foot 
panty hose, 
sizes 1,2,3 and 4, 

$3. (Minimum 
order for sends, two 
pairs.) Please add $1.35 
beyond our usual area. 

Hosiery, Street Floor 
and White Plains. 


nri , _ .. . , entire coun- 

las jm- ;€ *n newsmen in Lima and New- try." 
ling of the {Voric, indicate that Phnom Penh j Other enterprises such as 
■; airport as has been substantially resettled-! cement, paint, glass, oxygen 
af factories 1 Immediately after the end of and paper plants, as weil as 


produces enough floods in the Phnom Penh re- j aimed at halting development. y an 
.... — ... 'in the Sudan. 


gion. the radio reported, while 
rainfall has been scanty in 
other areas. 


governor- general ai the 
turn of the ce.Ttsr.' z nJ an 
He urged the Sudanese toj independent rcoubllc in 1£?5. 
him over to the police any| Two years laser. Ora. Ibrahim 




754 FIFTH AVENUE • ON THE PLAZA • N.Y. 10019 PL3 7300 


facilities, the war in April, a forced soft-drink factories, the local i the most militant ardor” the 


“StilL production activities! Patters w &o might have fied:Abboud seized power in the 
---into the countryside after the: C0UJim .- s firsl nii]Ll2rv coup . 

lmncincf faiM _• __ j _r _• - 


continue to be carried out with 


owever, the 
that heavy 
ped a num- 
- >addy areas 


exodus of' the entire popula-jbrewery and distillery, and a|fadio concluded optimisticaHy. 
don of the capital took placejtcbacco mill are also in opera-. Some analysts here believe 


md hundreds were reported to.tion end employing about 10.- 
have died on this march. 000 workers in Phnom Penh, 
However, in a recent bitr*d-!according to the radio broad- 
idio has re- j cast, monitored in Bangkok, the ; casts. 

motion of iPhncm Penh radio reported that; There are still problems in 
Ireds of fac-j “among the plants in Phnom: the agricultural sector. While 
ses" in Sai-iPenh there are 13 state-owned the radio has noted that "we 


that much of the optimistic 
rhetoric particularly from the 
Phnom Penh radio in recent 
days is designed to herald the 
homecoming, now expected 
Tuesday or Wednesday, of 
Prince Norodom Sihanouk. 


Phouma Says He Plans to Retire in. ’7 6 


■ is. Sept. 5 
~:-Presse) — 
l. houma, the 
of Laos, 
.. xm politics 
ions for a 
'riy are held 


/ ” ‘ 


T I 

t 0<] 


lions, emphasizing that his 
successor would be chosen by 
King Savang Vatthana in ac- 
cordance with the existing 
Constitution. 

"It will be the leader of the 
majority who will be designat- 
ed by the sovereign , to form 
Lhe new nonpro visional govem- 
iard enough |ment of Laos,” he said. 

--^1 the com- 1 The coalition Cabinet he 
-mean that, heads is a provisional body in 
-_ais of Laos which the dominant pro- Com- 
7and that myjmunist, or Vientiane side, noml- 
^ the Prince nally command an equal num- 
today. ber of ministries. In fact, 
however, lie leftist side con- 
trols virtually alt of Laos. 

. ft is believed here that the 
Premier will most probably 
hand over power to his half- 
brother, Prince Soupbanouvong. 
the head of the Lao Patriotic 


MOSCOW, Sept 5 (Reuters) 
■A Russian Baptist, his wife 
bis country, divided by war for and five children tried to rush 

Ibtl ' P® 81 Soviet policeman’ into the 

united and that the process had; v" 

sped up over the last fcHir| Anien< ^ ai1 Embassy here today | 
manths. In that period, the; to apply for visas to go to the 


will be 74 
heart attack 
s been Pre- 
foce 1951. 
"dd take no 
-nment that 


. ,^,-fter theelec- 


Soviet Baptists Try a Dash 
into U.S. Embassy for Visas 


Front, and a year younger than! 
Souvanna Phouma. | 

Souvanna Phouma said thatl- 


Pathet Lao took over areas pre- 
viously controlled by the Vien- 
tiane side, following the flight 
from Laos of a number of right- 
ist ministers. 

’The reunification process,” 
Souvanna Phouma said, “was 
delayed for a long time by ob- 
stacles created by certain minis- 
ters in my Government, and I 
deeply regret the attitude of; 
some who did not want to un- 
derstand that the aim of the 
agreement of 1973 was reunifi- 
cation and peace.” 


M r ^ 


■ill* 


s Islands 
dWsBid 

xalia. Sept 
lunies-Ross, 
> the “king 
ids,” has re- 
s offer to 
ldian Ocean 
■million, 
nought and 
I start taJk- 
i Australian 
ster. 

>ss has re- 
by Australia 
:al rule over 
me of the 
ocos Islands 
iwest of the 
and. 


•*»-: a 

.-.T 




•*--} • u 


■r ’ • 



of a British , 
« tried in the ! 


>0 years ago, 

; is absolute 


154 subjects, 
vho call him 
» John. 

r 

1 granted the 
es-Ross fam- > 
y. In 1955, J 
2d ownership j 

pr-; 

Mr. Clunies- : 


1 the Austra- \ 

1 

.t’s attempts 

benefits . of 
izenship to 

■ i"' 

ds a Hand 


United States. 

Three of them made it into 
the embassy but four were 
caught and detained by the 
police, who normally prevent 
Soviet citizens from entering 
the building. The four were 
allowed to enter the embassy 
after a United States consular 
official came out to intervene. 

The Baptists identified them- 
selves as Mr. and Mrs. Pyotr 
Vazcbenko and their children 
'from Krasnoyarsk in Siberia, 
[a soldier were killed in a guer-j Mr. Vazchenko told consular 

|officiaIs that he am^his family 


uprising had failed. 

The President said the plot- 
ters were in the pay of a for- 
eign agent but did not elaborate 
and edded that he would give 
more details in a speech Mon- 
day. 

[The Omdurman radio said, 
according to United Press In- 
ternational. that plotters in- 
cluded junior army officer s. 
Communists and members of 
the Moslem Brotherhood, an 
outlawed extremist religious 
organization.] 

The President said he had 
learned of the coup attempt 
at 3 A.M. and had appealed 
to the rebels to “surrender or! 
be crushed.” 

According to the Vice Pres- 
ident, the fighting at the radio 
station was over in 40 minutes 
after troops had entered the 
grounds on tanks and shot their; 
way inside against revel sol-i 


He resigned after riutir.g in 
1965, and a Chilian government 
aws elected under ;,:chcramed 
Ahmed Mabgoub. 

At about the same t'me, bloc 
Christians and an hoists in the, 
southern provinces rebelled 
against the Arab Moslems of 
the northern Sudan who demin 
ated the government in Khar- 
toum. 

Elections were held in 196S, 
and Ismail el-Azhari became 
president. General Nioneiry de- 
posted him a year later. 

In an effort to end the civil 
war in the south. General 
Nimeiry offered the southern 
provinces limited autonomy, 
and this was incorporated into 
a new constitution in 1973. 
But the policy of reconciliation 
has been only partly successful, 
and there have been periodic 
outbreaks of violence in the 
south. 


■ "nterconcepts 

a division of interiors and soi 


sound inc. 



FREEDOM... FRESHNESS... FUN 

WES SAINT LAURENT 


ALL DANISH WALL SYSTEMS 


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FLOOR SAMPLE AREA RUGS 


8 Are Killed m Argentina 

In N ew Political V iolence the Buenos Aires suburb :—14 children in all— wanted to 
BUENOS AIRES Sept 5 °f San Martin, shots were fired! go to the United States, “on 
(Reuters)— Eight persons were j and bombs thrown from three] religious grounds.” They filled 

passing cars, killing the passer- out applications and were es- 
by and wounding two police, corted back onto the street by 
guards, the police said. ton American diplomat 


killed in three separate inci- 
dents in political violence in 
Argentina today. 

Five bullet-riddled bodies; 
were found near the city of Laj 
Plata, 40 miles southeast of : 
here, an army officer and a 
soldier were kiDed by leftist* 
guerrillas in northern Tucum&n 
province and a passer-by was 
killed when guerrillas ^attacked ! 
a sports complex near here. 

The police said that the nude 
bodies of three women and two , 
men — all municipal workers in . 
La Plata— had been found by i 
a fisherman on a lonely beach; 
near the city where there have 
been similar killings in recent; 
months. 

In Tucumdn a lieutenant and' 


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at low “unmentionable” prices 

American, BurDngton,. Baker, 
Directional, Eclipse, Sealy, and 
all the other famous name 
manufacturers to choose from. . 

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15 East 32nd SL 09 Fifth Ava* 

Open 10-5 Mon.-ttmi-Sat. 



>Jt.*Siuxc«*r inn Si i 
?t| ai ;;m 

AnlHiliii IM. 

iMm ila*i ntilwf Mi 
Sn m nu nUMi *■>»■■« 



World Minis-i 
ted Church of I 
: lunced it has I 
t interest in a] 
■ refinery in' 
. the African 
ind low-income 


J} PRINTS 


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SALE 


The recession is forcing us to dispose of countless floor models and 
thousands of yards of fabrics. Carlyle is going to thrive in seventy-five by 
offering the best convertibles at the best prices. Only a retailer with. his 

very own factory can offerthese values! 

Miraiactarad by us lor us and for oaifthM-alonv, 




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PAMIRS 

{HAWSE 

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INT SHOP 

. Kansan 
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Mt *.;-iSSrt 


MANHATTAN- 1050 Tfilitl Hw*u bov 62nd EL '(2121 W8-1S25. Open Moil. S 7Hurt. 10 to 9. Open Tuoe- Wed^ Fit. SeL TO to & 
SSSSSSi,”?: 365C*nl^ ££ (SMj 72W446. Oper^Mpn. tt.rv Fn. 10 to 0. Open S.L 10 to 6. PMUKUS. MJ.: 185 M IT. 
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Masler Charge and Bank Amen card accepted. 

FAIRFIELD, N.J. ' 

1 330 Rome «. 2 miles w«t of W> HO- Brook Mill going east. (2^75-0050 Owm Mon. shry Fn.10 W •Open! h».10 W i. I 
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[ models at substantial reductions for immediate delivery. 



OFF 


20% .40% 

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15% OFF 
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“OPEN SATURDAY 1 0 to 6 - OPEN SUNDAY 12 to 5 N.Y.C. Store Only. 
Weslcfrester Store Closed Ibis Weekend'' 

In now york n In wvatchastnr 




iM CliO'tH H.H.fgitHI 

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A.*ic>‘«r \%an & Karon firsl 1 Creomy soft oti-whife leather slirvj m e endio of 
light beecp. Or tho BlocL Falcon t-iock loathe: in a rosewMd-f.nish 
beech cradle— or brown le-atK-r. Also .n st mI tit. h,gli bock model' . And on 
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ccme and w lor >ourseli. 


The famous bag that accompanies 
explorers, fishermen, photographers, 
fliers, hunters, adventurers the world over. 

Probably the world's most copied bag. The authentic Originals 
s are still made exclusively for us, by our meticulous craftsmen 
in France. Why settle for less than lhe best? 

Shown: *6006, 16 #2" x 11“ x 6" Beige Waterproof Canvas 
$125 Add $2 on Mall Orders, N.Y. Res. Add Tax 
Other Models From Sip 51 £ i 

Send $2 to DepL T For C.ii . cl 116 Page Catalog " 
Open Mon. thru SaL 10-6 

HUNTING WORLD * 

16 EAST 53RD STREET. NEW YORK, N. Y. 10022 




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iTandmownn Furniture 

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THE NEW YORK TIMES. TTTPDAY. SEPTEMBER S. I9T5_ 


CHROME SALE 



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,4 •* 

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48 , x2(T Glass CHROME-STEEL COCKTAIL TABLE 

REG. $169 NOW *99 

ALL SIZE TABLES IN CHROME & GLASS 

AVAILABLE ON REQUEST AT SALE PRICES 


1001 1ST AVE. AT 55TH ST. NEW- YORK CITY 
MON. THRU SAT. 9:30 TO 6. 

OPEN MON. & THURS. EVE. TILL 8 — MU 8-7980 


When your doctor 
recommends a firm bed 
buy Swiss lattoFlex 


2 KILLED BY BOMB 
AT L OM HI LTON 

Continued Fran Pag e 1, Col 4 

surge of violence in London 
in the pest two weeks. 

“I saw people r unn i n g out, 
people injured, screaming, 
bleeding, said a taxi driver, 

George Michael, who had Just 
dropped two passengers at the 
hotel 

Judith Kalt, a cashier in the 
hotel, said: “There was a huge 
explosion and part of the ceil- 
ing came down on our heads. 

The air was full of dust, and 

when it cleared everything was 
a complete shambles. I heard 

a lot of screaming and I saw 
one man who I think had his 

leg blown off." 

Scotland Yard said that a 
man and a woman died in the 
explosion, but they were not 

■TOSS'S-* -aj. ^ mtafflce to ae Hi** note, in u— rife . e^ed W-M— ™ ~ 

partment of SL George's Hospi- detonate a second explosive device. At left , a police officer — 

taL at Hyde Park Comer, which — ” "7 f oimdiUv was also 

« ssr sSS£ , SfH 

I vcrice zi L tffhl went off.™ a middl.e-aged^nmn Sitting Bridges, which were 


_N 

Fren 

High€ 

Taperc 

FUe 

Fffli 

ter 

Oust 

$15.0C 

Custom rr 

Franc: 
Custom n 

AmerktsE: 




•».. ^ Hilton Hotel in London after a bomb exploded yester day. An w ***™ is hemg used to 

detonate a second explosive device. At left, a police officer issues oniers. 




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fekSnsSy 

M 


iown. There ® _, h alerts at London and 


TheC 

£ 

618 5th AW. a1 
Call 582 - 4 : 




HO^ITAt. 


mode at me tin ion n«ei m inn in a chair witn ms ien. ieg wim — yv.-f,., 

10 minutes,’ ” Mr. Pick related. There ^ere perhaps ^00 £ ^ Hg was in agony.’” . clo^d ^JSnment’s anxiety — ■ ■ — = 

“I tried to hold him on but he people in the lobby Moments after the explosion The ^ “J the Hilton, a | . | J p 

merely repeated, ‘Hilton Hotel One oftoei* Arthur v. Davies ns palice care and am- was under- 

in 10 minutes.’ ” of Toronto, said: balances reach«l toe Hflton- symbol ^en Rov Jenldns. the r* h • 

Early accounts said that Escape From Basement The police cordoned off the fg^s^tary.' arrived in the '-H 3.1110 1 
several policemen went to the i saw was a brilliant the streets around it. afternoon to confer with police 

hotel butfalted to ask the man- flash ^ the next thing I knew Park LaneandMayfairareas aftern^ and ^ hote l manage- r£7?i£& 

agement to evacuate guests, i was <m the ground. It shook menL — S V3k 

Tom Gibson, a police spokes- ^ plaCc . i saw smoke and For nearly an nour a n . 

man cflid: "What theV did Was t hasnl rpnnlR sav. ‘LcL'S get — tr- w 


B pat. superfirm flexible wood . 

I Slat spring (sizes to tit any bed) and 

B mattress, even backsufferers rave about Tax 

B $. . deductible with doctor's prescription. 

| LATTQFLEX Beds, Couches. Convertibles, Mattresses 
B 1 50 E 58th St, 1 5th fl. (betw. 3rd & Lex.) 

■ New York, N.Y. 10022 ■ (21 2) 753-5877 ' ■ 1 0:30-5:30. 

B Closed Sat Till After Labor Day 

Harvest of Ideas 

I nvar 1000 courses ™L Ia „ 


IfUrw 1 ^ anc 

, It 

SSspSSS4£=T s 

55— 5SSS5S.— — * ™ 

of thB week. VforKS '! 0 » breakfast j#.* ex, 

SSS^jsA’SSSSSn^ & 1 

S5SgSgs!S5tft- Ml 

* . m Ne 

f “ ' “Joyful Discovery..*!” 

Show Me! 

A Remit Book of Sex for Children and Parents 
Photography and Captions by Will McBride 
Exp hi^Toafcyl^ 

Show Me! is a revolutionary approach to sex education. It puts into 
pictures what is difficult- if not impossible -to P°t mto wor^. At 
Xe heart of this superb volume is a senes of magnificent doub 
Mocnhotographs accompanied by the actual responses of children 
£«s?rve Captions. Together they intimately explore the^^ng 
of love sex. and sexuality and their interrelationships, .exploding for- 
ever the embarrassment, the myths, and the emotional crippling that 
can grow out of closet communication. 

Show Me! does exactly what its title suggests: it shows. Nothing ts 
hidden nothing disguised. It shows children the differences between 
5ffSE2 bodies (and why those differences are something to 
~ y) . Through some of the most beautiful photography you h we 
ever seen it permits children to see themselves as well as all the acts 
and tehaviofrf adolescents and adults which they themselves wifi 
eventually enjoy, unfettered by the guilt and inhibition that prevent 
real growth and love between human beings. 

Show Met is unprecedented in its openness. Sex and sw^ty are 
pictured in an absolutely honest’ maimer-.beauufuUy, deariy, 
5icity...wUhout guilt and without sly suEg(^\-encs^Theel^ra 
sees our bodies and our acts with the unspoiled vision 
SLX implementing frank innocence with clear understanding. 

Show Me! is of inestimable value to parents who have diflieblty «\ 
ntainimr sex and sexuality to their children because its presentation 
^ Uninhibited by hidden value Judgements. The jactsi 

-there Wise narems can select the material they want uietr 
children to see with relaxed objectivity. (But.be prepared to be 
pleasantly surprised by Che ease with which even the youngest child 

understands and accepts its contents). 

Show Me' drops the euphemistic double talk of the past. Instea d o 

OTja££l£fiSSa to^mno ai d older ch ildren 
MUp^trum o! swu J Mpcriencc and <tev e lopracnu ^ 

, and with to « ta-ES. lor U>= 

^^o^honest answers to honest quesuons. . 

K: &Me! is a superbly bound hardcover book 

;,i 'p^« of P^^^£ r ^^fo^d«ignfrom- tbc ArtDirectors 

; j“-i-asSivs 

s^saaasr 

*-— • __ conte in or write: ' 


:■■■. wLKc Tom tiioson, a pouce place, l saw smose 

- ’■ ;'p ■ p ».'-"s/!SL Iman, said: ■'What they did was j heard people say, ‘Lets get 

» *■ what they did with all the There was glass all over 

v.' '-"L raOUSES fif other calls to hotels. They tried ^ place> and some people I 

■ ■ .-yttWKagt r j«i 1 jpw»r initially to find some suspect were ^ ter rible shape.” i 

a "KM parcel and establish that it Melanie Hill, a hotel secre-, 

was not a hoax." tary, said: We escaped into the 

-meHWYwvnBw/sert. «,i975 Guests reported seeing police street throng the lobby. The 

— officers in the lobby up to 20 whole lighting system there 

One chap is losing a leg. an- minutes before toe blast. But was ripped outjrnd l was hang- 

2S!U Kaf hie blown right Ann Crewdson, a hotel repre- mg down on the c ables. 

off and is losing the bottom sentative, said: "Obviously 

half of a leg." there has got to be a fim m- 

The 28 -story hotel had its fuH quuy. There was no official 
capacity of 750 guests, many of warning to us unfaljust when 
them Americans, and 1,000 em- the bomb went off. 
nloyes when the bomb went off. “The police came in and were 
It was toe target of terrorists just telling the assistant mana- 
m December, 1973, when two ge r that there had been a warn- 
small bombs exploded. ing when it went off," she 

Rmnh Blast in Pub added. “There was no official 
Bomb mast in warning, but the police had 

Last week more than 30 peo- some f onn ^ notificatkm and 
pie were wounded— among were 

them a soldier who lost flu Mgs 5 ^^ yard said that toe 
“ d . < Sfb , ^iS mttSSs hotel’s security staff had been 
in Caterbam, on toe southern 

fi ? Dge ? The Proceedings 

also planted a bomb m Onord T T rr« j 

Street, London's busiest shop- J n the U.JN. iOday 
ping thoroughfare, mjimng 

seven. A bomb-disposal officer Sept. 6, i»75 

was killed as he dismantled an GENERAL ASSEMBLY 





SHIPS 1 IUIIDLE Ml 

Ow own exclusive import’madfl of . ¥/ 

beautifully grained teak vaneers. Spacious storage ^ 

drawers with military brass handles, super-firm mattress. 

Opens to sleep 2 on oversized mattress. Also available as single bed. 
Immediate delivery- Walnut finish on spedal or dw 
SOFA BHK/LAHPS/CHAIRSn'ABLES/TRUMOLH BE DS/CAMPA16N BEDS - 

Bend _V«r3ei|-t 

ta|tatlidte«MlU...aaBtllqaf Ltddressrd Envelope /orl 

— r Frer Catalog j 


f HMin 
SWffMhlRM 
MpICMd 


SSn. A taSKtapotfl TStS sept. 6, 1975 

was killed as he dsnantled an GENERAL ASSEMBLY 
explosive device in the Sensing- Special Session on Devel- 
ton area last Friday- opment and International Ec- 

Hours after the Hilton ex- onomic Coopera tioh at 10^0 
plosion a controversy arose AJd. 
over a warning telephoned to — 

the Associated Newspapers Tickets may be obtamea at 
Group, Ltd., owners of The the public desk, main lobby , 
Daily Matt and The Evening United Nations heatUpmrtei^. 
News. The warning was re- Tours: 9 AM. to 4:45 P.M. 


<k£te 

FHthAve.tJel.55m&55tn 


■ B H M f Free Catalog 

f m v« COI© If O® 

4LmSl(in5tt)1B01t»M:6iS-^rijjin2Baflyt&tJijifPiL^ 


QScndFrwC 

S1C.35 ppd 
Size — 

Ship— M 

(§> $i:.50 ppd 


Address 


Outdoor 

L.L. 

fit! Main Sr 


Ticfcets may be obtained at 
the public desk, main lobby , 


Shop Monday, Thursday, Friday ’til 9:30, Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturda; 

Closed Today in observance of the Hig! 




HAmmonron 

PARK CLOTHeS] 


w 


l 

In at,, 
by /f 


'M 




Show Me! is the best sex education book I've seen so far. The mes- 
sage is particularly good since it stressed the pleasure of sex a? weB 
as the biology. 

Don Shan. M.D. ■ 

Director of Psychosomalics, Sexual Therapy 
and Education Center Dept, of Obstetrics 
New York Medical College 

The photography communicates the joy of relationships of phyacal 
closeness, tenderness, mutual appreciation and affection ...of relating 
to another with unit of body and spirit. 

HugoJ. Hollerorth 
Director Curriculum Development 
Unitarian/ UnarersaUst Association of Churches 
By picturing with great clarity, but no medical formality, happy 
people doing happy things. Show Me! opens new avenues of frank- 
ness between parent and child. 

San Francisco Chronicle and Examiner 
Highly explicit, often beautiful photographs— for the whole family, 
through ages ten and up, will get more out of the text. 

Kirkus Reviews _ • 

Will McBride's other Works have appeared ih Life, look. Fans Match 
and the major German magazines Stern and Jastnm. His Photography 
has been commissioned by the same German publishing house that 
first published Show Me! in Europe. 

Dr Helea Fleiscfahauer-Hardt who wrote tile explanatory text for 
Show Me! studied medicine in Freiburg, Tubinpm and Munich. 

Since 1969 she has served as teacher and parent adWsor at the School 

for. Parent Education in Rciuach, Basel of which she was made 
president in 1974. 

• The Emporium Dept. SM-10 l 

m 10 Bank Street, NewMafori Com. 06770 ; 

• Please send me the hardcover publisher’s edition of SW Mel * 

; OT no risk guarantee. I must be completely satisfied or I may • 

: return at any time witirin 30 days for full refund. • 


KSfcSS 


No 1 
Sales Tax 
on Clothing 
inNJ. 


Get that 'Hammoriton Feeling 

in the world f s finest— 1 00%. Pure Wool ? V?;. 

Above: 

Fresh and spirited, our Hammanton Park ‘Bristo’. w'iS-' 
Unususal fashion touches throughout: 

Three rows of cording between upper and 
lower pockets, front & back shoulder patches, \ 

throat latch, stitched edges. Grey and rust. ^ 

Schlgsiager value priced, $210. 

Right: 

For understated elegance, our Hammonfcon Paris Suit, 
the ‘Danone 1 . Impeccably tailored in traced window- 
panes of Navy/blue/light blue. Black/ grey /light grey 
and Brown/rust/tan. Sizes 36-52, regular, short, 
long,. 5-long. Schleanger. value priced, $210 

Enjoy Schlesinger’s hand-basted custom-fitting! 


JSv%w : ; - 






EndosedisS. 


(S1L95 postpaid) 


wm 


_ ■ Ll/I'w — - " 

fhe Emporium 


Address — Apt ** • 

I City — Stat * S 

5 riwa- miriertsaddBlescB. • 

It*. if 



. TheWoolif. 
yourassuran ■ 

tested produc . 

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r WestNnr.YBHf.Nl 

Parking rear of store 



















rg.E NEW YORK TIMES , SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6. 197S 




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,;4 


s Sadat for Signing | 
h</ Shameful ’ Accord ! 


^ii aW Sept. 5 United Nations troops move 
t ^ ,e - nt ? a new * expanded demiH- 
wgflfiHM^em'int tarized area following Israeli 
■ withdraws] from the strategic 

military Gidi and Mitla passes through 
m^an a week, the Sinai mono tains. 

xfi|B 3 a P er of Israel and Egypt also agreed 
~J giapt party, to renounce the use and threat 
°* foree ^ ains£ each other. 
jf& ,!r Syria “'“OST because the 

% „ W V a S re ement contains no commit- 

j[ rt aP An ®‘ ment ^ 1 st ael to negotiate the 
Js gBft _ . return to Syria of the Golan 
5 3HW S >™“ Heights, 
j® vjWSLf 0 ™* A Syrian army spokesman 
ifl filRr 16 P 4 ; the new military maneu- 
^l^ijra^nal and vers involved "various kinds of 
Israeh sophisticated weapons." 
greatest — — 

" '-mrabs in Pi.0. Assails Sadat 
juld be* BEIRUT, Lebanon, Sent 5 
condem* (UP I) — a high-ranking Paiesti- 
th when nian guerrilla leader angrily* 

st Sinai denounced president Sadat to- 

r said, day for signing the S inai ac- 
*residetat cord. 

.. . oJve the The denunciation by Zuheir 
“peace- Mohsen, head of the military 
f ^-“strange department of the Palestine 

• nt with- Liberation Organization, was 

geo- the bitterest criticism of Mr. 

* . ns." Sadat ever voiced by the Pales- 
■-.•^^dyester- farians. Mr. Mohsen called 

. . '‘vJie Abu President Sadat a "traitor and 
.,7‘J 1 '* United a conspirator” and promised an 
> ; .long the all-out Palestinian offensive- 
. • L-^inal, and against bis Goverment 

7 -t:-. officers 15 Lebanese Soldiers Hurt 
i^sVAttcmpt In Attack on an Army Base 

' ^. Sept 5 TRIPOLI, Lebanon, Sept. 5 

senior (Reuters) — Rockets and mortar 
■' ' ‘ be tried shells struck an army barracks 
gating in here, wounding some 15 sol- 
Monday tilers as a general strike to pro- 
ar^ l uiilermo test factional violence today. 

entered its third day, security 
U will be sources said, 
a list of The firing on the barracks 
during the night suggested a 
incemSt P°“ iU * attempt to involve the P 
army in Lebanon’s factional 
the 14 violence. V 

^^■^nediately Tension ran high in this sec- ! 

ijf- clear ond largest Lebanese city, a : 

" ^'Vitm^in Moslem stronghold in the north, 
s, ? if'sies here The strike here was called Wed- 
-•* ^ r of the ^esday in protest against fight- 
/ Zf/jGonzUez “g between local armed gangs 
, Sf- lincluded a^d groups from nearby Zgbor- 
tried jq ta, a mainly Christian town. 

1 ( b. T Factional violence in Lebanon 

be tried earlier this year left some 3,000 
* J irity law people killed or wounded. Shops, 

5 lL Some offices and factories were closed 
'■ 1 to have here today and the streets were 
... wounded empty except for gunmen lurk- 

— — he presi- ing with pistols, grenades and 

rifles. 


FIIDIHE CHAM CENTERS 


A DIVISION OF W&Y SLOANE 




iTM 


Values you must 
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MIRRORS 


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■*VPED CAMPAIGN FURNITURE 

'enter guided drawers tally dust proof 
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18 th century reproductions in so many 
beautiful styles ... at one special low, 
low price! Gracefully molded frames 
in lustrous finishes, set with mirrors 
of quality plate glass— in sizes and 
designs to brighten every hallway, 
dressing room, living room, bedroom. 
Chinese Chippendale styles well-ori- 
ented to many themes . . . others 
reflecting French elegance or classic 
Italian charm. Great Sloane Clearance 
Center values to take home now. 


V ; ss :•••/ . • 

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Now look into the marvelous details that put the 
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A. French style in graceful swirling 
design. Gold-tone finish. 48x26* size. 

B. Classic French style in antiqued 
gold-tone finish, it measures 45x26*. 

C. Classic Italian style in soft gold- 
tone finish, an impressive 46x29*7 

D. Richly embellished French style in 
gold-tone finish, it measures 35x25*. 

E. French style in beautiful classic 
motif, gold-tone finish. 51x21* size. 

F. Classic Italian style mirror in an 
antiqued pewter-tone finish. 46x29*. 

G. French style in a splendid floral 
design. Gold-tone finish. 44x24" size. 

H. Chinese Chippendale bamboo- 
look style, gold- tone finish. 47x27%*. 

J. French style in beautiful swirling 
design, gold-tone finish. 56%x25*. 

K. Bamboo-like Chinese Chippen- 
dale style, white lacquer. 47x30*. 




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01975, Fumitaxa Ctearance Centeis 


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Fit 5: 1 : ^ 
i Rt. o.Ntr 


, AIR SPECIAL! 

CHAIR. Cane seat and back set in natural, 
it-finished wood. Polished chrome frame. In 
diate pickup. Mail or Phone Orders accepted. 

(M CHAIR. $85 Value. NOW $65. 

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HAMdEN) 

flamdeiiTtaza* Coriit 


t 56* 









fra 

amiKEOFPACT 

y * 

Wile No! Giving an Official 
^Reaction, It Reflects a 
^Strong Negative View 


i- ■; ' 

'■By CHRISTOPHER S. WREN 

, SsMdal to The 5 f«S Y«k Times 

« MOSCOW, SepL 5— While 
faaintaining a conspicuous offi- 
faaj silence on the conclusion 
W a new disengagement agree- 
tadst between Egypt and Israel, 
fee Soviet Union has made 
Ttcar its unhappiness over the 
wurae of events in the Middle 
Cast 

\ yesterday's formal signing in 
Geneva was accorded only two 
fcentences of a bland Tass press 
agency dispatch that appeared 
today in the Soviet press. Oth- 
erwise. Moscow has generally 
iodged any direct official com- 
ment since the agreement was 
initialed by both sides last 
edemday. 

- This is not to say that the 
Kremlin has presented an en- 
tirely disinterested pose. During 
*nd since the negotiations. So- 
viet newspapers have reprinted 
selective negative comments 
•ifted from the foreign press, 
fufoscow uses such a device to 
reflect its opinions when it does 
take a formal 



Associated Pr« 

ISRAELIS WALK OUT OF LONDON CONFERENCE: Abba Eban leading the delegation 
from the annual conference of the Inter-Parliamentary Union. They left during the 
10-minute speech of an observer from the Palestine Liberation Organization. 


RABIN PESSIMISTIC 
ON A SYRIA AC CORD: 

Continued From Page I, Col. 1 ! 

I 

evacuated.” 

“In an interim settlement' 
-none of us even imagines ad-/ 
j vastly affecting any existing; 
! settlement on the Golan : 
j Heights,' - the Premier declared. ‘ 

Secondly, Mr. Rabin said that; 
| Israel would not agree “ under t 
;any circumstances” to change j 
jin the demilitarized status of] 
(the region of Mount Herman.’ 

! at the northern end of the: 
j United Nation-supervised buf- ! 
fer zone. j 

j Thirdly, the Premier said, the 1 
| room for maneuver in certain • 
i parts of the occupied territory! 
was between 100 and - diffi-j 
cult,” he said, “to assume that! 
anyone can conceive that iti 
is possible on such a basis] 
to conclude an interim settle-; 
ment” j 

Besides bis remarks foresha- 
dowing difficult times ahead 1 
in relations between Israel and 
her hostile neighbors andpos-, 
sible stresses in Israel’s vita' 

I ties with 


UNEMPLOYMENT IN THE US* 

Seasonally .adjusted^ - - - - 




l ■ 

1 

1 • - 

- i 

- ' 

,rj 
< . 


■ j ; 


Total 

Employed . 

Millions 


85.352.CC0 


-90 


-88 

86 


*-■ m.rn. « ■ ■ o 

0 N 0 J f M A U j J A 

1974 1975 


— 4 


k- 3 


—2 


— 1 


i h i , iv. in i 


1972 


0J 

1973 


0J 

197 


Xi ;_li i lj.u 


DJ 

1975 


40 


Tfco H*w York TIiaM/Scpt. «. 1975 


;aes wyji the United States, * 7 ry» , 7 r « . « , 

)the Premier put the country JOD 1 Oldl Increased Ul AUgUSt; 

Low Point for Soviet in MideastP^^f^^"' Wholesale Price Index Up 0 . 8 % 

i stress on Exports 


By JAMES M. MARKHAM : ues . to . rac ^ ca ^ Palesti n ia n ; has granted oil - prospectingj export more and consume less. 1 Continued From Page 1, CoL 2 
spedai to me i;«e York Time* i organizations. rights to en American company [Mr. Rabin declared, addingthati . 

BEIRUT, -Lebanon, Sept.»5 — I Some Arab informants' say, and. last month, ended the con- j this was “the central issue.”} adult women and 1.9 mil- 
not want to take a form all With President Anwar el-Sadat that the revival of the Egyptian ]tra«s of 100 Russian petroleuj To achieve these goals.’ were !eenasers of bath 


technique creates an illusion j r0 | e in Egypt and attacking the Soviet Union has, in effect, 1 chip p^ L away in Yemen Too I development of Mtvices” and adult men was' 6.6 per cent, 
•tlhrmid international COnsen- 1 fv., AMfc’riaeirf/vl * n i**H thm internal I r. Ie "* en - *r°- development oi services ana rt.T 


jpf -broad international consen-i^y^g^j f QC “splitting the Arabldecided to lead the internal 
* U SonK t we^ V Sov^et d reaction ranks-’' die Soviet Union’s posi-j opposition to Mr. Sadat. The 

■was expressed in the current [ 

"issue of the foreign affairs ( 
weekly. Novoye Vremya, which 
Contended that the agreement 
has “failed to defuse the.explo- 

iS”^SUwVfonows d S!e began well before Secretary of) 

XflState Kissinger's latest shuttle 


News 

Analysis 


tion in the Middle! move certainly marks a grave 
East appears to ' deterioration, of government 
have fallen to a -ties, 
new low point. | The manifesto issued by the 


The 
Soviet 


ebbing of 
influence 


iSojfjet press line but lacks the 
auB^prity of official organs like 
Priftida and Izvestia. 

Moscow’s reticence has not 
■prompted much surprise in dip- 
lomatic quarters here. “We've 
Known all along they’re not 
happy with this process," said 
one Western diplomat. “They 
think the United States has 
stolen the limelight and is now] 
i in the center of things.” j 

i ‘A Bitter Pill’ for Soviet 


: A ranking .Arab diplomat 
'in commenting on the nonreac- 
.tioti, observed, “It’s a bitter 
pill for them to swallow.” But 
•hT predicted, ‘They will swal- 
? low it” . 

Several reasons are seen for .The 
■ ijie Kremlin's frustration. The - 
! acceptance of a new partial 
•disengagement by Egypt flies 
'in the face of Soviet advice 
! that the Arabs accept nothing 
iless than the total return of 
!*U their land taken by Israel 
1 since 1967, as well as the estab- 
kawhiI: of a Palestinian home- 
land. . 

Moreover, diplomats have 
■Hmed. some Soviet concern 
that Moscow’s credibility with 
*fce--Arab countries has been 
undercut by Mr. SadaFs faith 


diplomacy. Some datgfrt to July, 
1972, when Mr. Sadat expelled 
Russian military advisers. 

But the Sinai disengagement 
accord arn*iged by Mr. Kissin- 
ger in a watershed in the Sov- 
iet-American struggle for influ- 
ence in the Middle East, accord- 
ing to foreign and Arab inform- 
ants in a number of capitals. 

“They don’t like the Rus- 
sians.” commented one Western 
diplomrt, generalizing about 


party, however, did not call 
for the overthrow of Mr. Sa- 
dat's Government Rather, it 
urged militants to encourage 
“the nationalist elements with- 
in the Government to oppose 
i£he trends of capitulation and 
truce which serve the American 
scheme in the region.” 

A number of reasons are 
offered for the steep decline 
in Russian influence, which 
flourished as Ion£ as the United 
States seemed to' many Arabs 
locked in an unequivocally pro- 
Israel stand. 


Afab arthudes. “They don't like 
their Tracks or tbe'ir jeeps. I 
think it’f only a matter of time 
before they throw them 
ouL” 

This may overstate the case 
Russians remain 


Lately, demonstrated lever- 
age *of the United States over i 
the Israelis has clearly made ‘Teheran -Riyadh-Caixo axis. 1 


man like Mr. Sadat willmg 
all] to gamble on his ♦'good friend 
Mr. Kissinger. 

Another fundamental factor 

in the waning Russian Tole is 

trenched in Iraq aqd Syria and! the spectacular growth of Arab 
they have struck closer ties I oil revenues, which have given 
with Libya and the Palestine! a number of states an mdepend- 
Uberation Organizations. Butlence previously unavailable to 


en 


their decline in influence is un- 
deniable. 

A note of alarm has been 
sounded by the Lebanese Com- 
munist party, which often | 
serves as a spokesman for pro- 


them when the choice was sim- 
ply between Soviet and Ameri- 
can backing. 

Appetite for Technology 
It has also given then an 


There the Government is easing I transfers of manpower to in- * significant decline from the 
out Soviet military advisers andjdustry and production. 7 . *r enc „ rate . Ju *y “o® 

is appealing to the United Israel is thought to be facing. P®**. r ”* e of _ 7 * 3 P®f cem 
States for arms — to be paid- a foreign-currency deficit of^ reached \ n May. For adult wo- 
for with cash furnished -by .perhaps 54-billion, of which men - the August unemployment 
'Saudi Arabia. I S2*3-bi!lion may be covered by > ra _te was / .7 per cent, compared 

The Saudis, whose conserva- ' American aid as an outcome' w,til /• 9 .P?^ ceDt in J ^>" and 
trve Government has been ajof the Israel i-Egyptian -Am eri-! a of 8.6 per cent m May. 

backstage anti-Soviet force, are ! can negotiations that resulteR 1 ror teenagers, the August 

in the interim agreement with] unera P*°y mcil£ ra* 6 21.1 per 
Egypt signed yesterday. The;<* nt represented an increase 
American aid contribution re-} over the July rate of 19.1 per 
quires Congressional approval, cent, and was little changed 
Mr. Rabin was asked about ‘from the peak May rate of 21.8 
unconfirmed reports that the; per cent. 

United States was urging Israeli A Labor Department official 
to negotiate with Syria before said that the recent flucrua- 
the momentum of Secretary ;tio ns in the unemployment rate 
of State Kissinger’s shuttle mis- -for teen-agers— down in June 
sion is dissipated, and whethe;and July and up in August— 
the United States accepted this! probably really meant that the 
view. He replied: ! unemployment picture for per- 

- . * T do not know what the;sons In the 16-IR age group 

to denounce a newly discerned] position of the United States- simply hag not changed very 

‘Teheran.Rivadh-Tjtirn nvt* ” i^jjj ^ w j, en issue will imucly over the period. 


also r^iortedly ready to grant 
aid to the Mabdst Government 
of Southern Yemei if it ends 
assistance' to a leftist rebellion 
m Dhofar Province in neighbor, 
ing Oman. 

At the same time, the new 
activist Saudi leadership has 
made conciliatory gestures to- 
ward the Soviet Union. 

With Saudi-Iranian relations 
improving and with Iran mov- 
ing closer to the Arab camp, 
some Arab leftists have begun 


Toehold In Libya (become concrete.” Benefit to Experienced 

The Russians have also used- Indepen cence Cited fact that the* improve- 

their traditional Middle East) Asked whether hints from* ment hi the job picture mainly 
entree — arms sales — to gain &| Washington cm this issue were ; involved experienced workers 
toehold in Libya, in what some 'being transmitted here, the Pre- ! could be seen in a number of 

mier replied that the interim ; different aspects of the statis- 
agreement with Egypt stood; tics. 

on its own, with no implication; The picture of the unem- 



jCOAL 01 
j 0 PP (1 

They Urge ft 
; Those Who E 


1 CHARLE5TO 
5 (API — Local 
, Workers union . t" 
; pledged a back 
:ment in the > 
i urged the unio: 
.’those who hair 
i 26-day unautho 
• Some 250 i 
■ from the unic 
'based District 
! a ftormy two. 

, the heart of t 
I Appalachian ct 
! to return to v 
< for punishment 
( bers who ha 
; strike. The ur 
! Arnold Miller, : 
itreasurer. Han 
j into Charleston 
.local union of 
) West Virginia 
jihe strike area. 

I The meeting 
1 strike spread a 
! border into P 
jail. 37,000 of 
] 50,000 miners. 

0 \ Pennsylvania 
in ei 
refused to worl 
I Yesterday, th 
I of violence a; 
[interrupted sei 
[tistrike movetr 
;a! officials at tl 
; of fearing viol 
1 Mr. Miller 
! that he thou; 
Dstrict 17 w 
jwork. ‘T don’t 
)to-strikers hav 
'prevail,” he sai 
! The right-tc 
j pushing for a 
1974 contract ; 
strike proi'isio 
international u 
ioo^sibe deman 
individual min 
from mines tl 
unsafe, hut th 
strike. 

Mr. Miller 
miners were ! 
a joint commi 
and managem 
resolve what 
was the key \ 
court injuncti. 
stoppages. He 
!minc locals \ 

.to strike, it 
tli rough contr. 


brazenly 


server iU A hiAfRcamau lut Cl ~i# - J . — % ; -ri I 

Moscow Iraqis, Syrians and lappetUe for Western technolo-' friendship seems to be /a fragilej 


observers consider a 
anti-Egyptian move. 

The Egyptian Communist 
party's manifesto last month 
appeared in a pro-Libyan Beirut 
daily that provides a forum] 
for Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi’s 

But the Libjwt.RgBan . ti0n it may regard as necessa- 


The KM York Tim?* 

jul'us Shiskm, Bureau o>‘ 
Labor Statistic" chie". be- 
fore Joint Economic Com- 
mittee yesterday. 


HI tiler Blami 
W. Va. Sep 
asked if the ra 
cross picket 
the strikers, h 
can’t say that 
want to see 



The current grave phase." jgy. which is widely regarded 
warned a statement by the as superior to Soviet 
Lebanese party’s central com- } „ In the case of Egypt, the 


mittee on Aug. 22, “is diar- 


rin Secretary o’f State Kissinger. i^terized by 'the increasing 
fTCertainiy, the . a^eernent^ if | gains made by the United 


{•Been here as evidence of .a j states in the Arab region, par- 
tWanims of Soviet influence m]ti cu larly -Egypt, which allows 
- ■ * - — 1 1 it to go on re-arranging condi- 

tions in the region ut accord- 


{ the Middle East 
h Finally,. Moscow has 


been 

'^rpiq^ver.fee fact 
:.Hhat American technicians are 
,to be imported to monitor the 
fttfr wngagemcci in the Sinai prn- 
■SS^particulariy when about 


ance with its imperialist 
scheme.” 

‘Reactionary Usurpe’ 

The central committee called 


.Communist, King . Hussein of [months i tha , t > ^ e ? 0tl . a . t i 0 ^ p ^ J .2: 

_ (Jordan, has threatened to turn Sy™ f, b i, 

which tfie Russians opposed— to Moscow for arms if the mMtiismd 

and Egypt's subsequent.^ though (American Congress this month iff thre e months and see wnat r - - 

precarious, independent st^d.| does not permit it to buy Hawk I they propose, and group was stflL far above the 


financial support of Saudi Ara 
bia was crucial in both the 
launching of the 1973 war — 


job after a period of being .out) August a year ago. 

-• the work force rose. In the entire naiic 

In addition, there was a rel-rture included, the number of . 

atively large decline, from 6 persons at work in August ■ Jl.,” 5 ’ ^ 


Investment from the conserva- 
tive, wealthy Persian Gulf 
states now figures centrally in 
Mr. Sadat’s strategy for re- 
building the Egyptian economy. 

"If it wasn’t far the oil 


revolutionary forces, par- J wealth,” observed one respect- 
Palestiman | ed Arab analyst,” Sadat might 



gronnd - to - air missiles from j will have to take a decision.’ 
Washington. ; Mr. Rabin said that in carrv- 

Lately, the Russians have 'log out the Egyptian agree- 
moved closer to the Palestine f ment, Israel wqtud face two 
Liberation Organization. De- 
liveries of Sam-7 missiles to 
Palestinian commandos in 
southern Lebanon — through 


^SSSde^tiiaTunfttS' Nations J Soviet influence Jn the' Middle j wealth are visible elsewhere. 

quipped toltast It was the late Gamalf Iraq , which signed a treaty 
'3J?Si7<S^nd^om&ied that) A^del Nasser, for example, who oF friendship with the Soviet 
job ,compjamea “ a a | conduded the fir5t Arab arms; union in 1972 and permits two 


concluded 

Ideal with Moscow in 1955.|Communists to hold Cabinet 
Others followed. i portfolios, has been using her! 

Last month, after 11 yearsi 0 y revenues to buv heavilv 
of inactivity, the Egyptian. j n ^ west. Baghdad is teem- 
Communist party announcsaijng with American and West 
that it had re-emerged to coun-| European businessmen, 
ter Cairo's “policy of placing! There has been a cooling 

itc K(>r« nn f hi’ Amencan 501 ll- ! J 


Ilran deckled to end 


’ester- 


1 ihe job was falling instead to a 
. nation with demonstrated pro- 
.•israeii leanings. 

"? Some American officials said 
Cihey assumed the Soviet Union 
.Jtad boycotted yesterday’s sign- 
■ing because they did not warn 

C reached ! ‘I s bets on the American solu-ji n s 0 \-i©t-iraqi ties, particidariy 
econom,c bberaliza-j since Mareh ^ when Iran and 

^ j „ [Iran deckled to end then 

'conference to Geneva last . had a( 

foundered over Arao dissolved itself. Some Cammu-lu^ai comiunisx "oartv disau- 
Soviet ni ^ joined Eg>T>t’a only 

political party , the Arab Social- j th e anti-Commimist Shah. 

“sfaceMdy. 1971, when Mr. Syria Depends on Soviet 
Sadat quashed a plot by Vice! like Iraq, Syria -defends on 
President Alv Sabry, who was the Soviet Union for her ar- 
believed to have Soviet back-Jmaments. But subsidies from) 
ing, Egyptian Communists have . conservative Arab states have 
not fared well. The Government] improved her economic 


35T Its ’best hope for a direct 
‘.role. 

O Soviet Reaction to Sadat 
president Sadat's harsh criti- 
■cism yesterday of the Soviet 
tAuoo, in which he accused 
Moscow of seeking to split 


in March. 1965, the.ing Kurdish rebellion on their 
Moscow s belies Lf border and improve ties. The 


The Palestinians have been 
leading the verbal attacks on 
Mr. Sadat for agreeing to the 
Sinai accord, which must please 
the Russians, who yesterday 
boycotted the signing in Gene- 
va. 

But the Soviet Union’s accep- 
tance of the state of Is ra el- 
even though diplomatic rela- 
tions were broken in 1967 — is 
a major roadblock to complete 
intimacy with the Palestinians. 

22 Indicted in Bookmaking 
BIRMINGHAM, Ala^ SepL 4 
(AP) — A Federal grand jury in- 
dicted 22 persons in Alabama. 
Georgia and Nevada Thursday 
on charges of operating a book- 
malting network by using tele- 

S hones to relay wagering in- 
innation. Among those in- 
dicted was Sam Anselm o Fior- 
ella of Birmingham, who was 
also indicted in June on 
obstruc- 

justice. 


tests. One, he said, would be 
the orderly transfer of the pe- 
troleum facilities at Abu Rudeis 
to Egypt “i do not want anoth- 
er Quneitra,” he said. 

This was a surprising refer- 


Augusti . ^ 

per cent to°5J percent, in un-| totaled. S5.4 million, which «P- iSS“ n towaKU 
employment among persons. resented an increase of 2 1 a, 000 1 * j 1 . J 
who are heads of housetholds.!in August and 1.5 million since {J?., ", L” 
who are generally members of I the low point reached in March, j J 

the work force. I. Other signs of improvement * 

Unemployment m this group in the job picture included 

* '* creases in the average weekly.. 1 “ th-. 

hours of work in manufacturing 
industries and in the economy _ _ , 

as a whole and a slight decline 1 wo-wass ■ 
in the number of persons who- UTRECHT, 
are at work only part-time|eriands Railw 
when they want full-time jobs.) to maintain 


i3.2 per cent rate of a ytear ago, 


however, and the same was 
true of the unemployment rate 
for married men, which fell 
from 5.4 per cent in July to .5 
per cent in August but had 


ITUS was a auiptuuiB * c, “i unemployment rate remained 
ence to the town of El j onehanged while the number 


been only 2.7 per cent a year The number of persons who] system for 

3 J bav« been out of work 13 weeks However, firsi 

or more declined by 150,000 to will get a lit 
2.8 million. 'than they use* 


ago 
The 


fact that the over-all 
rate remained 


tra, retu med to Syria has 
charged that Israeli forces de- 
stroyed what was left of the 
heavily war-scarred town be-^ 
fore evacuating k, and Israeli.' 
h as consistently denied this 
Economic Aspects 


of jobholders increased signifi- 
cantly is not unusual. With a 
growing population of working 
age, the number of jobs has to 
increase if the unemployment 
rate is not to rise. 

An increase in total em- 


tar ^d wen. T he tiovemment unproved tier economic post-) also indicted in J 
A , 2^S«f a rt\oSh < frictionf l has arrested suspected Commu- ticn. Now Syria is buing Boeing) charges of perjury and 
;5^SS I ?2Slr!S1SS!.” Uts “ d « treme ^ Pl»« for to aom-aJW'tion'ol juai«- 
irrupted into the open before. 1 
’ Only last July, Pravda lashed 
out at the Egyptian press for 
^joining in what ft called “the 
chorus of imperialist and Zion- 
.dst propaganda.” against Mos- 
’■■cow. 

> Differences between the two 
-'Countries were believed to have 


Kissinger Hopes to Sway Soviet on Pact 


By PAUL HOFMANN 
Special (0 TM New York Times 


■£he .Soviet Communist party 
'. : chief f Leonid I. Brezhnev, had 
plained to make to Egypt early 
-last January. The trip . has not 
-been rescheduled, though Pre- 
; mier Aleksei N. Kosygin subse- 
'toientiy visited neighboring Lib- 
%a. which has had chilly rela- 
tions with Egypt Egyptian 
ujjress reports ormasstve Soviet 
rmilitaiy aid to Libya prompted 
' -aw angry reaction from Mos- 

,r Ndiwaereffl, one Arab dijrio- 
■Jpatic specialist said he did 
■not anticipate any breakdown 
5n 'relations between Moscow 
“aid Cabo, noting that the So- 
ivietrUnicn enjoyed a residue 
-of goodwill created by the So- 
.'Viet infusions of technical assis- 

vtanca in warmer days. 

-American officials said that 
--they still expected the Kremlin, 
■once it had assessed its posi- 
tion. to offer some substantial 
•~ j*fnwTvi wit on the disengage 


for the 1 stationing of the ex- 
erts in the Sinai zone. 

UNITED NATIONS. N.y., Sept.|. Hesaid he had obtained the 

sional leaders 
no parallel to 

able to dispel Soviet objections )5S tI i!5*lS?S5»IS , K2S t 
to the latest WRS D&Ulg drawn. He 

SsiSmt acSEris * sraetl expressed confidence that both 
disengagement accords. ^iCongress and the public would 
Speaking to reporters, he y* pLce-keeping 

he planned to hold ewended | function of the American- 
conversations on the accords, waming system, 
here with the Soviet Foreign, Mr . Essmser stressed that 
^j nister ’ A - Gromyko. Ue United States activities in 

who is expected to come to erea would be "really 

New York for the General As-| rather small,” and said that 

although they were, formally 
outside the United Nations 
peace-keeping mandate they 
would '‘nevertheless be related 
to the UJT. activities.” 

During his vis ft here today, 
Mr. Kissinger dicussed the 
disengagement accords with 
Secretary General Waldheim 
and started a round of talks 
with leading representatives 


sernbly session that opens 5epL 
16. 

“I believe that at the end 
of these conversations we will 
come to an understanding,” Mr. 
Kissinger added. 

The Secretary indicated that 
the Soviet objections to the 
accords were aimed particular- 
ly at the proposed posting of 
about 200 American experts to 


quarters and then conferred 
with Fores gn Minister Adam 
Malik of Indonesia at the Amer- 
ican Mission to the United Na- 
tions on First Avenue. 

Other Purpose of Visit 

Mr. Kissinger said that he 
had come to the United Nations 
today not only for his talk 
with Mr. Waldheim but also 
to “show United States sup- 
port” for .the current special 
Assembly session on develop- 
ment and economic coopera- 
tion. 

Last Monday, a long Kissin- 
ger message detailing Uhited 
States proposals to narrow the 
gap between rich and poor na 
tions, among them suggestions 
for new lending and investment 
agencies, was read to the As- 
sembly by the chief American 
delegate, Daniel P. Moynihan. 
Mr. Kissinger was in the Middle 
East at the time: 


The Other test. Mr. Rabin iptoy® 60 * and not much im- 

JFJSFiSZ & th, u»«pk£ 

which Israel would control the /ment rate had _been,_m tact, 
economic aspects of the con- 
struction of a new Sinai de- 
fense line. The interviewer put. . . 
the amount to be invested jnjof jobholders was centered 
thj s at “aM lion pounds t$160- iPJT'ate business Payrolls out- 
SflM aS pefhaps more”,*** of. the agricultural area. 


an estimate the Premier did 
not chal lenge. 

“I shall see it as a test 
of ourselves” Mr. -Rabin said, 
“to what extent we can do 
it in a controlled manner and 
prevent profiteering, which 
took place here and there m 
the past in connection with 
redeployment of the army.” 

In view of the sharp rise 
in the cost of living and indivi- 
dual tax rates since the IS73 
war and the austerity measures 
the Government is expected 
to ask for in the next session 
of Parliament, the issue of pro- 
fiteering has taken on an extra 
measure of political sensitivity. 
The expected inflow of great 
amounts of American assis- 
tance has given impetus to 
this concern. 

Mr. Rabin denied that such 
an aid inflow would endanger 
the austerity program. 

“At least 75 per cent of 
the aid we are asking from 
the United States is meant to 
finance the arms we need for 
our security,” he said, 

“The second element in the 
aid,” he said, “is compensation 
for Israel, in money, so as 
to buy the fuel we can no 
longer draw from Abu Rudeis, 
which we shall £&ve to buy 
elsewhere. So if anyone expects 
barrels of money' that can be 
spent on economic development 
in Israel as a result of the 
aid we are asking from the 
United States, he is suffering 
from a dangerous delusion.” 


The gain in such jobs in Au- 
gust amounted to about 500,000. 
and the total gain since the 
March low now totals 665,000. 
definite signs of an expanding 
economy. The rise m August 
was split about evenly between 
goods- producing industries, that 
is, manufacturing and mining, 
and service industries,- and gov- 
ernment 

Over-alL the number of per- 
sons on the payrolls of regular j? 


EDI/ 


TENNIS 

SPECIALISTS 

The most compi«t« sloe* qi ivnnis 
ticket*. stMii tears, cloth n ana xcn. 
SOflOS, recKafS of ovary irak«, moosl. 
wDghi grip hi ana Oilinc* Export 
Kelp in Miocting ins cornet woignt 
sndgnploryou. 

AHMe Sbaoa-A 4 idao-Pi*n*C«iVfrw 
Sprrrt* o/ftor D*mo brands 

Qm Hear Expart Hxktt Htdriagiig 

Jesse Halpem 

SbtefiTaft&StBp 

( M on. turn Wod. &30-6; 30) 

.JTIHII* and Fn. 9:30-7:30; Sat 9-E.30) 

518- Winter 7-S978 
99 Cotter ft® 81. Great Heck. LI 



Monctia Laboralarv 
Scalianfor Tt* chan of r rein 

To Dismiss 115 Employes i 


Leading French Newspaper 


- ALLIANCE FRANCAI5E i 

1U.U Raspail 
75STO —PARIS CEDE* OS 

li« oUomI ui Mat Mmitm 

Franck Sck+oljtr Pmrtifnm 
Lw ui r o Acttknlri French CnorsM 
— la I tali <c Coaraa - Ctaatrhil 
Track A dau LakntlK) — Private 
lew on. 


ilVI 

1 1 

i! 

| I Typo 50% tar 
i “ Racontod s»pw 
‘ V agafnal tha bol 
1 _ mcraoaas ymif 
| ODC Typing R 

i acoro chart an 
apaod drRta. Tc 

I Daol-h’-l, 24D H 

tooia 


REOUE5 
Rotmrt W. BlflRChall 
John H. McArthur, 
of Penn Central 
Debtor, trill receive 
chase by It of tbi 
ite 23 n; dev of & 
data they trill be t 
at times indicated, 
on Inquiry forms p 
Copies of sodi tom 
R. i. Jaseisll. Ma 
Materials. Penn Can 
nanv, Metropolitan 
Lexlnsten Avenue, f 
Bid Closes I 
Amount Article 
1000 pr. R* ml ore 
1 . Firia Wi 

■ THESE PURCHASE: 
;with finanoal 
BY THE STATE l 
iPARTMENT OF TW 


Black Cains a First 

BULAWAYO, RHODESIA 


PARIS, SepL 5 (Reuters) — j 
The leading French newspaper, 
Le Figaro, plans to dismiss 70] 
journalists and 45 other em-j 
pioyes as part of economy | 
cutbacks, a spokesman for tiiej 
newspaper said today. 

The planned dismissals were’ 
disclosed in a- letter from the 
management to the newspaper’s] 
labor committee. It cited the; 
economic situation and a fore-! 
cas deficit this year of $500,-' 
060 as reasons for the move. I 
The labor co m mitt ee is toj 
discuss the proposed dismissals 
OO Tuesday, when manage- 
ment will proride details of Its 
economy plan. 

Le Figaro employs about "350 
journalists. 


Italians Cali Abroad Often 
ROME, (AP) — in one 1 year' 
Italians make intercontinental 1 
telephone calls amounting to 


inent m floating the only pure-] was t al _so ^rly u 
■fy Soviet reacEioi ' ll * " «-* * * * “ 

plqted agreement 


_ The Secretary observed to- 
man electronic early-warning i from various nations. He is | day that the American attitude 

stations in the buffer zone be- j scheduled to continue the talks and their grievances was "con-](UPfl — Lutherians in white-, 
tween Egyptian and- Israeli * tomorrow morning and to re- dilatory, cooperative, construe- i dominated Rhodesia have elect- jdbout 17 million minutes, -the i 
forces. : tum to Washington early inltive.” He spent some time inied the Rev. J.C. Shin, 46 years government reports. Some calls! 

Mr. Kissinger said that he, the afternoon. . (the Assembly hall, shaking' old. to be a bishop of the. 25,- : axe for business but m*™ 

The Secretary saw Zambia’s [hands and exchangin'' - * — ™‘ lrt 1 — *• — * *- - - * 


to the com- j about obtaining 'the 'approval! Foreign Minister. Rupiah B.jwords with many 

Mreement thus far, [of the Urn ted States Congress I Banda, at United Nations head- 1 from the 138 member countries. 'black to hold deposition. 


; a few ; 000 member Evangelical Luther- i personal calls to Italian emi-l 
elegates|an Church in Rhodesia the first grants abroad, particularly- in j 


the Americas. 


Who decides wb 
your TV choices 

It’s a multibillion dollar game 
they play every year at the three 
networks. Such questions as 
“Can ‘Cher* break up 
'Family Holvak 1 ?’* are mpreimpc 
than you can imagine. And it's ai 
being done just to please you, 

Sunday in 

^bejXetuj|0rkStti 

lEa^asinc 








i | Teenspan Assert ? Energy Loan Plan 
| Could Have Potential for Corruption 

Ik ' 


j- •- 


10 ><U,C 1 uirg?& Police 
^for Federcti Funds | 


A By DAVID BURNHAM * 

J " Sped*! 10 The Her Ytrv Time 

! ■ ASHINGTON. Sept 5 — 
; ■ - Greenspan, chairman of 
i ; Council of Economic Advi- 
t has warned that Vice 
ip>ident Rockefeller's plan to 
! ' te a $ 100-billion energy 
corporation “creates a 
e potential for real or par- 
ed corrupt practices.” 
he unusually outspoken at- 
: on the proposed Energy 
.ources Finance Corporation 
' made by Mr. Greenspan 
i three-page memorandum, 
-2d last Friday, a copy of 
jch has been obtained by 

New York Times. 

.Tr. Greenspan said his pri- 

I y objection to the quasipub- 
corporation — which has 

ie to be known as ERFCO — 
:hat it “would be vertualiyT 







The Mr* York Tfam 

Alan Greenspan 


He said the corporation “also 
- creates a large potential for 
real or perceived corrupt: prac- 
tices^— such " as Interest rates 
offered below those . justified 
by existing conditions in ex- 
change for -future benefits.” 

A supporter, of the plan, in- 
' formed of, the criticism, called 
the memorandum “rather hys- 
terical”. He said further com- 
ment was difficult because the 
specific, allegations “don't re- 
late to foe-energy loan corpora- 
tion proposal” 

Immediate Review 

' Mr. Greenspan also criticizes 
a section of the proposed law 
that would permit the Joan 
.corporation to grant selected 
energy projects certificates that 
♦would entitle them to imme- 


;l . v • ' .. : - 

■ r ' * •' 
4? 1 - ' **‘ s ' 

.-Vrs _ 

•T? ' 


: unstrained in its opera- [porat ion. The unit could pro- } d 1 &te consi deration by regutato- 
ms. "“There are realistically vide up to SlOO-blllion in loans, r y i ^g«nciesfmdcourts. 

I limits to the types of I loan guarantees, grants and "me certificates that ERFCO 
■jects it can assist, and vir- other kinds of financing to could obtain would be exceed- 
lly no limits as to the kind projects designed to make the in 8*y valuable -to ERFCO clients 
amount of assistance it United Sates independent of and rommensuratety Mpeosive 
offer,” he added. foreign energy sources. fo ^» thl ^ r com P etlto !*> heobs 

| vc cording to a number of Mr. Greenspans attack on . ^ ®“ n ^ m 1 saKt c ? rt1 ' 



&b&r Department Accused - Tbei&nigtteaft Civil lAertiesj funds to 20 police deparduwte. j 

tip AtTarita EmP loves Unite# ahid ■■ Tfeuprsday it had pending their comphance^nth; , 

. sfc .L /: ■ » " V ’ 1 . . filed adt to feqerte.tte Federal the guidelines" mid that, -Tin. : 

. r r._: s r / = . - law ^^Enforcement Assistance 17 additional-cases LEAAras; 

yy g »hhe<rr unrqfo nw.pff Adndtestratimi.to cut '.off.Timff- threatened fund cutoffs-' .if 
. - Jtotctai toTbtm* TttKUmn ..departments* that ginddioes were not compile^ . 

vii « wrwrrmw ■— --- dvtcrinmffltei agamst blacks or with. There was ulwnate 
-VEASHWGIpH; Seqt,5-?GK ^ plismce in all the 37 caSfe."^ -i . 

# the- nnnanat Govemmunf ^ 'iiu thhoimi Hr*.-* ■» '.Ptnkrflel- 1 ■ 


v - ; ■ - ■ v- " • yiuuii^ m mu uis ■»« , ; . 

Ot fi *S prtntgjai- Government] the suit, filed in Penelope Brace, a Rtaftrflel-' 

agenoes- changed with., enfbrc- Udked ^States . District Court phia policewoman and. rate. o£|. 
ing - taw* against eogdoyment &- ^arfangtoiL. I were an- sue women, on whose. Jwtaffii ! - 
diserimmaiion faas^ been ao- nounced a . news conference the class action suit was 
cused^'discrimin^ ^a^ ;A$JLU- said only 86 jobs were apU^j - 

, “ W T 4ronn 1 9fiA fm* fpnwlfl pmnlavSfi Tir ■ 


V Z'tf '-■‘v .J 

t : . V %'< ■ . 3 

• ■ 

<&■ *1 


r^onai' fjffioe : of ' ^he , United Sojl'eachif 12 pl^ntfffs. I "When I.applied-for dfitwtiso ] 

States Labor . Depoitaieiit have ,Mr. Larson said that the Law classification, I was tur gQd ;' 

-•* — •*- J • - ■ - !P 1 _* * a >.J. ' ■! J ,ai. n - felfT ! 





Pitied effort to persuade tor 0 f ^ Mr. Zausner agencies to agree topetrconere’ 

iident Ford to recommend reported]y was in over- all requests to avoid foe further 
unusual new corporation 1^^ ^ prepa nng the last fo ^ « f 


Tbt Nm Yotlc TTmos/Georas Tanet 
Assistant Attorney General Thomas E. Kauper testifying 
at Senate bearing on oil prices. He discussed possible 
prosecution of major oil companies for an Illegal “supply 
or price squeeze.” 


, ~ rr .T. I'-iianse IN uiemii mg uie j,., .. wwai y«i«iauwiw mwuu 

^ngress represents the v icej draft of ^ loan corporation P T /» ; O, f f n » , « _ ing toe Labor Department, was to pour money intc 

■udeitfs major effort to m- iproposaL C .l.L. S otdTT UOUOtS Attempt compelling private employers In Washington. 

*nce the direction of the K cely less disturbing than the to chow ‘‘affirmative action-” fipokaanan said, 

ministration. Warns of Manipulation delavs that would result from C**XT_ I 7 - T . TV f- J? TV*-! , 


ministration. 

K Functions Detailed 


% Mr. Greenspan said a se 
cause for concern about 


blacks^ and especially 1 Mack utcmly and r constitutionally re- “Well, of course, there ' 

women. " quired to withhold funding never any doubt in iny -Tn^gj; - 

The 19-page - comjriaint bum law enforcement agencies that I was not a policefoffl^ 
signed by 26 employes, uses which discriminate on the basis she added, drawing. ouf.T&e 
the I^bor ;Depwtiment*s own ctf race ot sex." last syllable. "But X wantjW 

figures to show that the eight- .‘Tn the past three years Jed- be a detective.” 
state Atlanta region employed eral courts have found more George Thomas, a NewrfE. 1 
fewer blacks in Mgh-paying than 50 state, county or city N J., detective and pr^ofent* 
jobs in 1975 than it did five police departments to be guilty of the National Black JoHq^ - 
years ago. ■ trf race oc sex^ discrimination,” Association, said that discrjrtt- 

The complaint also alleges he said. “Fdur cities — Honolulu, ination against blacks 
a concentration of blacks . in New Orleans. Piutolelphia and enforcement agencies “raft the ! 
low-paying jobs that was more Portland, Me. — have; in fact, gamut from admissions, 
pronounced this year than five been found by ton L.EA.A. promotions and transfers!* 
years ago — covering a period to be in civil rights noncom- Felicia Shpritzer, a JXWCfe' 
when the Government, includ- pliance and yet they continue lieutenant in Manhattan*; sfl® 
ing toe Labor Department, was to pour money into these cities.” ‘Wew York was setting arr*ei-j 
compelling private employers : In Washington, an LE.A.A. ample for the rest of the i coun ,1 l 
to show, "affirmative ac&m-” spokeeman. said the agency try— both for the hiring" ; w 
in hiring and promoting more “has bom and is. now conduct- blacks and women. But - fifStii 


•» _ _ _ . J tXUMC li /1 bUUWCIIl aUWUL U 1 U « v.» u xmw 

■ ■ For ? ^ read LI eCel I^ d planned corporation “is that violated their rights for a fair 
^onnal bnefing from Mr.ljj will ^ staf{e< i outside the hearing. 


stipulation delays that would ta Jo Stifle Independent Refiners 5 B£* JlZSS&SS* 

said a second court appals generated by I ^ Tie 1 dependent /VclZ/lCrS blacks, and other minorities, ing a vigorous program to ob- the fiscal crisis flit uslranB 

m about toe those who felt toe certificates I 1 ■ „ J hnn-AomnlSflhce with itn Pm ini hecaiM» nf 5\pninritv. 


By EDWARD COWAN 


M an?ff CT Reports Aidted tam compliance with its equal j because of Seniority, it ‘^*8 
J ^ ^ emplOTment opportunity guide- mostly blacks and womraVho 

The employe complamt was Unes/ ne said it “has cut off 1 got fired/’ . J V ! 

[dressed to Robert M. Bums, ■ ** ■■■; 

gionsd director for the depart- 


. addressed to Robot M. Bums, ■ . 
old be in a stronger regional director for the depart- 
negotiate a revival ment in Atlanta. He declined ' 
ut if the veto were comment. - 

A copy of the complaint was Ufa! 




JJ* on * , . . J “While there are reasons for of apparently coerced decisions f hat if it sustained. A copy of the complaint was 

B* proposal has stirced kjug prov ision," he continued, more difficutt.” _ ,5 h ! maJ ? r Convereely the Democrats obtained from Mary A. Oakley, 

% debate within foe high- j “jt exposes foe enormous and He also criticized foe legisla- J J vouid - m would prefer’ to beat the Pres- an Atlanta lawyer acting for 

Circles of the Admuustra- scarcely constrained economic Son creating the proposed cor- of idexrt, revive foe old law and foecomplaining employes. 

:*Mr. Rockefeller and Frank powers of ERFCO to dangers poration on the ground that conteols, to kill off ^dependent resume folfrse^ fS Kenneth MUls, who is handl- 
Wb, head of the Fedend real or perceived political It would authorize ERFCO to a cost-pnce squeeze. foSlvS fog the LaborDepartmeiit in- 

\fy Administration, repor- manipulationy * enter into “a very broad spe*- ® »■ thTtosidS^I vStigation of Se complaint, 

•k are its prime supporters. The conservative economist trum of economic activity in C?L.* a ?2? e “ 1716 Sen ^ te phase-out foaimxla said that 60 managers in the 

f ury Secretary William E. said, "The lack of any clear competition with the private IW col ^ er nf rh __ eight-state region had beat or- 

Ifl and Mr. Greenspan are criteria for foe level of risk sector ” ' iZJFESt * “JSfSfSft « to w®’ their hiring 

P^jor opponents. ERFCO is to assume and the A final criticism by Mr. ? ear d _ toda y and yesterday ^ a ^™® € _wiU stffl be a m-antirj* SnmS 


final criticism by Mr. I 


vice stations. 


viwmi™. uucua iwi LUC wvn UI Xiaa. k»-iju»- j . , ~ Cnmahkr *t,orp TxHI! _ uereu. UJ ivpun. UD tDHT DUUie 

gyr opponents. ERFCO is to assume and the A final criticism by Mr. “ d yesterday and personnel practices. Some 

President is expected to failure to specify the rate of Greenspan was that the Presi- from refiners and them gasolene Hous^O^rKs preliminary finding on. the mer- 

■* a meeting soon to hear interest it is to charge indivi- dent would not be able to curb customers, the nonbranded ser- re 7y va ^ f ^ fts of the arapSSt is expected 

sides before making his dual firms makes tbTconcem toe corporation because his only vwe stations. SJSS?* STjJS-i? in about 45 t££, thT^ 5bor 

Cfon whether to recomfoend I about the political use of ER- legal rantrol would be to offer . report by foe «munis- &°SSS££f ’SSPiS** 1 ? DejSiSaentsay?: 

*»■ Congress create foe cor- FCO more serious.” advice and recommendations. Sl ®?® Bur ®au of Competition prevmled since Sept. 1. so^ cea a t ^ United States 

L = = gg Assayed aSiSSS C«!Sto!^5 

V n in > In t-. , T . rvM - testimony heqrd by that a complaint against a Fe- 

Ipse Panel Backs Senate Rejects Lunch Bill m ™?S!iSfaBf >SSST£XSiSSSS^ “ “S' 5 *** magnit!Ide 
Amnesty for Those * q Budget rtnidHinp - ^c.. H mL-^te^^thK ,n 3SrxS 

Al/hn finnncaA Wnr\ V-ZVCl DUQgCl VJUlCICllIlC de - economic consulting concern, investigatioa of the Atlanta 

yW no Upposea rr ar\ ** “SSL^iSE “ ld :^ «“ .A"? “fo 3 ^ decontrol" Smplrint couldinvolyean anal- 

i lt JETS few ot the sur- could raise the rate of consu- ysis at each of the nearly 

r,< Bv RICHARD I_ MADDEN ■ ^ a \ ore ^ the mer price inflation to 10 per 5,200 masons who have been 

WASHINGTON. SepL 5 (AP)| »eoui»n,. K «rT«r t ™ 1 ^ s n i* * ^° re . the res eS^by foe region in the] 

.House subcommittee gavei WASHINGTON. Sept. 5-The served to children who did not Sn£ iSVS^S^JSaSSP W ^ ^ 

poval today to a bill that Senatef Jo a of fiscal qualify for free or reduced- trol.” toe report Jald. P ffii “ Dt 

.il extend anmesty restraint toward a politically price meals. The cost of that Senator Henry M. Jackson, of the Air T^ijuiport Asaocia- the rerional jurisdiction 

and soldters who de- SQCial prograjn ^ reject . program is at 575. churpin of foe Intenor Com- tion, which represents sririines, Tfaetennpfctis 

■orders or deserted became ^ tod s 52. 8-billion school million. Sfto xSSSuSe fw in rite^t tion obhSalfof aff minority 

,unc ' 1 hh because k ^ ded 11 15 r >? ta ^ wn wiether ^ & fcStffyas?® wo v iifco^, a a-. n i? o s g 

.Jochma. the budget guidelines set by the Budget Committee s effort veto that President Ford has ground 400 aircraft out of an "T? “JSTLfSSfc 

r >! amnesty would be c n- Congpess By a vote 0 f 76 to to get at least foe Semite to promised of a Jackson-spon- industry fleet of slightly over mSjdJSS? 

1' d « ri<:t 'y on bwwtxon „ ^ Scnate sen( fte meMure comply with the new budget sored bin to revive controls 2.000 nod furlougb soSiO.000 ggjj' -IfrJISaJ gSgt 

r- » war. Those seeking am- . . . r - nfpr . restraints^ will be successful, for six months. Pnce and alk)- employes out of a totel of oyniei ll^f a "f ts 

would have to sign a , J Senate-House conferees . have cation controls lapsed at raid- 29(5,0*." . / back-pay aw^ds are not hkdy 

\ i-ate ctatin'y thAt was foe ence to ^ tnrnme “' , hot yet rewritten foe military ni^it Aug. 31 with the expira- L. C. Carpenter and Raymon- 011 a . cfoss Only doc- 

their actions The Last month the S® 1 * 4 ® also procurement bill that was re- tion of foe Emergency Pe- dA. Youngof the Midcorrittoent . 

’ 10 ^ itow the re- rejected. 48 to 42. a $31 -billion Jected Aug. 1, and the House troleum Allocation AcL Farmers Association, of Colum- against mdmduals are 

1 would also allow foe re- m procurement hill be- has tended to vote for more cp naM> Vftt _ wednesdav bia, Mo., estimated that every to resu ^ t 1X1 P 3 ^' 

n * or people now servmg cause i t wou ld have pushed costly school lunch programs f”* ’ acre planted and harvested re- »y* 

d native service under Presi- defense spend n over the limits than foe Senate. The President must veto the qu ired 22 gallons of fuels. Ini- Four- Year ‘Regressions’ 

ik Ford's amnesty program, set in the new Congressional In challenging foe defense Jackson bill by Tuesday, or tially, fanners will have to ab- th-. /- nmnbiinf mvs- “Tn<-nm- 

mtLn-P was anoroved budgetary process. bill Aug. 1. Senator Muskie it will become law. In antiopa- sorb higher fuel prices, they ^ 

^ vote^n foe In a brief debate today. Sena- served notice that also he Hon. of foe veto the Senate said, but ultimately the higher S twfstatiis 

0 tors stressed that they were would seek to reject the school is scheduled to vote Wednesday costs would lead to reduced 1B 35'i£LSf 107? 

S a C T>| l i chairmnf l Repre- **‘"8 consistent in seeking to lunch bill. The two measures ontiie noj on to oveende. planting, smaller crops and ® p «^^S’ E ion 7 4 

"> e : epply foe same fiscal restraints he noted then, “provide both Both sides continued to pre- higher food prices. J was found toat Regm 4 

^SJ^nr^wiRPOTLsin toward social programs as to guns and butter, more in each diet that they held a slight The principal fear of foe in- had vc* . 

- Democrat or Wisconsin. P * case than Congress has target, ^ge. Mr.. Ford needs 34 of dependent refiners-^foose with ^ 

1® “We cannot exeoot programs c*J.” foe 100 Senate votest o prevent little or no crude oil production ploy*nent otyor taoity „ 

> t f c u bl if *hp J which are close to our^own By opposing both the military the Demooats from mustering of their owxt— is that they wil Macks. To 



lilt's tightofier 
Track Spedafists 


■C l . 

ie jl 

r.ir jjfl*. 

:i c ' • • 

'tv i 


Everything in track lighting systems for home, ■ vT ^ j 
office, store, gallery. Skilled advice for decorators, . ; 

do-it-yourselfers. Li^itolier taste and quality at 7 ' Tf j 
very affordable prices, from N.Y.'s track spedafists. «, • 

LINCOLN LIGHTING CBOTBRS ’ 

nther an illuminating experience 
761 Tenth Ave.(52nd)LT 1-7610 . 


there in foe future. However, 


Shopour White Plains store, too: biggest, most exciting t 

?r> the Easti 7OOO3q. ft. of notlrirfg but sensational fixtures, ‘V^ : , e 
lamps, chandeliers. 189 Main Sr. f opposite Com House, . ■ 5 


The Traveler 


CdunOL exeopL uniKriUDS — — — -- * r-' , — UI W viuuc im jMUUUVUUii TZ "m .1 < . xi™- 

, K rrirtorwc mu ne — — » are close to our own By opposing both the military the DemoCTats from mustering of their owms that they wil Macks. To 

Sfnval by Congress, nui interests or ideology,” said Sen- measure, which was criticized the two-thirds necessaiy to be unaole to cover higher costs were many Instance where re- 

" he believed it had a atQr G€Qrge ^cGovem, Demo- by many liberal Senators, as override. It Is widely held that of purchased crude oh because gressions were n0 ^- 

nrrmpttv the crat of South Dakota, who pro- well as foe school lunch bill, foe House would override if the major oh companies will to 1%,: 

t ad *Ji Uon l ?. posed sending the measure which has strong liberal sup- foe Senate did. refrain from raising their prices figures, T2 & ' per ■ obk of 

. would Provide for restora- conference commit- port, the Budget Committee The Democrats, most Repub- of refined products; thus toe employes in the Atlanta region 

of constitutional rights was able to turn back both iicans and the Administration independents, to remain compe- were professionals. Of foe 

- citizenship for those that ■ . ^ measures with the argument would prefer a gradual phase- titive, could not raise thews, whites, 73.4 per cent were 



iithat foe orders would ' ia y B i 9f i here t +1^. ncw hudeet are doing is to insist that the on July 30, House DMoocrats out of business. Last 'January, 66.4 per. OTit 

jv them to kill someone in Drocedures that beean this I fiscal discipline which led to I rejected a Ford 39 -month The Federal trade report ex- of all employes were profes - 

■iiflnn nf thPIT beliefs. a( fl.A nlo*. nroccfirl +V. n f mvinr /■Am- oinnalR 1 771 npr Cent 6f wllites 


“ -- — — . — ,=> — nun v - miiicu ivuav uui ms I.i-puuu 

^SLers to perjure themselves, vear that began July 1. can party was risking “another 

said. " The measure would extend natj^nj,} nnlitinal sandal” in 


,-itIon of their beliefs. IP the disapproval of foe rcdlitary phase-out plan. pressed doubt that major com- sionals; 70 per cent of^Mtes 

1 :he bill would also grant:* procurement bill equally to oth- Iln light of that defeat, Mr. panies would choose such a were professionals, and «.7 

Siesty to any serviceman | Guideimes set er p rograms> so that each of Ford is unwilling to sign the course. ‘Yet it also appears per cent of blacks were profes- 

J| "disobeyed a direct order congress, which in the past our essential national priorities, six-month extension, partly to clear,” the report went on, sionals. . 

Hch if obeyed would reason- has approved spending pro- including national defense and make good on a threat to that “that foe major companies pos- Black women constituted 78.1 
£' have led directly to the grams on a piecemeal basis, child nutrition, can be, funded he would not, partly because sess the power to carry out per cent of all employes in 
wth of another human being. now gets over-all targets for a a level which is consistent his advisers believe it would such a squeeze, and therefore the low-paying non professional 
Representative Tom Rails- spending and revenues and with sound national fiscal poli- lead to further* extension the threat ca n n ot be ruled out class in. 1971; in. 1975 they 
£2 k. Republican of- Illinois, budget deficits for each fiscal cy.” through 1976 and partly be- altogether." rose to 86.7 per «nt of that 

V\ tended, there was no chance VWt an d within these targets - . Blacks made up 8.2 per cent 

•nejigress would pass the bill, guidelines are established on J m of the regional work force In 

Si said before foe subcommit- how much should be spent in -fOO A ccai 7c P nn Jf 71 * “dudihg 72 pe r cent 

vre vote that only 3.6 per cent specific areas, such as defense, ^JILgUSS ■/xSocLZlO U .L/.X • OH JO UT LL JL T1JJ O of the employes in grades 13 

Swthe people involved in Mr. health and education. \ ; and above and 22-5 per cent 

iSd's amnesty program regis- senator Edmund S. Muslrie, 4 of employes in the towert four 

3d os objectors to the war. Dejnecrat Q f Maine, who is By CHRISTOPHER LYDON — ^The Republican argument grades. In January, 1975, Macks 
__J said the subcommittee bill chairman of the Budget Com- i^ecki to TbeKcr Twit Tima ■ r iat 1 '^ r - ” as ° een travel- rose to. 15.7 per. cent of the 

lUrefore would do nothing for m 5 rtee> estimated that the WASHINGTON, Sept 5 — in 8 5f, a . part ^ re^onal work force, but only 

great majority of draft ^hool lunch bill would exceed Robert s . strauss. the Do mo- ?- 4 P® S* 

listers and deserters. . the budget targets by $31 7;mil- Nationa j chairman, as- . M U Jaw, Mr. Strauss said. i 3 and above Jile 32.7 w 

JfyYou may be encouraging Uon in outlays in the fiscal to day that the Republi- _ Supple I asch airman ofthe cent were in the first four 

^iers to perjure themselves,” vear that began July 1. . can party was risking “another Democratic party should name grades. . .. 

fS said. - The measure would extend nad) Sl political^Sndal” in ° n f„ of 0U I ; Tte ™j>lamtja^foat foe 

w — various child nutntion P™ - its heaw soendine on President dates, ; or four of them, or all daiparity between white and 

rr IRFf) TRUCKMAN grams such as subsidies for travels. ■ImB mM of them, as party leaders, and black employes arises largely 

„ S Mdoo .«! fcpe? Fo ^ spo SS ? *309.000 BHaH *<»■■ wte- tet «■» 

at the Democratic riationai pates. . 

Commitiee’s expense— without Much of the hiring was done 

limit, and without allocating out of agencies that traditional- 
charges against their spending ly have excluded blacks in the 
limits," he argued. “It would south, including the Georgia 
be - an absurdity. And that is State Employment Scanty A$n- 
. what we are bang presented cies, the complaint says, 
with by the Republican party, it said “whites are hired into! 
an absurdity." higher gradesthanW ackswho . 

T ° Soard^fWinelnstifite Robwts .^- 

Lcher markets. As he coUected SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - a n««coflfejW «« Democra Is Being Prepared fOT 1970 g™™e SroSLnce SLSnl 

Yncds. he mounted them o° Margaret Shaheman has become tic headquarters, W s is ca { n ‘ the Renublicans have asked the — s on the iohl with the Labor 

plywood board. foeflm woman In the history paignmg forhis^rt/s nomm- WASH ingT 0N (UPI)-A pri- With the. Labor 

-The word got around to of ^ 4 1 -year-old Wine Insti- ahon almost every day. ^ And ^ ^ Ejection, ^Commission to vate nonprofit corporation L> ^rV? d | tiQ _ ^ denartment 
^ends who began looking for ^ ute ^ ejected to the board if you don't want to take a rule that it is still legaL scheduled to- open the. nation's _ dHvertise lobs that 

editions to the collection. Sdi^tors Democratic chairman’s word Mr. Strauss, on the contrary, first coast-to-c^tttcyclermite 

jMr. Erickson later joined foe stie is ^ ce pres ident and forjt. Mk Ronald Reagan. argued that the old custom was on May 16 next year. portunitiSfor^niaority 

iiencan Pencil Collectors So- corpwa te secretary of Guild The former Caltforroi Go ver- outlawed by the retains that With assistance from, foe comp la mtsald. 

«tv and began exchanging du- wil . er j es nor is poised to challenge Mr. congress wrote last year. The Transportation Department's P 


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The measure woum exienu [,3^0^ political scandal” in 
various child nutntion pro- itg spending on President 

ora ms such as subsidies xor nniitiml travpls. 


STIRED TRUCKMAN grams such as subsidies for For( j. s political travels. 

g; rnircm Drwrir C School breakfasts ai^ lunchK ^ ^ RepulicanS ' $309,000 

COLLECTS PENCILS and for supplemental ^ P™" outlay on Presidential trips so 

grams for low-income far ^ year< which the party 

«POLK. Neb. (AP)— Edoff Er- nant women. Mr Mcuwern reported yesterday, is a direct 

ri<sort of Polk saves pens and; said the Senate coniCTees vio , atior ^ ^ Strauss, declared, 

~ncils. | would seek £< ehmms Lte a 3- ^ ^ MW S5f000 Umit that 

■„.The retired 79 year- old. cent subsidy for school lunen s aw<r qan spend on 

picker has 2^00 of them col-j a candidate’s nomination. < 

*.:ted over a 25-year period. 1 Th . r; r et Woman fs Elected ,,The Republican National 

sThe hobby began as he hauled ‘lie • ffSI Woman 15 Committee is sudi a committee, 

^restock from Polk Countj' to ( T 0 Board Of Wine Institute and President Ford is such a 
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Robot S. Strauss 


Uher markets. As he collected gAN FRANCISCO (AP) — la news conference at Democra-.- 
Yncils. he mounted them on Margaret Shahenian has become tic headquarters. "He is cam-i 


\ 'plywood board. 

-The word got around to 
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.Vacates With other members S h e beean her career in foe Ford ^diin the Republican par- Democratic party is consider- Federal Highway Admlnistra- Dw*u*inn le -ftnhoIA^od 
Sound the country. wine industry at the Alta Vine- ty- , _ ... ^ w ing a formal presentation, to tion, the organization is design- 

Some of the pencils are unu- p- ■* pM-no califs in Mar 7 Lo^ Smith, the Re- that effect before the election ing a special sign, to mark foe COPENHAGEN .CUPp. . r-_ & 
tHial. One is a working yo-yo. -.q.y ..j acauired bv publican National Committee’s commission next week, Mr. route. One section already, is new Danish law pravidmg.fi- 

v.nofoer writes five colors at L -,\ . h . erower-owned chainnan, said yesterday that Strauss said. open in Oregon, and several nancial support for environ- 

Sne same time. rrSrarilS. in 1962 the had budgeted S500,- But in foe meantime Mr. short guided tours are being mental protection projects 

one pencil claims to contain UIU| ”* tl c * 1 000 this year for expenses Mr. Strauss was making Watergate offered there and intheSelway- went into effect On July 15, 

Atomic power and another has n . . , a . u H . Ford and Vice President Rocke- references to underline his Bitterroot Wilderness area of It provides a subady of .up to 

fertilizer in it Another is a uriginai ones nouse feller would incur in their w«k point. "We have seen what hap- Montana. 50 per cent for projects that 

’’fooler’' pencil. It's made of ST. LOUIS (UPI — The first as party leaders. Such speeding pens when the law is. ignored," The completed route will in- cost $8,700 or more, with a 

i%ber and curls i^n- when I hrick house was ' Ijuilt in St. has been traditional irv*botn he said. 'That’s what made clufe low-co^ accommodations maximum sabsidy for . any. 


i%ber and curls i^n- when I hrick house was'Ijuilt in St. has been traditional irv,both|he said. 'That’s what made clufe low-co^ accommodations (maximum ssbsidy for. any! 
- du tiy to write with u. 1 Louis in 1813. • parties, Mrs. Smith said, and Gerald Ford President today.” Uor bicyclists. tangle project <jtff ' $l.7-miUion,' \ 


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OXAffiFORGITY 


Republican Leader Expects 
to Go to Washington to 
Ask Guarantees 



rj?£ YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 191S — 

\How State Board Would Run City Fin 


By FRANK LYNN 

f-pscUl to The Mew Tofk Tina 

ALBANY, Sept. 5-.Warren M. 
Anderson, the Senate majority 
leader and the state's most 
powerful Republican, said to- 
day v that the Federal Govern- 
ment should involve itself in 
the New York City fiscal crisis. 

The Binghamton Senator, 
whose proposals might carry 
weight among his fellow Re- 
publicans in Washington not 
onnly 

because of his state posi- 
tion but also because he is 
not a New York City resident, 
said in a New York Times 
interview that he had communi- 
cated his views to Richard L. 
Durham, a top aide of Vice 
President Rockefeller and a for- 
mer state budget director. 

He said Mr. Dunham, who 
is also deputy director of the 
Domestic Affairs Council, wsa 
noncommital. 

President Ford and admin- 
istration officials have said that 
they could do nothing to pre- 
vent default but confine its im- 
pact to the city. Yesterday, 
Senate and House Democratic 
leaders began pressuring for 
Federal intervention in the city 
crisis. 

The Senator is expected to 
go to Washington next week 
after the special session of the 
Legislature to confer with the 
Vice President and other offi- 
cials. Governor Carey alluded 
to the expected trip by Mr. 
Anderson in a conversation 
with reporters, although he said 
he did not know any details. 

Mr. Anderson, who is a key 
figure in the current specia 
session of the Legislature on 
the city fiscal crisis, suggested 



___. T | would be channeled Into a spe- since June 20. Pensions, how-jlion, could iwu« 

By FRANK M. PRIAL jcial fund *et up by the control ever will be computed as if jin bonds. TTj 

ftKeuitoThift-TatTfaMi i board. From that point on, un- ^ salaries were being-pledge all its 

ALBANY, SepL 5— The state ta the dry's emergency was • : fluids to back 

financial emergency bill un- over, all city funds and ac- « suspensions could be' At present onlv 
veiled by Governor Carey today lctwntSf unless exempted by the riPKt VMr ,and the citv’s * 

is a complex document, 25,000 , contr ol board, would become continued after the nut > ea - s 

words long that would transfer! me board’s funds and accounts, and as long as the Emergency .are set aside « 
the financial affairs of New nrv option* Financial Control Board deemed! repayment of M 

York City and the fiscal powers ^ city’s crisis continued to; iNDEMNi 

of its elected officials to the While severely limited,, there aI * 5 the facial crisis ~ bi „ ^ 

state until the dtv was once (ire tome options ren ami n g to 


The bill prov 


The bill also would set preview all contracts entered CONTROLLER event the cit? 

» =, dmnh. hv th* citv Now the bill DEPUTY CONTRULLen e\ent tne cuy 


the office erf a deputy stateluito by the city. Now .the bill, 
controller who would assume) says only that any contracts 


controller who would assume says only that any contracts The special deputy controller* p ot 

most of the budgetary func- the city mikes must be con- would be named by State Con- J™*” . 

□ons of the Mayor and the sistent with the intent of the {roller Arthur Levitt and would ClUdefli foe t 

city Budget Director, and it bilL function as executive directarjawiarea tnat t 

would provide the legal means Moreover, the bill specifies of the emergency control board, smw- m.. . c 
for the city to go bankrupt ^ city could continue to as well as an assistant to thCi R f nds t 
if that became necessary. dedde bow it wanted to spend Controller. He would have the^ontunos in 

The legislation would estab- j*. money so long as the total power, under the board, to audit j ‘ £ 


The legislation would estab- lts money so long as the total power, under the board, to audit | h sayim 

lish a five-man board, the spending was within the limit all the city departments and m-jTO°nsassaraii 
Emergency Financial Control then permitted under the fi- spect all city financial records.!. lpIra i : ’ * 
Board, to supervise and control nanc ^j plan for the city.” He would make regular reports ?*^ w 

all the city’s financial transac- * . freeze to the board on contract; and l^nas^MTLWt 

Hons and to insure that “sound . F " EEZE ' ot h er obligations entered into J. oension ft 

management practices are ob- The bill would suspend all by cjty and could recam - 11 
served or restored" by city salary and wage increases for th a t the board alter city j *“ e bijl^rec 


departments. Members of the city employes that have taken fu^dai programs and plans. f <^ds bu- 

Ih/vor/f irniilrl hs fZnrramnr n f JlMt 30. X freeze tl. lull nminHec rhp i PaCUCl S fen 


board would be the Governor, effect since June 30, a freeze -j^e bill provides that rhe ! l f acn ®^s 
the Mayor, the State and City that has already been agreed deputy' controller job would J®‘ " e wYOncCit 
Controllers and an appointee to by most of the major city end within six month after the) _lr 
of the Governor. unions. Also suspended, for a city’s fiscal emergency was l ^rem«u 5>sten 

Statutory Changes ^ftThSttay dMmed “ te ° Ver ' , filSul 

The act also provides for ^ vacadondiffeVentials shi^t EXTENDED BORROWING city Fire Dena 
a number of statutory changes differentials, and planned sal- Tbe Municipal Assistance Cor-| fund. S 10- mi Hiot 
that pzrmit state and city pen- ary adjustments and increments poration, which now has au-; Education retire 
sion funds, the state insurance w^jch also have taken effect thority to borrow up to S3-bil- New York City, 
fund and the New York City — ■ ■ ... ■ — 


The Hew York Tlrma/Ntal Bom 

State Senate Majority Leader Warren M. Anderson watching as Minority Leader Man- 
fred Ohre ostein asked that the session on New York City’s finances be continued. 


£¥£533 Carey Pushes His Plan to Bar Default E35S 


of .Municipal Assistance Cor- r 

»AuS,S m of f0 S *■ CO'- * 

^ . , . the house with denunciations of 

“It not only makes economic .. _ . 

sense but makes political Republicans and even an! 
sense,” the 59-year-old legisla- accusation hy the Assembly 
tor said. majority leader Albert H. Blu- 

Conkfin Speaks Up menthat of Manhattan, that op- 
The Senator’s statement took ponents had “used anti-Semi- 
on added significance when tism to accomplish a political 
Senator William T. Conklin of goal.”* 

Brooklyn, the deputy majority ^ Rebats charge 
leader, later called m a state _ ^ ^ .. , . 

ment for Federal involvement B ut the mihdnty leader, 
in the crisis. He said that “the Feny B. Duiyea of Mmitauk, 
clearest remedy and perhaps L.L, contended that the Demo- 
the only solution to the solven- crats actually had accedded to 

his demand for the recess be- 
front the Federal Government. . 

a.* cstirvA fimp nf th® SpCWCGf S13 \ d GOVfir- 

t!*t ”>p<y 

iSSJJSSflUSSjSE „ “ggftjf c^dJSSfS 

SasSfSiflS 


1* ™ 'no parUsan 


Vfe SR *3s« currentcrisL 

fj cept what the Democratic party 

u a zttbrz 

tio? he would probabiy sup- ^ t0 ^ disp i ay> 

jrart Govern ar Carey-s plan for SenatQr Anderson simply let 

the fiscal restructuring or me . . . „ 

city and emergency financing hls g0 

to stave off default. The plan mg that the real deadline for 

is scheduled to be voted o deciding the bill’s fate was not 

in the Legislature on Monday, today, out next Tuesday when 

Fwnininpd bankers must begin the process 
2* Reservations Explained _ fQr a state borrowing that 

Tbe Senator, relating in his WO uld pump hundreds- of mil- 
office near the Senate chamber ijons of dollars into the citv 
after the Senate had recessed treasury, under the Governor’s 
for the weekend without taking program, 
action on the city fiscal pack- R jj pcrai Resolve 
age,- said that his resen'ations _ I , . .. 

included the size of the panel The Senator indicated that 
that will oversee city finances, he had asked for one wipor- 
the ^designation of specific re- tant change in the hU - the 
presentatives of the Governor, enlargment of the Prosed 
8ie Mayor and other members Emergency 

a. And nroDOsed Igeis- BoatcI to run tic citj s f iscaI 

afSSSSSs sysjs. - 

t ■SJJ'aS con m 8 S aid . 



sinking fund to invest in bonds! 
of the Municipal Assistance rp 

Corporation, the agency set up I PxT OT U HI C 

by Governor Carey to raise * 

money to pay the city’s short- s ^ui ton .seiiT«tTim. 

and creates a state of emergen- 

cy.” the first section of the s^. xgit hy Govemo r C^ey 
bfll says in part “To end this *® swon 

disaster, to bring the emergen- fhz Legislature. 

cy under control ami to re- . . 

spond to the overriding state 1 b ^ re . convene d yo ur 

concern the stats must under- honorable bodies m extraor- 
takft an extraordinary exercise dinaiy session to share with 
of. its police and emergency you, and to seek your coun- 
powers-” sel and support for prompt 

The bill provides a financial action; to deal with a dire 
plan designed to cover the financial emergency. The 
city's cash needs through the City of. New York is 6a the 
middle of December, including brink of financial collapse; 
the mechanisms deemed neces- ait unparalleled disaster 
sary to raise the $Z3-million looms over it. 
the city will need during that New York City is unable 
period. Following is a look at to raise the funds it needs 
some of its major provisions: to pay debts as they become 
CONTROL BOARD due mid to_ insure that 

„ , ...... essential municipal services 

The key proywion m the act rontiniie uninterrupted. Hie 
is the establishment of the doors to ^ c^tal markets 
Emergency Hpancial Contro 1 j^ve been closed to it direct- 
Board. It would control entirely ly and now ^ judirecUy. 
the movement of money into New York City V financial 
end out of the city government, threatens .to paralyze 

Beginning Nov. 1, all revenues governmental functions, 
received by the city except end angering the health, safe- 
where pledged to outstanding ^ we ^ are ^ mon 
bonds or forbidden by law. . ^ I2 minion people in tbe 


Text of Carey’s Message on City’s ! 


consequences certain to fol- numerous cm in 
low a default. of unqualified 

7- had indications that judgment in n; 
closer and more direct partic-- temational fin 
ipation by the state m have consulted, 
monitoring the citys finances • 

during this crisis might im- era! fonner L 
prove its chances to regain or the Treasur 
entry to the capital market, officers of thf 
M-AX.’s board of directors serve System, 
so advised, as did other rep- unequivocabty 
resentatives of diverse in- ^ at default mi 
terests. TO this end, I asked inexplicably, o 
to recommend specific Federal admini 
forms of state involvement l0 S h ar e 

that might cause a change have received 1 
in the attitude and outlook jh ey ^ „ 

<rf the financial community dace the gravh 
and the investing public situation, or its 
across the country. M.A.C. plications for 
has now reported to me, and nation, 
its proposals form the basis jj ie experts 
.for the recommendations I warned that « 
am presenting to you for indefinitely clo 
your consideration. market to Ne 

Risks Cited and to M.A.C 


\DRUG IS IDENTIFIED 


city and region. It not quick- 
ly and decisively contained 
and resolved,' this crisis 


IN V A. PATIENT CASE JL' 'KffJSrS 


’ ILH-——- - riik for New Yoit State and 

ANN ARBOR, Mich., Sept 5 *5^* “ 

in' Inna pf thi, year, faced 




day that the drug Pavilion, re- 
lated to the paralyzing poison 


CUrETCe 1 UUUU W IWVW — |^i . . ■ , owifk >■%%•> 

been given to two patients who emergency legislation to wou ]d impair the soundness 
suffered breathing failures last of the financial plan and, in 

month.. Corporation for tne city or consequence, at a measurable 


arSyring poiswi New York City. I pitted 
foondto have “ *** honorable bodies 


I must in candor alert you, 
as RLA.C. has alerted me. 
that these measures contain 
certain risks to the state. If 
all elements of M.AX.’s pro- 
posed plan were enacted they 
would produce financing to 
New York City for the next 
three months. We have no 
assurances that at the end_of 
this, . period capita I markets 
will be open again to New 
York City, or to MAC.. 
Should that be the case, the 
continuing inability or the 
city and MAC. to obtain fi- 
nancing for New York City's 
debt and municipal services 


r Tiding w« found in urine New Tb * t . 
tempIcTitwM the first officW 


consequence, at a measurable 
level, the credit of the state. 
There are no commitments 


uiv .WB, . _ . ■ _ .Uamntul nine MS HU wuuiuuiiHiia 

sign that the drug may have then, taviftg attfflipted o 0r understandings for private 
been responsible for more than ggt ™ financing of the order re- 

50 respiratory failures and II FMeral assistance, to awt quired for a long-term solu- 
deaths at the hospital The Fed- ft* . tion. New York’s commercial 

eral Bureau of Investiration is tinrattoed by a New York hgjiks ^ indicated that 
searching for a possible p sy- Ci^defaidt. wah ywr thv are prepared to partic- 

chotic who may have admims- support, we tromea me ^ fi n g n r j ng portions 

tered the drug to patients. °f the jriah but in very 

Dr. S.. Martin Lmdenauer. the ration and empowered it to amounts, 

hospital chief or staff, said to- raise up to $3-biUion in the TTn j ftr t t, 0 „ 

STthat t5o of three urine 'public capital market With 
samples sent for analysis on the advice .and consent of 

SS, 15 showed tracS^of the the Senate, I appointed as 

drug, which can cause paraly- members of the board distin- JjJJjW 25J«35i«f!r2Il^ 
sis The use of Pavulon « now guished New Yorkers of out- 6 ba, ®® ce °f 

being strictly controlled at the standing reputation in public 

hospital. Both patients had suf- and private finance. w ^ 

f^ra .. breathirg failures, .but 0^ two months of SiiSt nffiSS 

SS 3S* rBVive4 Dr ‘ ^ ti." 

. aLgjjLSB3=:>pv ««■ TtateSrs!: 

tact with Federal- officials in 
efforts to enlist Fedora! sup- 
port for the city’s emergency. 
This week I met once again 
wi£h President Ford to ap- 
prise him personally of our 
desperate situation, of the 
alarming economic disorder 
that the financial tall of New 
York City > would cause 
throughout the nation, and of 
the need for Federal coopera- 


v-on trailers »nu » K uusni«««iai 

SSKh? sHf-L 


The H«w YarkTIins/Mmr LMmlb ; 

Demonstrators protesting the elimination of school 
crossing guards as part of the city’s efforts to cut costs. 
Several hundred people gathered at Bell Boulevard and 
43d Avenue, Queens. 


tinning its investigation, which ^ty from imminent fi nancial 
began Aug. 15. He said th«e collapse. On Aug. 25 and 


began Aug. 15. ne saia tone collapse. On Aug. 25 and 
had been no suspicious deaths again on. SepL. 1, however, 
since that date. the corooration informed me 


for-the purchase of the bonds I lsfature ™ ^ at£efflpt Ufl in Georgia Bond Safe 


Sag Harbor Teachers Vote 
r To End Strike; Talks Go On 


the corporation informed me 
that it was unable to finance 
any more of Now York City's 
debt . 

Step* Takes 


| June by t he Governor and Leg - city budget, but then reported ^ " besetting |twoiay strike’ anH return ..to £££„ " th^“itoanrial ”<±£T- «*» “ state’s effo’rtaTo 

SenViOT system but that he ( investora had shut their check- New York City ^ havilJg „ their classrooms to the * 5 - musty's and the public’s ^raster The 


agement 


pension system but that he . CZT LI . New Yorl£ Cl ^ K Jiavin « M "TTiiJr ™ .P™-" 

ahjss ss srfa£ Cm «° l Ws Role , H ssm 

Jcast one of the rKerva . On Event of Default proper uncterwiittee group had 

tions S’ apparently being met Under tee^aed fiscal- Jfd « off’ZTJTSLn ^te ScheS'^ , ’SS %£ £ 

-* -•* 1 a. budgeting *m«£LS£«fiu» 
SSmSl bo^d to oversee cZy Si w deter' '” wer of Hall, is an at- bonds have the ^ghest^ssi- the «n^a was cmnplrtei. agement Ad visory Committee 

finances feont five to seven i hew money should be «“P* “ dem^strute greater b'e tetmj . 

■mwnhers, snont in the first critical fiscal resolve. The plans major Financial analysts said the teacnera wai?ea wn citys management 

T he rffed of the change will days after any default by the points include the board, a $2.3- tor 1 tbe underwriters ** *“* 

be to further dilute the votes biUion mass of loans from pub- L»° AJP&S ^ . 

of Mayor Beame and City Con- B^ore anyone who was n c ^ pnvate sources to cover fl^telnlKSttLS? dlto Tta-fiflSirufi ?J2 tonunl °“ 

SfZSFE i ns tb..d5" for the nest thtee 2? J *MSSte of thou^nds 


President and other Federal 


era! former U 
of the Treasur 
officers of tin 
serve System, 
unequivocabty 
that default mi 
Inexplicably, o 
Federal admini 
seem to share 
have received 1 
that they as y t 
ciate the gravh 
situation, or iti 
plications for 
nation. 

The experts 
warned thar i 
indefinitely clo 
market to Ne 
and to M.A.C 
cannot borrow, 
be called upon 
full or a greate 
costa of insuri 
niiity of the ci 
functions — both 
for which the 
utes part of the 
as for those full 
city revenues, 
would be faced 
down of cons! 
ects. worth o- 
and affecting 
workers, firhne 
thorities and j 
corporations. 

Projects now 
struction cquld 
pleted. antf th 
outstanding sec 
for such proj’ec 
upon the State 
moral obligatioi 
law. The faith 
the state would 
affected by the 
ties, disruptions 
tiom, raising 
borrowing for st 
The ability of " 
counties anc 
throughout the 
row would Sim- 
paired. again 
probability of a 
state to niake 
credit and resoi 
sistance. Other 
municipalities th 
nation will not 
shocks and wav- 
from a New Yor 
rial collapse. 

UJXC- Cris 
This picture 
speculation. The 
tier this year 
York State Urt 
ment Corpora tic 
bond anticipatkK 
date of maturity 
mediate and su 
creases in the ii 
paid by several 
authorities and • 
Other municipal 
and sewer distri 
out the State 


Official. “wTre EK35 Sd are SS 
and sympathetic but offered 


no commitments. 

_We confront, therefore, a 
fonnidable . dilemma. There 
are major risks in any choice 


^ ^ n«w fisc ^ resolve. The plan’s major Finam&l analysts said the 39 trachera walked . 

Tbe effect of the change will dSys after any default by the points include the boaiti, a $2.3- k>ss ^ tor ’ the irndtowriters Wednwday. but c^ra w«. . wwi|« uw nze m 

be to farther dilute the votes y & 0 „ mass of loans from pub- ™jg StoF&Fd 

of Mayor Beame and City Con- Before anyone who was u c ^ private sources to cover S^tetolKSttLS? teSS SitoTta moratorium on addi- 

spurs* iz, a- ^ *. ^ tho^ 

Saease state representation 30^ days notice. During this ® ont ^ s “d a . procedure for purchased them A u& 12. ^ workers, elimi- 

SidresponsibiUty. period and any extensions, handling the city’s money af- GradvLynch, director of the nation of thousands of posi- 

Other Anderson reservations Se city could spend money fairs in the event that default stat L ^ of North Havw - tion* from the city’s budget 

■wil be discussed by aides of “to maintain and provide cannot finally be avoided and Dl ■ fn _ Bl ,-_ C - PO nicn«im+ “5 * fraeze ne ^, hirin g- 

the Governor and the Senator such purposes as are deter- wor feer5 and creditors start w- 2S? S? ^ an tor BUS Fare Discount 9A suspension of wage 


we makfi. Our most prudent 
comse is to weigh the risks 
ana follow the path that min- 
imizes them. 


est as well. 

These likely I 
default are unth^ 
unacceptable, 
choose to follow 
more limited risl 
in .the program 
My conscience -ai 


and a freeze cm new hiring. 
fA- suspension of wage 


Wil be oiscusseo oy wuw oi t.o niaiouuu wiu | cannot irnany De avoiaea anQ n „„_ ...u_ __ r-. B,.- niaAMtml ~ 

s 7t r - - ^SSSSSSL 

sSfasjrr , £ - 

»ASB55« MK 


Limit Mentioned 
I have. outlined above the 
risks presented by the pro- 
posed plan. Tfiey are real 
and sobrtantiaL But in some 
respects they are measurable 
and finite. The limit of the 
states immediate financial 
exposure fa determinate. 


My conscience ar 
of . prudence and 


had no plans to meet with the The 

_ r T‘ ia iua j 


torases. of dty employ^ /^opting the plto Vffera a 
tr fAj f m«rase m public chJTSi the P next ^ 

9A further reduction in 


ty adni 
ole. In 


interest 


« -r-- — , ,-n the orities in event oi aeiauit nouncea ms rearemenr rrom oeen ruea, out tnat me naaocmg enqrts, would en- 

the Republican ieaa^ would be to pay municipal years were outlined Thursday the National Aeronautics and yould make an investigation able the city to market its. 

assembly, eyen suss® 4 -® and keep city serv- by Robert P. Kane, the State.Space Administration Thursday jefore granting final approval, own .securities by thfa.Octo- 

the State shoiUd not ices -functionings Holders of Attorney GeneraL In a letter to Mr. Worden, 43 years old, said Ihe company will be- required her. But .this, hope lias riot 

itself any ton* 1 ? +»,. the city’s securities would Paul J. Smith, the State Secre- hp would become vice president to file detailed monthly reports been realized; thus malting 

order to, m _TT have to wait for their money, tary of Labor and Industry, of the High Plight Foundation on the plan with the commis- the prospect of default more 

hand of the Federal nwio m ^e Mr. Kane said representatives at Colorado Springs, Colo. He sion. . muwnwt . and' the heed for 

ment “If the state keeps otd priorities from 10 state, federal and f o- was command module pilot on The fare plan will be in effect bnmediato' state intervention 

ing to the city’s i tocue, w ay , the emer- cal agencies would conduct the] the Apollo 15 flight tip, the Mondays te rough Thursdays, totrdS^e 'and cnicial if we 

shcrtjd the Federal Government ^d Mntrol bt»rd. investigation. moon m 1971. for one-way or round-trip fares, are -to stave off the dire 

. bonier? 0 tbe Duiyea aide saiu. w “ 


to®, mouths to lessen its 
, TJ^ ^y* 5 - D «nng. this period the 

se U fa" f may pnivt workable; 
w 111 and we may convince the 
Pidilic, the financial conunun- 

i on 0 r JSff 2SF- We ras P° n - 
r -S& ^ M 1 sood faith, dom- 

SSS MSiMfflsr 

OrtS 2*7 Yorfc Ci ^ but to y th? 
s riot 016 nation as weir. 

Lfoa Si ll 8 n, i way t0 quantify 
the risks of a "default 0 f the 

4 for 5! agn,£ud e we face. That its 

5J5 

dire This opinion is shared by 













P 





.t: 




■ -wi . i* 




- . f 








v ; ■/*'* * 

■, , :.f Vote 


— • life 


•T.- 

>c V-WML 




• •- 

- •• **30} 

i* .3 


‘ f ^*j m 





' v-f-# 



sponsibility lead 
judgment in whic^. •- 
to join me. to 
of our energies 
to avert the cat 
a default. LW 

Faced with thi Bto 
it was my obllgat 
a decision that I Wk~ 
be in the best -i iHt 
only of New Yor 
of all the people c 
I did not make t 
lightly. But onbf 
confident the chc 
made is morally 
Accordingly, p 
the powers vested 
der Article IV, & 
the New York St 
tution. I hereby 
to you for consii 
the extraordinary 
have convened at 
noon on the foui 
September in thek 
thousand nine 
seventy-five, at ^ 
Capitol, in the C m 
bany, the legislatic v 1 
herewith respectu '. J 
naneial emergency > 
of New.Ypife. Lo 
to you wm, confi ■ 
it merits yoar tall • _ 









Im AV|a 


3-il 








■j Employe Leaders Say 

I few York Crisis Could 
| ; .'(Spread Over Nation 

i: < 

K . ■ 

5 ? *By DAMON STETSON 

■1 6 *dilt*Tlio Sew Tort tdm* 

'ASHINGTON, Sept. 5— 
pers of public employe 
jns warning that New York 
fa fiscal crisis could become 
National catastrophe, called 
« ay for Federal Government 
jOn to guarantee the bonds 
h the Municipal Assistance 
,‘poration. 

.relegates to the convention 
{he Public Employe Depart- 
jt of the American Federa- 
i of Labor and Congress of 

r trial Organizations said 
the crisis of New York 
7 might become the crisis 
pther ritieg across the land. 

i i strongly worded comments 
resolutions on the final 
l of the convention, the dele- 
35, who represent 2.5 million 
lie employes, expressed con- 
; k i about the impact of the 
York situation on the 
>r movement and the future 
collective bargaining. They 
Sd steps by President Ford 
Congress to help stabilize 
: New York situation and 
jrt similar crises in other 
'as. 

president Ford was sharply 
jjzed in a resolution that 
^sed him of failing “in his 
rasbDity to alleviate this 
?s by not taking necessary 
■I*: to bolster the confidence 
5 r red to insure the sale of 
York municipal bonds.” 

> i Political Motive Seen 


the Municipal 1 Finance; ■ 


■ TtlE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDA Y, SEPTEMBER 6, Jffi : , ■: 


Fiscal Crisis at a Glance: FIKEfflEN ANGERED tJ.S. Mayors Fear Default Here; 
KEY facts - . ■ BY TERMS OF PACT Say ftWoulidlnjur^Bond Sal 

Because its budget is out of balance, and because in-' .. ■ . 

coming revenue flow erratically, the city mftst borrow. • - •• ■ . : Continued From Page 1.' CoL Bibodds ubtS it 'bad' raised -tire 

hundreds of-mfllian s of dollars each month to meet ex- At .Meeting, Many Object . . — ^ \ • SSrwt’iiate to IftJS pS^enL 

penses, including short-term borrowing obligations that +n p rftf i. ir+ i«;t<. ties. Jacksonville has apopula- "it's -hot inst.-Now York." 

come due. But banks aid other investors have refused,- . Clause tion of 621,000. .\ . ■ Mr.: Gunther said.. .'They’re- ail 

ance 4ariy this year, to buy the city’s notes and bonds. _■ — ; 7 - . , - "There & not ’ a.- clty that ninnmg into some. veiy serious 

Various drastic steps, mcludz^ a. wage freeze and cut-^ ‘ Rv glenn FOWLER does not dapend upon the bond fnvahd» prt>bfatts "in'iiie mar- 

backs in services and personnel, failed to restore the con-. _ * , „ market,* Mfc ’ Tanzler said, in *wt r . ■ > ■ . • : 

fidence of investors in the city’s fiscal affairs. The Mumei- • Widespread rank-and-file als- an interview. "What happens ' ‘T dob’t see it as ripples, ‘ iia 
pal Assistance Corporation, created test June to help the satisfaction among city firemen in New Yorir is going to drive added, 'L see It-axatidal 
a'ty avoid a default, has piit together a comptex package was voiced yesterday over a the rate up, if it doesn’t toatUy wavei’V 
of fi n an c ing arrangements to raise the 52.4-MUkm the city proposed settlement, of the U P the. salability of. musici- Reass Offers Program - - - 

needs through the beginning of December. ■ . long-standing dispute on pro, ^ *2?* r ' ; . ; v / ' \ • jbh* .' '-feottnfa,' director 

But the package, whirt calls for a significant use of doctivtty between the Beame the Municipal'' Ftmnce Offi 

the state's credft to help die city is commit upon ap- administla tion and the Uni- ST I&aSr Assodatipn, tqHa.news con 
proval by the State Legislature of Governor Carey’s pro- £ ^ Firefighters Assoda- 3 mSSS» 25!? fSf da 

posed Emergency FmancteJ Control Board, which take : H 8 °^ rs Assoaa faujfc“wiil Jead'toagreatde- 

over'many of Mayor Beame’s budgetary prerogatives. Hie tio ”’ .. x ? n {'/ S ' raitpirat of -capital spenc&g 

board would also enforce a plan to close the city's deficit At a four-honr meeting at “Y “r** 1 ® the^mdus^ an^thelaree umtswmftid i 

by cutting expenditures by SSOCkniflion over the next the Statler Hilton Hotel, attend- *"£ very diffiaSt to rget into ' ilje 

ihree years. <d by more than 700 unlod ^ : . 

NEW DEVELOPMENTS members, Michael T. Maye, a population ' of one mfllion, roH*? 

iNii/VV v l o their recently elected president said in an interview ‘Tthink coaster t^ 1 -i» having veiy 

In Albmiy. the New York State Legislative- t^cervBd and other officers w^e ques- same is'trne of 'New York e^cts for state- and 

Governor Carey’s proposed legislation to avoid the city's turned sharply- on the two-year and the dries." ' local borTOwers,” '■ he added.* 

default, then adjourned until Monday. contract tentatively accepted ■ . . K r . p . _ . To brake the iteler coaster, 

Four city pension funds approved en a^eement to by the leadership a week ago. Anai ° ulves warning Representafive 'Reuss. proposed 
buy S 100-million worth of MAC. bonds, insuring a Sara- meeting, the terms Mayor Landrieu said that he a seven-point program, in -re- 

lation. -Department payroll and a welfkre chick mailing ° f a^eement were outlmed vms among a group of. mayors sponse to a *eq\»St for legisla- 
and preventing immediate default the firanen- for the mst who were exploring their state non made by the' New Ymk 

Warren M. Anderson, leader of the Republican raa- e i? n “ t - is ™e laws to determine whether they Congressional delegation. . | 

jority in the State Senate, called for Federal favolvement ^2^1? Work J»nds Mr Reuss warned of the far- 

in the city’s fscal crisis, but, in Rochester, Vke President fJStfa 2if uSSf" 0 * 1 ° f enL ^ lte,led fiung co-osetjuen.ces of a New 

RockefeSer asserted Congre^ could not instate Kelp for e c Yoi4c ***** & Yo *' 

N 7 York City alon^ and said the shouki balance *s 

In Washington, leaders of public-employes unions According Maye the ^, C± had S i P AA Ul ?^t 0 raS ^ nati ^ 6COT0n ^”. 

called for the Federal Government to guarantee M.A.C. only <*£>? concession made But he. VS. Umt I» Proposed 


&/e have a disaster facing 
Ajica,” said George Hardy, 
'.-lent of the Service Era- 
^•s Union. “Mayor Beame 
^ben down here on his knees 
.frig the President for help: 


In Washington, leaders of public-employes unions 
called for the Federal Government to guarantee M.A.C. 
bonds, and officials of municipal organizations said the 
Mayors o? other cities were deeply worried about how a 
default would harm their own budget 

what: is ahead 

The State Legislature meets again Monday to consider 
Governor Carey’s proposal to restructure the city’s fiscal 
operations and appropriate $750-miHion for the city’s deeds. 
In Washington, bankers and brokers are scheduled to 
testify before a committee of the House of Representatives 
looking into the possible national implications of a default 
in New York. 

. The city does not know at present how it will meet its 
1 cadi needs of $1 1 1 -million next week, but officials expect 
the revenue to come from banks, pension funds, prepay- . 
ment of real estate taxes and other sources tf the legisla- 
tion Is passed in Albany. Otherwise, the city faces immi- 
nent default. 


only other concession made But he warned that “if Nbw Loan I* proposea 

was elimination of the half- York defaults, ifs going -to im- -Asa short-term recammenda- 
hour uninterrupted mealtime to pair the credit ratings of almost tron, Mr. Reuss proposed ; au 
Which busy fine companies are every major city in the coun- emergency loan by the Trea- 
entitled. • tiy.” sury or the Federal Reserve to 

It was learned, however, that . Other mayors who expressed New York City, folly secured 
the contract retains the provi- concern over -a New York de- on a pri o r it y basis, “to permit 
sions, resisted by the union fault in the last week include the city to operate continuously 
negotiators for more than & Richard J, Daley of CHricago, and on an orderly basis.’”. The 
year, that give the Fire Com- Coleman Young of Detroit Wil- amount of the loan was not 
mis&orKT. John T. O'Hagan, McNicholas of Denver, stated • : * 

leeway to lnstrtiae procedural John Daggs of Phoenix, Arte, 'Mr. Reuss also said that “the 
changes des igned to increase Henry Meier of Milwaukee, Nell Federal Reserve should utt- 
productiyTty. Goldschmidt of Portland, -Ore^ hesitatingly declare . its inten- 

pay Increases and Louis E. Saavedra of AIbu- tion of maintaining bank fiquid- 

Tbe contract, covering the querque, N. Me^ according to ity by aaxpting New York Oiy 
period from July 1 1974 to J °hn Gunther, executive direc- paper, of. all maturities at its 
lime in -iQ7R firemen tor of the mayors conference, discount window.” 

STsi 8 m STra^fS “In' late July; they thought ‘This would stM leave the 
the first yejj^that was won it was a bail-out of New York ultimate, risk .of a loss through 
bv Other Civil Service unions situation,”- Mr. Gunther said, default with creators whare it 
and the 6 per cent increase “Now they realize that their belongs,” Mr. Reuss said. “But 
effective last July 1 that has own cities are at stake.” - the Federal Reserve would be 
been suspended by the wage Tfs'Nbt Just New York nqnidity- 


| ’ in American histoyT toe {Rockefeller Says He’s Doubtful effoXlve tesWul^f t^^hasjown citira^are at stake” - |the Federal Reserve would be 

S3cra - Congress Would Vote Citv Aid '*■»* ,ort Nm Y0 * li,nidi£y ' 

Hardy that Pres- CO/lgreSS W OUIO V Ole Ity At U. freeze Guntter »id thit Mayor tav, 

*S® 3 SE srs?M-a« ^ m - - ^ ssvwjgs * £? « « & - 

& eise ia z^sszxsrz gsH 5 £S 3 s 5 t brar Sssaw sSSHS^ 

eiator Harrison A. Williams Federal Government could help. h e S added. "We’ve been soend- citv’s present fiscal crisis. he Srf°r^thi S ^?'thiit nounce that foe thb next six 
democrat of New Jersey, a Federal Go verwne nt more mon^J ttS ^ SStoS contract wUl ^e^c- A wbuld 

vein 1 ^ can? Iinder- can t ^ in without Congres- bad revenue, arid unfortunately be ratified, but reluctantly. ^ ^cu]^ th e SScipal- mSdpalMte^in^souS^finft? 
^ taJ^e caS^U Cafro sional action.” Mr. Rockefeller this situation is catching up he said Baflots wfll be muted £» d raarireti ^ he recalled SgrSSgS' 

Jli id let New Yorkdoivn” ° said “I doubt very much whe- on m throughout the nation’ within the next we nd d ays that Bu ^ 0 had been- unable 

ffc — bS£K Sent ther’ Confess Agoing to act 8^2^“ to market - S35-mmioh in jewer gj-* t^SSwSTlSt 

^United Teachers Federa- for one cite witoout consider- ^AfLrt^in toe vote, several . Cite-generated mumcipaFbond 

■f New York State, warned mg the problem of others. SSehcl^Si SLtriL, L SJ union members said yesterday. DDr/’f fC fAJ I fjl fTTV market fall-off. 

.iche New York crisis was "Frankly, you’ve got to ba- would be the $1,220 in retroac- ID CALLED AE. I Welfare Iirred 

\s*t to toe American labor lance your own budget before ., expendimres Wlthm gje pay for thefirat year of W DRUUNG E0R OIL W e ^ . Ur g” 

"fient and w-as already hav- vou can set a great deal 0 f revenues. firerrt en will n i ' ri r As a ^nedium-tena xecoifa- 


lent and was already hav- you can get a great deal of . . .. . - the aSeement that firerften wiD „ 

destructive impact on col- sympathy or help from other *9. “VLSjty' receive upon ratification. Like i... - _. . . mendation. Mr. _ R«jss Urged 

bargaining for teachers levels of government.” • ^ Ro f k f fe ^ er o+faer unionized employes ITHACA (AP) The price of that the Gebferal Accounting 

artoecountiy The former Governor of New ?2l ^ ose v* 0 ™ agreed - ‘2* J" 7 fact ° r “ * 

ijasolutions addressed to York made the comments as voluntary one-year wage freeze how much of the petroleum expedited study of New York 

j.w York problen^and the he stepped off a plane here. F™? ^ raemth, firemen earning under the continental shelf on City ^expenditures and revenues. 


rf.so as to encourage their its expenditures. When he was government can’t spend beyond of ^ and those earn- Kalter of Cornell, four-fifths oral take-over of welfete costs 

Tt .ae by unions .corpora- Governor, he said, he "tried tfeir capabilities and expect ^ ..ndpr- sio.QOO will lose one- n f «ho nerves nmhaMv will from localities, and a 'national 


it. se by unions .corpora- Governor, he said, he "tried tneir capabilities and i 
n , private institutions and to get New York City to do the others to cany them.” 
. s. a lot of tbirtgs they'll have The visit here today 

iWtes also urg ed Crm to do now.” Mr. Rockefellers first t 

rw^. . 150 . '-OU- . .. A TTo. Pnrl orA, «'««« Urn. 


*•-,5® ‘^ned meir rapaomn^ ana expect ^g ^der $ 10,000 will lose one- of ^ reserves probably will localities, and a national 

City to do the others to carry them.” h f M f . , , L system of health Insurance. 

theryll have The visit here today was firemen said they 'Their implementation would 

Mr. Rockefell eris first to the bought no contract should be toe less will be devel- j, e ^ gre^ financial help to 

cjftolr’ Fiv. Dorhpcfpr area ernt'a MnonwiKm- u ^ . .h _ ia.. nrwl 1 w«fiiieA invpahnonf meto n i. -j * 


"?*) broaden toe market for , Asked if he would , seek Fe- Rochester area since November. acc ^Sted until the city agreed oped because investment costs New York City,” he said. 
^ pal bonds by permitting deral for the city if be 1972, when he held a town t0 rehire all or most of the wil preclude drilliiig on as Finally, Mr. Reuss urged 


^ pal bonds by permitting deral for the city it neiiu/A wnen ne hew a town t0 rehire all or most of the wil preclude drilling on as Finally, Mr. Reuss urged that 
• ..rnd local governments to J r ?, re still Governor, Mr. Rocke- meeting at a suburban motel qqq firemen laid off in the large a scale as might be mi- Connecticut and New Jersey, be 
Saxable securities with the fe er said: : ^ s a ver Y comph- while he was Governor. recent budget cutbacks. . , dertaken otherwise. brought into a mor$ direct and 

-<I Government absorbing - ~ r — Commissioner O’Hagan said gome estimate are that the less competitive relationship 

*cent of the interest costs. WADVi AND A/'VKffiQ formation on comoanies linked last ***** ^ expected recoverable oil amounts to 5 with New York. ‘The two 

Relegates adopted a broad “Ani LAlVll AGtlVCIta about 400 firemen to retire to 20 bUlmn barrds— Jess than neighboring state particularly 

‘ on proposing Congres- CTJDDnVNA FT\ fiilin AT A « , after ratificaticm of the con- one to fiv? years’ supply for should become part of the soJu- 

»enactment of "an emer- •jUBtUEnAEU UnUAl A Rodgers, two of the Governors tract • Together with 200 cur- the nation. tion to New York's problem, 

a counter-cyclical aid bill” closest social and political as- rently -unfilled vacancies in the Dr.. Kalter heads up a team "The situation is too grave for 

“nulate purchasing power sp*cuiu>Ti*K«wT<*kTfai« sodates. department, he . said, he hoped of Federal Sea Grant econo- the Jaw of toe jungle to pre- 

employment, the assump- BALTIMORE, Sept 5 — Fed- men were notified rehire most of those laid off. mists. van,” he. added. 

Y r £* ^eral Gov-enmeot eral prosecutors here served nearly lg months vrfft— ‘ . — 

taggerin^^tect °of°hfto a ^ enc *® s demanding Now, Without Even Gettii/g Your Hands Dirty ... , ; 

~ ?. - sr± SjfHSSS trrznsass ■ m m. mmm 


iments " iuiacu lu uvi. muiiuu -- — ; — ■ J — — 

“another f »,„|c!osest associates. fied, but subpoenas of his per- 

■’ tes said toat mim'iciML ^ subpoenas were sen-ed sonal financial records over toe 

***TiwS zed that r ta n 5S2l° n Ehe State 8031x1 of PubBc two months have ,eft little 
iiious finwdaJ d/ffiSte :Works ’ ** Contr °i'^ f oubV t t 5 a f t h th . e Governor is a 
aces must be made, but! 016 Department of Licensing targe t of the inquiry. 
jjeclared that such sacri- Reg^ation. Economic mid . 

K<aust be shared by all. not Community Development, the 19 Die in Thailand Mishap 
*.y those whom 'the city Attornmr General’s office, the BANGKOK, Thailand, Sept, 
aliment and the banking AgncuRure Department toe 5 _ Nineteen people 

Sits decide uoon Departmeht of Education and v "TT ZTT 

§ Fh S7 £hev Mid. the office of the State Admin- were toHed and ^bout 20 m- 
vx d be balanced by the istrator of Election Laws. i«»d when a truck loaded with 


ration that there is a vital l The prosecutore. who have logs plowed into a crowd at opRAY 'N qFAl liniiiH rental fnr miirlr ~ 

union principle at stake been investigating political cor- an open air movie, about 80 or rim lx oCML liquiQ luclal T0r qlllCK __ 

^-the sanctity of tiie union ruption in Maryland for more miles northwest of here, police 35 3 flash rBD&irS. _ 


Now, Without Even Gettii/g Your Hands Dirty ... 

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Westport, Coral. 06880 


Hew reduce 
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podutlon 



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WINE SALE 


There's jng question about it — asJung for a bottle of 1970 
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of the finest reds France has to offer. SUE FUSE 

BOTTLE CASE 

1972 Bonnes Mares (Alexis Lichinq) SSJ9 $69.90. 

- 1972 Chassagne Montractiet Les Boudrioltes £49 39J0 

1972 Ctos Vougwt 459 57.80 

1 972 Volnay CIos desCHwiesfUmbat) ' 4.49 51.00 

;1972SaolBriay(ColiD) - , 2.99 33.00 

1972 Beamie 1st Cru. (Loabet) 3.N 45 JO 

1972 Aknce Cortoa (Bfzsl 3J9 45J0 

1972 Nute St. Geoftes fJollBtl) 4.49 51.00 

•1972 Bourgogne (Todat-Beaut) - 2.99 33.00 

1972 Ctambertm Ctesde Bez&(6. Ctair> 7.99 88 JO 

1972 PlnotNOir(B. Clair) 2.99 33J0 

1S72 Moslgay (B. Clair) .12J9 140.00 

1972 liusigny (Rounder) '. 12.99 140.00 

1972 Cbambolfe Musigny fflourate') 4.99 58 JO 

1971 Nulls SL George Les BoudotS (Qivot) 6.99 81 JO 

1971 Monthelfe (Arapeau) 4.99 56J0 

1971 Votnay CkK des Cfienes (Snywi) 5.99 69 JO 

1971 Savigny Vergslesses (Dubrsuli) 4.99 56 JO 

1971 Aloxe corton (Tollot-Beaut) 5.99 69J0- 

1971 Musigny (Prieur) 15.00 162JD 

1971 Charebolle Musigny (Bertrand) 4.99 56J6 i 

1971 Santeday fMonnot) 4.99 56 

1971 Pommam (Sufflemard) 6.99 81 JO 

1971 Hospices de Beaune Ovitowonniaker) 8 J9 99 JO - 

. 1971 Beaune Cent Vignc (Besancenot) . * 4.99 . 56.50 

.1971 Beaume CIos des Monrhes /Su Illemard) 5.99 6 9 JO 

1971- Beaune CIos du Roi (Tallrt-Beaut) 6.99 81 JO 

1971 Chorey Cote de Beaune (Tollot-Beaut) 3.99 44J0 

1971 CIos Voug«rt (J. Prleur) 12.99 140.00 

1971 Nuils St. George Les Perdrix (Mugneret) 5.99 69 JO ; 

1971 Eehezeaux (Mugneret) 6.59 75 JO ; 

1971 ChapeQe Chambers (B.CIarr) 7J9 88.00 

1971 Chambertln CIos deBeze(B. Clair) 12.99 140.00 i 

1971 Gevrey Chamberlin CIos duForrtenay (B. Clair) 5.99 6750 : 

1971 Gevrey Chamberlin Les Cazetiers (B. dar) 5.99 67.50 

1871 ChambBrtin(J. Prleur) 12.83 

1971 Corton CIos tta Hoi (Senard) 5.93 67.50 ' 

1970 Vosne Romanee (Grivot) 4JB 55.50 

1970 Hospices de Nutts (Vergy) 5.99 ' 67 JO 

1970 Chambolle Musigny Charmes (Clerg el) .5.99 67 JO 

1970 Pommanl Epenot(Parent) 5.99 67.58 

1970 Voshe Romanee (Grivofl 4.99 57.00 

1970 Eehezeaux (Mugneret) 4.99 57.00 

1970 ChapeUBS Chambertln (Damoy) s.gg 5700 

1970 Latnderes Chambertln (T rapet) 5.99 5 7.08 

1 970 Mazys Chambertrn (Torochel) 5.99 57.00 

1970 Gevrey Chambertin (Perrieres) 4.49 51.00- 

1970 Chambertfn (Rem^ n og og fin 

1970Volnay(GIairtenay) 4.33 57'jn 

1970 Santenay (Mon not) 3.99 45.00 

1970 Savigny Lavieres (Brialles) - 4.49 51 JO 

WHITE BURGUNDY ON SALE Fm 

1970ChassagneMoritrachetMorgeot BOTTLE CASE 

(RamoneV-Prudhon) . $5.99 S69J0 

1971 Montrachet (Prleur) 21.00 22000 

1971 Chassagne Montrachet LesMaltroye. (Moreau) 6J9 81.00 

1972 Puligny Montrachet Perrieres (Chavy) 6.79 76 J9 

1972 Meursault Charmes (Guyonntere) 5.99 66.ffil 

1972 Corton Charlemagne (Tnevenotl 8.99 90.00 

1972 Puligny Montrachet (Mudtovac) 5J9 67 JO 

1972 Meursault CIos de Mazeray (Prieur) 6.79 73 Jfl 

1972 Corton Charlemagne (Thevenot) 8.99 99.0ft 

1973 Chassagne Montrachet LesflucJiottes - 

(Andre Ramonet) _ . 7.99 88.08 


dmutnuii uob ueBwe{B. warrj 
irrey Chambertln CIos doForrtenay (B. Clair) 
rrejr Chambertin Les Cazetiers (B. Clair) 
arabBriin(J. Prieur) 


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5.69 69 JO 


12.99 140.00 
5.99 67 JO 

5.99 67.5B 

12.99 140.90 


B0TT1E CISE 
$5.99 $69 JO 
21.00 226JS 
6J9 81.00 
6.79 76J9 

5.99 66.60 

8.99 90.00 
5-99 &7J0 
6.79 73 JO 
8.99 99.0ft 


7.99 88.00 


1973 Meursault Charmes Hospices 
' deBeaune(Schoonmaker) 


7J9 88.08 


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*ri 


THE HEW YORK TIMES , SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 197S _ 


NOW THROUGH NOVEMBERS 


SAT. 

SEPT. 6 2.-00 

LA TRAVWTA Armstrong! Scano, Fretiricfe; Martrili 

SAT. 

SEPT. 6 3^0 

CARHSI Stapp, Robinson; Collios (debut), DarrenJsaaip; 

Pillo 

SUN. 

SEPT. 7 1:00 

LA BOHEME Niska, Bergquist; Pane, Cossa, Hale, 

Jsnersnt; MarteJIi 


SEPT. 7 7.-0Q 

THE OAUSHTOt OF THE REBlMDfT Sold Out 


SEPT. 9 8:00 

THE DAUGHTER OF THE REGIMENT Sold Out 


SEPT. 10 8:00 

TURANOOT Ballard, Maltitano; Mauro, Bill. Jamersftl; Hudel 

IHURS.SEPT.il 8:00 

LES C0KTES ifHOFFMAKtt Haley, Shade, Crag, Harris; 

Scano, Ramey, Siuu ; Rudel . 

FBI 

SEPT. 12 S.-00 

THE DAUGHTER OF THE SEGMENT Sold Out 

SAT. 

SEPT. 13 ZM 

SALOME Nisfca. Bible; Na*y, Justus, Taylor; Ruda! 

SAT. 

SEPT. 13 &00 

CABMEN Stapp, Robinswi: Collins. DaTenkanp; P^lo 

SUK. 

SOT. 14 1^0 

ARIADNE AUF HAX0S Meier, Rolandi (debut), Stapp; 

Alexander, Holloway; Rudel 

SUH. 

SEPT. 14 7:00 

LA SOHEME MaHitano, Ber^oist; Pane, Cossa, Hale, 
Jatneisan; Martetli 

TUES. 

SEPT. 16 BKKJ 

MMAMA-BIJTTERaY Craig, Walker; Poll, Jamersmt; Martdli 

WED. 

SEPT. 17 8:00 

THE DAUGHTER OF THE REGIMENT Sold Out 

THURS. SEPT. 18 S.flO 

DIE FLEBERMAUS Meier, Randazzo; Griffitti, Titos, Cossa, 
Ualas. Baker (debut). Billings; Pallo 

PHI. 

SOT. 19 BiJO 

SALOME Niska, SUpp; frotoot, Pierson, Taylor; Rudel 


Bn Oltice opra lOam-Spra. Tickets also ai Bloomingdale's, Manhattan and HickeosK*. and 
ACS. alt stares. Casts and programs sub|Kt to change. Mason & Hamlin Is the miical piano. 
Charge tickets hj phase with major credit carts. Can CHMRT; (21 Z) 219-7177. 

HEW YORK STATE THEATER, LINCOLN CENTER / TR 7-4727 


p -- TODAY *16:30 & 9:3Q" 
TnrWit3&7 



mOMUUDI THE* TUI 
B'wsjr at 76th SL 

Phone: Rt3S. Calf: 799- 7690 

Group Salas (212)757-9218 
.M.C./RA. Cradh Cara Sales 23^7 177 . 


|TONIBHT7i3OW0:15nSU1»3&7:3D ] 



LAST WEEKS! 
■TODAY 2 & 8 • SUN. 3n 

"FUNNY!" 

“Mmn, —Watt. -GotUriod, 
Tima ' tJa'rfy News Post 

aeoa wc 

"YANKS 3 DETROIT 0 
TOP OF THE SEVENTH" 

Tims, ihrv Thus, at & 57.5ft fri. 4 Sd. si Bj 
(ttSOiMais. Wed.4SsL aiaiSun. at 3: S6 50 ' 
CHARS1T: Maiar CredH Card Resj 239-7177 
Tickets also A Thfatrac^tl -7290 

THE AMERICAN PLACE THEATRE 
HlW-46ftSLteMiB» c.) 

mm «es>- tm w-om wmm 


A SEXUAL MUSICAL 

■ PHONE RESCRVATKMS ■ 

f 473-7270 /473-3570 1 

■ village gateM 

rilEfQfEt 4 TflOMfWN STS. I 


Dance: Spoof s at New York Festival 


Half of the Program Is 
Serious, Half Isn’t 


i 


I TODAY 2 & 8; SUX, 3 PJil Li 

1 ST MUSICAL] 

■HE GRAMMY & TONY WINNER! 

RAI/IPV 

■ Groups: 354-1DE -Ticketron 541-72SB| 
AM Major Credit CwdfcTeL Its. 596-RE 


By ANNA KISSELGOFF 

The New York Dance Fes- 
tival took the strange tack of 
spoofing dance, the art form 
to which it is devoted, during 
a large segment of its new 
program Thursday night in 
Central Park’s Delacorte 
Theater. 

It was the other half of the 
program, in which dancers 
merely danced, that saved 
the show. There was, for 
Instance; the crisp and crys- 
talline dancing of the City 
Center Joffrey Ballet's Rebec- 
ca Wright and Kevin McKen- 
zie in the romantic pas de 
deux from Ben Stevenson’s 
“Cinderella. ■’ 

• 

A creative approach to fus- 
ing the stylization of Chinese 
classical dance with contem- 
porary idioms was demon- 
strated by Chiang Ching and 
her partner, Iu Chib-ming, in 
‘•Journey” and “YuangKang 
In ‘Three Folksongs,” both 
dancers, acted out three 
charming courtship duets, 
each beautifully rendered and 
different from the others. 

Joyce Trisler*s “Four Tem- 
peraments,” danced by the 
Denscompany, offered an oc- 
casionally unmusical view of 
the Hindemith ballet score in 
an eclectic modem-dance 
idiom. At the same time, the 
idea of threading a love 
theme through the work 
avoided the literal identifica- 
tion of each section with a. 

“temperament” 


The Program 

THE NEW YORK DAHC£ FgglWAL 
Prana III. At the Tneaftr, , 

MATTED P ETHNOAMERICA« 

THEATER. -Harm Sawwilia." c tm- 
wraota. La Atari, iwad * 
music, TchafcwtaY. With Soamu San- 
HnBr Mattee, Homer Garza and com- 
MV. 

CHARLES MOOR E, ,“5 10*5 _ftnaat 
Duka,” <t»wraphv. tndhlanil. 
Mint* Tilt*; musk, imUtiupa'; 
drummer, Ralph Dorsey. 

BOB BOVVER and JOANN BRUGGE- 
MANN, ■•roswetto." dKBWtfrsohy, Sab 
Barter; music, Maui.' , 

THE 0AN5C0MPAHY, "four Twwra- 
mente." cfwecjrattrr. Joyce TrWer; 
music, Paul Hmdemift. with Otf tfa 
Ralla. Cindy Bernier, JittSlffl Bu9- 
llii, MJIIan Mm, Mwwr Low. Lorn* 
Mormon, Laurie Kaplan and Mteuat 
Antonio. 

CHIANG CHING wffli Lli CNIH-MING, 
■■Jcurttsr. 1 ' 'Vana Kuan" and "Three 
Falk Senes." dwmraato. Chiano- 
Oilno; DMOJc, Chau BVen-dxmo. 

BOB BOM/YER and JO-ANN BRUGGE- 

MANN, "Rods 'A Rail, 2 cdorewraphy. 
Bob Bawver; mosJc. Bion Join. 

REBECCA WRIGHT and KEVIN Mc- 
KENZlE, "Pas da Dm* from Cn- 
dmHiV etwwgraBfiy, Ban Stevon- 
*on.- music, Pn»onav. 

LES BALLETS TROCKADERO DE MONTS 
CARLO, "la In des Craw, A a li<" 
dmraoorootiy, Tamara Karaoua otter 
Lev Ivanov; music. TchaOmsfcy, Willi 
Jack. d’AnlHa, Mods lea no vitd i Ler- 
montov, Roland Deaulln, Tamara Kar- 
oava, Za marina Zamartcaw, Oita 
TcfiUabotmokaya end axunany. 


A special moment in the 
program was provided during 
the performance by Charles 
Moore of a “Sacred For- 
est Dance” from Liberia and 
Guinea, Ralph Dorsey was 
the musician. Ah the mystery 
and magic of the medicine 
man’s power was embodied 
in the simple but emphatic 
gestures that Mr. Moore pre- 
sented as he paraded about 
encased in a cylinder of 
straw streamers. 

• 

The spoofing came in three 
parts. These was the vande- 
vfflelike team of Bob Bowyer 
and Jo- Ann Bruggeman. 
Their first lumber, Mfinut- 


Two From the Joffrey 
Shine in Pas de Deux 


to.’* took off after Baroque 
dance and social attitudes, 
while another duet, "Rock 
‘n’ Roll” had then grooving 
in today's attire in apparent 
' self- absorption. There ^ was 
an odd mixture of sophistica- 
tion and obviousness here. 

The Etbno- American Dance 
Theater, directed by Matteo, 
has some fine programs in its 
repertory. On this occasion, 
it chose to present La Men’s 
well-known tr eat ment of 
“Swan Lake.” transposed to 
the dance styles and mime 
gestures of classical dance 
from India. 

• 

The result is that the rich- 
ness neither: of 19th-century 
Russian classical YmHefr nor 
of the centuries-old Indian 
classical dance is conveyed 
by substituting TmSan ges- 
tures for the conventional 
mime language of 19th-cei- 
tury ballet The real rea- 
son the experiment falters 
is that it does not respect 
the distinctness of mime 
from dance, of “Swan lake” 
or Indian dance and turns 
into a demonstration of sign 


SUMMER DINNER SPECIAL 

Ink. rat A cmhH STEM BOUH: 
M Start s In*. 221«. 48 SL <1 A QC 
Call 2SS-B499 far <iUIIs.*I4* 4 ' 


Lmt-Fntaue Tina. 289 v. « st smsss 



THEATER DIRECTORY 



SSST VUBICAL 7975 
A H.Y. Drama Critics Orel. Award 
CHORUS UXB 
Mail Oman Now: Mn.-Sai. Evas, at 8 and 
Bat Mats, at 2: Orth. $15; Muz. 815. 13. 11; 
Bale $1. DIM. Mat. at "L On*. S1Z; Mezz. 
512, ID, S; Bale 54. Endow KH-*dd- stamped 
anvBiaw with order. Specify wveral all. date. 
'SHU BERT Ttna^ 22S W. 44ttl St. 2444990- 
Hcftate also at T kA e tim i: (212) 541-7290. 
TELE-CHARGE: 2445993/Tltlnte by 
Master Charae/Bank Aimr^Am. 

Par Cfrrms&rfer Call Abba' tGrouM 


Ez. /Diners 
j.-STr-JTs* 


■DAZ2UNGLY FUNKY! A BRILUANT COM- 
eor.'* — Sumo, .V.r. Time* 

•A BRILLIANT COMEDY OF DOMESTIC 
MISADVENTURE!" —GUI. Jfcir nrttr 


CAROL 

LYXLE? 

PATTI, 

SHTRB 


SHEILA 
MAC RAE 


SCOTT 

3IcK.1T 

CVBT 

DAWSON 


Marilyn 
CLARK 
Longest Running Comedo on R’vasr 
.BSURD PERSON SINGULAR 
8Y_PHQNE 

6.50. 

SO. Sal- * PAL Sharp: 811 JD. 10 JO, 9.50, 
50, SJO. Wed. Mats. 2 PJ*.: 57. B. 7, 5. 
Sal. Mats- 2 PAL: stfl, 9, 14. 4. 

— l-7!9o 

•I7B - . 
14*4434 


Bsaa 

L Sal-, t PAL Sharp: SH JO. ID JO, 
b 5J0. Wed. Mats. 2 PAL: 57. B, 

5*1. Mats. 2 PAL: stfl, 9, U 4. 
Mxtaoteoat TJCTCfiTEO.Y: <3i2i 5; 1-729 
FOR GROUP SALES CALL: 34H178 ’ 
US1C BOX. 45 St. W. of B’way 746-46: 


wirwa Torfso of e & &-A11 seat* i'Si 
Saats How at Box Otflco 8 By Mail 
i EUGENE O'-VETLE'S 
WILDERNESS ! 

A OPENS THURS. EVG. SEPT. IB 
at. -Sat. 8 PAl. Mats. Wed- 1 Sat. 2; Sun. 3 
ide In tho So. 50 St. W. of B'way 581-0720 
inmrun XJ|,rrq. fluirra Cluh. TW».‘n w. 


VaANDIPE 

"BEST MUSICAL OF THE YEAR." 

SJT. Drama Cntlra-S TOAT AlMfiD* 
‘-IF YOU NAVE ONLY TIME FOR ONE 
BROADWAY SHOW. THIS MU5T BE IT. 11 

—Salna Dmtir, L.A. T liurr 
"GOES UP LIKE A ROCKET AND NEVER] 
COMES DOWlif-fKw Bnrtre, -v.r Tta« 
Man.-5*t. Ew. Jtejerwd Seafj: SIS; Rfr> 
served Section 510; Neadien, 57-50. 5. Wed. 
Mats. Reserved Soah SlOs Rwenwd SepUea 

Slh B sS2?°tee?wd 'section 59; Bleacben 

sfec! " 'i o' gmu p ' 5* lb; m^«i; 

Hfisasr T« VBZ&fSM 

THckrfnalnat TICEETSOS; 1212 » SW-7J90 


■■ -CHICAGO' MUST BE SEEN BY ANYONE 
INTERESTED |K THE AMERICAN MUSICAL. 
BOB FOSSE'S STAGING 15 GOING TO BE- 
COME PART OF THE BROADWAY LEGEND." 

— crier Barer*, .v.r. rimre 
GWEX \XRDO.\ CHITA RIVEK.V 
and 

JERRY ORBACH 

C ln 
HIC AGO 

A Utulcal Vaudeville , . 

Sirected and Ouurecnjitied or 
BOB FOSSE 
Prices: Mon.-FrL Ens.il 8: Ortfi. $14; Mezz. 
81 UO; Bale. 811. IB. 9. 8. Sat. Em.- w 
On*. 81 7 JO: Men. JJJ; Bale. STi H 
10, 9. DM. Man. at 2: Ora. S12JD: Men. 
810; Bile. Jf. i, 7. sat. Mats, a je Oreti. 
114; Mezz. «2; Bale. 110, 9, I. Phase on- 
dw a stinped, self-add. envf. wHt» order 
4Mti stmt Thee^ 236 W. 46 St. NYC 244^71 
CSASOIT: tUri. Crrd. Can)* r*l21 2*9 -~m 


the corned? 


TnE ADULTER' ?8 M ^E A .'»A^f 

way, &^f -"ssr 

BtTRSTY.V G RODIN 

S AMF. TIME 

NEXT TEAR 
Mfla-Thurv Eves, at S and Sat. Mats, at 
2; OfCh. 89 JD; Muzz. St; Bile. 88, 7. 

S. Wed. Mats, at 2: Orth. $9; Mezz. S8J0.J 
Bale. 57 JQ, 7, 4. 5. Frt. S Sit. Em. af 8: 
Orth. Slip Metz. S10; Bale. 89, B. 7, 4. 
BROOKS ATKINSON, 256 W- 47 SI. 2454430 


1973 TONY AWARDS 

Beil Actor M a Mwttit-JOtf.V CULLtTU 
BBST MUSICAL BOOK 

S HENANDOAH 

The Her Moitod 
starring JOHN CULLUM 
Mon .-Thun. Em.: Orth. S12JQ; Mezz. 511; 
Rear Mezz. 89. 8. 4J0; 5. Frl., Sat. Em: 
Orth. 815; Mezz. S12JB; Rear Mazz. SIB, 9, 
7 JO, 4. Wed. Mats. Orch. SIB; Man. 19; 
Rear Mezz. 57 JO, 4JD, 5. Sat. Mats. Onh. 
SIT JO; Mezz. S10: Rear Mezz. 88J0. 7.50, A 
Amerin is Inure Accented _ 

P,ir Qroun Sales O ulu c ell tttli 796-377; 
Ttrkct* alto at TtCKPTSOS: t!IS I 5JJ-7290 
Ahrln Thei., 250 W. 52nd. N.Y. 10019 7S7-8644 
CHARCIT: May crrd. Cards r£J«J CJS-TIT; 


Stage : * Tragedy-Queen’ 


'MIRACULOUS FUN 1 " Sarnrr. y.Y. Timet 
ROBERT STEPHENS as 

S HERLOCK HOLMES 

and CLJVE REVTLL 
as Pro/cnar JTorlflrly 

Prices: Toes. -Sal. Em at I: Orth. MS; 
Front Mezz. SIS; Rear Mezz. 812, 10. 8. 7. 
Wad. Mat. at 7: Orch. MO; Freni Mezz. SIB; 
Rear Mezz. SB. 7. 4, 5. Sat Mats, at 2 * 
Sun. ai 3: Orch. 812; Front Mazz. 812; 
Rear Mazz. 810, 8, A 5. 

Tickets at TkJtetnn. |212> 541-7250 
FOR GROUP SALES ONLY CALL- 5754054 
All Major Credit Cord* Phone Bet. Acc. 
BROAD HU 1ST Una. 235 W 44 (2121 247-0472 


"A FASCINATING MUSICAL”— Watt*. Pott 

T he magic show 

■■A Brealtrtaktng Musical." <7BS-rv 
Tues.-Thurs. Ev*j- at 7:30 PAL: Orch. 81 1; 
Mezz. $11. 9; Bale. 87, 4. Frl. 6 Sat. Em 
at 7:30 PAL; Orch. 813; Mezz. 813, 11; Bale. 
19. 8. Wad. Mat. at 2: Orch. 89; Mezz. 0. 
A Bale 84, 5. Sat. B Sun. Mats, at 2 PJL 
Orch. 810; Mezz. SlO. 9; Bale 87. A 
Ar Sroos Bales Oithf Dill. 1 (ttS) 757-9SW 
CORT THEATRE. 10 W. 48 St. 4(96392 
TTdnfs also at Tlekelrnn: 1212} 541-3290 
Beg. Sept. !/.- : Ptrf». Bren I Bun. at : AS 


ASOJSAT “NG^ WUSJ PB« 

) ANCE WITK ME 

The Staten umkai 
rv-Thnrs. Em at 8. 56, 8JO. 9JB. Frt- 
Slf. EvV. At : Sd. 9, II W«ff. A Sat. 

WFAIR^ThU.'. ris*w!‘ 44 St. 391 -COM 

HE AUDIENCE CHEERED AND CHEERED. 
KTHO NY PERKIN5 HAS RARELY BEEN 
ETTER.** —Borer*. XJT. Times 7/SW5 
■ ANTHONY PERKINS IN 
iQUDS 

iL-Frl. Em t Sar. Mate. SIB. 9, 7.50, 
Sat Em 812, 10, 7, A Wad. Mate. 
59, 7J0, 6J0. 5- Evas. a» 8. Mate, at A 


JOB 

i£GROPr~a 

■A MUSICAL KNOCKOUT!"— Proluf. XBC 

e 

Irease 

BVoPt Longest Tanning Sic 

af a PJiL Orch. 812.90; Front 
EZ. SUJQ; 9.90; Rear Mezz. 57 JO, 6. 
. Em at 1 P-M-: Onh. 813.90; Front 
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TOTdaW of 7;SO <8 10:0/ Sen. at * d ?:» 

L et bey people come 

A SEXUAL MUSICAL 
Music t L»rto by EARL WILSON Jr; 
—TE, BLEECKER AjHlP* 

Ras. ilMOVAm 

Uzd*r, Mastar ' 


^ sc 


“VERY, VER^N^TT 0IW*T STOP 
LAUGHING FROM 

R ubbers * tasks 3 

2 1 THE^R®PlACS7HEgre 
, 111 W. 44 St^Phona Rffi M7-0393 

Tttrts «.'» “t Trcyfron.- Ifl.i 
CHARGIT: Mai, end. Ciarcte <3131 _J-Ti77 


"WU-DL 1 


blyTgl^RIOUsly funny. 


Tongue-in-Chcek Play 
by Williams Given 


By MEL GUSSOW 

Arthur Williams dedicates 
his new play, “The Tragedy 
Queen* (at Theater for the 
New City), to Charlotte 
Cushman, a miri-19th century 
American actress known for 
playmg male as well as fe- 
male roles. She played Ham- 
let and also Romeo — to her 
sister's Juliet The subject of 
Mr. William’s backstage es- 
capade, as one character 
describes it, is '‘cross-dress- 
ing;” sexual mistaken inden- 
ts ty is the key to the intri- 
cate plot 

• 

The . playwrigh keeps his 
play in period and Ms tongue 
in cheek. Except for an in- 
cipient homosexual relation- 
ship (gengeriy handled), the 
play could have been written 
in 1850, instead of merely 
taking place in 1850. Clear- 
ly, Mr. Williams is a student 
of historical American thea- 
ter — as well as a good mimic. 
This is not a parody so much 
as an affectionate tribute to 
an extinct theater, where ac- 
tors ached for vehicles Mid 
gave endless farewell tours. 

The star of this particular 
troupe of actors (at present 
on tour in Troy, N.Y.) is gv- 
ing up the business and head- 
ing for the Gold Rush. But 
first we see a cutthroat com- 
petitive actor in pursuit of 
the evening’s profits; a 
plighted troth between an in- 
genue and a detachable-col- 
lar tycoon, end a bent-back 


The Cast 

TOE TRAGEBY-Qgtaa, ■ pity with 
sonus by Artte will terns. Directed tv 
Junes Yterins; route br DavW Dor; 
setting and Da Mina by Donald L 
Brooks; prodocttai stag* manmr. Broca 
Hankins. P res en ted by Tbgater ter tta* 
Hnr Otr. Bartenteff/FlefcL Af 713 Jan** 
Street (between Was hi ngton and West 
Streets.) 

Magnus Pontefract Timothy McCustar 

Lateyette R/ddlr Jim Strain* 

Augusts Fancourt Jove* Springer 

Clara Pontefract — Marcia K. Marttsoa 

Horatio Canned* Andrew Roman 

Susan Rate fwtt Jean Antblmta 

Jennie Gfttrie Nancy SondM 

Areas Falkirk David LitHa 

Celia Taylor Jell* Kumitz 

John Tjylor Jaree* Sieanraod 



Music 


NEW YORK OTY OPERA. Hew York 
Stele Theater. UiKjHtt Center, Verdi's 
“La Tr■vl*tl.'• 2; S taffs ' Ctrtnerc- t. 
LATIN AMERICAN FESTIVAL, Awry 
Hill 9 

CUBA SIEMFRE CUBA. Carnes I « Htll f 

*" RONALD SCAGUONE, classical «M- 
tarlsts Caineate Red tel Hall. 8:30. „ 
saU&ER MUSIC FESTIVAL, Well- 
man Rink, Central Park, Rhdlte Havana 

il W0 < RKJ f BY 1 ' MARGA RICHTER, Som- 
nwrotrden. Musevtn at Medarn Ait, > 
West sate Street. «- 
HICKORY WIND, Muratau srau*. 
South Street Season. Fulton Street and 

East River. 8. 

LIGHT OPERA OF MANHATTAN. East 
Side Playhouse, 334 East 7«h Street. 
Gilbert and Sullivan's "The Mikadv," 4 

^"hArStB of AM STREET and TOM 
GiZZE. rede ores rare, Central Park Band- 
Shell. 2. 

Dance 

NEW YORK DANCE FESTIVAL, Central 
Park and West 81st Street. Program V: 
Bus Miner and Ethel Martin, Lama 
Foreman Dance Theater. Sounds In Mo- 
tion. Paul Russell and. Lydia Abarca, 
Marla Benitez and Second Century 
Oance Theater 8 (ticket* distributed at 
theater by 4:151. _ , ... 

DANCERS. City Center Downstairs. 131 
West Sjttr Street, Program I, 1:30; Pro- 
grant Urn a. 

TERRA FIRttA STUDIO THEATER, 24 
Eut IBHt Street, “GMoo Way. 1 ' 8. 

VIC STORNANT, Ow ra o e re irf d Thee 
49 West I4th Street. 8:30 



Beg. Perfc- Sqrt 184lmL 23: $U5 

WlzACtah.1M8SteKZim.dl 

□ CnOEINTHESQUAHE 

ajttsr.ff.Bfmvai-waj 


TOIBTC7S1fl.aJIL3«7^ 


— LfonorC Probot. CB2 j 
HE HOT L BALTIMORE 


i-4ates: JS4-1B32 PWw 

G^islrr 

Kaffir 5fl-729braml«rtrt5 rtus Rush 



m 

r TOIW18I ^tVAH/re 4-3838 


old crone with foggy memo- 
ries of her days with Sarah 
Siddons. 

Some of the characters are 
$. imply functional, filling a 
hole in the plot, such as a 
young stagehand who walks 
on, frequartly, carrying an 
unidentified metal joint, and 
the vaguely autocratic direc- 
tor of the troupe. The htanor 
could be sharpened. But 
there is a certain charm and 
amiability to the script. 
Though newly written it 
seems as if it tumbled out of 
an ancient, yellowing an- 
thology. 

A juicy romantic escapade 
such as this would benefit 
from, uniformly stylized act- 
ing (remember what the 
Royal Shakespeare company 
did with “London Assur- 
ance”?). Unfortunately, some 
of the “Tragedy-Queen” ac- 
tors, directed by James War- 
ing, are not equal to the 
material. 

• 

But Julie Kumitz (the 
strongest voice in the com- 
pany) lends class to the pro- 
duction, James Shearwood 
(as the duplicitous hero) gives 
it conviction, and David Little 
and Jean Andalman are a 
nice, oddly matched couple 
of suddenly smitten lovers. 
David Tice has composed a 
sprinkle of bright pastiche 
songs (there could he more), 
which he deftly plays on the 
piano. 


I LEROY HUTSON SINGS 
AGA INST MUSI CIANS 

Leroy Hutson, is a singer now 
going solo who was formerly a 
member of the soul quartet 
called the Impressions. But Mr. 
Hutson's solitary flight does| 
not exactly mean that be is 
alone; he managed to squeeze 
13 assorted musicians onto the 
small stage at the Other End 
on Thursday. 

It was not a complete suc- 
cess. Mr. Hutson emerged as 
one thin voice crying out in a 
wilderness of over production, 
and his efforts to get his simple 
song messages across were 
drowned in the back-up music. 
Possibly the Bfeecher Street) 
dub is too small for all tho 
machinery Mr. Hutson carries, 
bat certainly an effective and 
harmonious balance between 
voice and instruments was only 
occasionally achieved; 

A pity, because Mr. Hutson is 
a good singer in the soul style, 
able to leap into falsetto and dp 
some quiet rhyttenic urging. 
"Let Your Mind Go Free" and 
“The Ghetto” are the kind of 
songs he Sings, black relevance 
attached to a disco beat 
For singing with a dancing 
band, Mr. Hutson’s performance 

was more that adequate, but 

any attempt to present him as 
star of tile show merely had him 
as part, of the onstage scenery. 
Ian do ve 

Sh river Won't Sack Waiface 
TALLAHASSEE, Fla, ’ Sept 
4 (UPI)— Sargent Shriver, who 
is considering entering the 
Florida Presidential primary, 
said Thursday that he would 
not support a ticket that in 


The Ballets Trockadero de 
Monte Carlo, a company of 
men best known for dancing 
on toe - shoes and. in tutus, 
did, however, do most of the 
real Ivanov choreography for 
its own production -of Act 
H of “Swan Lake.” Female 
impersonation, however, is 
an art that requires a point 
of view. Except for Anthony 
Bassae a s the fading baller- 
ina, the other swans and 
their henchmen in the pro- 
duction have not found it. 
Bad dancing is not fanny or 
interesting in itself. 



ISiAClDATMT 

Guild of Musical Artists to 
Vote Monday Morning- 
Details Undisclosed 


Teen-AgersofYore 
UneUptoPay$4Q 
For Night of Sinatra 


Some of the people who once 
paid as little as 40 cents to 
bear Frank Sinatra at the old 
Paramount Theater bade in the 
e&rty nineteen-forties are pay- 
ing as roach as S40 for an 
orchestra seat to hear him at 
the Uris Theater for two 
weeks, beginning Monday. 

A spokesman for tiro concert, 
whose co-stars are Count Basie 
and Ella Fitzgerald, described 
ticket purchasers as "middle- 
aged” and “fortyish,” with only 
a small percentage young. 

Mr. Sinatra’s fans include 
many who as teen-agers lived 
in the Bronx. Brooklyn and 
Manhattan, but who now live 
in the suburbs. 

When Mr. Sinatra, sporting 
a big bow tie and a flappy suit, 
made his first solo appearance 
at the Paramount, admission 
prices were 40 cents before 1 
PAL, 60 cents for the afternoon 
and 85 cents for evening per 
fonnances. 

In fact, there used to be a 
joke about the varying prices 
that went something like this: 

“Did you see Sinatra at the 
Paramount yesterday?" a teen- 
ager would inquire. 

“Yes,” another would reply, 
‘7 had a date with my girl at a 
quarter to one, but she came; 
20 cents late.” 

Jerry Wemtraub, sponsor of] 
the concert, said “just a few 
seats remain to be sold ” even 
[though the ticket price la be- 
lieved to be the highest for its] 
type here. 


ARRESTS SAID TO END 
BAN K HOLDUP GANG 

NASHVILLE, Sept, 5 (DPI)— 
The Dawson Gang; a group of j 
bandits who have roamed the 
Southeast for five years, hold- 
ing up banks and obtaining 
more than S2-miIlion in loot, 
las been broken up, the an-, 
thorities said yesterday. 

The reputed head of the] 
gang, who is reported to have 
quit high school at age 15 to] 
rob bis first bank; allegedly led; 
machine-gun raids planned a 
executed with mflrtaty preci- 


sion. 

He and three co mpanio ns 
were held in jail today on bonds 
of $250,000 each. 

Attempts 1 were under way, 
according to the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation, to tie a dozen 
or so other suspects to more 
than 3D bank, robberies. One 
policeman said the number of 
robberies may goes high as 70. 

The latest holdup netted $59,- 
883 from the Union ~R»«lc of 
McEwen. Tipped off by persons 
who saw four men in an out- 
of-state luxury car speeding 
through the countryside, two 
FJSi agents and a Nashville 
policeman with his K-9 Corps 
dog captured Billy Ray Daw- 
son, '20 years old, Wednesday! 
night and the other suspects in 
a heavily wooded area about' 
30 infles west of here: 

Arrested with Mr, Dawson, 
of Leighton, Ala, were Wendell 
Sellers, 25, of Greenville, S.CL. 
Sam Bnckmaster, 28, and Frank! 
Welbora, 33, both of Atlanta. 
All four face a preliminary! 
hearing in United States Dis- 
trict court Tuesday. 


By JOHN ROCKWELL 

The Metropolitan Opera and 
the American Guild of Musical 
Artists, which struck the 
company Tuesday, announced 
agreement on a tentative con- 
tract yesterday. 

The agreement, which requires 

ratification Monday morning 
by the full membership of the 
union, vra s worked out at a 
rix-hour meeting that ended at 
2 AM. yesterday. Union mem- 
bers would report to work on 
Monday if the contract is 
ratified. 

The American Guild of Musi- 
cal Artists represents the Metis 
chores, ballet and solo singers 
below star rank, and is one 
of the company's three prin- 
cipal unions. The others are 
the American Federation oF! 
Musicians (orchestra) and lie 
International Alliance of The- 
atrical Stage Employes (stage- 
hands). 

No Details Given 
Neither Anthony A. Bliss, the 
Metis executive director and 
chief negotiator, nor DeLIoyd 
Tibbs, executive secretary of 
the guild, would give details 
on the tentative agreement be- 
fore Monday's ratification vote. 

But L Philip Srpser, lawyer 
for the orchestra's 10-member 
negotiating team, said that the 
orchestra committee had been 
offered a similar package yes- 
terday morning and has re- 
jected it “unanimously.” 

The Met had originally pro- 
posed an across-the-board 10 
per cent pay cut for all em- 
nloyes and a reduction of con- 
tracts by five weeks. The com- 
pany withdrew that proposal 
last month, but then called for 
a doubting of the number of 
weeks to be cut from the new 
contracts. The wage proposal 
now is to hold wages to last 
year’s levels; chorus members 
currently have a base pay of 
$250 a week and ballet mem- 
bers, $215. 

A major issue dn the gmld 
strike had been a Met request 
for binding options for four 
additional weeks of work if 
the season could be lengthened. 

Three More Weeks 


Puerto Rico Blast Kills Four 
SAN JUAN, P. R^ Sept. 5 
(UPI)— An explosion attributed 
eluded Gov. George C. Wallace} by the police to a natural 


of Alabama. He also talked of 
mending the rifts in the Dem- 
ocratic party, which he said 
were the result of ‘VSeorge 
Wallace politics.” 


leak ripped through a co- 
shop in suburban Bayaroon to-, 
day, killing four persons and; 
injuring seven, two of them! 
critically. 


Mr. Sipser said that both, the 
orchestra and the guild had 
now been offered three firm 
additional weeks of work 
from 42 to 45 or 43 to 46 in 
the case of the different cate- 
gories of guild membership, and 
from 40 to 43 for the, orchestra. 
Last season all the principal 
unions enjoyed nearly full-year 
contracts. The three additional 
weeks would consist of the 
two-week parks summer season 
and one at the Wolf Trap sum- 
mer festival in Virginia. 

In return for the three weeks, 
the Met is asking for various 
concessions. In the case of the 
orchestra. Mr. Sipser said, the 
company wanted five “free con- 
cert days” (the option to have 
the orchestra play for nothing 
at five possible concerts ofi 
opera excerpts of the sort the 
Met used to offer frequently in 
the past, but hasn’t in recent 
years), a provision for unlimited 
touring (as opposed to the 
preseat six weeks) and a reduc- 
tion of paid vacation- time by 
one week. 

"There was no way lie or- 
chestra could agree to that," 
Mr. Sipser said. “And I think 
the committee represents the 
hership of the orchestra.” 
Walter Bailey, assistant secre- 
tary of the stagehands 1 union, 
said be didn't know of the guild 
settlement ' and had no com- 
ment. 

Mr. Bliss said he hoped the 
guild contract would be ratified, 
although be couldn't predict the 
outcome. “Certainty the whole 
committee last night seemed to 
be very affirmative.” he said. 
T was very pleased. Let’s face 
it— they’re giving up a great 
deaL It's a very tough situation 
for both sides. We’re not out 
of the woods by a long way.” 

Library of Congress Gets 

Archives of Modem Music! 

• 

WASHINGTON. Sept 5 (AF) 
— -The library of Congress has 
been given the archives of 
Modem Music, a journal that 
for more than 20 years cham- 
pioned the cause of new music, 
the library said today. 

The donor is Minna Leder- 
man — Mrs. Mell Daniel— who! 
was editor of the publication 
during an its years from 1924 
to 1946. 

Selected items will be exhib- 
ited Oct. 30 to Dec. 31' in the 
ground-floor corridors of the 
library’s main building: The! 
exhibition coincides with the 
library’s 15th festival of cham-, 
her music starting Oct. 30. 

There are several hundred 
photographs of musicians, some 
of them autographed, at least 
a dozen original drawings of 
composer? and hundreds of 
letter and documents relating 
to the most prominent mu- 
sicians of the period. 

Nursing Home Evacuated 
ST. LOUIS, Sept. 4 (UP!) — 

A fire that began, in a closet 
swept through the roof erf a 
west SL Louis County nursing 
home early Thursday, forcing 
the evacuation of 120 patients.! 
No injuries were reported. ’ 
James Bemberg, administator 
Of the Chesterfield Manor Nurs- 
_ riome said the fire began 
about 3 AM. 


awfe. mu B fg mp SMASH WEEK! 

E “GENUINE EXCITEMB 


— N.Y.1 




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Tsmiity 

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■~ 3 tv^wnent re-jgation “an ominous develop-! ■ RraDe P artn i®irtlri Texas 

’*52 inventory J men £ for the whole museum 

■^b Mu^tade.- NEWCASTLE. Tex. CAP)— 

■■ f J* 1 'The Attorney General is not Eleven women in Newcastle are; 

.. :i ^\ v 31 " ^ “■! con, P ete nt to administer the trading their purses for hel- 
by Attom-j museum as I believe he inteds mets. I 

^ 1 L£fkowitz_,to do,” he said. "He is trying They have formed what may 


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n' ST Ved " y J?° , ea ^ 1 new ground here and be a first in Texas, an all-fe- 
3 'Helm an on is using this as a wedge.” male volunteer fire-fighting de- 
/ moves all The agreement also provoked partment. They have also cre- 
\ ation from “STV comment from Stanley a ted a new fire-fighter position 
-ictor, Dr. Geller, Dr. Dodcstader’s lawyer, — designated babysitter. ! 
^ader, who who said yesterday that the "We are the backup for the 
,,^-..re consult- Attorney General’s office had regular rural fire department,” 

' ; I 0 ® 3 °nly. promised to notify him before; says the group’s chief. Mrs. 
•ii^ ntially an submitting the stipulation to a Thetus Routon. 'The men are 
*e A«o™- that it was op- hard to find during the day if 

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.‘oe amnro- ^ 5^ *. ™ ^ noixa central Texas com- 

Mr. 'Geller added that he |“fi£ 3r - i 

wouId a letter to Justice! deaded we needed to] 

Renter tail- Helm an. telling him that tbe: get something done,” said Mrs. 

Atto roey General had acted ! RouLon - “ We want to be pro- 
“improperly" and advising him, ,tected - Wc are almost without 
"Lritf S? of ^ Oockstaderis opposition, protection during the day. Only 
yj^acts from Mr. Lefkowitz- was not avail- V on,en ^ ™ town during the! 

ion Of 4Ji .lf. r . I 



“‘farewell, My lovely' is 

TOUGH, HAM, HyPH 0 TK“ 

* -^•aBtfrf.WMfTQrtBirfrtowi ; 

“SURELY ONE OF THE BREST BUSS 
OF THE YEAR”-*™ 

* “A HONEY OF A MOVIE- MO VIE, GUTSY. 

: GRITTY. A GRABBER, FASCINATING 

AND THOROUGHLY ENGROSSING.” 

I — Bob Stltomsial. WINS Mio 

“ONE OF THE BEST MARLOWE’S 
SINCE BOGART IN 'THE BIG SLEEP’.” 

■ —Bract Witlimnn, PUyftof 


— OV lHf WE ST SIDE — -ONTHCZMSTSUX— I - CW U 5 MG ISUW 9 - 

LOEWS STATE i 0 LOEWS TOWER EAST IIA SYOSSET 

ff™»aeffla-5cjm rana. i tun*. -«»i3u | *,etaTcc**jtan« 

■ id. ms. ijo. 3 jc. ms. fits, i, si 1 air, sr.-ala^ 

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'7W000BRID6E [ UA CINEMA 46 

^ CcdjicAt I a I ( TatOM - COD 256 -SC* 

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Wfl Wf MttNtW YOnK SHOwmcl 

f^TTTTT! 


Now, More Than Ever, 
take...THE ULTIMATE TRIP 


"v; 11 1 “«S tstaies and i rusts division ^ meeting wun 

■ • - , 1 of the Attorney General’s office. t ? e men s f' re chief for instruc : 

V ,<r sai d: “That’s his [Mr. Getter's'll 1300 - Now - ea <* woman can op- 1 

feeling. His client was not #!«*£ ^ 500-gallon pumper if 
^KCte^llV Ar , r signatory to the stipulation, I needed - 

f , however, and further, the judge Helmets ‘Over* Purses 

S " 1:3 Dm pieces 311 order h^simply| “We have learned that our 

| ^ of court “ agreement between-! helmets are more important 

I - the Attorney General and the; than our purses,” said Mrs. 

| C^r^r.s Justice museurn s trustees.” jMarjorie Lazzeri. “Our purses 4 

| '. interim A 6-Month Deadline |are the first thing to go. We j 

| g F ~ ” roundly The Attorney General’s era-'r 0n ’ t j eve L carry them l ? ** 

' • " ' ^.R. Grant, phasized that ti,eTg^«t Tn ^ department, even for a 

the mu- no way limited its rights to ■ . 

^ who proceed in the action brought . J have a J_ um P ***1 on my 
■ -Ji Protest June against the museiim J 6 * ever >' night so I’ll be ready 
•“* « - : A ^ d he Dr. Dockstader and present and « J V^ P m it and take off to a 
I f o™e r museum trustees. , , 

9 . . ^i°t estob- Trustees who signed the When the alarm rings, that's 

5 -lx,.-' rjTrvSB 1 agreement are John S. wniiams ***** .**»■ ^ Kinser 

I Dock - Jr.. Dr. John C. Ewers, Dr. comesin - 

| •' Carpenter, Daisy Marks and Sh e is the designated baby- 

R, „ — merit’ Nathan M. Shippee. A number sitter. She will keep the chil- 

see the °f other trustees, including Dr. dren at city hall when the wo- 

P ^- , , inventory Marietta L. Sadder, Dr. Doc*- men leave their homes 

stader, William V. Lawson 2d lust be glad when I get 
I - Vlarse mu- and John P. CampbeU, resigned used td the helmet,” Mrs. Laz- 

t ■ ,‘iJmjthson-lhefore the Attorney General’s j^ en said - “ r fee ljihe 1 have my 




biiun 

MWITOT 



| ; J^e Ameri- first action was brought. . 

’. '-'ll History According to the stipulation, 
■„ '^rge parts the inventory at the 59-year- 
- Grant n !d museum, at Broadway and 

•- =!pn pieces 155th Street, is to be conducted! 
• ci "i''etime, if by an individual “completely 
' , and the independent of” past or present 

.-r^Ojankrupt trustees, must be completed 

. i 7"?ver and within six months and sub- 
w. . /mltted to the Attorney General, 


head in a drum.* 


“R fcH. and impressive. ' 

' ■ “V.-w iJirfc'Tsmi-?;' 


K -■ w ' ,-r—K H ve With w ho is then empowered to have 
'mcial, a an appraisal made of any ex-; 
- he con- changes or gifts by the nm-l 
. — nr : invest!- seum. j 


" DeSica ai his best .in 

► full artistic command'' 

- \ V y<i •;* f'isi. 

|- /A' GREAT FILMr 

— < ‘rtf it'. 'i-*M V, Vijii', ?ivwS 





As Originally Prasmtod in SfMCtKidar TOmm and Fun SUraophonk: Soond 


MGMmmliihaSlAMIYlMISO: IVOOUClICNalTOOl.ASrACEODmer 
SUSSING K31 CUUX - CW IOOCWOOO ■ SOEa«lAY St*Nl£7 UBRCK WO AITHS C OWBB 
KOOUCa NO DHCTB) »r SMM£f K1JBBOC ■ SUPB TWAVKtON AM) MEROCOUW 



( 5 »* tt from the b*o«rminfll) 


12TH RECORD WEEK! 

at a Conveniently Located Bine Ribbon Theatre j 

3S*£ — a8®'—i — ! {BBftr 

=. Jj,Qhai f 1 ?? 1 - «f"«53 UKURII MTM* 

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L - 9.10, 12 Midnight 



\ GOINGIOUT 

e 


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MmcnoN 

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fin 


I T - here are 

1 * • “* y York 

| to show 

| — - - - art Is 

I jf those 

f «• of the 

1 tory, at 

I me, be- 

I Avenue 

I * ■* rause- 

view 
eekends 

. . -- -f T *scS?oday. 

■. . ■ . *• r? .iif.iiplay is 

;■ 7 ■ a '?L Bronx 

; be 

.. -i.fjpll AJW. 
7: i ■ : '' •'“■'morrow 

SOn the 
^ ^ e is the 

- - ^ t* ! \alen- 

Tl; - colonial 
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^ cur- 

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t he only 
I --2 ugh on 

s : b inlan d. 

^hed by 
xr* -O 205th 

, .Rat tire 
■VL Free. 

^3e the 
*. in Rich- 
.? • Island, 
tomor- 
■ * . 6 PM. 

lintings, 
_ ' •es that 

J;.,— ualout- 

at the 

riners. 

^ t?,’ a mile 


get to Journal Square wa 
the Hudson tubes. Rain date 
— Sept. 14. Contribution $1. 
(201-659-3436.) 

MUSIC ALFRESCO This 
month’s weekends in . the 
Museum of Modem Art’s 
sculpture garden are devoted 
to informal concerts at 8 PJVL 
on Fridays and Saturdays by 
composers playing their own 
■works. 

Tonight, Marga Richer pre- 
sents works for harpsichord, 
brass quartet, solo viola and 
piano. Appearing with Mazga 
Richter, a pianist, are Karen 
Phillips, violist. Leonard 
Raver, harpsichordist, Michael 
Skelly, pianist, and the 
Metropolitan Brass Quartet 
Next Friday and Saturday 
evenings. Cedi Taylor, a 
pianist in the forefront of 
contemporary music, will per- 





A True Comedy Classic 


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Writer 

Rorie 

Theatres 


BENSON #1 


HEIGHTS 
CINEMA #1 


JERRY LEWIS #2 

lluupetiNi 
LIDO Lone Bexfe 
OLDBETHPAGE 

Old Bcltwn? 

PINE HOLLOW 
0wt»rBa» 

SANDS POMT 
Port W«0mtoo 
STUDIO I - 

L, i* rook 


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TRANS-LUX EAST BRYAN WEST 

I.,I«.U&1I4 I KU I 1I , 30. Il I A • c Ily 

LATE SHOW igNlTT 



UA PEQUA UA STATE GRANTS MOVIES 3 

■•««/ City RttSuofc 
OIM/yftMIS POIMM.5MO l»l| 74343X13 


RABID CITTf i^lMHSIC HALL 

7T Ths W3RLD s greatest stage and screen show . z*b-isy 
SPECIAL LIMITED ENGAGEMENT 


T^ 1 ^ 1 ! 1 " f iftTllf mi FBI 1 ! 

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nten Is- 
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for a 

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ork wiH 
idewalk 
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-fr* 4 

“7 

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7- ... >s of 

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^ ’ knd old 

■t of the 
moon of 
Jersey 
y «r tour. 
_ - * "^4 f ends of 

" ' Branch 

;i4 ira, and 
i- M a spare 
: should 

PJ.T .>> Journal 

^ «I1 as- 

ft» - at ? World 

’ 85 PM. to 


and 20, Ch arise Morrow, 
composer, who is involved 
with breathing, counting and 
linguistic patterns of non- 
humans and the poetry and. 
music of tribal peoples, wOl 
■perform, and on Sept. 26 and 
27, John Watts, the com- 
poser, presents works for the 
ARP synthesizer, tape and 
acoustic instruments. Admis- 
sion Ss free. (956-6200.) 

“DRAW ME!” The Brook- 
lyn Museum Art School is 
providing, tomorrow from 
1:30 to 4:30 P.M., an instruc- 
tor and a live model for any- 
one wishing to sketch or to 
try to sketch. The school will 
also present demonstrations 
of jewelry, ceramics, stained 
glass, batik, print- making and 
sculpture. The aim is to show 
prospective students possi- 
bilities offered in the school’s 
classes. Free. Refreshments. 
The school is at the Brook- 
lyn Museum, Eastern Park- 
way, stop on the No. 2, 3 or 
4 IRT subways. (638-4486, 
633-5000). 

MORE JAZZ Sunday eve- 
ning, usually a quiet flight 
around town, will be enliv- 
ened starting tomorrow with 
modem American music at 
Eddie Condon’s, from 8 PM. 
Zoot Sims arid Al Cohn, om 
tenor saxophones, faring their 
quintet into the restaurant- 
bar, which has no cover and 
no minimum charges, jazz 
every night and Wednesday 
and Friday at lunchtime. 
Available is an & la carte 
menu of steaks, hamburgers 
and Chinese food. (265-8277.) 

• 

For Today’s Entertainment 
Events listing, see Page 
10. For Sports Today,- see 
Page 12. 

C. GERALD FRASER 



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MURRAY HILL 


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I HE INFORMER 

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Sports News Briefs 


Lauda Sets Lap Record at Monza 

MONZA. Italy, Sept. 5 (UPD— Niki Lauda, tiie Austrian 
driver who needs just half a point in the last two Formula 
One races of the season to clinch the worid drivers’ cham- 
pionship, set a lap record for practice at the Monza circuit 
today as trials opened for the Italian Grand Prix. Lauda, 
driving a Ferrari, averaged more than 138 miles an hour in 
his lap Qf 1 minute 32.82 seconds. Lauda set the previous 
practice record last year of 1:33.16. Clay Regazzom of 
Switzerland, his teammate, was second fastest in practice. - 
Carlos Reutemann of Argentina, the only driver with a 
chance to beat Lauda for the driver’s tide, was third fast- 
est in a Brabham. Lauda merely has to finish among the 
first six Sunday to win his first worid championshi p^ In 
order for Reutemann to take the title he must place first 
at Monza and first again in tile United States Grand Phx, 
Oct. 5 at Watkins Glen, N.Y., while Lauda finishes out of 
the top six in these last two races. Mario Andretti was 

clocked in 1:35.17 in a Pamelli, 11th fastest time of the 

day. 

Marblehead Sailor Wins One-Design 

ENDINBURGH, Scotland, Sept. 5 (AP) — Steve Wales 
of Marblehead, Mass., retained his title in the world Inter- 
national One-Design yacht championships. Wales finished 
with 3*4 points. 4 better than the total of Archie Hooper 
of Bermuda. Jan Leask of Scotland was third with 17%. 
Marshall Napier of Scotland fourth at 21. and Thornton 
Clark of Marblehead fifth with 22. They were followed by 
Tom Allen of San Francisco. 33: George Degnan of San 
Francisco, 44: Don McKen-zre of Larchmont, N, Y., 49, and 
Orison McPherson, of Larchmont, 50. 


Nero Is Upset in $49,000 Pace 

LIVONIA, Mich., Sept. 5 (AP)— Osborne’s Bret, a son 
of Bret Hanover, streaked to a track record, of 1 minute 
56 seconds at Wolverine Raceway last night as he upset 
heavily favored Nero in the S49.000 Grand Circuit Stake 
for 3-year-old pacers. 

Nero, suffering only bis third defeat in 31 career 
starts, had been such a favorite that the Wolverine man- 
agement eliminated show betting from the race. Coming off 
a three-week layoff because of an ailing front foot, Nero 
finished third. Bo Bo Arrow, moving behind Osborne's Brett 
in a blistering stretch finish, was two lengths behind the 
winner at the wire with Nero two lengths farther back. 


Florida Woman Wins Water-Ski Title 

THORPE PARK, England, Sept. 5 (UPI)— -Liz Allen 
Shetter, who won her first event at the age of 14, took two 
out of the three individual gold medals and won the wo- 
men's over-all world water-ski title today for the fourth 
time. The 24-year-old woman won gold medals in the 
jumping and slaJora and finished fourth in the tricks event 
for her near sweep. The only gold medal to elude her went 
to Maria Victoria Carrasco of Venezuela, the defending 
champion in the tricks event, who won her specialty de- 
spite falling on her head an hour earlier in the j ump ing. 


Talley, on 76, Leads 
City Senior Golf 

Arthur Talley, a 59-year- 
old retired Defense Depart- 
ment electrician, led four 
golfers into the final round 
of tiie City Public Links 
senior championship yester- 
day. Talley scored a 76 over 
the La Tourette Course on 
Staten Island, to take a three- 
stroke lead. The champion- 
ship is conducted by the 
Department of Recreation 
and the Manufacturer’s Han- 
over Trust Company. 

Will Ireland, a Sandy Hook 
harbor pilot, on his day off, 
shared second at 79 with 
Jules Vogt, a former city 
patrolman. Paul Dan Lon of 
Staten Island, won a sudden- 
death. extra-hole playoff to 
get the fourth spot. Danton 
and Arthur Sisson of Jamaica, 
each had an 81 for the 
regular IS. Danton won with 
a par 4, as Sisson shot a 
bogey 5. 

In the women’s senior 
division, Rita Heilman, of 
Douglaston. Queens. led the 
four qualifiers for the final 
with an 86, Mary McNally, 
of Sunnyside, Queens, was 
next with 94; Pat Korman, 
of Dyker Beach, Brooklyn, 
had 99 and June Kessler of 
Kisaena Park. Queens, scored 
100. The finals will be played 
SepL 14 at the La Tourette 
Course. 


Sports Today 


(Television — 
PJK.) 


Bayi Bows in 800 
MOMBASA, Kenya, Sept. 5 
(Reuters) — Daniel Omwansa 
of Kenya beat Filbert Bayi 
of Tanzania today in the 
800-meter final at the East 
and Central African track 
and field championships. 
Omwansa led from the start 
and held off Bayi’s closing 
burst to win in 1 minute 
46.1 seconds. Bayi was 
clocked in 1:46.7 and Sammy 
Kipkurgat of Kenya was 
third in 1:46.9. 


P.M.) (Radio — CBS reports, 
2:55, 431, £31 and 5:55 PJK) 
THOROUGHBRED RACING 
Belmont PSrfc Elmont. L.T.. 1:30 
P.M. (Television — Channel 8, 
6 P-M~ tape) 

Monmouth Park, Oceanport, N.J., 
2 P.M. 

WRESTLING 


Quinn to Captain Flames 
ATLANTA, SepL 5 (AP)— 
Pat Quinn, a defenseman, 
was named captain today of 
the Atlanta Flames. 


Exhibition, al Madison Square 
Garden. Eighth Avenue and 
33d Street. SSO P.M. 



*•- : z* 


THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6 , 1975. 


British . 


. . „ ,# .V\ I ■***.'.« 


Sealyham 
Is Best at 
Tarrytown 


People in Sports 

Schultz Finds It Pays $350,000 to Be Rough 


By WALTER R. FLETCHER 

Special to Thr See York Times 

TARRYTOWN, N.Y„ SepL 5 
—A white-coated Sealyham 
from Wales keeps right 
on winning. When Dersade 
Bobbys Girl was named best 
of 1,179 dogs in the Tuxedo 
Park fixture today at Lynd- 
hursL it was the third time 
in seven days that she won 
the silverware for Mrs. 
Dorothy Wiiner of Church- 
town, Pa. 

Binny, as she is called by 
her Welsh handler, Peter 
Green, returned to the ring 
on Aug. 15, after an absence 
of two months. Since then 
she has been almost in- 
vincible. She has been in 10 
shows, won the groups each 
time and has been best on 
seven occasions. In all, she 
has captured the major award 
at 29 events. On the way to 
the final. Binny, who will be 
4 years old in October, cap- 
tured her 56th blue rosette 
in one of the best terrier 
groups in many weeks. Sec- 
ond was a mulli-best-in-show 
winner from Florida, a Skye. 
Ch. Glamoor Got To Be Good 
and fourth was a top- 
winning Manchester from the 
Coast, Ch. Canyon’s Rest’s 
Spitfire. 

Mrs. Ramona Jones, in 
giving the Sealy the top 
prize, said, “This is the third 
time I've judged her. The 
first time I gave her a breed, 
the second a group and now 
the big one.” Mrs. Paul Sil- 
ver-nail, who has been active 
with terriers for 47 years 
and been judging 37, chose 
Binny in the group, saying, 
"She’s a good, honest and 
sound Sealy.” 

THE CHIEF AWARDS 
VARIETY GROUPS 


Dave Schultz, the hard-hit- 
ting wing for the Philadel- 
phia Flyers who set National 
Hockey League records for 
penalties while the Flyers 
were winning the Stanley 
Cup the last two seasons, 
says he has signed a contract 
that will tun thfough the 
1980 season. 

“Just say that Tm getting 
more than the average nine- 
goal scorer,” Schultz said 
when asked the value of the 
pact. It was estimated to 
be for at least 5350,000. 
Schultz joins several other 
Flyers who have signed mul- 
tiyear contracts. They in- 
clude Benue Parent, the goa- 
lie, and Bobby Clarice, the 
team captain. 


more competitive,” he said- 
“There’s no other quarter- 
back I would rather sack." 


Fred Hutchinson was 45 
years old and the manager 
of the Cincinnati Reds when 
be died of cancer in 1964. He 
had pitched for Detroit and 
managed teams m. Detroit, 
Seattle and SL Loins be- 
fore taking the job in Cin- 
cinnati Yesterday, a seven- 
story SI1.9-raillion facility in 
Seattle, Hutchinson's home 
town, devoted to research 
into the treatment and cure 
of cancer was dedicated. It 
is the Fred Hutchinson. Cancer 
Research Center. 


Jerry Tagge, twice an All- 
America selection at the 
University of Nebraska, was 
released by the Green Bay 
Packers after three lackluster 
years with his home-town 
team. The quarterback, who 
was the Packers’ top pick in 
the college draft in 1972, 
was put on waivers along 
with Spike Jones, a punter, 
and Randy Allen, a wide re- 
ceiver. . . . John Gilliam, the 
wide receiver who considers 
himself a free agent after the 
folding of the Chicago Wind 
of the Worid Football League, 
hopes to return to the Na- 
tional* Football League’s 
Minnesota Vikings, where he 
played for eight years. ‘Tm 
not going to turn down of- 
fers from anybody,” he said. 
“But as far as Tm concerned, 
Minnesota is No. I on my 
list” . . . Merlin Olsen, the 
270-pound defensive lineman 
for the Los Angeles Rams, 
played for 11 years with Ro- 
man Gabriel before the quar- 
terback was traded to the 


variety groups Philadelphia Eagles. The pair ===== 

HOUND (Harold Sailing Judge)-!, Virginia irrfn hnsinftKS to- - 

Ffowcrt and Nancy Wmshora’s beaate. Or. ev “ J mBX 3J5tt ? DUSineSS ., a75 a * etc 

Nana's Triple Trouble Rick; 2. Mr. and getfaer. Operating a travel 
Mrs. Janus Bull's Vftilwwt, Ch. Oumod ® ’ ZLj an onfomrvhilp vei® Fall Cl 

CBnsman; 3. John Williams’ and Kstnleen agency and an aUtOmOOUe P gBS till U 

Sdilenfcerfs Afghan, Ch. Aftrta Friendly soenCV. Tonight, in a pTe- SjrtSKE S*trf 

•Guy; 4, Mrs. Alan Robson's basset, Uv At.oppc W- 43 Or 

a i booty Hili Hudson. season game at Los Angeles, *■ jlm * ac “* 


Skip Wise, a former Balti- 
more hibh school star and 
last season a freshman sensa- 
tion at Clemson, signed a 


aiiwy HMi Hudson. season game at los 

T ST R doS£ Olsen will getlrus first chance 

Dereada Bobby's Girt; 2, Walter Goodraah's to sack Gabnd. .Tue fact 


thst we-reclMe friends off 
smooth fox terrter, ctr. Bomiwn Benares; the field shouldmakeus even 


1975 METS * YANKEES 

WsSk FiR Cafor BaseluH Cards 
Mar $350 

if- 43c«*i £a n*- 

L *?:HQT SOU M STORES 

SPORTS. STARS PUB. CO. 
ML KnclSZ. Why Cott*. AT- I09M 


BASEBALL 

M ets vs. St. Louis Cardinals, at 
Shea Stadium, Roosevelt Ave- 
nue and 126th Street, Flush- 
ing Meadow, Queens. 2:15 
P.M. (Television — Channel 9, 
2:10 PJK.) (Radio — WNEW, 
2:10 PJL) 

Yankees vs. Orioles, at Balti- 
more. (Television — Channel 
II, 730 P.M.) (Radio— WMCA, 
735 PJK) 

Brewers vs. Boston Red Sox. at 
Milwaukee. (Television — Chan- 
nel 4, 2 PJK 

FOOTBALL 


4, Canyon Crest Kernels' Manchester, Oi. 
Canyon Dears Sottflm. 

TOY (Rav Beale, Judoej-J. Robert KomwJ'i 
white toy noodle, Ch. PeetHes Sahara; 2. 
Carmen Caramel's silky tenter, Ch. Mid- 
land’s Mtehty Mike; 3. Janine ZervouTls's 
and M. E. Banga‘5 ah I fzu, Ch. Wstebanfc 
Ouzo • v. Zwvlistan; 4, Gloria Satmever's 
Pomeranian, Si tear Meadows Tom Tom 
Cameron Ma. 60 Seat. 5 
SPORTING (Frank Undiraf, iuttee)— 1, Mrs. 
Robert V. Oark's and Dr. L C Johnson's 
sal dsn rstriever, Ch. Cummings Gold-Riuh 
Charlie; 2, Matthew Bonnetend's English 
stringer spaniel, Ch. Salilyn's Brava; 3, 
Kilty Pharr's Garten setter, Ch. Rocfc- 
aolenty’s Celebration, C. 0.; 4, Dr. and 
Mrs. John Moakler’s and Jude Colan ' s 
i-j«Hmaraner. Ch. Cotetdex Standing Ovation. 
NON-SPORTING (Mrs. SHvrnwli. judge) — , 
Edmond and Carolyn Slrflrik's and Mary 
Siabv's Ihasa apso, Ch. Pongo’s Odd I Oddi; 


31 ' CC Cmdr Spt Fish 7l 


Fir Sate -3M 

1963 Egg Harbor Sport Fish 


Invnac. mint w/Jo re. all fttwjh. Twin 
230HP, FWC. only 312 hrs-FB/BImint. 


?. Barbara Westfield's and Mrs Charles 
Westfield's bul'dog. Ch. Westfield Cuno- 


Minnesota Vikings vs. St. Louis 
Cardinals, preseason, at Bloom- 
ington. Minn. (TelevisiciK— 
Channel 7. 7 PJVL) 


GOLF 

World Series, at Akron, Ohio. 
(Television — Chann el 4, 5 


HARNESS RACING 

Roosevelt Raceway, Westbuiy, 
L.L, S P.M. (Television— 
Channel ». 11:30 P.M.) 

Monticxllo (N.Y.) Raceway, 2 JO 
and 8:30 P.M. 

KARATE 

World championships, at Nas- 
sau Coliseum, Umondale. LI. 
(Television — Channel 7, 5 
PJVL, tape) 

ROWING 

Huckleberry Indian Regatta, at 
Orchard Beach Lagoon, the 
Bronx, 9 AM. 

SOCCER 

ApoIIos vs. Argentina, at Me- 
morial Stadium. Mount Ver- 
non, N.Y, 830 P.M. 

Dalmatlnac vs. Clarks town, at 
Metropolitan Oval, Maspeth, 
Queens, 8:30 P.M. 

TENNIS 

United "States Open champion- 
ships, at West Gate T.C-, For- 
est Hills, Queens. II A3f. 
(Television — Channel 2. 3 


moms Stone; 3. Frederic* P Eddie's and 
Herbert Williams's chaw chow, Ch. Mi Tire 
Han Su Sham: 4. Henry St. Martin's and 
Karen Stadt'a dal man an, Ch. Te Jas Jack 
rnst. 

WORKING {Larry Dooney, ftrisel— 1, Mar- 
garet Skitmsn's Shetland staemta, Creek- 
view's Sweet Sue; Z Old Collier's Bouvlers 
das FlsndTCKi Ch. Tawm du Posty Aria- 
quin: 3, Mr. and Mn. Joe Berner's giant 
schnauur, Ch. Ebenholtz Bobl d’Lu* v. 
Berlc; 4, At and Care! Ensdmann's Ger^ 
man riia^ierd, Ch. Ma lochs Adria of Engle- 
ha us. 

BEST IH SHOW. 

Mrs. Ramona Jones, I uilar. 

Mrs. Dorothv Wi raw's Sealyham, Ch. Dervtdd 

D.M.U 1 . r.iA 


TlOV, Hit * 
l/cnnd, sh» 
Fair 
Marina. 

SI 6-333-5005 


omv^l2^hrs- FB/BImlnl. 

helec 

4, winter cover, al Worlds 


1973 LUHRS Super 320 
Tw/diesels, lo hrs, VKF-FM, 
DF, trim tabs, Bimini Top, cov- 
ers, swim platform, shower 
$28,000 firm 1212) 728-7008. 



H 9 USEBOAT 


196634’ PACEMAKER SBDAN 

Truly exc tf and. .Boated nutat'd- 7Wfn 


1972 Trojan 3a* Twtalnjwwd «dne Z ' . 
SS. F/B. go K etec retrre. S1S.900. 1516) 


FOOTBALL TODAY 
Horne Teams listed first 
Alcorn St.— GrairMIng 
■Boytor— Missfssioof 
Georgia— jpittsgurgfi 
-Houston— Lamar 
Maryland— VI llanoua 
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Morgan State-Virglnia State 
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•Penn State— remote 
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Truly excel and. Boated mofot'dL Tynn 
IBS Pacers. Swim nJattbim .5/5 radio, DF. 
Oram pen. Bimini too. trim tabs. This boat 
ns? fex«n.lM0NClate. Call eves aft 


SS. FJB. go K etec retnu- ! 
SM8W 


26 ft Penn Yon 1975 


46' DAWN CLASSIC 

w 14 crystal radio. DP, new tv Minted, 
rwjrthv,! steeps 12. mAooimv lltnnss. 



24' PERFORMER 1973 


1974 PEARSON 35’ 


DOGS, CATS. 

AND • 
OTHER PETS; 



'68 30' RevekraffCniiser 

tm-tresh 




NEW O'DAY 32 1975 

r dam, center codmH. 2 cabins, 
power, wheel stearins, man A (ft. 2 
■ Stumer, sleeps 6, many extras. 


CAL 271973- 


28’ T969ALURA 


CHRIS CRAFTCONNIE 

Tri UMn 1912 Twta 300 M.P. Qtrh Ojft 

SEACRAFT 23’ TSUNAMI 73 



43’ KOK CUTTER ' 

BeautS Shari:. Proof! FbotoomrstecLtm- 


m 

TRITON-LATE MODS. 


HP, YHAJ CBjSoMT DAKS I, RDF. Many 
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TANZER22, 1973 




OLD ENGUSH SHEEPDOG 
PUPS 

hi 






SAMOYEDf 


«sm - -a 

DOBERMAN PINSCHER 




1961 CHRIS CRAFT 36' 
1975DON3X18 

FULLY aumO.^lgJSELL SWM 


^AftAY.73 


muld^-ear . contract wjm tte 

^ BalaraorefranclMe f#rwml averaged 7 


the A-B A. Terms were not 
disclosed, but Lee Lilvertnan. 
the general manager, said 
Wise would make “near 51- 
million." Wise, a 6-4 guard, 
was the first freshman named 
to an Atlantic Coast Confer- 
ence all-star team, scoring 
almost 18 points a game. 
When he played for Dunbar 
High School in Baltimore, 
the team won 48 to 50 games 
over three years. 


points a game last season, 
to the Chicago Bulls for an- 
undisclosed 197G draft choice. 

The Golden State War- 
riors have been unable to 
come to terms with Joe Bry- 
ant of La Salle, their No. 1 


By <; 

. ENGUSH 

Fourth 

Kn— I j3t 
S.V ■ i ■» Sw-j.-jo 
Tr«.'We Rj.i.4 ;. 

RUGBY 
Ftnl l 

C-sIte'e-rt .'4. tarn 
Sj 20. t‘.<C'V5 

Second 

.'3. Dc-rar* 
rmttshMM 13- 

RUGDl 
Club I 

Hi*l? n 'vjd F'ty <4 - 
B iC'Vvj j;, Trwis 
y. t.-n tc 
Ts-voiv AlfUhe 7. 




• A - 1 n, 



draft pick- “He wants more 
money than we’ve offered 
and longer terms than we 

are interested in giving, said 

Dick Vertlieb. the genral 




Thursda: 

D y Tit An 

Partl-inj. I 1 -.— Tw 




Because he demonstrated 
an unusual behavior pattern 
on the night of July 23 when 
he led the police on 3 seven- 
mile chase in Chesapeake, 
Va, David Vaughn may not 
have to go to court on four 
counts or attempted murder 
with an automobile. Peter M. 
Axson Jr., the state prose- 
cutor, said his decision of 
whether to press charges 
would depend upon the 
mental ability of the 6-foot 
10-inch center with the Vir- 
ginia Squires whose chase 
ramt» to an end when he was 
shot in the abdomen by a 
policewoman. 

Jack Ankerson. the Squires’ 
general manager, described 
Vaughn as “quiet and reserv- 
ed” and said his actions on 
that night were “entirely out 
Of character.” The police- 
claim that Vaughn hit an- 
other automobile and even- 
tually rammed several police 
cars. 



faxslEnnrt 


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The Cleveland Cavaliers of 


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Thomas Rogers 


114. Hjrlto 
CifriTliJ. Nrt'.— Ron 
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New tires, gar, fuff pwr, excel- 
lent cond. low mi $1850. 212/ 
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CAD 75 LIMOUSINES 



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FORD 1971 GALAXIE 500 

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CARS 

WANTED 


WE BUY ANY MAKE, YEAR 

AMERICAN FOREIGN & 5PORT5 CARS 

OVER BOOK PRICES PAID 
Mercedes, Jaguars; Porsches 
compacts, Cadillacs, Lincolns 
Volkswagen* &Toyotas 
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Embassy Auto Sales 
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427 E. 60 ST NYC 593-2500 




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LLACE 




ts Drop Gogolak; 
t Gets Kicking Job 




:ji ' if,, 


sL?^V.= ; : - 

jjMi; *»rwV -'., 

Si*- -? • 

f®aS**vAi I , -V i *.'V’- 
V*-.' ' 

*;«■ r- t ... 


. f ;; %E°5 

Gogo- 
^"OjCtas said 

X by the 


by the 

I « .• VL ? ! 47. 

" n iRSiVJ md has 


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VVA 


SKTOM'l 

V M ...• .-.. .. 

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. 1 J I 

■■■ ■: ,': i 1 ! 

*■— Nfaa l w ' 


* »■ i 


•*-» ie, also 
j>' would 
be final 
igs, the 
uld also 

is only 
Idcker- 

I .L., al- 
■e more 
,1 roster 
!ept 15. 
:tcroft of 
:.. ns, the 
tomor- 
,-■ ir next- 
' game 


■:. ..-jjl, saction, 
'■ another 
a waiv- 
•■•“ :iy. His 
.’■ 1 and he 
Ji draft 
, I. f % > out of 
; - '-ii .versity. 
; '■' i to the 
for a 
ice that 
'll Green 
— 1^. Vaivers- 

h )C Jumnus 
M\ 3 y the 
|J ad only 

Trrv • L -P ,a >'> 
\n -e His 
< ;oals in 
I L J ilent to 

C. The 
. . , te next 
iree-day 
iar ago. 


performance in training camp. 
Furthermore, the coach con- 
tinues to discard players he 

inherited from the previous 
regime of Alex Webster. 
There are only 15 Giants left 
from Webster's 1973 squad 
following the placing of Don 
Herrmann, the wide receiver, 
on the injured reserve list. 

Gogolak could still kick 
-and he worked hard this 
summer after a poor season 
a year ago in which he had 
only 10 field goals. He holds 
the Giants’ team records for 
most points in a career. 646, 
and season, 107 in 1970. He, 
too, was a punter briefly one 
season, 1969, with a 40.6- 
yard average. 

Apart from his ability, 
Gogo will be remembered 
best, and inaccurately, as the 
player who caused the merg- ■ 
er of the American and Na- 
tional Leagues. The Hungar- 
ian-born Gogolak was drafted 
12th by Buffalo of the A.F.L. 
after a brilliant career at 
Cornell. The original soccer- 
style kicker, he was ignored 
by the N.F.L. draft. Who 


■d in an 
j-nspar- 
Giants* 
:’s good 



wanted to bother with one 
of those crazy side-winders 
from an Ivy League school? 

After two fine seasons with 
the Bilk, Gogolak played out 
his option and became a free 4 
agent- Wellington Mara 
signed him for the Giants 
in May, 1966. much to the 
disgust of cither NJX. own- 
ers and the American League 
began a retaliation program 
under its commissioner, AI 
Davis, it was great for the 
star players like John Brodie, 
who made $800,000 out of 
the war, but expensive for 
the owners. Merger came in 
June. 

Jets Get Break 

The truth of the matter 
was that serious merger talks 
had begun between Lamar 
Hunt, founder of the A.F.L., 
and Tex Schramm of the 
Cowboys, representing the 
N.F.L. , in a Dallas airport 
parking lot in April. 

The Jets, who - play the 
Redskins tomorrow night in 
WasHingtoa (Channel 7, 9 

Continued on Page 14, Column 7 

Dave Anderson 



Miss Evert Gains Final 
With Miss Goolagong 


yii r 


Jimmy Connors and Chris Evert before her semifinal 
match against Martina Navratilova in the Open. 


By NEIL AMDUR 

After five rounds of much 
ado about nothing, the wo- 
man will have something to 
shorn* about in the final of 
the United States Open ten- 
nis championships today at 
the West Side Tennis Club 
in Forest Hills, Queens. 

It will be top-seeded Chris 
Evert against fourth-seeded 
Evonne Goolagong. The fact 
that it will be their 21st 
meeting since their first sto- 
ried singles match at Wim- 
bledon three summers ago 
does not dim todav’s luster, 
not with a S25.000 first prize. 

The 20-y ear-old Miss Evert 
extended her amazing string 
of triumphs on clav-hke sur- 
faces to S3 yesterday with 
a 6-4, 6-4 victory ON'er her 
doubles partner, third- seeded 
Martha Navratilova, who 
tearfully wilted !ate in the 
second set after a question- 
able call. ML«s Gcolagong 
was the last player to defeat 
Chrissieon 

clay two years ago. The 
graceful Australian, who is 
married to a British metal 


The Chris and Jimmy Romance Revival 


broker, Roger Cawley, but 
prefers to use her maiden 
name cm the court, prepared 
for a patient baseline duel 
and outsteadied second-seed- 
ed Virginia Wade, 7-5, 6-1, 
in the second semifinal be- 
fore a stadium crowd of 12,- 
003. 

Rain is Forecast 

Besides the women's show- 
down, the two men’s singles 
semifinals — Jimmy Connors 
vs. Bjorn Borg and Manuel 
Orantes vs. Guillermo Vilas 
— will join today’s program 
if the forecast of rain does 
not win out fir st- 
acking an Evert-Goolagong 
winner may be more difficult 
than leaning toward the top- 
seeded Connors, who is the 
defending champion, and the 
ihjrd-seeded Orantes, who 
has a 3-0 won-lost record 
against Vilas this year. 

Miss Evert has won II of 
the previous matches and 
leads Miss Goolagong. 6-2 
on clay. But nine of their 
meetings have gone to three 
sets, and Miss Goolagong 
appears to be at her best 
when pressure pulls her from 
familiar mental walkabouts. 

The i S-year-old Miss Navra- 
tilova had sufficient chances 
to foil Chrissie’s fourth bid 


and high-velocity strokes are 
all woman, her mental com- 
mitment often yields to 
youth. She let her concentra- 
tion slip long enough on a. 
replayed point for Miss Evert 
to escape from a 15-10 
deficit which would ha\e 
deadlocked the first set at 
4-all. 

The real disaster, however, 
came with Chr-.ssie serving 
at 3-4. 30-15. in the second 
set. Martina attacked only to 
have Miss Evert hit a fore- 
hand lob that landed on the 
baseline. 

Miss Navratilova, thought 
I he ball was 2 inchps out. 
But Mrs. Pat Brumnicr, the 
lines woman, .said, “The ball 
was good It hit the edge of 
the line.” 

Baseline Argument 

Martina balked, c\on a ft or 
Mrs. Brumnier, a te.i chine; 
pro from Newport, R.I., left 
her scat, walked to the spot 
and picked out the mark 
“without hesitation." 

“She showed me a mark 
that was !i inches awa' - ." 
Miss Navratilova said angrily. 
“The calls were perfect ex- 
cept for the last one. That 
really screwed me up." 

It «ccrtainly did. 

Martina lost the remaining 


U;-'fc0wi *',A 

The H*w York Tlmci 

Pete Gogolak 



- • 

• rV - 


T.es 1 fcrr 


an 's Tactics 
^ig- Eyebrows 


ly JOSEPH DURSO 



*■ 


w™. - - - 


yn •*«' **• 


-r 1 .Tri*.?- -,- * 


5* .^ - - ; 

.•TjV.t-. . r ■ ■ vj 
Sftirii hjir- 
i, * J* 

Jfri 


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•. :-s 


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“ .j.""' 

WsJTT ' 

f-^s. r’-# 

s V* r 

tlm m* " 


Vi ■*« 






- in’ the 
Igh H- 
, grouped 
— - Stadium 
~ pitching 
s Cardi- 
mes left 

_ 'J » work 
--i Harry 

■ strai^t 
' ght Vic- 

5, a win- 

'id 7 and 
rage of 
■ lints, he 
National 
;T* his one- 

■ t aching 

■ problem 
o on the 

did not 
they de- 
starting 
- ry Koos- 
Matlack 
; sttermen, 

. bb, Craig 
e among 

tlack 

did not 
so they 
the biul 
nsurance. 
•ded help 
, r recalled 
• y decided 
■" the top 


Monday with a five-game 
lead on the Mets in the Na- 
tional League’s Eastern Divi- 
sion. Then Seaver pitched a 
four-hit, ten-strike-out-shut- 
out and visions of sugar 
plums danced in the Mets* 
heads. 

But that was as close as 
they got to an upset over the. 
division leaders. The next 
night, Koosman was- chased 
inside four innings while 
Pittsburgh slugged out • an 
8-4 decision. And in the de- 
ciding game of the series, 
Matlack was undermined by 
three infield errors white 
Manager Roy McMillan 
squirmed through some sec- 
ond-guessing. 

The second-guessing was 
prompted by the fact that 
McMillan had played a hunch 
and started two left-handed 
batters, Wayne Garrett and 
Del Unser, against the left- 
handed Jerzy Reuss of the 
Pirates. For a conventional 
tactician like McMillan, that 
was a novelty, but the 
novelty became a disaster 
when his two hunches went 
0 for 8 and Garrett made 
two errors at third base. 

Later, McMillan turned 
aside any criticism by saying, 
“I just felt they were the 
best men to do the job." But 
some grousing was. heard in 
the locker room outside his 
office for the first time since 
the players similarly had 


when the ^ similarly had 

)wn last Continued on Page 15, Column 3 


Now that Liz and Richard are together again, the 
matchmakers of the world need a romance to repair. They 
might have one. Quietly, the love match between Chris 
Evert and Jimmy Connors appears to be on serve again. 
That was evident in the green and white tent that is the 
inquisition chamber for competitors in the United States 
Open tournament Chris Evert was perched prettily on a 
metal folding chair behind a small table. Her racquets were 
piled in front Df her and a towel was draped over her blue 
and red tr imm ed white bareback dress. 

Sports Some queens don’t look as good oh a 
* throne. But she hadn't just come from the 
hairdresser. She had just come from cen- 
Tfce 'nines ter in Fores t Hills Stadium after a 
6-4, 6-4 victory over Martina Navratilova 
had qualified her for the Open final for the first time: At 
the age of 20, she is now the world’s most dominant female 
tennis player. But part of her appeal is that she always 
looks like a female. Her long fingernails were polished a 
pale pink. She wore a small diamond bn a gold chain 
around her neck and silver earrings, pierced. Against her 
streaked blonde hair and golden tan, her eyelashes were so 
dark they appeared to have been dipped in an ink well. 

' j “Most women,” somebody observed, “would be afraid . 
mat sweat would make that eyestuff run.” 

“But she doesn't sweat,” somebody else said. “Look 
at her. Not a drop of perspiration.” 

She wiH oppose Evonne Goolagong today, which 
might make he sweat some. But she should m 

“What means more,” somebody asked her yesterday, 
“winning Wimbledon or winning Forest Hills?” 

‘We Always Were Clese* 

M i haven’t won Forest Hills yet,” she said, smilmg. 
“But if I do. TO tell you.” 

In the back of the tent Jimmy Connors and his dou- 
bles partner, Hie-Nastase, kibitzed the inquisition. During 
a lull, Nastase -asked, "How many times have you lost to 
Jimmy Connors in practice?" and Miss Evert replied with 
a grin, “He never practices with me anymore." Connors 
had watched some of her match. 

'1 play a lot better when he watches,” she sadi. “It 
just seems to help me when he’s there.” 

“Is there,” a newsman asked,. "anything new on your 
off-and-on romance with Jimmy Connors?" 

“We always were close," Chris Evert said seriously 
and softly. “And we always wiO be.” 

In the men’s locker room later, Jimmy Connors was 
holding a plastic cup of Coke when the intercom blared. 

"Will Jimmy Connors,” the voice announced loudly, 
"please report to the backgammon table immediately.” 

He was relaxing between doubles matches. He will op- 
pose Bjorn. Borg of Sweden in the men's semifinals today, 
with the winner qualifying against either Guillermo Vilas 
of Argentina or Manuel Orantes of Spain in tomorrow’s 
final. If both he and Miss Evert were to win the United 
States titles, it would equal their sweep of the Wimbledon 
titles last year before their engagement was broken. As he 
departed for the backgammon table, be handed his Coke to 
Pancho Segura, his coach. Typically, his coach was talking 
tennis, not romance. 

‘Probably for Another 30 Years’ 

"Jimmy's got to be more patient on this clay than he 
was on grass last year,” Segura said. “And the clay takes 
away more from his return of serve. That’s what put pres- 
sure on the other guy's serve. But one thing about this boy, 
he raises up for a championship. He’s a Sunday player." 

Not far away, in the card room, Jimmy Connors and 
Hie Nastase were taking turns playing backgammon 
against a bearded West Side Tennis Club member. When he 
was playing, Connors was a competitor, staring intently at 
the dice, smirking when they weren’t rolling for him. As he 
lost one game, he bounced the table in annoyance. 

“Poor sport,” somebody said. 

Jimmy Connors smiled thinly. He has a reputation for 



1 — Asuditad Pnu 

The two tournament players kissing at Forest Hills 

rudeness on the court when the match or the calls are 
going against him. To some extent, it was a factor in ihe 
breakup of their engagement because Chris Evert said later, 
"He doesn’t realize that he can be funny without being 
dirty." Maybe he realizes it now. His rudeness has been 
minimal lately. 

“My motto for the tournament," he said when the 
Open began, “is stay calm at all costs.” 

His backgammon game over now, 23-year-old Jimmy 
Connors was calm again as he spoke of how he enjoyed 
watching Chris Evert in her matches. 

“I’ve been doing it for three years," he said, "and Til 
probably do it for another 30 years.” 

They had a dinner date with friends earlier in the 
week in a midtown restaurant. 

“We’re OJC.,” he was saying now of his relationship 
with his former fianede. “Put that in big capital letters. We 
realized that we weren’t ready, that’s why we called off 
the wedding. But she’s really bloomed. Life is but a dream 
— shaboora. Life's been good to me, good to her, good to a 
lot of people. Tm into recording now, into movies. I have to 
sit down to see what makes me happy. You can have all 
the money in the world, but that doesn’t mean you’re 
happy. You’ve got to get all the gusto out of life you can.” 

"That’s a beer commercial," somebody said. 

"That’s a life commercial,” he suggested. "But the 
secret is, everybody has to have their own thing to make 
’em happy. And you can’t do it alone. No good." 

It almost sounded like another proposal. 


to reach the final here. But 

while Martina’s husky frame Continued on Page 14, Columns 


Connors on Cup Squad 

Jimmy Connors and Vitas CcruljUis will bead ihe 
United States Davis Cup team that will oppose Vene- 
zuela in the opening round of the 1976 North American 
Zone draw Oct. IT-19 in Tucson, Aria. 

Tony Trabert, the new .American captain. alsi> named 
Brian Gottfried, Dick Stockton, Rose ex? Tanner and 
Erik van Dillen to the six-man squad for the match ac 
the Tucson Racquet Club. 

Trabert’s selections confirmed the return of the 23- 
year-old Connors to the Davis Cup. after a personality 
conflict with Dennis Ralston, the former American 
captain. 

Others selected yesterdav by Trahen to the complete 
United Stoles squad were* Arthur Ashe. Eddie Dibbs. 
Bob Lutz, Cliff Richey. Stan Smith and Harold Solomon. 


Orioles Turn Back 
Yanks , Medich, 5-4 

By PAUL L. MONTGOMERY. 

Sp»rl*i tc 1 The New Iw» Tima 


BALTIMORE. Sept. 5— The 
Yankees, fresh from a sweep 
of a two-game series at De- 
troit, were out early at Me- 
morial Stadfum today to cut 
up old touches with’ the Or- 
ioles. who have dropped 
eight games behind the 
American L eague East after 
losing a two -game series here 
to Boston. 

The . Yankees were here 
for a doubte-header tonight, 
a night game tomorrow and 
another contest Sunday af- 
ternoon. The Sunday contest, 
with Catfish Hunter going 
against Jim Palmer, promises 
to be an extravaganza. Aside 
from the duel between two 
of the league's better pitch- 
ers, each fan will receive 
a free seaf cushion and Com- 
mander John Crews will at- 
tempt to parachute from 3,- 
500 feet on to one of the 
cushions in the stadium in- 
field. 

The Oriole won The opener, 
5-4. 


In the first game. George 
Medich was seeking his 13 til 
victor.' of the year for the 
Yankees against 15 defeats. 
His opponent was Wayne 
Garland, making his first 
start of the season for the 
Orioles after 25 relief ap- 
pearances. 

Weaver Doesn't Concede 

Though the Yankees are 
effectively out of the pen- 
nant race, they could prob- 
ably get back in it if Ihe rest 
of Lhcir games were against 
Detroit. After winning S-0 
on Wednesday night behind 
Hunter, they" won S-l last 
night as Rudy May pitched a 
five-hitter and Thurman Mun- 
son drove in three runs. 
Munson had four runs batted 
in the night before in Hunt- 
er’s game. 

At the stadium today be- 
fore the game. Earl Weaver, 
the Baltimore manager, re- 
fused to be pessimistic about 

Continued on Page 15, Column 5 


Schroeder 
Leads by 2 
On 66-131 





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ASKlatod Pro* 


DAY’S GOLF TOURNEY: On for Hie Work! Series Of Golf, which begins today in Akron, Ohio, 
ft,, are Lou Graham, Jack Mcklaus, Tom Weiskopf and Tom Watson, all tWehoIders. Pane 14. 


COLUMBUS, Ga^ Sept. 5 
(AP) — John Schroeder. ap- 
parently out of his season- 
long slump, continued his 
sharp shooting today, card- 
ing a 66, ana took a two- 
stroke lead after the second 
round of the SI 00,000 South- 
ern open golf tournament. 
His total was 131, nine un- 
der par. 

Schroeder, son of Ted 
Schroeder. the former tennis 
star, emerged from a first- 
round tie with Mac McLen- 
don on a blazing finish over 
the 6,971 -yard, par-70 Green 
Island Country Club course. 
Schroeder scored three con- 
secutive birdies to cap his 
excellent round. ! 

Alan Taple, a rookie on ! 
the pro tour, was second 
at 133 after a 66 over the 
hilly, narrow course in 
sweltering humidity and 
mid-90 degree heat 

Tapie, a 26-year-old from 
Newport Beach, Calif., who 
to date, carded five birdies 
and one bogey. 

McLendon managed a 69 
for 134 along with Hubert 
Green who had a 66. 

George Burns, who recently 
turned pro and was playing 
■ in the last of die three tour- 
naments he is eligible for be- 
fore attending pro qualifying 
school, shot a 65 to lead a 
group at 135. 

The 26-year-old Bums, i 
from Port Washington. L. I. 
had seven birdies and two 
bogeys in his strong round. 

Also at 135 were Mark j 
Hayes and Terry Dill. Haves ; 
had a 65 and Dill a 69. Her- < 
mil Zariey and J. C. Snead ! 

’-Continued on Pape 14, Column 8 i 


Look at it this way: 

At your wife’s last dinner party 
the French bread 
came from France, of course. 

Why are you still drinking ordinary scotch? 














K PROOF BLtNOED SCOTCH WHISKY- RE NF IE LD IMPORTERS. UD-NX 





t 


THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 6. 19/5 


Soy Numero Uno en Belmont F uturityd Es V erdad? Maple l&d RamffaltsPr 


By STEVE CADY 

“Bill, watch it," a stable- 
hand shouted yesterday in 
Bam 34 ai Belmont Park. 
*He’s gonna getcha." 

A horse they call “Devil" 
has stretched his neck over 
the webbing of 

At the the stall and was 
doing his best to 
* , fasten bared teeth 

rracKs Qnt0 ^ turned 

back of Bill 
Borders. But Borders, assist- 
ant trainer for Homer Pardue, 

had gauged the distance 
preperiy. 

“No ” the Kentuckian said, 
not bothering to turn around, 
“he ain’t gonna get me.” 

The horse with the devilish 
personality is Soy Numero 
Uno, a 2-year-old colt who 
will be one of the favorites 
in today’s S 6 th running of 
the $118,053 Futurity despite 
the fact he has had only 
one race. 

“One race doesn’t make a 
race horse,” said Borders, 
“but he’s done everything 
right so far. And he’s tough." 

The colt's name (Spanish 
for *Tm Number One"), re- 
flects the impatient horse- 
naming policy of his co- 
owner, Joseph Straus. 

He also has a mind of his 
own. To keep passersby from 
walking too close to his stall, 
?. yellow rubber “cone” about 
i feet high detours traffic 
around the open door. 

But Soy Numero Uno’s 
groom, John Clarence (Jackiej 
Ebert, insists his favorite 
devil is just playful. 

"He’s not mean,” said 
F.bert, putting his bare fore- 
arm sideways between the 
colt’s outstretched teeth. 
“See? 1 don’t know about 
other people, but he doesn’t 
bite me.” 

Another uncritical friend 
of Soy Numero Uno is Jacinto 
Vasquez. the jockey who 
rode him in that first race 



W3 

Triple Optimist, right, wins first race at Belmont, with Gene’s Legacy second and 
Posterity in third place. The winner was ridden by Ron Turcotte. 


and will ride him again today 
in the Futurity. 

“He does it because he 
can send them in once to 
The Jockey Club and get 
them accepted.” Borders ex- 
plained. “I asked Mr. Straus 
once, ‘Don’t you ever name 
these horses Smith of Jones?’ 
He’s got a whole bamful 
of horses with Spanish 
names.” 


Borders, Pardue’s brother- 
in-law and, for 30 years, his 
partner and assistant, point- 
ed to another stall a few 
feet away. 

“Hey, Gator," he called 
cut to the groom, “what’s 
that filly’s name?" 


know what these names 
stand for.” 

Mona Predosa. it turned 
out, means "Beautiful Mon- 
key’ in Spanish. Another 
Straus horse, Az Igazi, has 
a name that means "the real 
thing” in Hungarian. And 


“Mona Preciosa." came the v next year, the stable will 


reply. 

“See what I mean?” said 
Borders. “We don’t even 


send out a whole troop of 
2 - year - olds with Chinese 
names. Sample: Mon Fu, 


Belmont Race Charts 


COSTS, nr Triune) e FnbUcaUom. me. (The Dailr Radac Form) 

Friday, Sept. 5. 11th day. Weather clear, track fast 


FIRST— 56,500. cl. nrtces. S2SA»S3&000: SIXTH— S9X00. allow., 3 and 4 Y0. 6F. 
3 and S YO. 1,‘aK (dnilel. Winner. S. Winner, Red Tree Farm's dl. I.. 3. by Nobta 
Sommer's b. e.. 3, by Northern Dancer- Commander -Jam bo. Trainer, V. J. Nlciw- 
Allegro. Trainer. P. Martin. Net, S3.9G3. Km. Net 55.-I00. Times— 73; J7; 1:12 4/5. 

T1 m«S— 23 4/S; 472/S; 1:131/5; 1:40; _ n — ss- — ; — 

1 :46 3/S. 0TB Starter* PP Vt Ife Fin. Odds 


Chris Evert Reaches 
U.S. Final First Time 


9WT’ Continued From Page 13 

; Kli 4/;, 

Fin, odds nine points in the match. 


FEATURE MATCHES TODAY 

STADIUM COURT 


meaning “a million rich.” 
This colt, a son of Ack Ack, 
is a yearling now. 

in the meantime, the stable 
awaits Soy Ninhero Uno .» 
first big test. The colt, a 
bay son of Damascus, did 
not make his debut until 
Aug. 25, opening day of the 
Belmont Park fall meeting. 
He won by four lengths, “rid- 
den out." running six fur- 
longs in 1:09 415. 

At Arlington . . . 

Richard Bailey’s Dearly 
Precious, who has won seven 
straight races after losing in 
her debut, heads a field of a 
dozen juvenile fillies today 

for the Arlington- Washington 

Lassie Stakes, which will be 
worth $113,230 if all start. 

Dearly Precious, a supple- 
mentary nominee for $5,000 
for the six-furlong Lassie, 
has won six stakes — The 
Polly Drummond, Fashion, 
Colleen. Astoria, Sorority 
and Spinaway. Others en- 
tered, each under 119 pounds, 
include Free Journey. Mary's 
Fantasy and Famed Princess. 

Soy Numero Uno went into 
that race for maidens (i.e.: 
nonwinners) as a 6-1 chance 
in the overnight line. But 
he came out of the starting 
gate as the 4-5 favorite, on 
the strength of fast work- 
outs. . . 

No 2-year-old around has 
been working any faster. At 
Saratoga, -he had five-furlong 
drills of a minute fiat, then 
58 2!5 seconds, then 0:58 
I!5, in addition to a six-fur- 
long spin of 1:12 3!5. 

Here at Belmont, where 
he had a final three-furlong 
tune-up of 0:36 2!5 yester- 
day. he recently worked five 
furlongs in 0:58 315. In the 
advance line for the 6 %-fur- 
long Futurity Soy Numero 
Uno is listed as the 5-2 third 
choice back of undefeated 
Turn of Turia and undefeated 
Jackknife. Eight 2-year-olds 
have been entered. 

Straus, a retired Texas 
businessman, bought Soy 
Numero Uno for $53,000 at 
last season’s Keeneland 
Yearling Sales. That was 
$43,000 more than he paid 
a few years back for th 
colt’s half-brother. No Le 


Entry Wins In $ 75 , 000 Akr 


In Jumping 


Spcfioi to Thu '.itrrt Torn Times 

STONY BRQOK. L.L, Sept. 
5— Maple Leaf Farms’ Rogue 
River could do not better 
than a fourth-place finish in 
the final class, the Stake, but 
still coasted to the junior 
jumper championship today 
at the North Shore Horse 
Show. 

The event, one of the few 
remaining Class A" shows in 
the metropolitan area, is be- 
ing held at the Old Field 
Club on the edge of Long 
Island Sound here. It con- 
cludes Sunday. 

Ridden by Debbie Thoring- 
ton. Rogue River won the 
day’s first class. That victory 
clinched the title for him, 
and his fourth-place finish in 
the Stake added a point for 
a total of 14. 

For Doubles, entered by 
the Double Tree Farm and 
handled by Katherine Birds - 
all. the situation was far 
grimmer. Doubles was the re- 
serve champion with 1 1 
points, but going into the 
final two classes he was far 
bade and his prospects look- 
ed dim. _ , . . 

However, Doubles finished 
second to Rogue River in the 
opening test and then won 
the Stake by beating Cristi- 
T nar Farms’ Joey in a double 
jumpoff. Doubles and Joey 
were the only two entries to 
tour the course without a 
fault in the second jumpoff. 
Doubles won on time, 46.807 
seconds to 48.570 for Joey. 
That triumph was worth 5 
more points and assured Dou- 
bles of the reserve title. 

Robin Bacon's Twentieth 
Century Limited, who was 
entered in two divisions, cap- 
tured blue ribbons in both. 
With Miss Bacon riding. 
Twentieth Century Limited 
won an amateur-owner hunt- 
er class and later, with . Ron- 
nie Mutch, a professional, up, 
took a first-year green work- 
ing hunter event. 

THE CHIEF AWARDS 


0TB Starters PP ft 
B-Triele Optimist . 2 Jt'l 1“ 
E-Gm'S Legacy . S 4H» S» 
J-Poslcrihr .. ..10 103 7i 
K-FraO Dealin .11 4“ ft'j 

C-Tftildi 3 4Mj 

L-Brsulip 12 5* 

G-Abov? Hi* Belt .7 7* 5“ 

F-Confettl II . ... 6 a 11 ? o'? 
D-*0tf Hie Record . 4 II® 1017 
H ■ -Regal Talenl ..0 12 12 

l -Valiant Sucar .. 9 I's 3"-' 
A- Handsome Tod .1 ft? n s 


Fin. Odds E-Proud Patile .5 Hi 1“ lY? 3.40 

iv F-CaldBo.-: 6 9" 4' \3" 

s 5 AP*"** . I !■' 3* 3-* K.W 

,3-21 D-Prlr.oess F«ur . .4 2» 2'i 4U 2 33 

4?'« ' r ®J C-Flari Frinras . 3 4“ 5= S»3 2.33 

:•* 4 '-“ B -Magical Lad# . 2 t> l ft IS-SO 

a* oau . — , -- — — , - . 

'-*} Proud Pattte .... (Maple) a .so AM in 

& SrSiGifdBox . . (Bracdalel . 4 JO 141 

f . jJ'SPdlh Grlsa . .. (Martens) .. 5.83 

ff.V i? is! 0TB Myotts, (El 120, 4.00, 3^0; (FI 


3 >o slamming her racquet to the M AJ ru Ju u!ii 1 Bl,<!: H,waM St,, “ n,le,l, Hace, a good stakes winner. 
«•£ dirt in disgust after the eighth , p.m/^jiiiimv comwr; us. Biom bo™. izzy Proler, operator of a 
? 32 gsiTK* and flashing a sarcastic ta:ond MMch-Oirf* Ev«t ». Evonne cool- company in Houston, 


thumb-and -forefinger OJv. to mird Maich— Nianuoi o. -antes Guliferaia co-owner of Sov Numero 

■ ; . - Ullic __ J 


i lines wo man on Chrissie’s 


(BriSI ,JB 4 jo ai? backhand lob that broke her 
'. (Martens) .. s.H at love in the ninth game. 


9 i's 3i 'ill*'* 2170 a.fi off 
1 91? n s 12 34.00 3 -™-.* an : 


"She could have won it if 


VIJA5. 

pisurtti AAalcti — Okfcer- Riessen vs. Con no: > 
Hastast. 

, GRAND STAND COURT 
II AM.— Junior Final: Greer Stevens us. 
Natasha Cttvmreva. 


she forgot about that point ’’ om nWg 


■ Dead heal tor ftti. — i i r li ‘v V 'V-h:(2..*< ! nd 0 r T' admiflin® that ore^sure had Fourih“Maldi— Mnore-Cohen vs '-.■inner of 7“,' ornw He’s DUt 

Triple opiimisi ..ntaddiu sjo « ]*•¥, W’ r^ L « iS ' aaminin 0 mat pressure naa Fl i n . RMd chw^ousernan. let Brow. «es put 

Gena's Lwacr . (Cordero Jr.) . .4.40 &40 ; *rjv Tom . j : made her more tentative on together good. ’ 


SEVENTH — 5 1 MHO, alia*'/.. 3YO and uc. 


Miss Evert said afterwanL 


Uno. 

“He’s a good sound colt,” 
said Pardue. “We didn’t rush 
him because he came up from 
the farm last spring on the 
small side. We wanted to 


Posterity . . (BracdlU) ■ ■■ LOP 

OTB pjvdHs. [B1 9.40. 5.00, 4J»; (E) 
4.0ft 3J0; (J) 5.63. 


JSiPnole. Nd, SAM. Tiima-U: 46 3/5; l:il: 
4=7 1:36 3/5. 


secoNo-um d. oncas. {SaSlL: 

2YO. if. V.lniMr, 5. Sommer's *. b. or br. " 

bv Trefiado^ivees Past. Trainer. F. Martin ■ 

Ne t. 53,603. TimcSS34.-5; 482/5; J: 14 4/5. I^iJVfSuWw^ 
TB Starters PP li Fin. Odds [H-Pantomlme ’. 


' ‘ ’ ground strokes and too reliant 
— Fiii - Shu on the lob. “I think she lost 
~ — • the match on that point. The 


together good.’ 


fu, 5.63 last three games, she was 


3 iP io 4 j«> l ’■:» thinking about that one 


0TB Sterters 
L-Cle:,n Sidle . 
M-Abbey R. ... 
0- Joanne Behave 
K-Gra;te>a E. . 
C-Hrldw Jot . 
G-Bush VYomsn 
E-Atercv Percy . 
H-Csml Love .. 
a AcnpCbiliim . 
R4Vurumn Melody 


: ltj I** 
. 5 o’- 3” 

10 nil, ns 
6 ‘ 
n 4*4 7* 

. 4 03 10 

.37 1’ 

5 10 9* 

. I 3!; 4 1 ; 

9 6 H 


1 “ l= 5 i 
3*4 

23 3-% 


[? 3-j|» gS&fiff 1 . 


31 5«* 

4*7 A'-s 


? 2 o pcinL 
oJa Miss Evert said she "felt 
6M sorry" for Martina’s collapse. 
S-S would have accepted a "let" 


FonnvCal (Amrl 9. 

jm Special Love .(Hoodhauwi . 
gs^ ^ « Amberjlem ... (Bata) . 
VM EXACTA 110-6) PAID SSL SO. 


)“ 7N io would have accepted a "let" 

; 1. on th epoint but did not let 

taw! 9M fio 9ji U P "because I knew if I did, 
Sana) 7M 1 wouldn’t win the match." 


A Constant Contrast 

K-Aunrninwmr ™ OTB layoffs. (I) 9^0. 4^0. 3^0; (F» 

Dean Slate . ..(Cordero Jr.) L20 4^0 3J0 ftaj. 9 JO; (E) 7J0. Exada IJ-F) nM MlSS Goolagong’s COnfl- 
Mtataw'.'lMcliffl! :: ■■■ dence against Miss Wade 

DOUBLE (2-71 PAID 06.411 EIGHm-CMOO. aiMar..' 3YO a.rf uo, 

OTB saroffs, (L) 7 SO. 4JUJJ0; (M) l'AM Hurl). Winner. W. K. Gi/moerrs 6L. tnat adSO Will determine 

s jo. 3jo; to) 4 . 00 . Double (B-u eaid b. or b^ b„ 7. by TNj-n7v?ii^oMeto:w. whether she stavs back or at- 

$34,40. Trjlrier, P. G. Jotirvson. M»?l f 31. -000. Times— „ • ,>■ _ . 

- - — 251/5; 491/s; i:M; i:38; 2:«i/5. tacks against Miss Evert. 

. OTB start srs pp v, m. Fin. Odds "I know if one thing doesn’t 

? YO- 6F. Winner, M. L. Wcnznci & ea. f. -■ ■ , — --- ■ llfA|l i. r*-- _ l” 

In Liqhtmiifl Orphan-Miss RIJawav. Trainer, B-Ywlot 2 2M| 7* l B *J 9.90 WOTK, I IT3 gOUlg tO SV* itCH 

nm -“ ,, “&8&ui-.::l X SLS' iS ?. v . e C. Ev ^rS? il i.J fter ? i !: 

n y n r , . - ~ = = -r. — ; jttt . c-Big Red Devil ..3 3^i jVj 44 5 .m mg Miss Wade’s bid at 5-all 

OTB Startera P? 1 — 9?^* D-Barcas 4 5 5 5 2JD with a Inw harlrhnnrl CPrviro 


grew with each rally, a factor 
that also will determine 


trained constant Including 
contrasting . personalities, 
backgrounds, lifestyles and 
court styles. It is precisely 
Evonne’s' unpredictable nature 
that keeps Chrissie guessing. 

Asked about her chances. 
Mj’ss Goolagong said, *Tm in 
a better position. I'm seeded 
four, she’s No. 1. She’s got 
a lot of pressure. I hope she 
feels it tomorrow." 

WOMEN’S SINGLES 


In Baltimore ... 


Anuteur-Ouppar Jumpers— Country Club Sld- 
blss' 5ilwr Lining. 

Small Ponr Hunters— Libby McKinney’s For- 
get Me Not. 

Large Foot Hunters — Mrs. David Guycr’s 
Foiaris Make Believe. 

Junior JUMpers— MapJa Leaf Farms' Rogue 
Rl\fT. 

_i,rsc Junior Working Hunters Under Sadtiis 
—Double Tree Farms' Old Sail. 

3 rial i Junior WortUng Hunters under SaddJe 
—Tan iTwrman's Frotf Fire. 

Ama< our Starter Harrtors Under Saddle— Robin 
flica/i Twcntietb Contvry LlmilM. 

First-Year Green Working Hunters, Morning 
Cass—' Twentieth Century Limited. 

Scmnd-YNr Green Working Hunters, Morning 
Cass— Mrs. Guyer's Soring Trust. 

Small Pcnr Hunters Under Saddle— Lynn ce 
R otti'a Orton. 

Lem Porrv Hunters Under Saddle— Polaris 
Mska Believe. 

Small Model Pony Hinders— Laurie Cavai- 
laro's Crystal Blue. 

Large Model Pony Hunters— Slwlly Guyer's 
Sautnern Grey. 

Adult Horesrrunahln Championship. Division 


SEMIFINALS ROUND 


dence again5t Miss Wade Chris Evert defeated Martina Hivramova, 


CecnosJovakla, 6-4, 6-4: Evonne Geoia- 


A key government witness 
in the case against four jock- 
eys and three others charged 
with fixing a horse race at 
Bowie offered conflicting tes- 
timony about his role in the 
alleged conspiracy. Carlos 
Jimenez, a 29-yea-oJd jockey, 
under cross-examination . by 
two defense attorneys, Peter 
Angelos and Leslie Gladstone, 
contradicted his previous tes- 
timony that he participated 
in the plot and denied ever 


A— Ciempion, Allison Byrne, . 1 q pJnti; 
nsrrvr, Susan Hunts, 7. 


reserv;, Susan Hunts, 7. 

Adult Horsemanship Championship, Division 
fi— Champion, Mary Star*, 10; . reserve. 
Mrs. Laura Lesch, 8. 

Junior Jumper S rate— Double Tree Farms' 
Cables. 

Junior . Jumper. OumBlsnshio— Champion. 

RjSim River, 14; reserve, Doubles, II. 
Small Pony ConformaHtm Hunters— Orion. 
Laree Pony Conform atfon Hunlers— Southern 
Gray. 

Intennedlare Jumpers— Ralph icSanetrs's Lord 
Raven. 

Firs! -Year Green Working Hurler:, Afternoon 
Oass— Mr. and Mrs. Winston Guest's 
Dlddknl. 

Second-Year Working Hunters. Aftsmaoi 
Class— Leslie Ewing’s Polaris Sofa. 
Renter Worklna Hunters, Appointment— Mrs. 
Goyor's Wareslan. 


tacks against bliss Evert. 


(hint. Australia, defeated Virginia Watte, knowing about it. 

Britain, 7-5 j. w. The seven are on trial in 

M n.^«°r.n,?h ES United States District Court 

QUARTER ROUND 


Miss Mann 


I .know if one thing doesn’t 


4? 4/5; 1:12 3.-5 
OTB Siartn 


A-Liahlnln? V.'ay 
E-Mocha Bear 


E-Hatchel Man 
■ v, n C-B1g Red Devil 
Rn - Od ds D-Barrw ... 

i» .w 


9 90 work, Tm going to switch »n, Sweden. 6-2 6-2 

i.50 over " Evonne said, after Foil- semifinal round the ninth-ace triple on reD. 

2-« L K,. Marly Rlessen and Ton, Ok ter. the Nether- 14, bought 38 tickets On the 

5.00 mg Miss Wade S bid at 5-all lands, defeated Fred McNair and Shcrwrod io ^ T™C n t4„7 VKQA 

119 with a low backhand service 


detea leu Armlstcao Neely and Tenny Svens- arrange 


charges they conspired to T T J 
ange the order of finish in J.S l^CSClCr 


the ninth-ace triple on Feb. 


F-Knrous Pleasure . ft 3i’? 3 ' 1 1 3^ 
D-Lillie Broadway 4 7 S a 


B-Qulci. Qul: ... 
G Noble Rctledion 
C-Fo<y Imo 


2 5*j 7 S» 
7 4 3 4i»j 6« 

3 «»! 6’j 7 


4«U 9.30 
S» 35.00 


ISS* ICa, ?212f?i > 21,80 2^ return that Vicginia volleyed 

HiidniMan"”.' (BraotoM . 2M past the baseline. 


lama, oeiFdira rrec mcnair ana anerweaa n 0 ,» CCg4 

Stewart, Connors and Nastase defeated 2-8-12 Combination for 5684 
Dick siocvioi and Erik wan diiiqu. t4, 64. and cashed the winning tick- 


WOMEN'S DOUBLES 


By 2 on 67 


d'S OTB ojwHs. (81 20.60, 6.20, 100; (A) 
f, JO 3-M. 2^0; (E| 160. 


T-i. ■■ ■ , . _ SEMIFINAL ROUND 

The attraction Of the Goo- J »n King and Rosemary C«als de- 
lagong- Evert rivalry has re- 906 Ml “ N-vn,,lwa ' 


3-40 l* Lm NINTH — $7,000. cl. prices, SI 1, 500-S9, 500. 

■ ■ <V ,iS^ ‘ 100 ft’-F. Winner, Mm. M, Marks's ch. c. 

J onxn Pfen aro .. (Baaai ... — mu ^ Qyj, commander-Double Rank. Trainer, 

EXACTA (14) PAID S&40. M. Mortis. Net. St.200. Times— 223/5; 46 2/5; 

' OTB aayoHs. IA1 UO, 120. 2.10: (E) l :lg{ 1:18 i,S - 

t«ft 110; (FI 120. Eudi IA-E) PiW <jTB 5rart« pp V, ^ Fin. Odds 

S7JQ. - ■ — — — — — — 

— — TT- t-Oa.ihteCn.miMn I? JS IV- 1» 4.90 

FOURTH—^ 510.000, (I. wires. 535X00-00000 B-Desi- Clerk 2 tV« S'" 2", 14,10 

3 YO and UP, Or. Winner. A. G. Vender- K-lnaharsLKt . . 3 ID 1 9': 3'% 13.20 
hill's ill m.. 5- br Flag Raiser-Bolseaita. F -SI lent Success . ft 7“ 4Uj j* I.B3 

Trainer. R. P. ULe. Net. 56.00. Times- C Harold's La :nd . 3 ?J'? 3= 5«'? 7.9J 

'”3 5. 467.'5: 1:113-5. 1-CcTlnCloul .. . 11 II* 6“ ftii, 4 j.70 

, 7,~ — K-Leadcrkmnte .11 5“ i'« 7'-'i 20 W 

OTB starttn PP U * ; Fin. 0 ^5 J Nelioral Note . ID !* 6' Si': Mm 

C~Yoll1 >7 S’ l's« 11.90 A- A Jody Tar .. . l I* 2 1 !? ** 7.ifl 

A-tinal Suit . I JI': 4» J.ftO E-lsatq- S «• 10» }0«: 15.5? 


Roosevelt Results 


THURSDAY NIGHT 

— r- . FIRST— B.S Oft pace, mile. 

PP W "2 F in. O dds [-Cardinal J. N (D'ckim) S.C0 3J0 ?.fl0 

TTls 11Z is am 9 — F ct S. PE 590 ". ‘T. Ta»ta> ... a.« 180 

n Jf? It,, WMtts Secret N (GWm r)_ ...... 340 


Horse Needs a Poke 
To Be Successful 


C-Ydll 

WMte'sFM 3 P- SiS T:« D-HmlcW'.'.. 4 12 i: IMUi ji.« WtoUj.' ^ (HoJi.F)Uini • ” iM .““1 «««*«=** 

.. 1 5* *»' 5* 5.50 G -S ynonymous ■■■■7 9': IT* U 40.80 . OTB .[ettars^-C. B. D. , TTnje— 2:03 7/5. PokehetailhegO. 

aaaa ■= ‘ ^ 5 j s RWnwse “ a g wh “ *• - 

Ypnt .. _ !'5 J-® lnJ i Mysl * c * (Bma) . caie 526.90. of Jet Traffic was a yearling, 

S ffrw&Pti "‘mmm vn triple paid 5440 s. ' <1P lnn a . stablehand who spoke 

. or* “rstK. ig> 24.40. 940. 340; (a) OTB (Li 1540, lift tM: (b> |^J2? n &5li2? n<, Tr fC w2S l «> "' 5a> iKS ^ 5ro ^ en English said: "Poke 

64ft 340; (C) 120. 1100, 7.20; (H) 6J0. Trial. (L-B-HJ M ^ J. 6 - ^ h _ (_=, ho ' on „ 


1 5* ft* 
6 6“ 7 

? !«'? 3i' 


l 1 ? 3 >'m I.MlD-Horolc Aaoc 


\h ij, N twimvj M Baltimore (ap) — a 3 - 

!ii i? J^T year-old-gelding who won 

3 5;;> B’flfe'Ma.'t'fcita. Claiming races at Pimlico last 
* ni S:o!tlt SKr,t Mld m - spring and was favored in 

6* B* 1 2 30 70 n SECOMD“.-5#5flO, Wnt c. ffii/e. civ mao tKnf 

niiv 7.10 3-Fros^Smlle iWGHmour) 5.:P 3-CO 73l race at Uiat 

io» " io‘’ : 15.50 *-«?surTiriMr tR.jtashi ... 3 .Bo 3 i 4 track and at Bowie is named 


ets in the four days following 
the race. 

*T didn’t pull him [his 
horse] back and I never knew 
.the race had been fixed," 
Jimenez told Angelos. “I 
didn’t really like ray horse in 
that race. I didn't think he 
even had a chance to win,” 
he said. Just moments earlier. 
Jimenez had detailed for As- 
sistant United States Attor- 
ney Daniel Clements his role 
in the conspiracy. 


S.SOlG-Synoftvmous 


»*■* §1? iDoui 


It seems that when the son 
of Jet Traffic was a yearling, ' 
a stablehand who spoke 


F;FIH-K40D. cl. Brlcn, 540400-535400, 
2YO. 6F. Winner. Mrs. L. Liurln's Or. b. 
or br. c. br Beau Mjrter-Bhalhm. Trainer, 
L. Liurin. Nel, 54400. Times— 23 1/5; 

4r;.s; l:U vs. 


Fin. Odtfs 
1*1 2.40 
:» 4.90 


Attendance, I647B. 

Track perl -mul uel handle. 52428.924. 
OTB handle, 51,943478. 


0TB letters— G. B. E. . Time— 243 2/5. he tail he gO.” 

_ Aurlene Siyoter. Drulllp, Berna Hanover. . . __ 

- Hawkins lofccli and Magic Air atsi started. In hlS first 26 races Over 

Evach iV-j] King and Hanoi Ick DandrJ , . . 

paid 344 two seasons, the Virgima- 

r-wMuneyMe vv^ferT' 1 j'.m 2jo cm horse won eight times. 

_ 1— Buddy D. (N. DauDlalvrl 749 a.ffl 

— 5-Aidweiss P. (R. Dancer) 160 

OTB letters— B, A. E. Tune — 2:03 1 -'j. #T\ j j T> 

C ire icon Treveri-, Culver Pen". BUIr I OflH V S rLntT’ 

.. Au5>(n. A. I In One and Dnie Pop Pod also A V/V40,Jr w l—ALX U. 

11 iteried. 

* FIFTH— 513400. hnl. mi.e. Horse* listed In 0 

,S 4— UqrjNUx?i> ( Patterson J 1340 5.60 3.*0 Letter d*slw 

;■ S -“ FIRST-594M. aiio-av.. 3 yd and u», itel 
j OTB letters— D. E, B. rme-?:IU. Lyndon w ™ 

3 Virlo.y. Hera Aimanurst. V/ay To Raa»n, A-Buck Private *ili i«no , 

5 Sfilawly O-amp and Lively A:ma alH started. B-Ouulk Long ' 110 RTurentte J 

5 Big triple (Light K Lively. Vlrgnes Charmer c-Olal a Lad ..!!ll9 K L Tl/rc ° ttg 


C-Tiam 2 3“ 4'4 l*i «' , .40 

FOuiytaul Aim .. 5 I's •*. 4.90 
D IVeoden Tcelh . 3 C'i j'“ 3-’j 5.00 

A.ButtomxoWlrcc 1 SJ S« 4« 10.0 

E Ted to Win .... * l« 3".s S>* .10 
C-ftlUchael of Manlk ft 6 6 6 31.00, 


Belmont Jockeys 


G- MfehMl'of Manlk ft ft 6 “ 6 SL OP ISteMapfe 8 ! 

flam (WoodtauM) ftOO 340 240 Jorge Veiasouee' 

Constant Aim ....(Vawuerl ... 4.M 340 Rori Tu-ratlr 
Wooden Teeth .. (Sanllaool ... 340 Jacinto Vasques 

EXACTA (2-5) PAID 52440. «Kl . i ’ 

OTB nyoffs, (Cl ft4ft Mft s (Ft Ceoreo Marion* 
44ft 240; (D) 34ft Eucta IC-F) nM Viren Bracda,, 
522 J 8 , mllcfi vpneiw 


Pac-8 Follows N.CJLJV. 

SAN FRANCISCO. SepL 5 
(UPI) — The Pacific Eight 
Conference said today . it 
would follow National Col- 
legiate Athletic Association 
policy on football squad 
limits. A spokesman said the 
N-CAA's 60-man limit would 
apply in the conference until 
litigation involving N.CjVA. 
rules is settled. 


Today’s Entries at Belmont 


j and Lunar Lodi re id SI 42. 50. 
SIXTH— SS40D. pjre. mile. 


Hones listed In order of nost positions 
Letter designates OTB listing 

FIRST— 5940), allow., 3YO and un, 41; F. SIXTH— £20400, allow., 3YQ and up, lira. 

^ PrelL (tort). 

„ . ^ »- . Oddx A-Anoril 11 Ill R. Turcotte- 10-1 

S^ k , t Pr , lva,e ■ j 5 Low ■ - ... B-l B-u-Shroddnr 112 Brarclale Y-l 

9 M . u,k .Lwfl ..IIP R. Turcotte 6-1 C-v L J«cqiMS Wnp .111 Martens ........ 5-1 

Ola! a Lad ....119 — M-l D-Candle Stand ..116 J. Vasquez 15-1 


■■.!!? A. Cordero' Jr.":: 8-1 E-Infreold Here ' I IB i Cordero jr. ' iii'S-l 


Tonight’s Roosevelt Entries 


5— Jen Alan 10. Ouncldeyl J2.30 I3.B0 B.m F-AJIshamar 19 t I fi 

3— UiuISowj I Hen. FTIionl ... 3.63 240 GJVudltertum " no pinroi Si! ■ u1S!jll , MSbL‘. 1 IIS i5"! 


SSsmwi 8gsa...iB titasswar:.!# 

uS r 1 Anirij? . Al SK ,.12-I|.--T.V. Neamcntar 116 15-1 


Horses listed in order cf MSI Mslttafis 
Letter designates OTB lisilna 


FIFST— S5400. uu d» C-3. mile. 


A— Skieoy Slar (G. Mrerl 
B — Jane Again IT Tarter I 


, , 114 Blur Chis. Elanora. Bootsle Barrett, Dar J^eiuslie Rltai 9 vrSaseS- ■li ir'jLri^uuSr^ 1 2 i 

r cf nosl POSitWlB Oroam Bey also started. X-Jota Bren ? j iw 1 fS’SSSX.rH "1 a XSS2F H 

5 OTB lisilna Con Alan and Loyal Song) paid L-Paiare GomIp 119 lmnarate ■■ ■ ■ ' 8- 1 L G £ 3te j. a^ddsr^r^T^Jipnnas' 

m OM *^ -■ »» **■ <*•* 

"s £iEse%£ frisu.... ■■ a tia.'SKs' “ a a (-jf- as , .... . 

■ ?■! IHBU4Um.-R.V- **• 'tSTUSEK W Ka».S9* IK ILS5- H 


DALLAS, Sept. 5 (UP!)— 
Carol Mann shrugged off a 
flash of lightning as she 
walked onto the final green, 
dropped a two-foot birdie 
putt for a five-under-par 67 
and took a two-stroke lead 
today after the first round of 
the Dallas Women’s open 
golf tournament. 

Miss Mann, a three-time 
‘ winner of the Ladies Pro- 
fessional Golf Association 
circuit this year, led Betsy 
Cullen. Joyce Kazmierski 
and. Sandra Spuzich. Each 
carded a 69 over the Brook- 
haven Country Club course. 

At 70 was a group that 
included Sandra Burns, Sue 
. Roberts. Patty Bradley, Laura 
Baugh, Judy Rankin and an 
amateur, Nancy Hager. 

Sandra Palmer, the United 
States Women’s Open winner 
and . p re tournament favorite 
here, headed a group at 71. 

Miss Mann, running third 
in . prize money on the tour 
this year behind Miss Palmer 
and JoAnne Garner, the Dal- 
las defender birdied four 
holes on the back nine. 

After running in a 25-foot 
birdie putt at the par-3 17th 
fo move into a one-stroke 
lead. Miss Mann — playing 
in the last group of the day 
— knocked her second shot 
on the IStb to within two 
feet of the flag. 

THE LEADING SCORES 


DPI. l ?tM-~G i .. H. A. Tin*— 3:03 4/5. E-Sablt Linda .. 119 Crowet 


♦I— Saunders Bhrtan (G. PjMjtgl 

SECOND— SftSOft wee, a,«ft 

A— Knrstane (H. Fllton) 

B— Dec PK (F. TaMrteilo) * 

C— Steady Ormy JP, J« W ' 

D— Prince Ma; W- Wlrewl 

C-T 1* Sfclpwr »- 

F_Bestn»n Hanowr (B, Wristar) 

G-DfwRM (Hen- 

H— Bachelor Blui (C. A hhaHBllol 

THIRD— Slft00ftMCC. lnv. 3YO. mllfc 


~To— Bye Btr Giql (B. Webster) 


6-1 rishftt. 

PlGWTH— 57, SOft wee. mile. 


S5JJ.J:;"* ■■ }” f{ A-aaneiw 1I3 lomrete 6-1 

WMOUIKB . . I It BXU 4-T B«8t l Nlfhi# 113 ffti&iflt a_i 

jtew Quote 119 y C-Frankla Adams "l» R. Toreott* " ^ ! ! I 6-5 

SESEr 2 f-i D-nsiwitd 113 vMaHub 10-1 

J-f E-AmeriWiigdoBi .113 ~ 20-1 

OlfaModtre* ...119 yaBjWM 3H p-DonT Be Ule J. 113 B-l, 

THIRD— SSJOft cl.. 3YO and uu, 7 F. G-Rctent 1» J.Vasautz S-l 


Carol Mann 

Sandre Souzlch . . 
Betsy Col ten .. . 
Joycs K«inIersLi 

Amy Aleut# 

Judy Ran#in .... 
Laura Bauoti ... 
Pat Brad lay .... 

Sub Roberts 

Sandra Bums ... 


EIGHTH— SSOiOOO. wee. oren H'cao, trnifc 4— Billy Billy 8»rt rTayIJrj 


FOURTH— 59,003, mdni.. 


3M A-Taddy's Cw. .122 SIM 

- 6-1 B- Princely Glow ..IZJ R. Turcotte IS-1 

fe . ...SI c-HaR liberty ...122 — — 2D>I 

h o-l D-Twn to Turia . .12Z Bata 7-S 

and 4YO. E-Beau Talent :...I22 Vdasousz 20-1 

F-5tate Bank 122 R.Turenft* S-2 

, j r c.a G-sov NumeroUno 122 J. Vasouez 6-1 

z . . . . iT H-ladmlfe / 122 Cragnef 2-1 


•Nancy Hager J6 34-70 

Dabbte Rhodes 36 35—71 

Sandra Palmer 35 36—71 

Dotma Ywmo J4. 37—71 

Sandra Hamit 45 36-71 

Kathy McMullen 36 35—71 

Static/ Han rill 34 37—71 

Sally UjHr 35 35-71 

Louise Brea- 37 34—71 

Gloria Eh ret 36 35—71 

Janet AnM 35 36—71 

Kaltrr Welsdi 36 35-71 


CTiftgrt Aim Creed 36 36-7! 

Kathy Whltwarth 77 35-J2 

JoAnne Canter 35 37— 72 

Rotart? Altars 37 35—72 

•Amateur. 


tScSaK- a ,p - ’*'■ 

7- .8“ _ B-l inyru « i t nm. n.v-e. cia« , 


-fifth- 513 m ^ T ai I ftMwife • • • '.H yea« and will c 

( . ' format ^1 me. 


0TB. E «. C smih, .. j-; d. *o «d 

; C-Wlcked .Larh . 1(8 Montoya 12-1 A-Siiwr Prlnn ..“III R.I.VSIQ 15*1 

— . . ~ ^ .... H-Not a Clue -113 R. I. Velez .. ..12-1 B-Lnedallte “109 bins '. 30-1 

Dreaded Saturdays CB-jsied: Mum's me woro-princess Rr, c-Tbumo m e. Maeie 6-r 

The Illinois football team " ? ElU _ t „ lWI , - gKSj"'* ■•■■Sji tl 

has played Ohio State and A^nmlshman ..-1 k' LBN ! Vi F-Sir Jason Aviles 

Michigan on successive .Sat- J]? £\ SnSSSa.::'! S.tSS 

uroays for the last uirce D^ti. of Venue . HJ J V2Soua? ' Cl l-Roger's Dandy .116 R. Tureuftt 13-1 

years and will continue tot ||J g SSffi?' '■ « fcSS5S!!.':::'!S adSf^- ; ^ 

format the. 1979 season, G-Volney . II4 Eiaera 4-1 "AppmoJic* tllnranra cteimod. . i 


Michigan on successive Sat- MgdSHjiw'.ito K. Ckm 
urdays for the last three &cb! e ot 0 venue , : , n 2 J* WsSjL? ' 
™ts and mil eontmue tot |'< ■ ; gSp 

format v*:^! me 1979 season. G-voinn . . . . iu aaera 


U.S. Loses in Volleyball 
. SAN DIEGO. SepL 5 (UPI) 
— The Soviet national volley- 
ball team easily defeated the 
United States team at the 
Sports Arena last night in 
straight games, 15-8, 15-7, 
15-4,- in the third of an elght- 
, stop United States tour. 




Bj’ JOHN S 

Io Tfct 


AKRON. Ohio. Sept. 5 — 
The scheduled praciice-and- 
rehearsal round of the 14t.i 
World Series of Golf was 
rained out today after two 
holes, but whas’s a little 
thunderstorm here? This 
northeastern Ohio city nas 
had rain in some measure for 
IS of the last 22 days. 

The rain did not inconven- 
ience the participants — all 
four of them— because they 


have logged plenty of hours 
on the big South Course of 
the Firestone Country Club, 
the most recent occasion be- 
ing the Professional Gobers 
Association championship 
last month. The winner then 
was — who else? — Jack Nich- 
laus. 

The other competitors in 
this 36-hole. $75,000 “show- 
case,” which runs tomorrow 


case, WHIV6* • V i. 

and Sunday, are Lou Graham, 
winner of this year s United 


States Open: Tom Watson, 
the British Open champion, 
and Tom Weiskopf, winner or 
the Canadian Open. 

This series is open to win- 
ners of the four ‘grand slam 
events of the pro tour, but 
because Nicklaus won the 
Masters and the P.G.A.. the 
way was opened for an alter- 
nate. the Canadian champion; 

Prize distribution is S50.- 
000 far the winner, $15,000 
for the runner-up. S7.500 for 
third place and S5.000 for 
fourth. 

The World Senes is not a 
regular unit of the pro tour, 
but rather a television show 
of a foursome playing golf 
for big money (NBC. Channel 
4 in New York 5 to G:30 P.M- 
Saturday -SundayL Today s 
activity was to have been a 
runthrough for the function- 
aries with stop watenes and 
clip boards to determine 
when to bring the players up 
to the “television holes." 13 
to 18. 

Nicklaus and Graham card- 
ed par 4’s on the first hole 
and Watson and Weiskopf 
bogeyed after missing the 
green. Graham and Watson 
birthed the 500-vard second 
as Nicklaus and Weiskopf 
settled for par 5’s. 


. RADOSTA 

Net Y«hTiatK 

By no< 
were alir 
third Iiol 
chance U 
as the i 
They sa 
house, n 
that Lee 
Nichols ! 
lightning 
Western 
They r 
er room 
chat wit 
weather 
went lo 
and the 
the back 
Weiskt 
because 
12-hour . 
film ser 
riving hi 
ham is 
effects o 
home to 
night a! 
Insh opt 
housc-hu 
In a n 
.of Golf 
bonus f 
nine app 
four lim 
ond fh 
$263,750 
not adm 
this nr 
par-70 
been g 
counting 
and reg 
at Fire: 
won S3£ 
Wcisk 
one pre\ 
when he 
the Bri 1 
that on 
by three 
Watson 
the first 
“This 
ing to b 
crs.” W 
This ■ 
the Wo 
the 14tf 
ent fon 
Next se 
open th 
players 
to '72 h> 


Giants Drop Scl 
Gogolak,646 Lei 
Points Later Q n 


Continued From Page 13 


P.M.) got a boost yesterday 
with the return of Rich Le- 
wis, who is to be a regular 
outside linebacker. Lewis and 
Woody Greene of the Kansas 
Citv Chiefs were acquitted 
in Roseburg, Ore., at a trial 
on a charge of rape. Lewis 
will play in Washington. 

Joe Namath, who has 
played only two periods this 
summer, against Minnesota 
on Aug. 9 in Phoenix, con- 
tinues to say he will start 
for the Jets. His advertised 
presence has sold tickets and 
the Redskins expect a crowd 
of possibly 40.000, or better 
than twice what they have 
been averaging for recent 
preseason games. The club 
has 40.000 seats priced at 
$11 each. 

Lewis could be a steal 
as Jack Kemp once was 
for Buffalo. Although many 
thought Lewis was their best 
linebacker, the Bills exposed 
Win last season to waivers 
when trying to bring him 
back from the injured list 
and the Jets grabbed him. 
He was not quite healthy, so 
New York put him on Injured 
reserve for the rest of the 
year. A decade before, Buffalo 
took Kemp from San Diego 
under similar circumstances 
and the quarterback led the 
Bills to three championships. 


were at 
68's. 

Schro- 
Jolla. C 


was a : 
said. He 
five bir 
canie on 
included 
On the t 
226-yarc 
lipped t 
14 inch 
closed 1 
more bi. 

Schro« 


not earr 
mid-May 
three wi 
week la 
make th 
vious st; 
vive a 
here. 


Preseason Football 


LAST NIGHT'S GAA6E 
Oakland ai Dallas. 

TODAY'S GAMES 

Bofteto vs. AHinla. «t Tamoa (n). 
□Dcago at Miami fn>. 

Cincinnati at Detroit. 

Green Bay il Kansas Clly (n). 

New Orleans at Pittsburgh mi. 
Philadelphia at Los Angeles (il). 

51. Louis at Minnesota (n). 

TOMORROWS GAME5 
Jl-Y. Glante at Cleveland. 
fj-Y. Jets at Washington (n). 

Denver at San Francisco. 

San Diego at New England (n). 

MONDAY'S CAME 
Baltimore at Houston (n|. 


THE l 

John Schroedei 
Alan Taalii . 
Hubert Green 
Mac McLendon 
George Bums 
Mark Hares . 
Terrs Dill ... 
J.C. Snead . 
Kermlt Zarler 
Glbbv Gilbert 
Ben Crenshaw 
Don Ivereon . 
Leonard Thorne 
George Cadis 
Posi RandaH 
Miller Barter 
Jim Colbert 
David Graham 
Larry Hinson 
John Toesel . 
Allen Miller . 
Tom Purser . 
Jim Dant — 
Bill Rogers . .." 
Tom Shaw ... 
Bruce Liette . 
Danny Edwards 
Barry Jaedtet 


u.s.c. . 

OSAKj* 
— The Ur 
California 
scored it 
tory to da 
tional te 
decision. 


. 35 32-67! 
...34, 35-49. 
...3* SJ— 49 
...35 34-ft7 1 
...35 35—70 
...36 34— T) 
...35 35-70 
...36 34-70 
...H 35-70 
...37 33-7D 


Was Catfish H 
worth all that i 
to the Yankees 


Atthe start of the season, on 
Yankee said, “There’s no wa 
can lose the pennant!" You c 
hear talk like that any more. 
Has Catfish changed? 


Sunday in 
©lje^eluJ|orkSi 

IHagasme 


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THE HEW YORK TIMES. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6. 1975 


13 


! n ^ox Win, 3 - 1 ; 

by 8 Gaines 


'-'in- 


<c Millions] 

Y Brooks 
May on 

0 a pair 
the first 
>ox went 

victory 
Orioles 
nore. It 
sweep of 
■ ies and 
le Amer- 
Drvision 
the sec- 

d in the 

1 a wild 
pitcher, 

id up 

was the 
r rors in 
hed the 

• singled 
traemski 
.1 Lynn 
5 bases, 
n Rice’s 
ns third 
-out on 
■n threw 
alJov 
r chi 
ied up 
seeing 
ie plate, 
ie catch- 
lllowing 

fifth-in- 

eaders 


ring error led to the Orioles* 
run. Duncan walked and 
moved to third on Mark Be- 
langer’s angle, and Belanger 
stole second base. Both run- 
ners held their bases as 
Burlesoft hobbled A1 Bum- 
bry’s grounder. Bob Grich’s 
sacrifice fly scored Duncan. 

Dick Pole and Dick Drago 
held the Orioles to five hits. 
Drago. who relieved Pole 
after five innings, pitched out 
of a two-on, none-out jam in 
the eighth. 

Indians 10, Brewers 5 

AT MILWAUKEE — Joe 
Lis, re calle d from .the mi- 
nors three days ago, drove 
in four runs with a . three- 
run homer and a sacrifice 
fly as Cleveland won for the 
fifth time in its last six 
games. The 29-year-old Lis 
hit his homer in the second 
and his sacrifice fly in the 
third to give the Indians a 
6-0 lead. 

Angels 6, Rangers 4 
AT ANAHEIM, Calif., — 
Lee Stanton had five runs 
batted in for the Angels and 
broke a 3-3 tie in the eighth 
innin g with a bases loaded 
double. Stanton hit a two- 
run homer in the seventh, 
then the Angels tied Texas 
when Mickey Rivers drew a 
basesloaded walk in the 
eighth. Stanton followed with 
his three-run double. 



Orioles Top \Ex-Of tidal of Teamsters Union [FARM LABOR TALLY 

Is Heard by Hotfa Grand Jury BARRED ON COAST 


_ b&AKtti 

Aurelio Rodriguez of the Tigers being forced out at 
second base Thursday night in the fourth inning at 
Detroit. Yankee fielder is Sandy Alomar, who threw to 
first for the doable play. Yankees won, 8-1. 

Tactics of McMillan 
Puzzle Some Mets 


'Medich and 
Yankees, 5-4 

Continued From Page 13 

his team's chances despite 
the two disastrous losses to 
the Red Sox. “We haven’t 
lost yet,” he said. ‘This is a 
funny game. You never know 
what's going to happen next” 

Brooks Robinson, the 38- 
year-oki oriole third baseman 
who was fielding as weir as 
ever but hitting, only .196, 
said he would definitely be 
coming back next year. T 
want to .see if I can get back 
in that hitting grove," he 
said- .“If I ' don’t then it's 
time to hang them up.” 

Robinson, one of the 
league’s more accomplished 
bubble-gum chewers, said he 
had declined to enter the 
major-league' bubble-blowing 
championship, which will be 
decided during the World 
Series. He said he wanted to 
retire from the bubble-gum 
fry undefeated. 

“I won the only one of 
those contests I was in.” he 
recalled. “I was 12, 13 years 


By ACTS SALFUKAS 

Sj'eci*] to Ttv- tieir Torj Tlar* 

DETROIT, SepL 5— Anthony: Mr. Buffalino said .several 
Pmvp nran n, a former vice 'times today that his client "is 
president of the te^JIlstere;' , ®? cen *■ ,, „ „ 

union who has been one of' Teamster* close to Mr. Hoffa 


Judge Forbids Counting in 
Representation Dispute 


ihave said that Mr. Provenzano 


Special to The Krit Tort Tune* 

SACRAMENTO. Calif.. Sept 
5— A Superior Court judge lata 
yesterday issued a temporary 
restraining order here prohibit- 
ing the state’s Agricultural La- 
bor Relations Board from 
counting ballots tonight in the 
first union representation elec- 
tion to be held under the state's 


the key figures in the investJ-ij^j threats against Mr. 

gation into the disappearance! Hoffa, and .that he held a 
of James R. Hoffa, appeared Ignidge a a ainst him 
for 10 minutes before a grand; Mr. provenzano has denid 

he IL t0 ° ay ' . jed that there has been any 

Mr. Provenzano, who other ; animosity between him and Mr. 
witnesses have , said was one , Hoffa. 
of the people Mr. Hoffa was; Robert E. DeMascio. a United 

supposed to have gone to meet; states District Court judge.. 

Off July 30, the day of ins;^^ -today that a car the -new secret-ballot election law 
disappearance, said in an inter- if.BlL had said contained ira- for farm workers, 
view after his appearance ttat; portaJlt evidence in the case be| Judge Joseph DeCristofaro 
t«wy was me first time ne returDec j to Joseph Giacalone, .issued the restraining order on 
** ? IT De “°“ ** years- the son of Anthonv Giacalone. behalf of the Western Growers 

Ths car was borrowed by j Association, a group represent- 
Ho ^ as ; Charles L. J. O'Brien, the fosterling about 160 farmers around 
son of Mr. Hoffa, o nthe daylthe state, manv of whom are 
rarth SS Mr * Hoffa disappeared. Trained i in the Salinas area, hub of 

!<•«** Im» picked up Mr. Hoffe’s the lettuce industry, 
scent in the car’s back’ seat The vegetable growers con- 
HiSevw he h£n 8 £ade 1 £> d mmfc 'ended that no billots should 

Sd^f^enito^Bin"! Appeal Planned becuunted in electionsinvolv- 

Rights, which cause some Ob- 1 Judge DeMascio niled that 1 § * JnotS 
servers to wonder whether Mr.: the Government had not shown j£riatFE™inil»« unit was 
Provenzano had invoked his; probable cause that a Federal P ^L^k the Uni^ Farm 
!if jnme had bew committed, or! fited JJtitions 

■ that the car had been involved. for elections at 25 ranches in 


self-incrimination. 


R 

74 

'.‘69 
— *5 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Dodgers 3, Reds 2 
AT CINCINNATI — Doug 
Rau pitched a four-hitter and 
Willie Crawford hit a two- 
run homer, for Los Angeles. 
Crawford’s homer keyed a 
three-run first that started 
7? i34 jm with a single by Dave Lopes, 
si i4i .an w h 0 eventually scored on a 
single by Lee Lacy. Then 
Crawford homered. The only 
hit Rau allowed in the first 
five innings was George 
Foster’s 22d homer. 

Giants 2, Astros 1 
AT HOUSTON— John Mon- 
tefusco notched his third 
straight • victory, and Steve 
Ontiveros and Bobby Murcer 
batted in the San Francisco 
runs. A triple by Derrel 
Thomas and a single by 
Murcer gave the Giants their 
winning run, in the eighth. 

Braves 2, Padres f 
AT ATLANTA— Run-scor- 
ing singles by Ed Goodson 
and Marty Perez in the ninth 
won it for Atlanta. The at- • 
tendance was only 1,062, 
Wednesday night it was 
1.1 30, , . 

Mets’ Records 

BATTING 

HR RBI PC 
S 33 -->57 


R . H . Pd. 

82 172 .372 
E& 148 .327 

73 180 JI7 

83 1 54 J13 
72 154 JIO 
58 147 .306 

74 155 J06 


59 120 .298 


; R.JacWan, 
raiAw. 27i 
wrfis, Texas, 


IN 

Boston. 91: 
'btrnr, Kan- 
96; 

unsor. New 


. ... . 
Ire. Boston, 
_ Cite, 125. 

~ .700: ■Me- 

. {••.Torres. Bal- 
1W. .69?; 


Continued From Page 13 

groused about Yogi Berra, 
whom McMillan replaced as 
manager four weeks ago. 

Some persons felt is was' 
unfair to judge any manager 
on tactical decisions alone. 
But the Mets* high command 
had raised the issue of base- 
ball tactics when Berra was 
dismissed. And now his suc- 
cessor was stuck with the 
inevitable comparisons. 

Putting the comparisons in 
terms of games won and lost, 
the Mets stood 56 and 53 
when Yogi left Under Mc- 
Millan. their record before 
last night’s game was 16 
and 13. 

Moreover, the official view 
was that Yogi had let the 
Pirates off the hook after 
the Mets had won the first 


three games of a series in 
: Pittsburg and then lost the 
final two. This time, they 
won the opener against Pitts- 
burgh behind Seaver, then 
lost the next two. and Mat- 
lack later observed with 
some heat “Pittsburgh want- 
ed to win more than we did.” 

As the Cardinals arrived 
last night, the Pirates held a 
margin of five games over 
SL Louis and the Philadelphia 
Phillies and six over New 
York. The Pirates were in 
Montreal playing a double- 
header against the Expos; 
the Phillies were home play- 
ing^two against the Chicago 

The Mets were beginning a 
weekend series with the Red- 
birds, hoping that somebody 
else would trip the Pirates 
during the final three weeks. 


_ Another major figure in the: Government Investigators took 

old back in TittleVo^k'^ i case * Anthony Giacalone. reput-i steps to appeal the judge’s rul- 
r beat out 1QQ other lrirU-T «<* a Mafia chieftain in Detroit, ing and asked that thev be 
won a bicycle." nfls * 1 I is expected to testify next Mon- allowed to keep the car while 

[day before the grand jury. His j the made the appeal. 

| attorney. Neil Howard Fink.. Others appearing todav be- 
said that his client had been;fore the grand jure ‘were 
subpoenaed. i Robert Holmes, a teamster vic n 

Meeting Plan Denied | president, and his wife Vi. and 

„ , . , I president of Local 299 and the 

Several witnesses under h>>!son of Frank E. Fitzsimmons, 
nisis recalled to agents of the, t he president of the teamsters 
Federal Investigation that Mr. 1 union. His car was bombed 
Hoffa told them on the dayfoutside a bar last July. 


bicycle. 

The Orioles jumped od 
Medich for five runs in the 
first three innings. In the 
first, Al Bumbry tripled when 
Rick Bladt misjudged his 
drive to center and scored 
on Tony M user’s sacrifice fly. 
In the second inning, Bobby 
Grich doubled and Robinson 
walked. Mark Belanger drove 
in one run with a single and 
Bumbry delivered two more 
with a liner over second base. 
The fifth run came in the 
third on Ken Singleton’s 1 5th 
home run of the season. 

While the Orioles were 
leaning on Medich. the Yank- 
ees did not treat Garland and 
his successors well either. In 
the second inning. Graig 
Nettles singled to right, Chris 
Chambliss doubled and Ed 
Herrmann got an infield 
single for one run. Jim Ma- 
son, making a rare start at 
shortstop, delivered the sec- 
ond run with a single. In the 
third Netties doubled and 


the salinas area, all but one 
of which are now under con- 
tract to the International Broth- 
erhood of Teamsters. The team- 
sters filed an election petition 
under a master contract they 
have had with about 150 grow- 
ers, including the 25, since 
1973. 

Want Single Election 

The teamsters and the grow- 
ers want a single election that 
would cover about 150 ranches. 


of his disappearance that he, Other witnesses were Bar- '-However, the ranches that 
was on his way to meet Mr.jbara Lipchick, a secretary to would make up the bargaining 
Giacalone and Mr. Provenzano. | Dave Johnson, the president of; unit are not exactly the same 


Both men have denied that [the teamsters, and Gayle 
they had scheduled a meeting 'Richards, a receptionist ’at 
with Mr. Hoffa. Local 299. 


SENATE SPY PANEL \N° ne Hurt as Blast 


TO OPEN SESS IONS 

‘Startling* Subject Slated 
for Public Hearings 


In Utah Damages 
Kennecott Offices 


SALT LAKE CITY, Sept. 5 
(UPI) — A bomb exploded early 
today in a restroom in the 


came home on Chambliss’s iBy NICHOLAS M. HORROCK.j^pjjng^gjj Building Two per- 
single. whereupon Garland J s^,on, e »»Tcrh r, mM sons identify™? themselves as 


on lists submitted by the team- 
sters and the growers in con- 
nection with this lawsuit. The 
agricultural board has indicated 
Lhat worker preference should 
be determined on a ranch by 
ranch basis. 

Jerry Schaefer, the board’s 
assistant general counsel, said 
he thought the judge’s decision 
was "premature” and would 
be appealed because the grow- 
ers had not "exhausted their 
administrative remedies with 
the board." 

Judge DeCristofaro sel a full 
hearing for Sept. 16 on the 
bargaining unit issue. By then, 
a number of elections will have 
Jbeen held, including the one 


H Prf 
575 .367 
162 235 
IH .330 
9* 144 .319 
IS 131 .329 
* 139 317 
U ■» .315 
>5 181 .315 
•9 140 .31* 
J> 177 .312 


: Schmidt, 
Npm Yo-9. 
■Fc«ter, Clfl- 


IN 


HP RBI PC 
Vlll I 4 .170 

KrmcMOi 3 40 J40 

Grate 2 37 301 

RKim ri* 1 * .297 

.5*2?' C J?: Unsir U5 as 

5 taut 15 92 .273 
*• Tone 6 34 .159 

Alou 0 10 .258 


G«rr«tt 
PtiHllw 1 26 -243 

Kinsman 29 75 .236 

Clines 0 10 S3* 

Hi ml ion o r .124 
HeWomann I 13 .C02 

Mitnar 7 20 .194 

5) w ms 3 9 .192 


•> 


Taam-AB, 4,709; H, 1.212: 357; HR, 83. 
PITCHING 


0: Hrabosty, 

Ne-> Yn-t. leaver 
. IS*. .692; Mall ack 
Norman, Cln- Slone 
. Cinrinnill, Hat) 
jnciKO, 13-7, Webb 

Leawood 


IP W L 

244 70 7 
195 16 9 
4? 3 2 
58 4 3 
104 6 6 
24 I I 


K was man 

Tate 

Baldwin 

Apodan 

Swan 

Sanders 


1R W L 
204 11 14 
130 S 12 
78 2 4 
63 I ? 
17 1 2 
31 0 1 


Florida State’s Probation Ended 

TALLAHASSEE, Fla., Sept. 5 (APj— Florida State’s 
athletic program has been removed from National Collegi- 
ate Athletic Association probation, the school announced 
today. Stanley Marshall, the university's president, was 
notified by Arthur R. Reynolds, chairman of the N.C.A.A. 
Committee on Infractions, that full privileges were re- 
stored Aug. 22. The one-vear probation, which amounted 
to a slap on the wrist, allowed the school to appear on 
television or participate in postseason bowls or tourna- 
ments, if invited. The penalty grew out of an investigation 
of misconduct before and during spring football practice 
in 1973. 

Olympic Hearings Begin Tuesday 

WASHINGTON, Sept. 5 (UPI) — A special Presidential " 
commission will open hearings here Tuesday on problems 
that have beset United. States participation in the Olympic 
Games, it was announced today. Four former Olympic ath- 
letes, including two gold medal winners, Frank Shorter and 
Elite Daniel, head the witness list for the two-day session, 
which begins & series: of six public hearings in various cities 
over the next ’12 months. 


making his first major league v „ _ 

appearance. The left-hander j Intelligence will begin on Sept. ! S round ’ ^ the b,ast was to i scheduled tonighL at a small 
got out of the third inning |i6 its first public hearings in- protest the Kennecott Copperjastichoke farm, but no results 
without trouble and retired ,an eight-month-long investiga-' Corporation’s ties to the pres- ; 3,1 nounced. 

~ * ton of the intelligence commu-ient Government of Chile. Gladwelj, a lawyer 

Bity . „ ut . h e content is ,| a second >o mb ftn* 


the side in the fourth. In the 
fifth, however, Thurman 
Munson singled, went to 
third on Nettles’s single and 
scored on Chambliss’s third 
hit of the game, a double to 
right center. Paul Mitchell 
replaced Flanagan and re- 
tired the side. 

Brinkmanship 


secret that the committee 


call, this time to the Kennecott 


.11 Box Scores and Standings 


;ht 

STOH (N.) 
i If 5 0 1 0 
2D 2 D 00 
cr 4 0 00 
■ c 3 0 10 
lb 4MD 

i i o 0 o 
3b 3 0 0 0.' Hair- :t 
h 1 0 0 01 Yessw 

- » ? 0 0 0i DcJcsus 


THURSDAY NIGHT 

UK AN6ELES fit) CINCINNATI (N.l 

abrnbl abrhbl 


Low? 7b 
larr if 
WCneifW rf 
Garv;y lb 
Cev Jb 


4 13 0 Rosa 3b 

3 111 Rttmund rf 

4 I 1 7 Morgan 2b 
4 0 0 0 TParaz 1b 
J0I0 Banm c 

4 0 0 0 C-ftKlrr If 


4 110 
4 0 10 
40 11, 

3 0 00 

4 0 0 Oj Rite 
3 111 Mik 


THURSDAY NIGHT 
BOSTON (A.) . . BALTIMORE fA.) 


THURSDAY NIGHT 
YANKEES fA.l DETROIT fA.1 

„ ab r h b> ab r h bi 

Bon* if 4 2 2 0 l«F lore cf 2 0 0 0 
Corolns rf 10 0 0 StrtfierJnd 2b 4 0 0 0 

Alomar 2h 4 2 3 1 Mover 1b 4 0 0 0 

RW-TIfe I» * I I 0 Horloft dh 3 0 0 0 

Mitsw c 5 12 3 Firehan c 3 10 0 

GNrlflr* 3b 4 ? ? I 4R?dree: 3b 4 o 7 O 

Chamblls lb 5 D 11 LRobtrla if 4 0 0 D 

Herman ch 5 0 2 0 Oollvle If 3 0 3 1 

Bledr cf 3 0 12 Veiyror ss 4 0 0 0 

Clemen euerd. to multi-rear contract e«S- JT r » ” nSSS . p - _ 9 2 ? 5. 

CLEVELAND fNBAI— Treow Fred Fooster, RMoV p OOOOAnwR-D 0 0 0 0( 

formaid. to Oi'oeo tor 1976 d'oft "itirice. 


would not announce either the|co^oration’s main wtehboJS!” JJff" wire^innwSnM? 1 

of wiSes?’. ° r a 1 1,,£ !» l c J V - po "“ me " “ ‘ hc ;— chose 
Several member, of the com- ^a '"Ihen " a S maVvoice re' ^" 1 ' rin " in § uni ° n . b " :lus .' 
miuee privatety totd the £ ,““>i TtJSStebSnStt.Jni | SSjSfcjS? “ mt 

staffs; however, that the sub- T n there " Twelve hundred of- mp rope , „ .. . . _ 

jject matter would be ^startl- J? ce * “Site? ^ 

"How was it out there?” |ffi SES, “ "J"* 

Tommy Ml oUhe Orioles V “ lh f 

greeted Eri Bnnkman. the k^ehtened todav herause thpLr" ex P ,os,on c 5 me ^ ““j 5 shire effect set in. meaning 
Yankee utility infieider whn jSSS&S? £? ^kSTJSk OTE d^th^nSEt ” f 

.o play fortheT.Eers^ | ?ri Du cke ,t dSector J uf -the “ °''er-aUpat- 

Central Hntell.gence Agency’ , I973 . during a mHitajy-led cern '__ 

Science and Technology Divi-j coup in oi ile . — m«... n; 

slo P* . ^ ^ ^ ; The blast caused an estimated 

Senator Frank Chureh. De- $40,000 to *50,000 damage to 
raocrat of Idaho, who is chair- ^ offices of Kennecott’s Utah 
man of the committee, ap- Copper Dinsion — knocking 
peared to rule out as subjects {down concrete walls, shredding, 
of the neanngs drug testing piaster ceilings and ripping upioi 
by the C.I.A.; electronic eave-i w j r i n g an j plumbing. sii 

sdropping by the National Se-| No one was hurt although 
jcurity Agency, or a i C.LA.| tw0 policemen and six com- 


used 

“Same old story,” said 
Brinkman of his trip back 
“home.” “When you play 
there, you’re a bum. Then 
you come back with another 
team and they give you the 
standing O.” 


Pro Transactions 

BASKETBALL 

(ABAl - Sl9~rt' Skip Witt. S!l?Ln C 

rrl tr. mirih.M., rm-J-.M OrTHIlr 


BALTIMORE 


ib r h bl ob r h bl UTAH ABA}-3iS ton eZEF IriS To, « l 3* 8 14 8 T ml 

coper dtt 3 110 Bumbry dh 4 0 0 0 UT jhJ Giriner ' Vrinr - N n York 

Doyl» it, A 0 0 0 Grlcn 2b 3 0 11 s,hr U,ah DMroir 

Ysfnnskl lb 4 0 10 Singleton rf 4 0 1 0 FOOTBALL E-Bfinkman, 

Lynn cf 3111 LMj " 



31 1 5 1 
III 050000— 8 
. 000 000 001— 1, 

... . . - . . . Cfiambli'tt. OP— Nnr| 

IT 3 0 0 1 gSU b cf- 4 0 0 0° C X C ^J l «r F !to^' V jr d ruS 25* ¥ ^ 

4 0 0 0 Gcronlmo cf 3 0 0 01 Evans' rf A 00 0 3b 3 0 0 0 pgn 1 5P “* l0mlf ’ 

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4 D : 0" Kirby p 2 0 0 0 PphoceHl 3b 3 0 0 0 Ouncan c 2 100 Trm*r^ Bar * > LB-11) 4 8 7 

Bwton P 0 0 0 OiPole p 0 0 0 0 Muttr ph 1 0 0 0 far Arrft '° s 1 1 

Ambrur Ph 1 0 O O Dr^o a 0 0 0 0 BeUooer ss 3 0 3 0 1 • > ; w - WP— <UM>. T— 2-.26. A— 4.341. 

Eastwldc o 0 0 0 Of MTorre; p 0 0 0 0 “ ‘ 


Finding New Oil for U.S. 

Is Seen Costing $400-Billion 

FINDLEY, Ohio (API — 
Finding and developing the new 
oil needed by American con- 
sumers by 1985 will cost more 
than 5400-billion, according to 

r Marathon Oil Company. 

project to recover a sunken iputer department employes { This is based on needs out- 
Soviet submarine. [were on the 14th floor when dined by President Gerald Ford 

The Senator said that thejthe bomb went off shortly after to achieve "some degree” of 
committee’s 300-page report _on imidnight. 

C.I.A. involvement in politicall had just found the depart- 
assassinations would be given jment manager and was telling 


ip 


to the individual committee 
members for review and editing 
and that he expected it might 
be in final form by the middle 
h RERBBSojof this month. 

5 1 0 5 s| He declined to comment on 


Tpfal 

Los Angles 
Cincinnati 


35 3 8 3 


Total 3i 2 4 2] Total 
... .. 300 000 Q0Q 3 , Bo-fon 


31 3 4 I 


Yankee Records 


I I 6 
0 0 0 
1 T 2 
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J.Crauford. 


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Eastwidc 1 1 0 0 0 1 

WP— Kirby. T-2;14. A-29.S1Z 


bwy. linebarJrr. Placed Cliris r.upe:. c>ar- 
tarbatfc: Jjidps Thompson, wide reierver, 

.and Benny Barbour, dvtemive od. on 

TWal St i 5 I loured Miner iis!. 

.7M0WBH- 3 CLEVELAND (AFCl-Wavsd Jim Cooe, lir«- 

~ — — - ‘actrr. BATTING 

EEN BAY l NFC) — Waived Jer.-y TasC!- PBI PC 

aua-ierbac^. u..— ,, m qi« 

Yilnenufcl. 38-nst -SB-Grkh. Brte- KANSAS CITY (AFCl^taln^ TTm liar; g 

i>wr ? 5p_GrldL ncv» IwWDldJr. tnsm CJiKninali on rhaxnbllsa Q # 'oj 

j p h RERBBSO waiws- tfraivnl Mike Jones.* safety. feSE* l S| 

Mf CWJ4) 5 2 1 E 0 l J NfW YORK Pel. Gowlak. „ e 6 

Dnwo 4 3 0 0 2 4 placaAHcttwr- Obtained Paol Linford, oa- willtnis J 16 .L’? 

M.Tomz tL.16-8) 9 4 3 2 5 2 taflsl»e linemen, tram Grwi Bay on Netli« I? 84 .275 

Save— Otago (101- WP— M. Torre. T— _ ■S l *S!r — . . _ _ ... Bonds 25 68 .?«* 


W0 Ml 000- 2| Baltimore . . ... ... 000 010 000- 1 

E-K.irbv.. LOO— Loi. AneplMj^nndn-;,^* 

'LOBl^efor L 6^ y INmor** 10. m— 


him we had had a bomb threat 
and were going to evacuate the 
building,” said Police Sgt. A. 

Kent Epperson. "Then I told 
him: ‘On. God. It went off.’ ” 

A woman and a man called! 10.5 

o' I what Mr. Duckett had said mjnevrs media in Salt Lake City [with the difference 
iprivate session. [and San Francisco about 15 j through imports. 

• wr • minutes before the explosion. 

Hamngton Complaint I saying a. bomb would go off 


energy independence by then, 
and it assumes an inflation fac- 
tor of only 5 per cent a year. 

Marathon pointed out that 
consumption exceeded 16.5 mil- 
lion barrels per day in 1974, 
while domestic production of 
liquid hydrocarbons averaged 
million barrels per day, 
provided 


2:35. A- 25 .334. 


National League American League 


LA8T NIGHT’S GAMES 
St. Looi* «t New York. 

Chicago 4, PhHa. 3 (1st, twi.). 
Chicago at Phila. (2d). 

Los Angeles at Atlanta. 
Pittsburgh at Montreal (1st twi.). 
Pittsburgh at Montreal k (2d). 
San Diego at Houston. 

San Francisco at Cincinnati. 
THURSDAY NIGHT 
Atlanta 2. San Diego I. 

Los Angeles 3, Cincinnati 2. 

■ San Francisco 2, Houston I. 

STANDING OF THE TEAMS 
Eastern Division 

W. L PcL 


Pittsburgh 77 
Philadelphia 73- 
5L Louis 73 
■New York 72 
Chicago 84 

Montreal 60 


59 

65 

65 

66 
75. 
76 


.566 

.529 

.539 

.522 

.460 

.441 


Western Division 
W. L. Pet. 
Cincinnati ' 92' -47 .663 

Lea Angeles 74 66 .529 

San Fran. 70 69 -504 

San Diego 63 77 .450 

Atlanta 61 79 .436 

Houston 53 86 .376 


GS. 

l 


GJJ- 

m 
22 
29 
31 
40 


LAST NIGHTS GAMES 
Baltimore 5, New York 4 f ] st, twi.). 
New York at Baltimore (2). 
Bonin at Milwaukee. 

Detroit at -Cleveland. 

Kansas City at California. 
Minnesota at Chicago. 

Texas at Oakland, 

THURSDAY NIGHT 
New York 8. Detroit !. 

Boston 3, Baltimore h 
California 6, Texas -4.. 

Cleveland 20, Milwaukee 5. 

STANDING OF THE TEAMS 
Eastern Division 

W. L. PCL GS. 
82 55 


OAKLAND (AfCi— Waived Dan Conners, line- Her.-tnan.i 

PHILADELPHIA (WFL>— Sisned Willie Cullsrs. 

Menslve end, and Ron Easier, defensive 
back. Waived Pat Woadawrd, Tam Costello, 
linsbartcers. Boo Pasdiali. taoter, retired. pHrow 

SAN FRANCISCO (NFC) — Waived ‘Bruce CoS. Hunter 

WA5HIHCTON (NFC)— Walvad GWnw Hyde, g'uti 
oflensiro tac*ta. GuWry 

HOCKEY 

PHILADELPHIA I NHL) — Sionrd DaM Sdiulte. 
vir.e, <o mulliwar contract. 


5 25 .2bI 


HP RBI PC 
B torn tiers 4 17 .755 


WASHINGTON, SepL 5 (AP) jin ‘the Kennecott offices in re- 


Bladt 
Alomar 
Stanltr 
Pinielia 
Coaslns 
Brinkman 
Mason 
B-raman 


15 
o i* .7 y> 
0 12 .211 

0 22 .196 

1 5 .118 
0 3 .167 

2 IS .149 
0 0 .BOO 


Team-AB, 4652: H. 121$., .260 HR-93 

PITCHING 
IP W L 1 
64 6 3 { Sawyer 
777 10 13 J Dotson 
180 12 10 Medich 
117 5 5 | Lyle 
7 0 0 I Martinez 


IP W L 
6 0 0 
166 11 14 
225 17 15 
76 4 6 
24 1 2 


2 Leading- Thieves 
ST. LOUIS (UPD — LOU 
Brock of .the SL Louis Card- 
inals and Bert Campaueris of 
the Oakland Athletics were 

the leading basestealers (most 
thefts for a career) still active 
in 1975. Brock is the all-time 
National League leader.. 


Angels Throw Strike 
ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP)— 
Nolan Ryan of the California 
Angels has company on his 
team in strike-out artistry. 
This spring. Frank Tan ana 
struck out 13 Boston Red Sox 
in a nine-inning game and 
Andy Hassier fanned nine 
Baltimore Orioles is 10 in- 
nings. 


— A complaint asking House 
•265 j disciplinary action against Re- 
presentative Michael J. Har- 
rington has been dismissed on 
technical grounds, but the Mas- 
sachusetts Democrat’s chief ac- 
cuser says he wili file a new 
motion. 

The House Ethics Committee 
decided by voice vote yesterday 
to drop the complaint, lodged 
by Representative Robin L. 
Beard, Republican of Tennes- 
see, after attorneys for Mr. 


the company’s 
of workers in 


taxation for 
“exploitation 
Chile.” 

The woman, apparently call- 
ing long distance from a pay 
phone, told Max Knudsen of 
The Salt Lake Tribune that she 
i represented the Weather Under- 
ground and that a bomb was 
set to go off ”in 15 minutes.” 

She said the blast was in re- 
taliation for recent political 
events in Chile, where Kenne-, 
cott’s huge copper mines were 


60 New Caves Uncovered 
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (UPI) 
— The Missouri Geological Sur- 
vey says 60 new caves were 
discovered in Missouri in 1974. 


Boston 

Baltimore 

New York 

Cleveland 

Milwaukee 

Detroit 


74 

70 

64 

60 

53 


*63 

69 

69 

79 

S4 


.599 

.540 

.507 

.481 

.432 

.387 


Oakland 83 
Kansas City 76 
Texas 6S 
Minnesota 65 
Chicago 66 
California 64 


Western Division 
W. L PcL 
55 


61 

72 
70 

73 
75 


.599 

.555 

.486 

.481 

.475 

.460 


S 

J24 

16 

23 

29 


GJL 
6 ' 
it* 

17 

19 


(Last night's saaws pal MbM.) 


(Ust rigW's sah» net Included.) 


TODAY’S PROBABLE PITCHERS 


U : ' 


1 1 


SL Louis at New York <3:13 
PJtf.)— Forsch .(13-9) vs. Koos- 
man (11-12). 

Chicago at FMadephia in.)— 
Stone (11-7) vs. Christenson 
(9-5). 

L 09 Angeles at Atlanta fn.) — 
Sutton (16-12) vs. Easterly 
1 1-8). 

Pittsburgh at. Montreal in.)— 
Candelaria (7-5) vs. Rogers 
(10-10). , % 

San Diego at Houston (n.) — 
Strom (6-5) vs. Komeezny 
(6-12). . : 

San Francisco at Cincinnati fn.) 
— Halicki (9-1 1 1 v*. Billing- 
ham (14-7).: 


New York at Baltimore (n.)— 
Dobson (11-14) vs. Cuellar 
(14-10). 

Boston at Milwaukee — Moret 
(11-3) vs. Travers (5-8): 

Detroit at Cleveland — Leman- 
czyk (2-4) vs. EckersTey (10-5). 

Kansas City «t California (3. 
Lwi.-n.) — LittiHI (0-1) and Bird 
(9-5) vs. Tanana (14-6) and 
Singer (7-13). . 

Minnesota at Chicago (u.) — Bly- 
leveii H4-6) vs. Osteen (7-13). 

Texas at Oakland— Jenkins i!6- 
14j vs. Holtzman 115-12). 


Ali 'Planning Title Bout in Germany 

Negotiations are under way for a title defense by 
Muhammad Ali in West Germany, against an opponent to 
be named, earlv next year if Ali beats Joe Frazier in Manila 
Oct 1. Don King, the promoter, said yesterday. The West 
German newspaper Brld Zeitong quoted Ali's manager. 
Herbert Muhammad, as saying Ali would fight George 
Foreman in Munich on Feb. 6. It also said an Arab group 
based in Zurich, Switzerland, reportedly was backing the 
fight but must deposit $700,000 in a Chicago bank by 
SepL 10. 

King, who has played a major promotional role in Alt's 
last four fights as well as in the Manila bout, said Herbert 
Muhammad was negotiating “with a German group, but it 
won't be Foreman. It’s still an unnamed opponent But 
there won’t be a fight if the money doesn't come up and if 
Ali doesn't beat Frazier.” 


Harrington argued that it was ; nationalized several years ago] 
invalid because it had not been ; by the Allende regime, 
made und er oath. I “Onlv resistance will win.”| 

Mr. Beard is seeking to havejfhe said. “Call the police andj 
Mr. Harrington censured be- have the building evacuated.” 
cause Mr. Harrington told aj A similar call was received 

reporter for the Washington: from a man by The Associated 

Post about secret House tesii-1 Press bureau in San Francisco, 
mony on covert activities in! ‘That’s strange.” said Ken- 
Chile given bv the Director | neth _ Kefauver, Utah Copper 
of Central Intelligence, William [Division public relations direc- 
E. Colby, after signing a pledge |fo r - “We were nationalized 



not to disclose the information. 


Bird Fanciers Are Found 

. . , A -a ii<ir.ci'*ci u< i «ui mini 

TO Develop Special Disease (four or five years ago/ 


under the Allende regime sev 
ml years ago. We've had no 
interests in Chile since the 
takeover of nur mines there 


Winnipeg. Canada (UPi) — jplanes Have to ‘Move Over' 

If a person who likes birds and 
is around them all the time! 


(Ftoum in wmrlhnn dy suson's wwi-losl 


High Tides Around New York 

SandrHnk Wlllrfc SilnoKoU! HlB Island Montand «* 
Ro:k4Mf Inter Pudt Cana' mm Point uutoon 
AjSTpM. A.ftLPM. A.M.P.M. A.M. P.M. A-M- P.U, A.M. PM. 
Sfpl 6 i;*5 0:U 12:11 12:18 12:42 1:07 3:ii l:Sfl *:2i lu:iM .u:tt 

IS' 7 5-3 9-53 . 1:00 1:11 5:15 f:45 10:U 10:M U:» 

Sc5' 8 10:23 10:44 l:2S 1:49 1:S9 2:22 9:45 111:06 10:34 18:47 11;49 

So nil 9 11:1611:37 1:19 2:48 2:51 3:16 19:3910:59 mas 11:30 till M 
Seal. ID - . 12:11 3:14 3:36 3:48 Sill.lljg.ina .8:8212!? ..ltM.ljy 

for Utah tide it AsBurv Pa;k and Bnlw-f, difi4d 34 min. tiom SdndT Hon imr. 
Per lltft <1 AJIanllc Cite (Steel Plml.tlcduri » rmn. lirni intfrHMk imc. 
For nwh fide rt Jour, laid I PL Uoinil), dsdud 19 min. from S#ndr Honk l'n»- 


starts coughing, wheezing, los- 
ing weight and not feeling so 
good, he may be in Teal danger, 
indicates an allergy research 
team at the University of Man- 
itoba Health Sciences Center 
here. 

He may be suffering from 
"bird fancier’s lung,” an aller- 
gic lung inflammation that 
eventually results in permanent 
scarring, or pulmonary fibrosis, 
and even death. 


And Make Room for Birds 


WASHINGTON (AP) — Air 
planes still have to yield right 
of way on occasion to birds. 

The Bureau of Land Manage- 
ment is rewriting its lease with 
Alaska International Airlines to 
prohibit use of the Sagwon 
Cliffs airstrip on the north 
slope of Brooks range during 
the period from April 15 to 
August 15 each year. This is 


.to protect rare hawks such as 
Dr. Carl J. Zylak and a teanngyrfalcons and peregrine fal- 
|Of physicians recently corn-icons which use the cliffs to 
ipleted a stiidy of patients with j nest, hatch their eggs and raise 
this allergic reaction and point i their young to flight stage, 
out that the disease can be | In addition, the Department 
j cured if detected early. Diagno- of Interior has had one of the! 
•sis requires x-ray studies of the! 12' Alaska pipeline pumping! 
Hungs in addition to the usuali stations relocated for the same 
laboratory and allergy tests. Ireason. 


WHAT 
PRICE CAR 
ARE YOU 
LOOKING 
FOR? 


Low, middle, high! 
You’ll find cars in 
every price range 
advertised in 
HieNew YorkTIznes 
Automobile Exchange. 
See for yourself, today. 
There are plenty to 
choose from. In fact, 
more new andused ; 
car ads appear in 
The N ew Y ork Times 
than in any other 
New York newspaper. 
Its easy to do 
your shopping here. 


NOS?; . 



r 


16 


THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1975 ' 


Antiques: Autographs 

Prices Rising for Documents Penned by 
Declaration of Independence Signers 


John Hancock’s sweeping 
style when he put quill to 
paper to sign his name is 
known to virtually everyone. 
And Thomas Jefferson’s 
spare, smallish signature is 
renowned. But how did But- 
ton Gwinnett pen his — and 
who was he? 

Of course, historians and 
collectors of everything re- 
lated to the Declaration of 
Independence can readily 
identify Gwinnett as the 
Georgia politician who, with 
Hancock, Jefferson and 53 
others, signed his name in 
flat, wide lettering to the 

1776 document. 

Gwinnett, the most obscure 

of all the signers, died in 

1777 and. of the 56 men, left 
the fewest letters and docu- 
ments, according to Kenneth 
Rendell, Boston autograph 
dealers. 

So uncommon is the poli- 
tician’s autograph that, in 
the nineteen twenties, col- 
lector spurred by the ses- 
qui centennial of the nation’s 
founding created a Gwinnett 
craze. Between 1925 and 
1930, auction prices for at 
least two such documents 
were pushed by avid bidders 
to the astounding levels of 
$22,000 and $28,000. 

“Autographs are once 
again bringing the prices 
they did in the nineteen-twen- 
ties,” George S. Lowry re- 
ported this week. Mr. Lowry, 
who heads Swann Galleries, 
Inc.. 104 East 25th Street, 
an auction house specializing 
in books, autographs and 
graphies, added that he is 
quite certain history could 
repeat itself during the 
BicentenniaL 

But Mr. Lowry, who on 
OcL 16 will auction such a 
document — a receipt dated 
Feb. 1773 for four pounds 
two shillings — will not be 
able after that sale to verify 
the market price for a Gwin- 
nett autograph. For the docu- 
ment he will knock down is 
part of an extremely rare 
set of signers’ material, one 
of two owned by Haverford 
(Pa.) College. And Mr. Lowry 
said the college agree that 
the set should be sold as 
one lot 

• 

|Mr. Lowry stressed the 
scarcity of such sets, noting 
that most of the 34 known, 
to exist have been removed 
from the market and placed 
in private or institutional 
collections where they will 
probably remain. 

Furthermore, he asserted, 
when signers’ sets have 
come on the market in re- 
cent decades, they have 


By RITA B3EJF 


usually been broken up to 
obtain a higher price by sell- 
ing each letter separately. 
That happened in 1939 and 
again in 1947 and on each 
occasion the Button Gwin- 
nett letters brought the best 

E rices. The last known pub- 
c sale of a complete set of 
signers was in 1922. just be- 
fore the competition for 
such sets reached fever 
pitch. Henry E. Huntington 
reportedly outbid Harry 
Hoodinl and won the assem- 
bled documents for $19,750. 

Since then prices for au- 
tographs of the signers have 
soared, then plummeted and, 
after World War H ascend- 
ed slowly again. Gwinnett’s 
signature commanded $2,600 
at the 1939 sale. But when 
the same document appeared 
again in 1961, it fetched 
$ 6 , 000 . 

Collecting sets of auto- 
graphs of these early patriots 
came into fashion during the 
Civil War and continued un- 
abated for more than 60 
years, Mr. Lowry said. The 
Haverford documents were 
assembled in the raneteen- 
tweoties by a Denver dealer 
who was commissioned by 
Alice Bernis TSylor to find 
the autographs. She gave the 
leather - bound, gilt - embel- 
lished two-volume set to 
Colorado State College and, 
in 1946, the college sold it 
for an undisclosed price to 
William Pyle Philips, a New 
York lawyer and investment 
banker. The set, part of the 
$2 million-bequest to Haver- 
ford of this 1902 alumnus, 
carries a $100,000 reserve, 
the announced price below 
which it will not be sold. But 
Mr. Lowry estimates that the 
documents, which will be ex- 
hibited for three days preced- 
ing the sale might bring as 
much as $250,000. 

• 

Rare and historical though 
these papers may be, few 
contain references of general 
interest Aside from a 1785 
note on foreign trade by 
John Adams, and a letter by 
Stephen Hopkins to bis wife, 
most of the documents refer 
to legal, commercial or fi- 
nancial matters of limited im- 
portance. 

But the lines written by 
William Hooper to Robert 
Morris, another signer, com- 
menting on the election that 
Joseph Hewes, a third signer, 
lost to another, are provoca- 
tive and show how little has 
changed in 198 years among 
Congressional critics: “Con- 
gress’ attention,” Hooper 
wrote in 1777, “is chiefly 
exercised to devise ways and 
means to continue in office 
or to amass money. . . ." 


Bridge: 


Summer Games Are Held 
For Sunning City Residents 


By ALAN TRUSCOTT 


At nearly all the places in 
New York City where resi- 
dents sun themselves and 
swim during the summer sea- 
son, there are a few bridge 
tables to be seen in a comer. 

The most energetic program 
for such enthusiasts was per- 
haps that provided by the 
Bnghton Beach Baths, Coney, 
Island, Brooklyn, which of- 
fered a series of lectures by 
Jerry Prisyon of Woodmere, 
N. Y.. a leading player and 
organizer. The players there 
competed in a rubber bridge 
knockout contest, with 28 
pairs competing. 

In a well-played final last 
Saturday, played in front of a 
substantial audience, Ben and 
Ruth Zeitlin took full advan- 
tage of the preponderance of 
high cards to defeat car] and 
Muriel Zimmering. One of 
the most interesting deals is 
shown in the diagram. 

2 Schools of Thought 

Three no-trump is clearly 
the best contract for North- 
South, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Zeitlin got there by the sensi- 
ble sequence shown in the 
diagram. There are two 
schools of thought about 
whether North's rebid of two 
hearts, after a one-diamond 
opening and a two-club re- 
sponse, should be considered 
a traditional reverse, show- 
ing long diamonds and extra 
strength. Even if it is so 
considered, the North hand 
might just qualify, since he 
has considerable playing 
strength and his partner has 
responded at the two-level. 

Notice that if North had 
rebid two diamonds, South 
would have had a difficult 
decision. Many experts would 
now bid two spades, -avoid- 
ing a two no-trump bid in 
the absence of a full stopper 
in hearts. 

School Reading Kits Based 
On TV Children's Programs 

NEW YORK (UPI) — New 
reading kits using papular 
characters from two or public 
television's most successful 
children’s shows will be intro- 
duced m grade schools across 
tiie United States this fall. 

Three kits based on “Sesame 
Street” and “The Electric Com- 
pany” were developed to help 
bridge the gap between tele- 
vision and the printed page. 
They use filmstrips., audio- 
cassetles, special comics, do- 
it-yourself mini-books and self- 
correcting games to teach 
everything from pre-reading 
through sentence comprehen- 
sion. 


NORTH 

♦ Q52 

C? A 1053 
O AKJ98 6 

* — 

WEST (D) EAST 
4 A973 4 J64 

O 64 V K Q97 

O 43 O Q52 

4* Q J 1092 * 765 

SOUTH 
4 K10 8 
q? J82 
O 107 
* AK843 

Neither side was vulner- 
able. The bidtKng: 

West North East South 

Pass 1 0 Pass 2 * 

Pass 2 Pass 2 N.T. 

Pass 3 N.T. Pass Pass 

Pass 

West led the chib queen. 


The actual bidding would 
normally attract a spade lead, 
which would give South a 
fairly easy road to nine tricks 
by winning in the closed 
hand, cashing one club win- 
ner, and establishing dia- 
monds. But unfortunately for 
the declarer. West bad good 
enough dubs to lead them 
in spite of South’s bid in that 

suit. 

Mrs. Zeitlin ducked the 
opening club queen lead and 
took the king when West 
persevered with the jack. 
Seeing all the hands, the con- 
tract can now be made by 
leading a small spade. IT 
West ducks, the declarer 
wins with the queen in dum- 
my and leads a low diamond, 
after which she cannot be 
prevented from making nine 
tricks. 

But that is double-dummy. 
In practice. South made the 
normal play of finessing in 
diamonds at the third trick, 
runnin g the seven to keep 
the ten as a possible entry 
to her hand. Mrs. Zwrmering 
as East won and decided the 
issue by leading her remain- 
ing dub. 

South correctly won this, 
hoping that East held the 
spade ace, but West eventual- 
ly produced that card to de- 
feat the contract with two 
more club winners. 

Notice that South could 
have given West something 
to think about by playing 
the club eight on the third 
round. This would prevent 
West from continuing clubs, 
since he would have 10-2 
and South A-4, but a heart 
shift would be decisive. 
Sooth would have been 
wrong to tiy this play, since 
jt could lose even when East 
hdd the **■ 


l 


2 U.S. Lines Are Engaged 
For Angola Refugee Airlift 

WASHINGTON. Sept. 5 
(Reuters)— Trans World Airlines 
and World Airways have been 
engaged to provide one DC-8 
jet each for an airlift of refu- 
gees from Angola to Portugal, 
the Air Force announced today. 

An Air Force spokesman said 
that daily flights from Nova 
| Lisboa in Angola to Lisbon are 
scheduled to begin. Sunday. No 
monetary figure was given fcr 
the contract award. 

Earlier this week the State 
(Department said that $52 mil- 
lion in aid money had been al- 
located to evacuate 270,000 
people who want to leave An- 
gola before its scheduled in- 
dependence from Portugal in 
mid-November. 

President Francisco da Costa 
Gomes of Portugal had appealed 
to the United States and other 
countries for the airlift from 
Angola, where nationalist fac- 
tions are fighting for control- 


roicft. iiihcj, onm*^***, _ — — — ; , . ... .. — ■ - ■ - - 

Second Day of Busing in Louisville Ends Without Serious It 


By WILLIAM K. STEVENS 
Sp«l*J to Th* Me* Yurie Hines 

LOUISVILLE, Ky., Sept. 5— 
Louisville and neighboring Jef- 
ferson County completed with- 
out serious incident today then- 
second day of court-ordered 
busing of black and white 
school children between the 
central city and its suburbs. 

Antibusing demonstrations 
were out in force in the white 
working-class suburbs south 
and southwest of Louisville, 
but in nearly all instances their 
protests were peaceful. At all 
but a handful of tie 165 schools 
involved, the scene was report- 
ed to becalm. 

One exception was Fairdale 
High School, where demonstra- 
tors tried yesterday to block 
school buses as they were leav- 
ing ct the end of the day 
to transport black students 
back to- their homes in Louis- 
ville's West End. The demon- 


strators threw stones and i this afternoon. “This is tame, 
bottles at the buses and shout- 1 School attendance was said 
ed racial epithets. Three protes- to have improved over yester- 
terswsre wrested. i<%. when sbout 45 per 

Today at Fairdale, jeering! of the district's 130,000 pupils 
white teen-agers hurled sticks! showed up for classes on the 
and bottles at the busloads j first day of busing. JreUmtaary 

estimates were that 55 to 60 


of blacks as they left One 
arrest was reported. Many of 
the protesters were identified 
as students who were staving 
out of school as part of a 
widespread boycott by whites. 
Similar incidents were re- 
ported at three other schools. 
In one case, stones were said 
to have been thrown at whit 
demonstrators- from inside a 
bus carrying blacks. And last 
night 13 peisons were arrestee 
on minor charges d uri n g an 

antibosing demonstration that 
in the words of the police, 
turned into a “wild party. 

But in none of the scattered 
incidents were any serious inju- 
ries reported. “I was at Little 
Rock,” said a Federal Jaw en- 
forcement official at Fairdale 


estimates were that 
per cent attended school today 
Whether this reflected any 
weakening of the boycott was 
Problematical. School officials 
said yesterday that they 
thought many students had 
stayed away on the first day 
not because of the boycott, 
tilt because of their uncertain- 
ly over what might happen. 
These students, they saxa, 
owuld probably be the first 
to return to classes. 

As was true yesterday, blacks 
appeared to be attending school 
normally. It was the whites who 

were staying away. 

The combined Louisvule-Jef- 
ferson school system is the 12th 
largest in the nation and one 
of the two or three largest to 


be operating under a desegre- ride them in 
ipation order from the Federal tion- . 
courts. Twenty-one per cent of This is the f 
the students in the combined polrtan area u 
system are black. Under the -carry out th 
busing plan, 11 .300 blacks are cross-district t 
Sfsed to ride buses from between city : 
Louisville to the suburbs and to achieve rac 
11,300 whites are supposed to 'public schools 


A COMPUTER CHECKS 
FE VER IN HOS PITAL 

SACRAMENTO. Calif. (AP) 

If you are a patient in a hos- 
pital, don't be surprised if they 
put a computer in your mouth, 
lit will take your temperature,- 
_&abOUt 17 seconds— and ns true at mai 

beep when it’s finished. 

What actually «oes in the 
mouth is a thermal probe that 
is attached to a pocket-su* 
computer hung around the 
nurse's neck. The temperature 
fc electronically recorded in 


on the compu 
According u 
trains nurses 
pital where 1 
thermometer 
placed the c 
cuiy type, t 
whelmingly 
thermometers 



WHY 20 MORE DEALERS OF 
ANTIQUES, ART AND 
COLLECTIBLES MOVED TO 
OUR EXTRAORDINARY 
CENTER THIS WEEK . Class. Style. 

A selling environment. And it has already 
attracted some phenomenal names from the 
art world [watch for future announcements). Its 
galleries appeal to people with taste. [Collectors 
are coming and buying.) Its rental incentives 
are coupled with the promise of real commercial 
success— not to be ignored by serious dealers. 
From spacious display windows on the street 
level, you enter into three beautiful levels, en- 
closed and comfortably weather-controlled, and 
all connected by floating circular stairways. 
There are bright, wide shopping avenues to 
stroll, handsome lounges, fountains, landscap- 
ing and more. It's all so original looking and 
unexpected. Come now and see this remark- 
able merchandising concept for yourself. You 
can easily pass an hour or two. Or if you’re 
searching for the perfect store to rent, you must 
take advantage of what is being offered now, 
for a limited time only. We’re proud to invite you 
to visit us. Telephone (212) 751-0738. Mon-Sat, 
10-6. Sunday, 12-6. 

THE MANHATTAN 
ART 6 ANTIQUES CENTER 

1050 2nd Ave. (55thr56th Sts.] 


William Doyle Galleries 


175 EAST 87th STREET, NEW YORK, N.Y. 
WEDNESDAY, at 10 a.m. 

Furniture, Accessories , Decorations 
English, French, Italian 
Continental & American 

Please see our a d hi the auction pages tomorrow 


EXHIBITION 

TOMORROW. SUNDAY, Noon-5 p.m. 
MONDAY. 9 a.m.-7:30 p.m. 
TUESDAY, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 


William Dculr — Brian Oliphant. .1 net mutters 
Trlrpbiiw*: i.JI’l 4jr-jrjU; WK-J2W 


PUBLIC AUCTION 


Selling Regardless o! Price 

the 

Johnie Bassett 
Collection of 
Early Americana 

Friday— 1 PM 
Saturday— 10 AM 
Sunday — 11 AM 
September 12-14, 1975 

Springdale. Arkansas 


13th Annual 


Fair 

7th 


Quafity Antiques 
Sunday, Sept 


Ha y»d ala ftaut. 14 

U)R8*TAYL0irS PARKINS LOT 
MANUftSSET, L 1. 

11 A.M.-4 P.M. Children Under 12 Fret 
Admission Si .50. With add 31 .25 

QUAURED APPRAISERS 

SUMparOant— I2to4 PM. 

Omar Ramsay, Mgr- 
Mra. D. a. Ctaaa, Conauttant 

II Prififc jhu to Irtrtca Caw Stdetj 

100 Satactad Daalan 


MiK 

ANTIQUE 
SHOWS SALE 
OwafiMflMai 
Friday. OCT. to- 1 am.. 9 m 

SAOTUV. OCT. It • WSJH.-7p.IH. 


Arab c 


For Sale 


—8002 


SPECIAL SALE 

CHINESE — JAPANESE 

PORCELAIN ft POTTERY 


HUGE PRIVATELY OWNED ORIENTAL COL- 
LECTION lOvfr 1000 ITEMS) BEING SOLD 
AT VERY LOW BRICES. DEALERS CAN BUY 
CHINESE: 3TO-I9 CM (Sons. Mina, Gibs l 
A FurHin ft Ting). 

JAPANESE: 17 K TB CM PcraJaSj ft Tea 
Ceremony Pottery. 

By Amt dir Sat 12-6, Sun 10-6 JU 6-4487 


LARGE ESTATE SALE 

On promise*. 20-nxmj home at prominent 
Mm Canaan fJ nrily. 3 floors of airiloins. 
Rn» furnishings. collectable miscellaneous. 

FRI -SAT— SEPT 12-13, 10 AMJPM 
Dir: Merritt Pfcway Exit 38. North on 121 
to 2nd traffic light. Tom right onto Brushy 
Rd. fallow si on. 


ESCAPE THE CLICHE IN OUR UNIQUE 

ANTIQUE JEWELLERY SHOP 

We BUY S SELL the UNUSUAL! 
ANITA RHODES 

m Steer. Mafveme. L.L. N.Y. SJSSSQJ 500 
Toes. Sat. 10 AM In 5 PM 


ANTIQUES SHOW 
5 STORES 6S thru No. 89 
North Washington Aw. BergenfMd. NJ 
2D ns hi tries from Geo Washington Bridge 
Rt 4 Teweefc Rd, North to Bergenfleld 
CLOSED SUNDAYS 

LET STGONE5 BE. A/mWUES, SEACLfFF. 
L.I. Aaltoue— aid witter. Chaises, ouches, 
settees. desks, rockets. chairs, tables, lames, 
mere. Custom cm or so ravins. Wednesday- 
Sunday I S :3a 31 6 Segriltf Ave.. Sradiff. 
LI. 516 OR 1-OSU 


EARLY GEORGE II 

Tall case dock In magnificent red lacquer. 
Hinton Bronx dree 1740 S1L40Q. Principal* 
only. 212-9W -O«0 


GLASS PAPERWEIGHTS 

Send tor our Illustrated catalogue ft price 
list, S3- 00 GEM ANTIQUES 415 E. 53rd St. 
New York, N.Y. 10022. 82M91B 


CAIN'S Antiques, Rockland Rd. Rnscoe, N.Y. 
Phono (6071 499-430. Lee display on two 
firs. Metals, docks, lames, decorative acces- 
sories, reflntetd tumltr. Posed Tins. 


BASEMENT SALE 
Scot. 6-7, It AM-6 PM 

201 C. 31 St 51., N.Y.C. 

EUZABETHEAH Era Ittlg tefo IRvQp 

board, wine catenet. 

Ron Ferahr. RFO I, Hermlkar. N.H. 0242 

ANDERSOfUJNDEN ANTIQUE CTR, 
hint shen in Raclcmacfc. Nj. 

Ear direction* call; 3H-34M3B7 


pTnE MaJMGANY daubte WfaSont, r M 
* 10' vide, approx ICO rra old^ A classic. 

Call tor a cor. 212/377-^00 gri. 593 
SACMF— Exact faunas— same as 15-19 cenr 
tampered steel French, Eng, Roman swords, 
ranters. anner. 87*6800 Mon. 


,bj oeto 3 Her dwaiillar fr Nonraodr. 
■nested glass/leaded geometric frnwf fis's. 
SI 250. 535-434/354/5340 

s. 


70 Individual Art, Antique 
& Craft Shops in the Historic 
Hudson River Village of 

N$ack 
N.Y. 


at the west end of the 
Tappan Zee Bridge. Open 
Tuesday thru Sunday. 



IStb jUmUAl ANTIQUES SflOW 

YWCA 4! K.MSL.EASmil.M. 
SVT. 4-10 11 JUM PM 

3S Dealer* Del Hospital 

Sihrer-Amer. Fofc Art — Primitives Furni- 
ture — Jewelry — Art Glass — CMna etc. 
II you coded — Don't mtes oix show! 
YOU CAM BUY AT THE "Y" 
Rene« Moss. Mgr. 


For Sale 


-son 


TIFFANY LAMP 

Peony pattern nltti base, excellent "condL 
tioo. Now In private male In Florida. For 
Ml* by owner. Will ba sold to highest 
tedder over 515,000 trior to Oct. 15, 1975 
or first otter of S1MOO. Lamo miy be 
soon by ascolntmcnt. Call Lincoln, Mass. 
(6171 39-8716. 


COME RUMMAGE through the attic of It* 
graotilc arts. Hundreds of cooper arts, thou- 
sands of wood lettms, a huge Inventory of 
oM ortntino paraphernalia dating from mid 
WOOS' to the present time. JUST IN: Hto 
sopdal group of unusual ynaJI typed rawer*— 
only SS each. 

THE STONE HAND 
MS Centre SI.. NYC (across from the old 
poftar headauariers). Open Toes, thru Sar. 
12:00-6:30. (2121 96633aS. 


WORLD WAR l POSTERS 

Most 510 to S4Q 
EXHIBITING 

Commodore Hotel NYC Sent. 12-14. 
Galrtwawni. Md. Falrgrnds. Sept. 20*21 
GLENTIQUES LTD. 

Plewd ten). NY 13C3 914-657-626 1 

ANTIQUE BOTTIFS ill categories in mint 
condition. Also bottle books tor Mia. Jim's 
Battle Step, 609 Sawmill Rvr Rd, Anblar, 
NY. 9U493466& 30 mins fr Tines Eo. Exit 
7 NY Thniwev or Ashford Av Extt Saw Mill 
Rwr Pfcwy. Ooe» Sst ft Sin 12 5. Wa also buy . 
19TH CENTURY AMERICAN PAINTINGS 
F.R. Gifford; H.P. Smith; Mabel Woodward; 
Haler Laver; Gemo H. Bouehton: H.D. 
Marlin; Edward Moran; James Firman; 
16" Acorn Signed Tiffany Table Lams. 
7032553629. 



Cars — Paintings — Bronze 
Western Items — Motorcycles 
Toys — Antiques 
Antique Furniture 



Fa pirne Wormanon and Tree teochurg 
contact: 


mis/ 


CLA3SC AUCTION COMPANY 
Aubum mourn 4706 
219l92S-«04 


M/ i S L 

1 HATCHCOVERS; 

FROM WORLD WAR HUBEKTY SHIPS 


Fer Sals 


— 9002 


PERSONALLY SELECTED IN ENGLAND 

QUALITY 18th & 19th Century 

Country Furniture 

Largest Collection 
in Weschester 

Including Welsh Dressers, Cupboards. Side- 
boards. Dining Tables. Chests at Drawers, 
Occasional Tables In Oak, Elm, Mahogany 
and more. 4 Complete Rooms of Stripped 
Hne. 

AND UNUSUAL ACCESSORIES 

The Yellow Monkey 

ANTIQUES 

CLOSED SEPT. B THRU SEPT. II 
Rt*. as Cross River. N.Y. 914.763-5B49. Ooan 
Toes, thro Sun. 10 'HI 6 P.M. Erff Saw 
Mill Pfcwy or £M at Cross River 4 ml. 

east Rte. 35. 

AUTOBIOGRAPHY 5n Hotter 
dal records of tho Union, and Confederate 
Navies In the war of the rebellion (22 
volumes tB94f. Hogarth — A rates morass 
(1735). Audubon Prints (1917 Series). Cril 
War prints. Centennial prints. Bound vol- 
umes "Judge" 1 W7 -1907. 

YESTERYEARS 

4fl West Broadway 982-21 n 


FDR SALE: 7-eiea J1 VkJorU 5**» CHnesa 
Dade ft 2 chairs, needleooint armchair, brass 
stand '9 lams, lee Victorian tainting. Vic- 
torian rosewood desk, art noveau, amoi ra. 
or rad oak tefcfnrt + modi mete. 7I2-FSP-627? 
AKT1DUERS House I Gtraat LeadadpND 
Ionic. Bronas. Clocks, BarWnWort, OOiSSm, 
Decorator Dents, furniture, Armolra. Cnilecf- 
ablas, Man/ other gootftes-dgned, unsigned. 
APPt only. 516-MA 3-4295 - 5061 


ANTIQUE AMERICAN QUILTS 

FOR SALE 

Call 212-7517-057 


TIFFANY 

JadMn -Thp Molt, sold, fullv signed, 17 
In M, SW». Firm. Call 794-1757 


TUXEDO JUNCTION ANTIQUES 

3 SHOPS! Rto 17 between Tucgdn & Sterling 
Forast— Thursday -Sun d«Y—l 1 :2ft- 5PM 

ORIENTAL COLLECTION FCR SALE ’ 
Over ISO items. Jepetme-CMne-*: Pnrc-Ialn 
Bronze. (Mantle, etc. Slfi <754022 Ownr 


ANTIQUES 
BOUGHT AND SOLO 

(!BH 259-3554 


RARE C OLLECTIO N OF ANTIQUE COIN 


OPES 


MACHINES FOR SALE 
CALL 213-951 -60BO 


ART GLASS, OAK ft EWTLAKE 
Furniture, Art Deco, Llntoaa, Helsei 
- By BPfxrfidmant. (9IO 90-WSD 


PRINTERS TYPE CASES 

2 an Printers Type Cases will be sold at 
PUBLIC AUCTION In Ms of 24 each on 
Spot. 171b In Newark, NJ. For details 
free circular anted: 

Print-Art Services, 277 Broadway, N.Y.C. 

12121 964-2350 

PRIVATE GALLERY offers anctenf ottos of 
emotional Interest from Grace. Rome, 
Eeyotr Carthage, etc. also extensive oalecilory 
of andMt jewelry, also Qilnese S Korean 
pieces from the lWh-lflh centuries. Tele- 
phone for a pot. 212-628-3427, 


THE YESTERDAY VILLAGE BAZAAR 
Adteeant to CLYDE 1 * ReriatifMt 
Route 10 ft 1 Main St. Suasion na. fU 
(201 ) 584-9822 

AnfmeSf collscllbfcs And crafl5> 

Dally IB6, Bridge fill 9 PM 
PRIVATE. HertfMe ftnihn. Kfenran oroet 
17x12. French Inlaid Kinoswood coanode. 
Also Cylinder desk, parted condition. Art 
nouveey bronze, Chines* screen, etc. 212- 
371-8874. 


ANTIQUE VILLAGE has restored oak, dwn> 
walnut furniture, srimltlva to elrant. Oak 
buffet. Amish woodb o x. bedroom rat, settee 
ft chair, trunks, more. Rto. 6. Brewster. 
H.Y. 9W-57W364/354I. 


TIFFANY & ART GLASS 

ETCETERA ANTIQUES 
2970 Merrick Road, Bellmore 

516-785-01 2fi 

OLD STRAP! VARIOUS VIOLIN, with bow aid 
case with silver mounting fur sale. Rwly 
Is: K. Olson, PrastevansBi 7 it. tv. DK-423Q 
Mreelsknef, Oanmart. 


T$i»5 

COMPLETE, FINISHED WITH LEGS 

Beautiful desk, dining, coffee 
Uble, i bit of the seven seas at 
! a price everyone can afford. 
While you're here lo get yours 
l browse thru S acres of antiques, 
furniture, farm tools, trunks, 
i stained glass, nostalgia, fabulous 
reproductions and junk. Conn. 
I Turnpike, Eait 6. Closed Sundays & 
’ Mondays. Write for free literature. 
I UNITED HOUSE WRECK! NS CO. 
328 SelleckSL, SUn tonl. CL 06902 
Telephone (203) 348-537] 


NEXT WEEK 
SEPT. 13 

Outdoor Antiques 
Flea Market 

On tha Ground* of 
ft for the Bonafit of 
jMuia Clorfaon Hem for Children 

VALHALLA, N.Y. 

(5 minutes from White Plains, 
on Route 22) 

9 «Jn.-6 lun. RAIN OR SHINE 
Adm. SI .50. or SI. with this ad 
NUTTALC-BOST1CK-WENDY MGT. 


?TheN 
Antiques 
(’enter of 
America 



Time-honored 
their own ‘old si 
too), daily, in a 
from E53 thru 
lb seasoned ct 
New York’s ON 
ANTIQUES CE 
original one. 
Do antiques Sc 
‘speciat’ to yot 
hear somethir 
Toes.- Sat. KWO- 
FREEADMISSK3 
415 E. 53 St- 410 


Sotheby Parke B 

Exhibitions will resume for the Fa 
on Friday, September 12 
See our ad on Saturday, Septer 
for details 

Or for further sale mformatk 
24 hours every day, dial 212/472- 

980 ’Madison Avenue New York 1 002 1 



NATIONAL 
COLLECTIBLES 
! SHOW 

Fri. • Sat. ■ Sun. 

Sept 12, 13, 14 

featuring 

Advertising Ctelacttbles • Conics • 
Nostalgia • Political Americana 
Worlds Fair - Toys ■ Cards • Etc. 


Commodore Hotel 

WMm SvSI. 4Jsl SL lot tot, U T 
OeaterSpawAra&We f2)2j 724-5919 


SOHO CANAL '"“I 

= FLEA MARKET “ 

= INDOOR/OUTDOOR = 

= ANTIQUES -dOTHES^JOLLECTIBLES = 
= 3S9 CAMALST. (W. fcng) Eb* Twt ILL = 
= 22G-8724 - 

^ FREE ADMISSION = 

5YEAR ROUND OPEN 7 DAYS 1 tam-6pmS 

nimimu»iiiii»»n»»»»i»m»»s 


ANTIQUES ALFRESCO 

GMdobn Pteza ftesaftt Darias Hte- 
tortartSoctoty 

Cans Tpta Ertt 1 1. DariM, Cono. 
AdmlsrtonSl 3S *rtth Bite ad 


Fer Sale 


—8002 


PINBALL MACHINES 

A ftp* satKflni of totally reconditioned ft 
paribdty woridna madifnes are now being 
offered tor homy sale: W* otter gwrerrtres, 
toll service arraraaments, and our prices 
start at 

Antique Amusements, 3007 Auc K, Bldyn, NY 
11Z10, 951-6080 Open 16 PM, Mon-Sat 
or bv appf. ■ 


AUTHENTIC SOMERS-HAND MADE 

TIFFANY STYLE DOMES 

A fantasric se/eettan of several hundred 
leaded chandallere, each CMiteliAna hundreds 
of Individual Placo of glass. Bill 60 pc* 
dealers dlsoouot on any Um» In stock with 
this ed. 

SOMERS Sained Glass 5166674D62 

So. State Pfcwy. Exit 41, No Bavsbore Rd, 
I mt fa 106 Brook Av, Dear Pfc, LI. NY 
HALLE. DIAIMI NANCY, ART GLASS 
Fine Pwcetains. Gouda, Sabhvj, Bronzes 
EXQUISITE ANTIQUES LTD. 

2938 Merrick Rd.. Bellmore, N.Y. 516-781-7305 
Tun s -Son 12-5 Closed Monday 

Shows 


— 9804 




ER 28Hi. 7975 

IB AM to 6 PM 
(Means fiotonlcol Garden 
43-S) Main SL, Fleshing, N.Y. 

' Donation St .25— With Hits ad si 4)0 

FOR DEALER INFORMATION 

NUTMEG PROMOTION 203-438-8101 

307 Raymond Court. Rldaafiald. Ct. 06877 


ANTIQUE & FLEA MARKET 
- FREE ADMISSION 

13630 AVE. FLUSHING, NY 
Open year-round Fri 5-1 0PM; Sat 
11-9 PM Sun U -7PM. 80 dealers. 
Indoors, air-cond. snack bar. 

FLEA MARkBi 1 ft hALhmV SPlf 
Sal, Sept 13, 10AM-5PM. (Indoors, H rein.) 
Bargains galore, old ft now. Three Saints 
Russian Orthodox School, Duhrahr Lane, 
Garfield, NJ (GW Bridge to Rl 80 or Rt 46). 
Free admission. Bev Michael, Manager. (201) 
791-3145. 


HOWARD GIT MAN'S ns anttoae wretch ft 
ctedr shso af 25S E 50 5f near 2nd Avo. 
Welches & docks bought, sold ft rerelrtd, 
4864070. 


ANTIQUE LAMPS ft FIXTURES 
REVERSE PAINTED LAMPS. Setodlve Iteht- 
Ina devices c. 1 865- 17317 5 769-4672. 


COLLECTOR'S glared ft unglued Tans 
horse* Ming blanc dc CNne, Kang Hst ft 
Yum Owm percalalns. 914/961-5 694. 

SHIP _ MODELS Bm?ht-5ohWtestorod-Scrito- 
shaw-SHp* In Botltas-OgcppS-Prlrtti-MnHfMH. 
NPtfBfl'i felly, 1129 Lex QHg PL SQdlft , 

CASH REGISTERS— BRASS 

RestarwL Mr. Lab MU 3-9221 Wtafrs 9-5! 


ELMHUR5T-IAOCS0N HEIGHTS 
INDOOR FLEA MARKET 
81-16 45th AVE. (t ELMHURST 
Oran Fri Sat lOan-iOpoi, Sun I0am-7pm. 
gee adntodnu fie.pareing, free Marionette 
ShwrFn-Sal-Sun at 3:30 ft 4 PM. Bring The 
Kldsl! Dealers alsa wanted CALL; 4269500 

BKLYN INDOOR FLEA MKT 

.OPENING SEPT, 13th 
NEAR BKLYN BRIDGE 
DEALER SPACE AVAILABLE 

312-931-3406 weekdays 9-5 

TWENTIETH Arewal AnHaunc Shn» « cju, 
Swtember W 1 . IOH 1 and Ufa, Tua £ 

*■* ?M» 5t. Barihalo- 


WwL 1-10 PM. Tharv 

' " ' Oxi — _ 

Donation 51 


mew's Eabcml OxirciiJ 
Ho-He-Kus, N.J. ~ 


Fdan Avenue, 

— . 25 Pee lers. 

TNECANAJL STREET FLEA MARKET - 
Open Its Fall Season, Sort. 13th 
Saiwtlaw ft Sindays .thro NiAr 
335 Canal 51. Information, 7l?.?7il-7Vi 


38TH Anmi Raw Hnan. Com. AnHiSa 
9nm af New Havon Collsewn. Seat. 19-20-51 
232 Outstanding EshlWfars! 


f TODAY »aurita5pm 
Antiques in a Cow Pasture 

SALISBURY, CONN. 

1 Route 44, just north of Village 
180— -Stations Wagons — 180 
1 Managed by Russell Carrel! 


NEW SHIPMENT 
JAPANESE PRINTS. 
TIBETAN piAL OBJECTS 

2U7y. Discnunr Sale 

TOYO GALLERY 
OB Eaal MOi Straat 

TBML-SaL 1ZSPH 

=777-9750 



-Shows 


Shows 


—8004 


ANTIQUES SHOW— SALE 
WILLOWBROOK MALL 

KTI. Oft 46, WAYNE. NJ. 

Seat 17-21, I6AM-10PM daily. Sun to 6 
ALSO 

SOUTH SHORE MALL ' 

SUNRiSE HWY, BAYSHORE. LI. 

Stot. 17-26, 1 QAM- IB PM DAILY 
DEALERS INVITED TO CALL 

ERICKSON SHOW 201-746-6317 


ANTIQUES SHOW 

SUNDAY— SEPT 28 

(NOTE DATE CHANGE) 

Yonkers Raceway 


Pteln ft Fancy. Inc. 


(5161 LI 1-3061 


Vendors Wonted 

pdror Indoor Bazaar ft Fair (covers 2 mek- 
ends) Includes flea market, crafts, genl 
ESS?* wore. Detss: Oct. 26, 

18-33, 25, Ml WMavs & Sals: Eves only. 


*' 1 AM-10 Pm. Folly secured prgml 
Sy 3 " Jr»liti Center. 550 ' 

Ptarev, Bklyn 11216. Into: 436-4900 


Ocean 

(Excepl 


Ocaan Pfcwy Jewish 
Wtem 

Sals). 

a ..CRAFTSPEOPLE 

Is. bring planned Sent, 
a through Od 5 at Great Adventure En- 
tert ajnnianf Pa rk In Jackson, NJ. There will 
dgy^’taYS. workshops, ft rrwrchait- 

32 0 E - 

SEPT. 14, HILLSDALE, NJ 

Arow aj Anll nue Market af Valley Fair Shoo- 
nag Center, Broadway, Hillsdale, KJ. $pm. 

vailw MB'lal Heal lh. 
Donation 7Sc with ad. Senior ddmi and 
dilldron troa. I Rain date Sept 21 1 
A STELLA SHOW 




rajEMBER THE PORTOBELLO RD ft 52 St 
rg 1 ”) 5 ? Up*. here’s ton Atlantic Antiq 

SSM, .tc fLSSLJn? £ 

rountt/'crouis. ^ 

ail JOTte GlbhS, 875-1190 ’ 

.. jmi A NTIQUE SHOW 

5L Stephens Emtcagal Chun* 

, Port . Washington. NY. l!0$n 
5cptmjiKr 9, la n Noon-10 PM 
WSjjY.. n AM .6 P.M. 
SBfm ,U * ** frro "Hunis al l 

_ NATL COLLECTIBLES SHOW 

Fri, Sat, Sun, Sent 12, 13, 14 ' 

[OOaler Smob Avail (2121 724-5919 

.Site a If adm. with this ,, A D , »i 1 

ihnw a sale Sept. 7 1W PJ«1 
c^-Crwl Manar, Rto 39 Southampton, N.Y. 
jyns- Ga UMtogy 5oc, Suff Co Hisf Soc 

Honflnoton Historical 5oS*Vr 

iJSLfNNUAL ANTIQUES FAIR 
Appraisal Sendee Scot. )p, 20, 21. 


1 


AN - 

SB»TEI 

WAY 

Ham bun 

(Rt. 80 h 
Thurs, F 
Appraisals — sll- 
band — ncellen 
glass — barter j. 

FRE1 
VENC 


Waul id 


ANTIQUE 

For Antioue YW 
ft Rte 533, Prti^ 
or vrrllo Prow 
Ccronnt 51a. KJ: 


DEAL 

Indoor Flea Mr 
Shor- 
3300 Cowv 
£. 


WANTED— Marts 
tor inierested bu 
bank in good co 
tlon 


. . DEALERS W 
West Brighton 
Sunday. OctoOn* 


MISCBlIaiTCMS 


FOR REN, 

AT WE 
A lewalcr nr l> 
crasorlcs to ra’, 
vaall, 8/20 v> 
doors. "A Real 
of too safest pla> 
Fun People to 4 
atmosphere, Pie 
ssk tor Lucille I 




“They are 

Mrs. Gradv. 1 


onds, compar 


utes. There's 


man error, n 

- .1- ‘-Jjium- 

enough. It’s 


glass to sh- 

- ire'-jUfid 

cleaning and 

j ■ 5-21 




:- 1 




t- 


9-Day Indoor B. 

■' -■**> ■■ 

mds). Free Ad 

General Mttao 

- - ifc‘ 

, , Dates: Oc 

Weekdays ft 

• ■■ 

Sun* 


Fully secured pi 

Center. 550 Ocr 


4900 (Excrot S. 


POR 


ANTI- 

' ■ v fttrawcve- 

RYE RIDC 

- • *. .- vK-.ni 

Sponsor — The fi 

* , *‘v. J >-iqpi Jt, 

5UN.se 

RAIN OR SHI 


DONATION S 


GRAMl 

* fU 

LAWRENCE 


Under 

. \ rt 

„W. * f 


Lawmcevtlle, t 

Drive 





; ■•‘F, 




' •«#*#. .Tt' 


1 •ra'-ra 


ANTIQUI 

WEERlY fw 
LISTINGS, n 
PERS. Trial 
For 4 Issues 

ANTIQUE. 
230 E 9 






n 


$ 


Oil isvi\\ v y. 


w 




,9 





THE -NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 6, 1975 


17 


t . . 




^ ■’> y \ 

jt. 


aF.ST «iv ... 


’he Times 


;er Modernist Architect 


* h 


^*.r" 




Hi 




(Meries 


tHUrtim * 


j* r -. . v 

i-., . .. 

- s •* : + - *.* 


V. ?■**«** 

A.V. ijuV-ift 





. ’owcnf a Modem American 
\ Hobart A. M. Stem. 273 
id. New Haven and London : 
■ ■;■ Press. $25. 

■Riming Out of obscurity — . 
• it seems— these' American 
'late 19th and eariy 20th 
listen ans bad long over- 
of modernism's giants, 
sier and Mies. We have 
phies of Daniel .Burnham, 
Raymond Hood, among 
Robert AJvI. Stem has 
- is superb study of George 
. Iphia architect who died 

ooks of this new wave 
c architects who, reject- 
odernism growing about 
nain bound by historical 

y leaser-known moder?*- 

-v, bok d&es both, rince hi? 

'nique among American 
'Xs a successful historicisr 
is the late nineteen- 
t a dramatic and au- 
to become one 
st ardent champions, 
'“’vj two careers, as a re- 
- 'as a modem one, and 
one to the other Is 
Mr. Stem’s story. Howe 
pt what he did and why 
hat separates him from 
articulate architect-col- 
t makes him an ideal 
■apby. 


By PAUL GOLDBERGER 

But Howe sensed, slowly but steadily 
through the twenties, that something was 



ealthy Family 

Howe was raised in 
eighteen-eighties in an 
described as “conserv- 


lie 

Antique* i 

{ L'fli PPrit onary.” At Harvard, he 
V V * * ^ 111 hut troubled, Mr. Stem 

America — 



r 


- f j 

i. ra 


t — * - • • 



J*. .-A . _ • - 

lj i i ; • ■ • 

«'.».■ -it 

hi it. - • V ■. ; 
iff-- '** 'T V ■ • 

OJ-> 

- .. . 

fr^_*?** ***_♦ I ■ 

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ing conflict between 
and a sharp, rational 
{ rational intellect that 
the long run; for now, 
s love of romance and! 
of McKim, Mead and 
mlariy powerful influ- 
in 1908 he sailed for 
■ed the Ecole des Beaux 
~"^r postgraduate experi- 
^ ... 1 1 t n n historicist architects. 
v ) t J in C hy pdadelphia in 1913, by 
« ‘e father of two daught- 
the comfortable exist’ 
n architect 
be was a natural for 
ined the firm of Mellor 
nn of Mellor, Meigs & 
25 one of the country's 
>f picturesque country 
. (“Wall Street pasto- 
owe himself described 
career.) But Howe’s 
was, curiously, not to 
f picturesque imagery, 
certain discipline and 
"" ‘^He was dearly begin- 
lething of a rationalist 
his movement toward 
Stem tells us in 


us m a 
^.on, “was halting and 
instinctive ability to 


« I t 

ffinlsfkti 

--.tv :• . 

i'VfcWV - 

mmi . * * 



rj., r - lone and to compose 
i S u !. ilay : rafter than accel- 


amiss. He sought refuge briefly in a num- 
ber of historical styles; each time his 
•eclecticism led him to a somewhat simple, 
stripped-down structure, as if be were 
searching for a basic piuism. HJs 40th 
■birthday and the death of a domineering 
mother added to a sense of drift, and 
Howe found himself reading extensively, 
both in the literature of the growing mod- 
em movement spreading through Europe? 
at the time; and in such fields as geometry, 
philosophy, science and history. 

For Howe, as for so many of the pioneer 
modernists, the new architecture was more 
a search for the primal than it was an 
intention aUy radical act But it was per- 
ceived as a radical act, and his departure 
from his firm in 1928 was not amicable. 
His partners viewed it as a betrayal of 
them personally as well as of their archi- 
tectural. values. 

Howe quickly formed a new partnership 
with William Lescaze, a young Interna- 
tional Style architect, and together they 
created what was, clearly, the major Inter- 
national Style skyscraper in the United 
States at its completion in 1932 — the 
Philadelphia Saving Fund Society. Stro ngl y 
expressive of ’structure, with horizontal 
office floors visually separated .from a 
vertical circulation spine, all floating on 
a dark curved -com ex base, the building 
remains one of the great monuments of 
early modernism. Mr. Stern analyzes it in 
detail, admiringly yet critically, and gives 
special attention to the role played by 
James Willcox, the company's chief execu- 
tive, -In the long process of design. It is 
a welcome reminder of how crucial clients’ 
wishes can be in evolving a final design. 

Other Significant Work 

Although Howe did other important 
work — notably two distinguished resi- 
dences, Square Shadows and Fortune Rock 
— nothing brought him the ac claim of the 
Philadelphia Saving Fund Society. But 
Howe’s new approach brought him criti- 
cism as well: when the building was 
shunted to the side at the annua] exhibi- 
tion of the Architectural League of New 
York, and the work of younger modernist 
architects was omitted altogether, Howe 
helped organize a rival exhibition, and 
then resigned from the league. He tot* 
to defending his position with polemics, 
claiming that, for him, “functionalism is 
essentially an esthetic movement” and 
that “modernism is not a style. It is am 
attitude of mind . . . inevitable” 

Howe’s difficult personal struggle with 
modernism was very much a search for 
basics, and in these days of modernism’s 
decline, rt is an important reminder that 
the movement was never so monolithic 
as it is often made out to have been. Mr. 
Stem documents that struggle thought- 
fully and readably, although one might 
wish for a bit more insight into Howe-’s 
own emotions as he faced the ire of his 
profession — we are never quite sure 
whether, underneath his polemics, he was 
bitter or bemused. But perhaps that is 
because Howe himself never offered a 
hint; for all his radical architectural con- 
version,. Tie,' remaineda discreet Philadel- 
phia gentleman to the end. 


Art: The Pleasures Found in Drawings 


By HILTON KRAMER 
The pleasures afforded by 
the art of drawing are in- 
exhaustible. In certain draw- 
ings, it is the freshness of 
the artist’s initial impulse 
that holds ail attention. In 
others, it is the patient, pains- 
taking orchestration of myr- 
iad tiny touches into a 
complex, unitary image that 
counts for everything. Some 
drawings are executed with 
an emotional detachment so 
complete that they seem to 
be acts of pure cerebration, 
whereas others are the sheer- 
est effusions of spontaneous 

feeling. And then there are 
the drawings- in which an 
artist seems almost to live a 
secret life, confiding to the 
intimacy of pencil and paper 
the kind of naked emotion he 
would hesitate to disclose to 
the more public medium of 
brush and canvas. 

This divergent range of in- 
tention and expression is 
neatly stated in the works 
of two sculptors — Alberto 
Giacometti and Isamu No- 
guchi — that are included in 
a delightful little show, 
“Drawings: Recent Gifts,” 
which opened yesterday at 
the Museum of Modem Art 
Giacometti’s pencil drawing 
“In the Sculptor’s Studio’ 1 ' 
(1948) is nervous, searching, 
intense — a classic example of 
draftmanship’s wresting from 
the repeated revisions of the 


hand and the eye an image 
of great emotional resonance. 
Mr. Noguchi’s worksheets 
for sculpture (1946), on the 
other hand, radiate an atmos- 
phere of serenity and sus- 
tained contemplation. Graph 
paper is cut and pasted on 
sheets of black construction 
paper, and a firm, unhesi- 
tating pencil delicately am- 
plifies and supplements the 
emphatic shape with vari- 
ations and alternative ver- 
sions. 

Each artist, inha biting a 
world of his own, thus gives 
us the quintessence of his 
art in these “minor” works 
of small compass. 

Elsewhere In this exhibi- 
tion, which consists of 17 
items recently added to the 
museum’s exemplary collec- 
tion of modem draw ings, 
there are revelations of a 
very different sort. The Mexi- 
can artist Diego Rivera, com- 
monly associated in all our 
minds with propagandists 
mural paintings conceived as 
an expression of radical polit- 
ical sentiment, is represented 
here by “Por tra it of a Wo- 
man” (1917), executed in 
pencil, a pure example of . 
classical draftsmanship de- 
void of ideological distortion. 

Giorgio de Chirico is like- 
wise represented, in the 
graphite pencil portrait “Gio- 
vinetto Aldo Cast eJ franco” 


Courts Act in Teacher Strikes; 
Million Children Are Still Idle 


37 rue Associated Prea 

Some 50,000 teachers walking [where classes were suspended 
picket lines In 11 states kept st noon, the local school board 
nearly a million children home Ugked a court for a contemot 

bad ignored a previous injunc- 
tion. 

Mel Haves, a spokesman for 


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7 Old World fruit 
3 Debt chits 
9 Doe, in France 

1 Word with ran 

2 Strong spirit 

3 Group character 
f One-up 

maneuver 
5 Headland 
3 Indian peasants 

DOWN 


1 Navy police: 
Abbr. 

2 Smell — 

3 Scottish sight 

4 — of fresh air 

5 Girl of the 
sorrows 

6 Regarding 

7 Dressed 

8 Conservative 

9 Stage trumpet 
call 

0 Squirrel-like 
rodents 

1 His, in France 

2 Secular 


13 Stopover spot 

21 Peking name 

22 Genus of bees 

25 Cara 

26 Damage: Var. 

27 Certain tides 

28 U.S. columnist 

29 Decree 

30 “Per — adastra” 

31 Napery 

32 Electrical unit 
35 — cat 

40 Long-stemmed 
glass 

41 — doke 

43 One who cheats' 
at exams 

44 Actual state of 
affairs 

46 Banner 

47 Heavenly altar 

50 Harris or Gallup 

51 Approximately 

52 Time past 

53 Pitcher Tiant 

54 Attack vessels 

55 Pining nymph 

56 — put (field 
event) 

57 Dope 
60 Curve 









Relief Curb Is Barred 
BOSTON, Sept 5 <AP) — 
Superior Court Judge Samuel 
Adams issued a temporary re- 
straining order today barring 
the state from dropping em- 
ployable persons from the 
general relief rolls on Monday. 


teachers either to return to 
work or to resume bargaining 
with school officials. 

In Seattle, school officials 
decided to keep the 66,500-pu- 
pil system operating despite 
a strike by custodians and food 
service workers. 

Areas hardest hit by the 
strikes remained the 530,000- 
pupfl Chicago school system, 
where 28,000 teachers are strik- 
ing, Pennsylvania. Strikes 
by 7,800 teachers in 32 of that 
state’s 505 school districts have 
kept more than 200,000 pupils 
at home this week. 

Class size, cost-of-livnig pay 
rises and improved fringe bene- 
fits were key issues m most 
of the teacher disputes. 

Other Strikes Cited 
Also striking or locked out 
were 2,200 teachers in Rhode 
Island. 900 in Lynn. Mass.; 2,- 
000 in Michigan; 1,000 in Wil- 
mington, DeL; 9,900 in New 
Jersey; 600 in Tacoma, Wash.; 
300 in Ohio; 1,200 in upstate 
[New York -and. 1,300 in Berke- 
ley and San Jose, Calif. 

Tentative settlements were 
reached late Thursday in Los 
Angeles and in Joliet and Ur- 
bans, HL 

Meanwhile, a Massachusetts 
court ordered teachers in Lynn 
to end their walkout immedi- 
ately, and a Rhode Island judge 
told strikers in two school dis- 
tricts to resume bargaining 'or 
face a back-to-work order. 

And in Wilmington, Del., 


tbe National' Education Asso- 
ciation, said yesterday that 
^acber contracts in 2,300 of 
the nation’s 16,000 school dis- 
tricts were still unsettled, by 
far the largest number ever 
at this time of year. 

Mr. Hayes cited 65 strikes 
or school board lockouts in- 
volving NJE.A. affiliates so far 
this school year, compared to 
48 at the like time last year. 
Fifty of this year’s are still 
unsettled, be said. 

Meantime, in Louisville. Ky.. 
60 protesters demonstrated 
peacefully outside two Jeffer- 
son County schools on the se- 
cond day of court-ordered bus- 
ing of pupQs between the cen- 
tral city and its suburbs. 


(1920), by a side of his oeuvre 
far removed from the kind of 
dream-haunted urban fantasy 
that is familiar to us in so 
many unforgettable paintings. 
In this drawing, at least, Mr. 
de Chirico re minds us of his 
links with a great tradition. 

Part of the interest of any 
drawing exhibition consists, 
inevitably, in seeing well- 
known ideas in process of 
formulation and testing. Here, 
for example, is an untitled 
— dated 1917— by the Dutch 
geometrical painter Bart An- 
thony van der Leek, a coun- 
tryman and colleague of 
Mondrian, in which the hard 
edges and pure colors erf the 
De Stifl manner are given a 
highly romantic renderings. 
The atmosphere of nature, so 

rigorously eschewed in the 

ideology of De Stijl abstrac- 
tion. is given its due in the 
form of a milky, atmospheric 
light that bhirs the edge of 
every form and imparts to 
every touch of color the qual- 
ity of something observed in 
the workaday world. 

• 

Most of the artists’ names 
in this roster of recent gifts 
are not only familiar but also . 
long celebrated — Max Ernst, 
Erich Heck el, Willi em de 
Kooning and Henri Matisse 
are among the other artists 

included— but there is one 
surprise. The French artist 
Sam Szarfran (bom in 1934) 
is represented by a large re- 
cent pastel drawing of a stu- 
dio interior in which boxes 
upon boxes of pastel colors 
are spread before us, lend- 
ing a bright chromatic glow 
to a scene otherwise en- 
shrouded in a gloomy and 
slightly bizarre atmosphere. 

Several of the drawings in 



U 


Giorgio de Chirico’s “Giovinetto Aldo Casteffranco," 
done in 1920, is at the Museum of Modem Art. 


the show are gifts given to 
honor the memory of the 
museum’s former director. 
Rend d’Hamoncourt, who 
died in 196S. The show is. 
perhaps, too small in itself to 
warrant a separate visit to 
the museum— and a separate 
admission price — but for any- 


one hastening to visit or re- 
visit the great “Modem Mas- 
ters: Manet to Matisse” ex- 
hibition before It comes down 
on Sept. 28, this gallery of 
drawings will provide some 
delightful supplementary 
pleasures. It remains on view 
through Nov. 9. 



Ex-Gurney Aide in Prison 
ALLENWOOD, Pa^ Sept 
(AP) — James L. Groot, once 
top aide to former Senator Ed- 
ward J. Gurney. Republican of, 
Florida, began serving an 18- 
month prison sentence today 
for his- part in a slush fund 
conspiracy. In a five-and-a- 
half-month trial in Tampa, Fla 
Mr. Gurney was acquitted on 
all but two charges growing 
out of an alleged conspiracy 
to shake down Florida build- 
ers. There has been no decision 
on whether to refry Mr. Gur- 
ney on the remaining charges. 





Before you spend 
15 weeks in an art school 
you might bate, 
spend afew hours with us. 

Come to our Open House 
& Faculty Show at The Brooklyn 
Museum Art School from 1-4 PM 
on Sunday September 7th. 

Have some refreshments, 
visit our studios and workshops, 
talk to our faculty. 

If you like what you see, sign 
up for one of our many exciting 
daytime, evening, full or part 
time classes. If not, have some 
refreshments, and then enjoy 
one of .the fringe benefits of an 
art school in a great museum. 
See the Brooklyn Museum's 
fabulous collection of art. 

FarMormsGonmlutaloectf NEfrMflS. 
Eastern Bariaey a UtRiwtgftjn fceJreoklyn 
f7th Awe. Ekjuks stops « at* dooti 


CABALLO TORERO 

A Book 

with Original Aquatints by 

jsstfMuoei CAP U LETT! 

AndTextby 

AM PERALTA > 

Hastings Gallery 
The Spanish Institute 
684 Park Ave- at 68th 

Mob. to Ssti: 10 vb to 6 pm 
ChuSnpSipt ember 13 


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PtrStl (untfina NEW YORK STA TE : 
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M TfQNA t ENDOWMENT 

FOR THE ARTS 


Important Auction 
of Major and Recent Works 
by 

ARTISTS OF THE HAMPTONS 

Benefit 

GUILD HALL, East Hampton, N.Y. 

to be held on Thursday Evening 
September 18 at 8 pm 
at Sotheby Parke Bemet 
.980 Madison Avenue, New York 

On view September 12 through IS from 10 am to 5 pm 

Inquiries, catalogues and poster by Jack Youngemun, 
call 516/324-5171 


SUMMIT ART CENTER 

members no rltU 

LEVER HOUSE 

SELECTED ARTISTS: Uiti Handler 


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: AN OPPORTUNITY 1 
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a AAA is often offered special' * 

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: {1786-1884) 

l Japanese Ukiyo-e woodcuts 
> from the larger Genji Mono- 
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• Kunisada Ga. Moderate im- 

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tree, Steinlen, Ibels, Willette * 
and others. Many in color and 
with music. Signed in stone. 
$25-5175 

FRANCISCO 60YA 

[1747-18281 

Original etchings from the 
“Disasters of War" series. 
Fourth edition. Printed by the 
Calcografia for the Real 
Academia in 1906 in an edi- 
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ris these impressions are 
generally a little inferior to 
those of the second edition, 
but better than those of the 
third. $60-$75 

Currently on view through 
September! 3. 

BY THE BEAUTIFUL SEA 

Over 200 prinls by more than 
150 19th and 20th century 
artists, illustrated catalogue 
with prices on request or at 
the gallery. 


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Mon.-SaL 10-6 ■ 


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Lynn Kotiier Galleries — ■ 


3 E. 65 3L N.Y.C. • sapl 7 to Sept20 


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17 EAST B7TH STREET NEW Y DRK 



More than 12,000 works of art, valued in excess of 
SI 2 million, have been reduced for this unique, 
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Our collection of oils, wetercolors, drawings, gouaches 
and lithographs is completely data processed. An 1H.M. 
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BETTY PARSONS GALLERY Sept 9-27 

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HELENE AYLON 

Paintings that Change in Time 

SUSAN CALDWELL GALLERY 

sapL&octi 383 West Broadway, New York City 




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JOHN S. OAKES, Editorial Page Editor 
A. H. BASKIN, Anwtnt Editorial Pafs Editcr 
A# St. ROSENTHAL, Managing Editor 
SEYMOUR TOPPING, Ascutoai Managing Editor 

MAX FRANSEL, Sandey Editor 
JACK ROSENTHAL, Areiaiast Sunday Editor 


Letters to the Editor 

How the City Can Lose Its Bond Dealers The New Hist. 


CHARLOTTE CltBTISr Associate Editor 
CLIFTON’ DANIEL, Associate Editor 
TOM WICKER, Associate Editor 


A Round for Freedom 


Portugal's military ml era haye finally delivered a shaip 
setback to the cause of Soviet-style Communism by re- 
moving Geo. Vasco Gonsalves from the High Council of 
the Revolution, thus barring his appointment as chief of 
staff of the Armed Forces. President Francisco da Costa 
Gomes finally acquiesced — obviously with great reluc- 
tance and only after a stormy session of the Armed 
Forces general assembly — in cancellation of his plan to 
shift General Gonsalves from the Premiership to "the 
highest military post. 

■ In ousting General Gonsalves from the military power 
structure — where he had served militantly and defiantly 
as the instrument of Portugal’s Communist party — the 
Armed Forces Movement was responding to demands 
from decisive majorities in its own ranks and in the 
citizenry as a whole. To have backed away from tins 
decision, or even to have delayed it unduly, would have 
been to accept the greatest risk of civil war. 

Neither General Gonsalves’ fervent military support- 
ers nor the disciplined Communist party cadres are likely 
to accept his dismissal with equanimity. Having done a 


car is still seen as the greatest source of profit. Such 
mass-transit facilities as are being built by the auto com- 
panies are a near-monopoly of General Motors, which 
makes 85 per cent of ail American bus diesel engines; 
but the country’s total bus production is kept down to 
less than one-eighth that of Japan. 

Fortunately the industry appears to be less than 
unanimous about the lack of balance in American trans- 
portation Hearings on the bill, planned for the fall, 
should smoke out the attitudes of the motor companies 
and encourage the breaking up of a trust geared to low 
production. Beyond that, they should enhance the 
prospects for the first significant shift away from the 
present dangerous dependence on the environmentally 
damaging and energy-wasteful private car. 


Guns and Leaders 


After a decade in which three public men — John F. 
K enne dy, Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy 
— were gunned down, in open view and less than four 
years after a bullet maimed Gov. George C. Wallace 
for life, the news that a young woman came close to 


To the Editor. 

The trouble with the city’s new 
bond purchase and sale C ‘transfer’ 1 ) 
tax is that it drives business out 
of New York because nonresident 
purchasers and sellers do not have 
to submit to die tax. They can 
and do demand that their brokers, 
dealers and transfer agents make the 
purchases and sales and record them 
elsewhere than in New York City. It 
is not a case of evil brokers and 
banks moving bond trading and bond 
registrar departments out of the city 
because they want the- city to fall- 
It is because their non-New York City 
customers will not submit to this 
exaction when they don’t have to. 

The tax ought to be repealed as 

quickly as possible if the dty is to 
avoid an exodus of bond trading and 
registration business, and a further 
drop in employment. There are over 
6^00 persons employed in transfer ac- 
tivities in the city, of whom. S3 per 
cent live in the city. 

When the new national market in 
securities, is established, the state 
transfer tax on stocks may prove 
to be similarly burdensome to non- 
New Yorkers. Congress ' seemed to 
recognize this In its amendment of the 
Securities and Exchange Act prohibit- 
ing states and political subdivisions 
from imposing a tax on changes of 
beneficial or record ownership of se- 
curities through the facilities of a reg- 
istered clearing agency or registered 
transfer agent, or on the delivery 


or transfer of securities to or through 
such agent, unless the transfer "would 
otherwise be taxable fry such state or 
pnittirjt) subdivision if the facilities 
of such registered . clearing agency, 
registered transfer agent, or any 
nominee thereof or custodian thereof 
were not physically located in the 
taxing state or political subdivision." 

The new dty bond tax as applied 
to purchases . and sales by nonresi- 
dents would seem to fly in the face 
of this recent Act of Congress. 

Congress is now considering a bill 
that would delete this provision ex- 
empting registered transfer agents be- 
cause what it was seeking t o exempt 
was transfer agent depositories. So 
the conflict with the new Federal law 
may be eliminated by further Congres- 
sional action. 

Bond dealers and registrars cannot 
sit idly by and see their business drift 
away to others. That is why they are 
considering leaving the city in order 
to be able to continue to effect trades 
and transfers for nonresidents, it is 

not a 25-cent tax dodge Better Aug. 
28]. It is an effort to keep business 
by doing it outside the city because 
they will lose the business if they do 
it here and so subject their non- 
resident customers to the tax. 

J. Sinclair Armstrong 
New York, Aug. 28, 1975 
The writer, executive vice president 
o/ the UE. Trust Company, is a former 
chairman of the SJ£. C. 


ofTaSS mUKlering . Presidmt For<MQOms » . tno PP ’76 Convention: The Democrats’ Choice 


their organization during Portugal’s long night of fascism, 
the Communists maneuvered brilliantly into positions 
of power after the military coup of April 25, 1974. Thanks 
to General Gonsalves and the wavering by President 
Costa Gomes, they emerged stronger from every crisis, 
despite their miserable showing in the free elections of 
last April. 

But now the Armed Forces Movement has given free- 
dom another chance — a chance that might have come 
month* ago had it not been for the procrastination of 
the President. Tbs Communist tide has been decisively 
halted ami ooiy serious divisions in the ranks of the 
officers and men who brought about this result could 
give General Gonsalves and hte champions a chance to 
recoup. 

These military leaders would be weS fiivised at this 
moment to turn for advice and cooperation to the Social- 
ist and Popular Democratic parties, which together polled 
64 per cent of the votes last April Such cooperation 
would be the best insurance against a resurgence of 
C om mu n is m ; the best guarantee of the peaceful evolution 
of long-suffering Portugal toward freedom, democracy, 
and solidarity with the Western world. 


Fresh Air Over Lima 


With his first acts as President of Peru, Gen. Francisco 
Morales Bermudez has enhanced his reputation as an 
officer of moderation and common sense. His Govern- 
. ment has Issued a decree allowing an deponed political 
leaders and journalists bo return home from exile and 
penmttzng all publications closed by former President 
Juan Velasco Alvarado to resume operations. 

The Government felt it necessary to warn tteti it 
would still deal sternly with anyone who impeded “the 
objectives of die revolution,” launched by the armed 
forces with their ouster of President Fernando Belaunde 
Terry in 1968. But within that limitation, the decree 
promises “total freedom” for Peruvians to express their 
“attitude^ and critidans as welt as full participation 
fry aH in the building of “a new society.” 

\ Return of the exiles, presumably including Mr. 
Befeunde himself, and the reappearance of political 
magazines, some of genuine quality, will provide Lama 
with a needed breath of intellectual fresh air. This 
liberalization tells much, not merely about General 
Morales BermOdez’s moderation but about his confidence 
in Peru's political stability and his conviction that the 
revolution will be helped, rather than harmed, fry con- 
structive criticism. 

The new President’s appointments bespeak a concern 
to maintain balance between officers who would speed 
up the revolutionary process and those who favor con- 
solidation. But he has gone outside the military for the 
first time since the armed forces assumed power in his 
selection of a civilian banker, Luis Barua Castenada, to 


for intelligible comment. The impulse is to despair for 
the country or to frame condemnations or to draw con- 
clusions that are too large to withstand rational scrutiny. 

Such responses are basically attempts to evade the 
unpalatable fact that a plague is upon us before which,' 
we seem virtually helpless. It does little good to rail 
futilely at our violent heritage. Because of It, violence 
has come to be viewed by too many as a neat resolution 
of the world's untidiness. Though more than half the 
people in the nation desire effective gun control, a power- 
ful and vocal minority demands easy access to firearms 
as some solution to problems of crime and violent soci- 
etal divisions. Loose gun laws do nothing to solve those 
problems or to provide effective protection for the 
law-abiding; but they do make it easier for deranged 
people to acquire the firearms that threaten the lives 
of this nation's leaders. 

Without the requisite will to control our raging and 
simplistic impulses, Americans are left to eerie and 
ineffectual m usings. One would hope, for example, that 
those tempted to seek the instant celebrity given to a 
successful assassin could see Sirhan Sirhan in his isola- 
tion cell in the wing for the mentally disturbed in 
California’s Vacaville Prison and contemplate his life 
there. 

One might also speculate upon how different this 
nation might now be if the scourge of assassination 
had not descended upon it. And finally, one is left with 
the shuddering sense of how much the automatic edge* 
of apprehension adds to the burdens of the people who 
sees to lead this nation. 

Two concrete considerations do need attention. No 
process of advance screening can be absolutely foolproof; 
yet it is startling, after the Secret Services tightening 
of its procedures in the wake .of the assass in a ti ons of 
the ninteen-sixties, that a vociferous member of the 
Manson family would wander so easily into the path 
of a strolling President 

And, Mr. Ford's stroll itself raises the irresolvable 
conflict between a Presidents natural and healthy desire 
to retain easy contact with the people he leads and, 
conversely, his obligation to himself and to the nation 
to keep out of harm’s way. There are no pat answers 
to either of these questions, but the attempt on Mr. 
Ford’s life clearly demonstrates that, despite the excep- 
tional reactions of Secret Service Agent Larry Bruendorf, 
there are still correctable flaws in the Presidential 
protection system. 

At the end of a series of thoughts on a subject so 
fraught with irrationality the only useful refuge is a 
rational response. The President was about to speak 
about his gun-control proposals when he was attacked. 
Those proposals and others now being considered by 
Congress would not fully insure the safety of public 
men if enacted. They would simply make the country 
safer for them and for the rest of us as welL 


be Minister of Economy and Finance. If this proves a 

first step in giving the Government more of a civilian A (Tpnrla f/^r 

cast It wifi be as welcome to most Peruvians as the AgCIIUcl lUl iVlUlIUd y 

return of the exiles. u v* 


Mass Transit Bank 


Senator Philip A. Hart of Michigan has — not for the 
first time — introduced legislation so obviously sensible 
that it is difficult to see how it can be opposed on its 
merits. His bill calls for a Mass Transit Development 
Bank which would serve botL to encourage automobile 
manufacturers to compete. for rail and bus equipment 
business and to provide jobs for unemployed auto 
workers. 

The Michigan Democrat, whose state is among the 
hardest hit by the recession, proposes simply that the 
Federal Government guarantee loans to companies 
undertaking to manufacture the rolling stock without 
which no mass-transit subsidies by Government can 
have much significance. "Special preference” would be 
given to applicants making use of existing auto plants 
and manpower to work on some phase of mass-transit 
manufacturing they had not previously engaged in. 

On the face of it, the bill should have strong appeal 
to an industry that is making fewer than two- thirds 
the number of cars, it made only two years ago. It 
should likewise appeal to a union that has suffered a 
loss of 220,000 jobs in the same period. And it should 
appeal to all Americans who, aware that the hope for 
a better environment rests on more mass transit and 
fewer care, nevertheless do not want to see that 
improvement made solely at the expense of production 
workers who can least afford it. 

There is no sign as yet that the first of these, the 
auto makers themselves, are rushing to support Senator 
Hart’s bill- Within the industry that helped to stamp 
nut the trolley car and to further .the proliferation of 
highways to the detriment of railroads, the laige private 


Although deference to the Jewish New Year put off 
until Monday a vote on the emergency legislation to 
save New York City from imminent default, all indica- 
tions are that the Ii/e-saving package will be approved 
by both houses of the Legislature after the weekend 
recess. Few among those whose affirmation is needed 
will vote entirety without reservations; but the truth 
has apparently penetrated that there is no rational 
alternative to tire rescue course charted by the Municipal 
Assistance Corporation and now backed by both 
Governor Carey and Mayor Beame. 

To avert any lapse from common sense by the time 
the Legislature returns next week, the focus must remain 
on the immensity of the disaster that default would 
wreak, not only on the city’s future but on the economic 
condition of state and nation. There Is a macabre wrong- 
headedness in some of the suggestions in Washington 
and among a conservative fringe of the fi n ancial com- 
munity that default might not be so bad for New York. 

In political terms, such sentiments have the unhappy 
effect of concentrating more on Federal actions that 
might be taken after tire fall than on ways of helping 
to prevent it Those who are letting their antl-New York 
feelings get the better of sound economic judgment 
ought to heed the warning sounded by Representative 
Hemy Reuss of Wisconsin, chairman of . the House 
Banking and Currency Committee, that New York’s 
default could set off “a chain of municipal crises” 
across the country. 

The rescue package, anchored in creation of a new 
five-member Emergency Control Board, promises sweep- 
ing reforms in the city’s fiscal management, but it keeps 
the dominant role in decision-making and responsibility 
in the hands of elected officials, through a top-level 
fusion of state and city direction. Reliance on the 
democratic process remains the proper course— even 
in the rush to avert catastrophe. 


To the Editor 

As to the Democrats’ selection of 
New York City over Los Angeles for 
their 1976 national convention, patty 
members may perhaps be excused for 
being nervous. Why? Because of the 



point out that the apple fell from the 
bough long ago and has since been 
consumed by the worm within: a suc- 
cession of Democrat administrations 
who got themselves elected by prom- 
ising free everything for everybody. 
The Democrats should feel quite at 
home in the smoldering ash heap their 
party's policies have created. 

There’s a splendid lesson to be 
learned in all this, end it shall not be 
lost on the rest of the nation. 

William McLean 
Ann Arbor, Mich., Aug. 28, 1975 


calftesr (and electoral success) of 
nominees produced by previous Demo- 
cratic conventions in New York City*. 
. The track record: The city’s two con- 
ventions resulted in the nominations of 
Horatio Seymour (1668) and John W. 
Davis (1924) — that’s OJL, Big Apple, 
third time's got to be a charm. 


To the Editor: 

It seems very Unfortunate to me that 
the Mayor’s committee finds it neces- 
sary to “clean up” the Madison Square 
Garden area only tor the incoming 
Democratic National Convention . and 
that the people who will attend the 
convention and come mto the city tor 
it are the ones who should have the 
“best possible image of the city’.” 

What about the residents of New 
York, tie hard-working, tax-paying 
citizens who live in New York? Doesn't 
their safety and well-being mean as 
much or more to Mayor Beame and his 
committee than that of the politicians 
and others who will be here for one 


To the Editor: 

The New Jersey So 
perts quoted in Jud 
news article "Historiar 
‘Crisis'” (Aug 20) re. 
be permitted to tell $x 
school. These and th 
riculum designers” 
bureaucracies inform i 
who are now saved 1 
memorizing 100 usele 
stead learning “conce 
rial sciences. 

After sixteen years » 
ing in the meiropaJiti 
suggest that Mr. Von 
Bragow be sent to th 
fice. Gentlemen, your 
neither chronology no 
many of them read at 
to five years below 
they do read. (The bo 
lustrated, printed in b 
tied to slides or films.) 
'•concepts” is eupheir 
as bunk. To find more 
of an undergraduate c 
tin guish the eras of 
angelo and their ow 
Is a statistical rar 
the graduate students 
staffs, that is — vague 1 
Renaissance preceded 
are often outraged wh 
more than four boo 
write a few papers. C 
posed as a substitute 
Mumford doing a dl or 
val city in a shoebox 

Dr. Bragow’s insir 
torians are complains 
lution of their disci) 
employment consider 
ment he hopefully re 
me of a student anx 
tion “Why did Row 
Social Contract*?" **T 
was the terse reply. 

It is a sad irony ti 
coming a curricula g 
moment when the d 
reinvigorated by ne 
teaching methods ar 
seeking the tracks ■ 
and the less than pov 
we have begun to 
critical questions c 
record. Not only do ■ 
why "X” war occun 
"Z" crisis did not l 
dents, from fourth g 
teachers, are being c 
exciting intellectual 


Associate Pr 
Richmo- 
New Yc 


Of Mobil's M 


LA-’s record: One Democratic con-- convention? Don’t we deserve the “best 


vention (1960). -Nominee: John F. 
Kennedy. Kenneth A. Buxton 
Claremont, Calif, Aug. 28, 1975 


To the Editor: 

The Mobil Oil Coi 
advocacy of phased 
mediate, decontrol c 
(editorial Aug. 26) i: 


possible image" at all times? After all, ‘ reflection of the co 
it is our tax dollars that are supposed tive position than ■ 


To the Editor 

It would be c be Democrats, of 
course, who allowed themselves to be 
seduced into choosing New York os 
their convention site. Not for nothing 
do these anachronistic defenders of 
tax-and-spend, spend- and-tax embrace 
the jackass as their symbol 

“New York’s still the Big Apple,” 
enthused Mayor Beame, neglecting to 


to go into helping and improving the 
city. 

When the convention is over, the 
delegates and politicians who came in- 
to New York will leave with a false 
image. For when it is all over, the drive 
to “clean up" the area will be over. And 
the citizens of New York will see the 
real image again — the filth, harass- 
ment, the derelicts, drunks, criminals. 
After all, we're not important; we just 
live here. Ellen Gavin 

Bronx, Aug. 29. 1975 


Fire Dept.: Toward 
Fewer False Alarms 


To the Edition 

Joyce Brothers asserts hv an Aug. 
10 Op-Ed ■ article that, the false-fme- 
alarm solution is “so simple that it 
is now in effect to deter bank robbers 
and those who pass bad checks. A 
camera!” 

As a point of Information, cameras 
were employed some tone ago on 
alarm boxes in the South Bronx 
with the following unsatisfactory 
results; Cameras required outside 
mounting, inviting theft or damage; 
alarm box handles .were pulled from 
the rear beyond camera range, and 
changing lighting and weather .condi- 
tions made prints unclear. 

To the detraction of the depart- 
ment's record of reliability and sense 
of. public trust. Dr. Brothers avers 
that the ’Tire Department is pfenning 
to play a form of Russian roulette 
With fire alarms." 

In reality. Fine Commissioner John 
T. O’Hagan 's last-resort measure of 
“selective non-response” would, only 
be employed at voice boxes with high 
histories of false alarms when no 
voice contact is received during the 
peak false-alaim periods erf the day. 

The concept erf selective non- 
response is .an alternative plan which 
represents prudent management and 


is realistic when the facts are consid- 
ered. Actually, by the year's, end. 
the department will have responded 
' to . more than 200,000 false alarms. 
This figure will represent more than 
half of our total activity and threatens 
our ability to answer valid calls for 
assistance unless this deadly trend is 
checked. 

Dr. Brothers has quite accurately 
identified youthful offenders as being 
responsible for this wasteful drain on 
our equipment and manpower. How- 
ever, the real tragedy is that the 
majority of our false alarms are from 
the depressed areas of the dty, which 
suffer the greatest losses from fire 
and can least afford the willful misuse 
of a .vital service. 

We are enlisting all available slriiic 
and cooperation to discourage this 
practice and presently are en g a ged 
in a concentrated campaign to alter 
the behavior of those youngsters who 
playfully abuse alarm boxes. 

The centuxy-oid tradition of the 
New York City Fire Department to be 
available for the fastest response to 
as emergency in any area during any 
period of the day is still - bur prime 
motivation. And it is our trust that 
with, everyone’s cooperation we shall 
be - able to preserve that tradition 
without change. 

Victor A. Colltmore 
Assistant Fire. Commissioner 
New York, Aug. 27, 1975 


concern for the eft s 
Not all the so-calU 
parties produce all 
they use in their re 
particularly defiden • 
supplying its refir 
about 40 per cent 
inputs from cotnpan 
sources (versus Exx 
for example). 

With some of its n 
competitors now pit 
product price increa 
cents a gallon after 
will find itself uoabl 
the higher cost of 
must buy from othea 
Big oil is no pa rax 
petition, but neither 
Competitive instinct- 
time to time, and tl 
here. For months no 
arguing strenuously 
trol, in part by s infer 
into political ads 
frequently grace th 
The Times. But let - 
also favors decontro 
hold the line on pn 


C hairman and President 
RARDKC F. BANCROFT, Vice Chairman 


JAMES C. GOOD ALE, Executive Viet President 
SYDNET GSCSON', Executive Vico President 
WALTER MATTSON, Executive Vice President 


The New York Times 
Company 


JOHN MCCABE, Senior Vice President 
JOES MORTIMER, Senior Vic* President 
JOHN p, POMFEETj Senior Vice President 


229 Wot 43d St, K.Y 10036 
(212) E56-U8A 


SEAKEPIELD ’ 7{ce President 

BENJAMIN HAND8U1AN, Vic* President 

JOHN R. HAKHISON, Vice JWeni 

ramp. THOMPSON, Via President 


MICHAEL E. RYAN, Secretary 
BOWMAN, Treasurer 


establishment of Ai 
llglon — neo-paganisit 


Staten Island, N 






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Mobil’s position, t 

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Princeton, N 


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Founding Fath- 


To the Editor. 

-iJT " 

The explicit langcu 


is not more signifia 


assumptions of the 


Founding Fathers vr. 


tion, tbe ringing wor 

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tion were still in tin 


men are created « 


dowed by their Crea 

Outside the Jud 


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fives. The pagan wc 


inexorable fate. The 

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were deemed eternal 

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ject to amendmen 


Congress. 

■ ■■■ . .7 

Charles Stephen 

■ •*■:? -Us-.-- 

Aug. 27), may be cc 

:-.e 

that God is not exj 


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"or implicitly^ to his 


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First Amendment ini 










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^ensor s 

ht Out 


ssell Baker 

into a saloon, walks 
nd says, "Give me a 
lender mixes it, gives 
3 at the other cus- 
TiatTl be ten bucks." 
> down a sawbuck, 
it up, looks. at the 
. “We don’t get many 
'." Gorilla says, "So I 
■ ted Sox can win the 

5 huffy. "That ain’t 
iys. “When I say we 
orillas m here, you’re 
' ‘At these prices. Tm 





Giving Them Anything, It Seems, but a Job 


If ■** ; * 

ifymsyi., •• ' 

V 'J:-SS» >r - * If 


ift.-..-. - T 


* 4- " 

^_r : *. t •-■**■-■ 


he bartender the red 
asks. Bartender says, 

- reaches over the bar, 
ender by the Adams- 
an tell you don't get 
■ire, else you’d know 
stand around telling 
put you down with- 
Ihing, what are "you 
ow you’re a civilized 

, ‘Til give you an- 
the house,” which he 
*’s a regular guy, he 
. 1, “Ask me who w&s 

JRVER 

seen me with last 
■ilia says. “Who was 
een you with last 

he bartender, “you 
was that lady?’ not 
Oman?’ " 

■ never say ‘lady.’ It’s 
rvented to oppress 

make you laugh.” 
r. “If you say, “Who 
seen you with last 

That was no lady; 
,11* 

>ver the bar, grabs 
id shakes out ten 
I'm some kind of 
ig, telling me sexist 
he says. 

own, the bartender 
are martinis on the 
a while the gorilla 
arts singing “Danny 
r Machree." During 
cert, the bartender 
r about President 

gorilla. 

and chew guni - at 
ays the bartender, 
s the bartender by 


breaking 1 a 20-foot mirror and eight 
dozen glasses: '“There’s nothing funny 
ih jokes about the President," he says. 

The- bartender figures the gorilla is 
a Republican so to get on his good 
side, he says. “Have you heard about 
the watertight Volkswagen that won’t 
suik?” 

"No,” says- the gorilla. 

"If Ted Kennedy’d bought one,” 
says the bartender, “he r d be President 
today.” 

This makes the gorilla so mad he 
picks the bartender out of the glass- 
ware and says, “There’s nothing funny 
in jokes about the men who ran our 
country. Start saying your prayers.” 

Bartender says he didn’t mean no 
harm, he was just, trying to mafce 
people laugh, he is a good guy and to 
prove it he wiH ; give the gorilla a 
double martini on the house: 

“Make it two," says the gorilla, and 
before long he is slumped over the 
bar mumbling that he can lick any 
thirty men in the house The bartender 
figures he needs cheering up, so he 
says, “Look at this,” and holds up his 
right fist with just the ■ pinkie and 
index finger sticking straight up in the 
air, and says, “Know what 'this is?” 

- “Tell me,” says the goriJla. 

'Tt’s a Polish sawmill worker order- 
ing five vodkas." 

.Gorilla lets out a thunderous roar, 
stands up, pounds his chest and says, 
"Anybody crude enough to tell an 
ethnic joke in my presence had better . 
start running.” 

Real quick, the bartender gives him 
another martini ori the bouse, and the 
gorilla subsides. After a while he says, : 
“This place is depressing. I come in 
here, plunk down tea bucks and don’t 
even get a smile for my money. You . 
know what I got a good mind to do?” 

"Look," says the bartender. “Don’t ■ 
do anything fash. Til give you back 
your ten bucks.” Gorilla pockets the 
sawbuck, starts out and bumps into a 
giraffe coming in. the door. 

"Hqy,’’ says the giraffe, “they don’t 
get many gorillas in here." 


5 him around his . .“At these .prices," says the gorilla, 
and lets him, fly, "I. don’t kpow-why not.” L. ■' 

calizing Education 
New York City 


1 Duffy 

has announced that 
ration of Teachers 
£ a "fully equitable” 
id is not prepared 
erning proposals to 
■ease productivity. 
City p id) lie schools 
job, one might be 
. S hanker’s demands, 
r’s financial impasse, 
item is not fulfilling 
which it might be 
{e. 

the games played 
3 and other achieve- 
mployer in this city 
olic -school graduates 
2 system is not 
antial portion of its 
even questionable 
stem is effectively 
-■y. And the absentee 
. it is not performing 
function of .keeping 
ie streets and out 

icial crisis, and Mr. 
0 strike on Tuesday, 
e fall term begins, 
alysts necessary to 


system 
educating 
stantial 
ion of 
ldents.’ 


ceded to make the 
.able. The Board of 
consider the follow- 

iat the schools will 
unitary, 1976. 
vemor Carey to call 
of the Legislature 
mating a New York 
ation Corporation, a 
poration. 

in, modeled on the 
spitals Corporation, 
power to take over 
schools under an 
ard of directors 
;he first instance, 
a ter on). 

n would not have 
t would depend on 
and funds obtained 


' through negotiations . with the city. 
The Board of Education (but,not local 
community boards) would be super- 
seded by the corporation's board erf 
directors. .*The- board of examiners, 
i nowr entrenched under state, law as 
I the: vehicle for perpetuating the city’s 

■ educational bureaucracy, would be 
abolished. * 

3. Urge the Governor to appoint an 
. emergency task force drawn from the 

city’s professions, businesses, banks 
and unions - to determine on a crash 
basis ■ the corporation’s manpower 
needs. 

The number, of teachers would be 
set on the basis of classroom size — 
temporarily high for economy’s sake — 
and the number of administrators 
would be pared to ~an absolute 
minimum. ’ 

The task force would set salary 
levels ‘ — probably higher than -at 
present for teachers (but for some- 
what longer classroom hours and with 
an incentive feature based bn students’ 
classroom performance) and definitely 
lower for administrators. The task 
force would supervise hiring for the 
short school year beginning ih January 

■ and make recommendations for a long- 
range personnel program geared to 
merit' and performance. 

4 . Invite .existing ' school employes 
to apply for positions with the corpo- 
ration. Each teacher would be hired 
on the basis of personnel records, an 
application and two letters of recom- 
mendation from parents of students 
the applicant had taught 

An administrator .would be hired on 
the basis of personnel records and an 
application, including a self -analysis 
of how his duties could be performed 
more efficiently. 

The corporation would grant imme- 
diate tenure to all teachers hired from 
the old system and tenure to adminis- 
trators after a year’s probation. 

5. If adequate staff could not be 

hired by this approach, the corpora- 
tion would seek to recruit from the 
jobless- college-graduate market nation- 
wide. - This hiring would be on the 
basis . of indicated motivation and 
suitability and results of the Educa- 
tional Testing Service's national 
teacher examination. . _ . 

The objections to these' proposals 
would probably be endless. But if one 
believes as J.do that all children are 
entitled to. an education that at least 
enables them to function as citizens 
of the community and that the quality 
of life in this city is not going to 
improve until such education is 
provided, radical departures are 
imperative. 

J. H. Duffy is o New York lawyer and 
resident. 

I 


By Alan Gartner 
and Marjorie Gellennann 

. . The United States is op the brink of 
becoming a permanently divided so- 
ciety^-* society ‘deeply split between 
the ever fewer who are employed and 
the ever more who, while willing and 
able to work, cannot find employment 
on a sustained basis. 

In the last two years, unemployment 
has risen from 4.9 per cent to S.4 per 
cent of the work force- — or, in human 
terms, at last count, 9.4 million people 
could not find work, S.2 million were 
“officially" unemployed, and \Z mil- 
lion more were too discouraged to 
seek work. 

While the increase in unemployment 
had been accompanied by downturns 
in the major indicators of economic 
activity, recently the two trends have 
begun to diverge. Despite the improve- 
ment in industrial-production levels 
and other leading economic indicators, 
most economists, including those in 
the Admi ni stration. -predict high, levels 
of unemployment tor the next several 
years. 

Meanwhile, national policy initia- 
tives focus on ways not to end unem- 
ployment but to soften its effects. 
Unemployment compensation up to 65 
weeks for some jobless workers has 
been authorized. President Ford pro- 
poses to extend these payments still 


further, expand the coverage, and raise 
the benefit leve3. Indeed, in the fiscal 
year 1976 domestic budget the largest 
single increase is for . unemployment ■ 
compensation. 

A wide variety of other income sur- 
rogates or supplements have been put 
forth. Hie Department of Transports--. 
. tion funds “transportation stamps,” 
while the Federal Energy Administra- 
tion proposes "energy stamps” to help 
the poor pay their rising utility bills. 
Others propose “clothing stamps" as 
well as further expansion of thfc. food- 
stamp program. 

Democrats favor the payment of 
health-insurance premiums for the 
formerly employed, as well as Govern- 
ment ' loans to- defer mortgage pay- 
ments. Even the limited opportunities 
afforded by public-service employment 
are shunned. Everything is proposed, 
it seems, except income earned 
through a job. 

Hie basic wealth of the country 
may be great enough to allow the 
trend toward subsidizing unemploy- 
ment to continue and even to grow. 
But we need to give careful attrition 
to the consequences of a policy that 
departs so radically from basic Ameri- 
can values. 

Through work, people have not only 
earned their living but, also, derived . 
much of their identity and feeling of 
self-confidence and self-worth. 

That the very foundations of their 


personal lives are shaken is suggested 
by the evidence- indicating that when 
the unemployment rate goes up so 
does the suicide rate, the rate of new 
admissions to mental hospitals, the 
rate of new prison incarcerations, the 
rate of family breakups, and the rate 
.of infant mortality. 

And what of the effect on the larger 
society? There are the costs to the 
employed, whose hold on their own 
jobs :s made uncertain, whose real 
income is held down, and whose col- 
lective-bargaining rights are threat- 
ened: to the consumers, whose needs 
are unmet because of the diminishing 
stock of goods and services produced: 
to the general public, which ■ suffers 
doubly from the loss of tax revenues 
that could be generated were the un- 
employed at work, and from the use 
of public funds to maintain its jobless 
members. Finally, there is the cost to 
Americans generally as their confi- 
dence in the ability of their society 
to provide for the well-being of its 
people is increasingly eroded. 

Yet the policies now being approved 
and carried out may well have the 
effect of institutionalizing unemploy- 
ment Substitutes for income earned 
through gainful employment do enable 
the recipient to survive but they can 
only reinforce the feelings of depend- 
ency. impotence and despair that 
accompany unemployment. 

- It is possible to guarantee to every 
person willing and able to work a job 


at decent wages. While over the -long 
run this can best be achieved by com- 
prehensive economic-planning meas- 
ures. in the short run public-service 
employment programs could drive the 
unemployment rate down to 3 per cent 
in IS months at a net cost of only 
S10.7 billion annually — in other words, 
at a cost of less than half of the tax 
rebate that President. Ford now talks 
about for next year. 

And it is also possible to achieve the 
goal of full employment without inten- 
sifying our inflation problem — indeed, 
full employment, with increased pro- 
duction of goods and services, would 
be antiMnflationary. The endemic na- 
tional problem of inflation, however, 
can probably only be resolved if the 
guarantee of a job is linked with addi- 
tional measures such as price and 
profit controls and credit and wage 
guidelines. 

What seems strange, indeed, is that 
our leaders prefer a set of policies 
that deeply and dangerously divide our 
society between those who may work 
and those who may not 

A /an Gartner is professor of early 
childhood and elementary education 
at Queens College and publisher of the 
magazine Social Policy. Marjorie 
Gellermann, an urban planner, is a 
member of the national board of the 
Democratic Socialist Organizing Com- 
mittee. 


Through Brooklyn, With Dismay 


By Joshua Resnek 



M 


• * 1 • 




i|J ■ Marblehead, Mass. 

Y father-in-law 
■ turned his Cadillac 

|B| left onto . Utica 

V Avenue and head- 

ed north for the 
Interboro Park- 
■ way. We had attended a middle-class Jewish 
wedding in a residential, tree-lined area of 
Brooklyn. Continuing on -Utica, perhaps ten 
blocks from the synagogue, we sped into a 
spectacularly ravaged section of Brooklyn. 

My father-in-law just shook his head, utter- 
ing the breath of silent wonder. He grew up, 
in abject poverty, on the Lower East Side of 
New York City, but there was a camaraderie 
then, a feeGng among the people of the -ghetto 
that vwth some hard work and- a lot of faith 
all would someday be well. 

A few of the poor boys from the Lower East 
Side aren't so poor any more. It's the people 
who live there now, like the people in Harlem 
and the people in the Bronx. Like the people of 
Utica Avenue, these are the people who live 
without The air reeked of .the rot of- despair. 
It seemed there was no hope around. 

We passed row after row of gutted tene- 
ments and street upon street of decaying build- 
togs. Each time we looked at a face it was 
black and there weren't any smiles, not any- 
where. The most noticeable expression was one 
'of a stonelike quality; the steel-fisted, hardened 
gaze of a people who have, with great diffi- 
culty, given up. 

We spoke of my grandfather and his arrival 
in America. He came penniless, unable to speak 
English. He relied exclusively on his relatives, 

■ who had come to America a year or so before, ■ 
to put him up and to feed and clothe him while 
he became knowing in the ways of the new 
land. Those were not simpler days as some 
historians, would have us believe. Grandfather’s 
was a fight for survival and he was lucky. He 
was white. 


The black people we saw in Brooklyn arc 
living in helL The system that accommodated 
the first generation of immigrants and that as- 
similated the second during the last fifty years 
is not, today, equipped to perform the moral 
task of dispensing equality. 

There is no equality of the mind, or the spirit, 
or of the soul in this place. No lingering sense 
of satisfaction over anything. Not birth. Not 


the living of life. Not death. It was the painful 
repetition of spent humanity and the corrosive 
■ ugliness of a dead- neighborhood that lingered 
in this place. 

We . went .to Long Beach the day before the 
wedding. Everyone we spoke with remarked 
about the blacks and how they were moving in 
. and how, in .five years, the whole place would 
be black. The Jews, the Irish, the Italians, they 
never suffered this Way. We walked the beach 
many times that day but never saw one black 
face. My father-in-law told us they were all at 
Coney Island. 

He told ijs Coney Island was once a fine 
place, where all white people used to bathe and 
have fun. We discussed the attitudes of people 
back then, what the landed aristocrats might 
have thought about the lower-class, immigrant 
rabble, albeit white, and their odd way of 
congregating themselves In large groups". He 
couldn't recall seeing it quite that way, but 
he reflected on it now. in his Cadillac, as wa 
turned off Utica and continued on Cooner 
' Street. 

■ 

The unending stretch of hideous city slums 
continued. Block upon block. The immensity of 
this slum, the grotesque images that were, its 
product, baffled us all. no matter our calling. 
Religious persuasion meant nothing here. There 
appeared to be no governmental presence except 
that of removal. How, we all asked, did every- 
thing get so bad, so completely bent out of 
shape? 

We talked about the broken families, the ad-< 
dieted ones, the- penniless. We saw some of the 
sick on the sidewalks in their beach chairs, on 
their wooden boxes. The thoroughly bored and 


‘There are 
too many 
lost Americans 
in this 
cellar.’ 


1 apathetic hung their heads from the open win- 
- dow5 of their tenements. Kids jumped around, 
I playing hopelessly in the gutter trash. We were 
just passing through, searching for the- biter- 
. boro Parkway. 

I ■ 

My father-in-law is used to the' city and its 
cyclical ways. He has witnessed the build-up, 
the prosperity. - and the decline of numerous 
sections of^ the city. One goes to pieces, another 
is bom. It’s as common as the community of 
man. He loves New York but chooses not to 
pay serious attention to .the parts of it that are 
dead. 

The debilitating conditions under which so 
great a number of the people of New York 
Jives is, by itself, a staggering statement, which 
transcends the politicians' casual articulation 
of the deplorable conditions in the city. 

These are not the good old days. Problems 
do not disappear. The melting pot is gone. The 
intensity of life in the ghetto feeds criminally 
on itself. It sucks all hope from the people. 
There are too many lost Americans in this 
cellar and unless the system acts to separate 
right from wrong, to begin clearing the stag- 
nant, cancerous -conditions in all the ghettos 
then our way of life is in peril of vanishing 
rnider the weight of catastrophic social disrup- 
tion and violence as well as socialism. 

The city is being encroached upon. One neigh- 
berhood after the other has succumbed to de- 
cay. The poor and the disadvantaged peoples 
are naturally placed in the decrepit dumping 
spots of the upwardly mobile who never look 
back, and who vigorously forgeL 
We drove for nearly twenty minutes through 
this immense wasteland. When Cooper Street 
ended at 62d Street, so too did the ghetto. 
My father-in-law didn't know that the Intettoro 
was closed. The journey took ns from the 
beaten track, an alien one at that, so he was 
relieved to see the well-ordered streets of 
Queens and the many thriving small businesses 

hcaKh im ° Dy 10 tHe ar6a ’ S “ ntilluin 8 good 

I realized that Boston, my home, has larce 
ghettos and that we too have been guiltv of 
segregating one people from another As the 
years pass the situation will worsen and those 
a ho are blind to the problem at hand will -row 
more blind and those who are angry wiiT be- ' 
come angrier. J w 

“™' mnsw "* r f ° r n '™y 




f 


20 


THE NEW YORK TIMES. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 19jS_ 


G 


i Diocese Cites School Enrollment Drop 


But Shanker Asserts Much 
More Progress Is Needed 
to Avert Strike Tuesday 


House Passes Bill to Fund 
Research on Electric Cars^^ s after that. 

Representative Mike McCor 


County Co 
Mr. Scut 


of the measure and 5,000 moreiFormer Peekskil! Judge 

spread across the country 27; p^ds Quilt} 1 tfl Perjury ; as adjudge 

WHItTpLAINS. sept. 4 (APVlast year* 

_ - n Fnrmer! advances t 


I'-'- 


By LEONARD BUDER 

State mediators reported a 
little progress yesterday in 
talks for a teacher contract, 
but said the city was approach- 
ing the start of the fall school 
term on Monday “in the 
shadow of a possible teachers’ 
strike." 

Albert Shanker. president of 
the United Federation of Teach- 
ers. agreed that there appeared 
to be small progress. However, 
he asserted that “there will 
have to be much more prog- 
ress" over the weekend if the 
strike threatened for Tuesday 
is to be averted. 

As both sides prepared for 
around-the-clock efforts. Mayor 
Beame telephoned the state 
mediator, Louis Yagoda. in 
midaftemoon for a report on 
the contract talks being held 
at the Plaza Hotel. 

Mr. Yagoda, who was as- 

signed by the State Public Em- , available its records and proved 


By DENA KT .TOMAN 
The abflity of the Roman 
Catholic Diocese of Booldyn to 
pay higher school bills, one of 
the isses involved in the cur- 
rent strike at five .Roman 
Catholic high schools in Brook- 
lyn and Queens, has been crip- 
pled in recent years by popu- 
lation shifts and changes in re- 
ligious dknate, a diocesan of- 
ficial said yesterday. 

"The trends are operating 
against us," said the Rev. 
Michael J. Dempsey, secretary 
of education for the diocese. 
“We can’t attract enough re- 
ligious [nuns and brothers as 

teachers], the costs are climb- 
ing. less students are enroll- 
ing and as the tuition goes up, 
less people can afford to send 
their kids there.” 

Unionized lay faculty mem- 
bers at five of the diocese’s 
high schools, who. have been on 
strike since Wednesday after 
contract negotiations broke 
down, have accused the diocese 
of withholding available funds 
from education. 

The Lay Faculty Association, 
Local 1261 of the American 
Federation of Teachers, has 
said it would drop a demand 
for a 10 per cent cost-of-living 
increase if the dideese made 


i- -Has- -js&SKifeSSr- 

tHlSJ rereaSuutd development said electric-powered cm* guilty to one count : i The jm 

“iS eSSSpowered vehicles’ would cost only about a pemty in connection with an mtesu ^ bein 
dvnl over the next five years as on.? 'per mile compared wjf ^lgation charging him 1fclti V 1 m “' i ) , ^“ :,a > . r 

tion’s energy' average four cents a JJiIe it, conduct, it was announced to-, was mdii 
’costs to operate gasoUne-.oonaum ; charge by 

orvii. nnivprpd automobiles. He SaidiOay* . MnnW .i Carl Vef- ■ IcecdlV ly 


kids. 

Father Dempsey said 
average parent of a parochial 
school pupil ■ in the Brooklyn 
Diocese earned $8000, less than 
the average New Yorker. 

“They want to send their 
kids to Catholic schools, they 
take on extra jobs to do it," 
Father Dempsey 
the costs go up, 


have been cut 

' in terms of education, these 
reductions have meant . the 
etimtaation of six elementary 
schools and. four high schools, 
and a cut of about 50 per cent 
in school subsidies. 

One hundred eighty-one ele- 
mentary schools and 28 high 
schools are sponsored by the 
Brooklyn Diocese. Of these, the 
diocese operates five nigh 
schools, which compose the 
Henry M. Hald Association. The 
other schools are operated by 
individual parishes ' and reu- 
einus orders. 

This year, the diocese allo- 
cated S 1 . 3 -mi 1 lionJ» far none has been interested 


answer to the nation 


Sir ?£&-. F>;sr W 


STS’ ffl&nzttpEsSk. 

schools. 

The cost of operating all 
of the schools has risen. A 
decline in the number of stu- 
dents— from 180.000 m 1967 
to 137,000 in 1974 — has meant 
a higher cost per student, ac- 
cording to the diocese. In addi- 
tion, the fewer nuns and broth- 
ers available for teaching “has 
meant an increase in the hiring' 



, M 'PHWE 


Father Dempsey «*-*■ i 

the diocese had been looking 1 
for independent religious orders 
to take over the operation of 
the five schools, but so that 




no progress was 
reported toward a settlement 
between the teachers and the 
Brooklyn Diocese. A meeting' 
has been scheduled for Tuesday 
[by a Federal mediator. 

Layoff Rule Sought 

In additon to higher salaries, 
the 260-member union has de- 
manded a strict system of lay- 
offs by seniority and the assur- 
that 


nloyment Relations Board, said 
that Mr. Beame had expressed 
his “great concern” and re- 
quested that he be kept in- 
formed of all developments. He 
said that the Mayor had not 
been asked for any specific 
help at this time nor had he 
offered any. 

Harold Newman, the director 
of conciliating for the State 
unit, said that the contract 
talks would continue today de- 
spite the Jewish holiday of 
Rosh ha-Shanah. 

Describing the state media- 
tion efforts, which are being 
buttressed by a panel of fact 
finders appointed by the state 
board, Mr. Newman said: 

"We are trying to sculpt the 
figure of a settlement, but 
whether it will turn out to be 
an elephant or a giraffe, we 
do not know now.” 

Just before he entered an 
afternoon session with the 
mediators and Mr. Shanker, Dr. 
Robert J. Christen, the head 
of the Board of Education's 
' negotiating team, said that 
neither the board nor the un- 
ion wanted a strike. The prob- 
lem, he said, is to work out 
a solution that recognizes the|V 
fundamental concerns of the . '■ 
two parties. ! 

Cost Estimated j 

He described the outlook a*- 
"uncertain.” 

. The board insists that tite 
union give up some benefits 
teachers have in the present 
contract, which will expire at 
midnight Monday. A specific 
board demand is that teachers 


Its inability to pay. 

‘We have offered them tiie 
books of the tuitnon- based high 
schools." said Brother Medard 
Shea, assistant superintendent 
of teacher personnel for the 
Brooklyn Diocese, who ban 
been a leading figure in the 
negotiations. “But ro ask for 
.all the records of the diocese 
would be like asking for the 
records of the United States." 
Annual Report Cited 

Father Dempsey has said 
that the fiscad facts of the 
matter were clearly detailed in 
the diocese's annual report ex- 
plaining: "It took in $6-miIUon 
last year and laid out $ 12-mil- 
lion.” 

Father Dempsev said that 
over the years the diocese’s 
costs had risen because it had 
maintained services for a de- 
ciirang population of Catholics 
in Brooklyn' and Queens. In a 
major policy shift over the last 
two vears, in which the diocese 
has tried to balance its budget 
school subsidies as well as all 


of lay faculty members, whol 
demand higher salaries. 

Salaries Differ 

Ten years ago, there *[^lsai(fthat its schools can afford 1 
two religious to one j ncreaSe this year and only 

a $300 across-the board-raise 
next year. It has also demanded 


ance that a teacher’s maximum 
load would be 175 students 
during the day. 

The Brooklyn Diocese has 


er. Father Dempsey Mid, -ad-| no increa£e 


ding: “Now it’s reversed. 

Nuns and brothers teaching 
at the five high schools in- 
volved in the strike eam -be- 
tween $5,500 and $5,700 a year. 
Lay teachers earn between $8,- 
400 and $15,600. 

Brother Medard said that the 
salaries of the nuns and Priests 
as also represented an increase 
over the years because of a 
move towards "individuality.” 

Ten years ago, nuns and 
priests received yearly stipend 
between $1,200 and $1,800, in 
addition to lodging, food andi 
an allowance for transporta- 
tion. Today, they receive an 
inclusive larger sum, to spend 
as they please. 

Tuition Raised 
Because the diocese has set 
a ceiling on its subsidies, the 
only way the schools can meet 
these rising costs is by increas- 
ing their tuition, which ranges 
between $800 and $900 now 
at the five high schools. 

“But you can’t raise the tui- 
tion," Brother Medard said. 


text year, n 
flexibility” in a teacher's stu- 
dent load. 

“As a Christian, I feel that 
everyone is entitled to their 
opinion, ” said Sister Marlene 
MacGergor, a guidance counse- 
lor at Bishop Loughlin High 
School in Fort Greene, Brook- 
lyn, where 20 religious and 
nonunion teachers reported for 
work yesterday out of a total 
of 58 teachers. 

She sat in an office with 
two other working teachers, 
discussing a revirion of plans 
to continue teaching during the 
strike. 

I don’t feel negatively to- 
wards the teachers," she raid, 
“but I’m here because the child- 
ren come firsL 

“It's a sad day for me,” saidj 
Lynn Caravan, the assistant 
principal at Christ the King 



Worship in on exciting 
happy atmosphere* 

MEET PEOPLE. MAKE FRIENDS. 

Marble Collegiate Church 

FIFTH AVENUE AND 2STH STREET 

DR. NOBMAM VINCENT PEMI* ««**»•* 
September 7 

11:00 “Your Greatest Opportunity” 

Dr. Arthur Caliandro 

CHURCH FULLY AIR CONDITIONED 

^SBKMSSSWKSffiS 


INTERDENOMINATIONAL 


UNITED SERVICES 

Grace Church 
first Presbyterian Church 
Church of the Ascension 

This Sunday at 11 A.M. 
Church of the Ascension 
FTfifi Are. if ISih Street 
Sermon by 

JOHN 0. M ELLIN 

(Nonary an provided! 


CHURCH OF THE -TRUTH 

Church^Truth 

In the magnificent 

AVERY FISHER HALL 

'formerly PhUhnmnic I felt* 

Broadway at 65th Street 

Dr. John Lee Baughman 

MMstar 

SUNDAY 11 KM. 

“SPECIAL HEALING 
SERVICE” 

SUNDAY RADIO BROADCAST 
WORatMSP.M. 

DM-a-Pnytr—JUdaon 6-02M 


CALVARY BAPTIST 

123 West 5 J«i Street ,m- *»•«■:*** 1 

Dr. LC. M ACAULAY, totertt a Pastor 

3:JB jjj. — MULE SCHOOL FU 8 ALL AGES 

BDRffl FRBM THE CROSS * 
fan it 

i PM^"T«ST0Rr Of THE SDR * 

Dr. Macaulay nraacMrfl 
at both tomcat 






ftfeesfay. 1 PB-B1BU STAB* AM 
CALVARY RADIO MINISTRY 


RELIGIOUS SCIENCE 


'assemblies of god 



LUTHERAN 


religious science 

ALICE TULLY HALL 
Broadway at 65th SL 

Ur. Raymond Charles Barker 

II In Mar 

Sundays at 11 A.M. 
Science of Mind Lectures 

TOMORROW 

“Yesterday Is 
A Cancelled Check” 

You are Invited to Attend 
BROADCAST: 

WBTB-AH11Z50I-1Z. 05 P.M. 
WFUV-FM 190.71— 1:05 P.H. 


(M 


SERVICE 

8;lS a 


Bealing : 
E ratal 

i'.Wic” 

6 

Sunday 


TV 

United! 

347 

S 

"Ml 


ST. PETER’S - 


UNITY 


Communion served at njn. 

6:30. FWC: i:3u. 31ketWd» 


WonUptnz at M SI. A Part Are. 
TW her. Ralph K. Peterson. DU. Pulof 


COURT REVEBSGS 
SCHOOL LAYOFFS 


representative 

fare she was promoted. “I have Tl £ m 

a lot of frien asscmbub of <wd- 4 N dependent; u ! 

I - m ■ I 5 d,ql— JAZZ 11 ( 1 ^ 

QDTIC fHIJRCr 7 .JPrZJBJLs eddie bowtemkrs * jbsu choir 

KIAA LrRJIV\-r . «Tr. Lertnxum) j vtzEKD&YS: Holy Communion at 

Rev, iwr SWSna I gT. PETER'S CENTER -j 

, Sunday 11 AM. * ,:30 P-M- -A tsa St 56th STREET 

l Taes. 3:30. TUe*. Wed, ThOrm. FrL 8 PJL, I thru PrL '12:15 ojui TOes. a a.m. ! 


Negotiations at the Plaza: 
Action Is on Many Levels 


Board Ordered to Reinstate' 
Counselors and Teachers 


By LEE DEMBART 

Squirreled away in a 10th-l their second session, which had' 


Sunday. 3:50 P.M. 

cmouneiGN SQKU30K Ut 
Pastor J. a vice 

"The light On The 

Lord’s Face" 

aTJ. IXVTTED 
LSr-anUUoocd acdlftanca 


^ETH ODIST 


BAHA'I FAITH 


By MURRAY ILLSON 

A SUte Supreme Court Jus- ^ c0I}trac£ ^ 
, 155!ST*£r* ^‘•TdvRiitaeedi cation yesterday to reinstate I po sals. 

are Jbrfve UP the^ three Sra I to their jobs 400 guidance coun-j in a suite on the 14th floor, 
miS.’ 1 oriselors. 1,500 kindergarten [ a dozen staff members of the 
45-minute no w [teachers and 100 attendance: board refine the data and feed 


■floor bedroom at the Plaza Ho- j been scheduled for yesterday, 

R :tel is a computer lerminal that at the recpiest of the nae<Uat ” s »; p AUATf nTNTPP N Y i 
M.imiiinn'. iKPCwhn thousbt thev could make uAnA 1 LHWIlA 01 ll.a«. 


CHRIST CHURCH 

PARK AVENUE at 60th ST. 

DR. DAVID JAMES RANDOLPH . 


in special-senice schools, large ■ | tin ordered the : Board rf ; Edu& 


the Board of Education uses’, who thought they could 

better progress: by conti nuin g j 
their mediation. j 

'"There’s a lot of teamwork! 


Si w«st istn Sc-m 

Center & Hbrt^r apm aaa. 3 to 5 

BAPTIST ' 


School officials that they want 
this money to be used to main- 
tain maximum class sizes at 


SSvfSdTflSE ""'SdSS who .been lald 
TTte estimates that the off because of the city's fiscal 

taSS- 1 ™ e orders to the board were 

tnSLIT-million a \-ear. Justic Frank J. Pino in two 
comes to $3 , muuon a i ^ <tedisi01is . m the first, 

he ordered the reinstatement 
of the guidance counselors 
EE yearis* * level * without - the j pe nding a hearing he set for 
fSuTSi Wt. Class ri«i|scpt. 18. to the seco^ Irulmg 
will soar because of the state- shortly after, he ordered the 
Sde^ buduet cuts. reinstatement of the kuidetgar- 

■wnne Duaget ’—'ten and attendance teachers 

pending a hearing on Finlay. 

Justice Pino termed his de- 
cisions, issued orally from the 
bench, “a holding action in the 
hope that perhaps some kind 
of compromise might be 
reached” by the time of the 
scheduled court hearings. 

Irving Anker, Chancellor of 
the city school system, said 
later that he bad asked the 
city's Corporation Counsel to 
appeal Justice Pino’s decisions. 
Strike Threatened 
Justice Pino's rulings were 


f&nvtr < « t S 2 IMADIS0N AVENUE 


However, the U.F.T. lias 
balked at yielding benefits won 
in previous years. And. unuice 
other years, this time there is 
no large sum of money avail- 
able to the board to enable it 
to offer a "trade-off.” 

A major complication^-*™ 
this became particularly evident 
yesterday — was the uncertain 
Wdget pWre in the city’s 32 
decentralized school dASi ^f' 

Althoueh collective bareaimn*? 
is bandied bv the central board, 
with local board participation, 
each local board has control 
over the elementary and jumor 
■ hieh schools in its district Ea Ji 
district hoard thus must make 
budget and staTfin? decisions. 

Mr. Sharker to re-. £ducation ^ teachcr , s Qnion 

ffSSSSStM that^nolhus threatened to strike the 
one reallv knows how manv 
oversized d?«es tliere will and 
how much money wu] _ be ra- 


il to the ' board’s negotiators, 
while three floors below, in an- 
other $ 180 -a-day suite with a 
commanding view of Central 
Park, representatives of the 32 
community school boards wait 
to advise the central board of 
their reaction to what takes 
place. 

The two mediators and three 
fact-finders occupy a four-room 
suite on the 13th floor, where 
some of the negotiations have 
taken place, and the United 
Federation of Teachers has a 
suite and three separate rooms 
on the second floor, where 
their president, Albert Shan ker. 
huddled yesterday with the two 
mediators. 

At the school contract .talqs, 
now making the final turn and 
heading for home, the action 
shifts from floor to floor and 
from room to room as the 
mediators prod first one side 
and then the other in an effort 
to ave tr a teacher strike on 
Tuesday. All the while, room 
i service shuffles in and out in 


said yesterday 


which is now In contract nego- 
tiations with the Board of 


enured to keen clw sized at 
present levels.” These class 
maximum* m the current con- 
tract 32 ".mPs in 
io«-*r «hool. 33 w honor hi** 

school , and 34 in hi«h rtte v 

derides Secs Coilaose 
For Cyprus Peace Talks 


made on . suite filed by ^ tHe ( effort to d eli\-er the refresh- 
Umted Federatjorf of Teachers, 1^,^ 

The Faring' Talks 
In the face-to-face talks, the 
two sides have been going "one 
on one,” “three on tiiree” or 
"six on six” as conditions war- 
rant, always with a mediator, 
either Louis Yagoda or Harold 
R. Newman, at hand- 
One on one means Mr. 
Shanker with either Irving 
Anker, the School Chancellor, 
or Robert Christen, the board’s 
chief negotiator. 

Three on three means Mr. 
Shanker; his aide, Sandy Feld- 
man and the union’s negotiation 
director, Lucille Swain, for thp 
U.F.T. and Mr. Anker, Dr. 
[Christen and usually Bernard 


school system on Tuesday if 
there is no agreement with the 
board orf a new contract. 

Shortly after Justice Pino 
handed down his first decision 
reinstating the guidance coun- 
selors, a spokesman for the 
U.F.T. said, “We are delighted 
that he ruled that the layoffs 
were unjustified. The board's 
action amounted to far more 
than a budgetary necessity” 

"We have a lot of children 
with learning problems, emo- 
tional problems and language 

problems,” the spokesman said. 

Teachers in large classes often i R. Gifford, the deputy chancei- 


cannot distinguish which of 
them may be holding the child 
back. The counselor, by woris- 


NICOSIA. Cyprus, Sept. 

( AP) — Glafkos Clendes. the 
Greek Cypriote negotiator, said 
today that the Cyprus peace 
talks would collapse If the 

53* "^"a^tSe- 

31 Tl« fourth stage of the peacallems and prescribe a’ remedy." 
,, „nd<»r the suoervision of) The spokesman said that the 
General wSSieSi of layoffs of tiie kindergarten 
th^Uitited^Natims, opens Mon-! teachers had also constituted 
day in New York. On his way 
there, Mr. derides will stop in 
Athens for a day of consulta- 
tion with the Greek govmuBart. 

He told newsmen today that 
if Rauf Denktash, the Turiosh 
Cypriote leader, did rwt subnet 
any proposals in New York, 

"our next step would be to 
raise the Cyprus issue before 
United Nations General 


the 


lor. for the school board. 

When the talks have involved 
six people from each side, the 
three others hava rotated from 
the full complement of negotia- 
tors. all of whom got together 
on Thursday night in the Crystal 
Ballroom for the -first session 
Irving 


canceled 


. .with the fact-finders, 

a policy decision" by the Shapiro, Msgr. James A. Healy 
school board, rather than & and Edward Levin, 
purely budgetary measure. He. fact-finders 

said in effect that the board! = — 

wanted to eliminate kindergar- 
ten classes entirely. 

A spokesman for the school 
board said that so far, nearly 
7,000 substitute teachers have 
been laid off in addition to 
6,800 regular teachers, assis- 
tant principals and other mem- 
bers of the professional staff 
out of a total of 60,000. 


Mr. Levin 
afternoon. 

Mr. Shapiro said that when 
fact-finding resumed it would 
be held at the offices of the 
Public Employment Relations 
Board, 342 Madison Avaiue, 
rather than a tthe hotel. “Tho 
atmosphere is a little too ndi 
for us here,” Mr. Shapiro said 
In the board’s 14th-fIoor 
suite, which is appointed in re d 
c&ipettng, sofa and bedspreads, 
the negotiators awaited a call 
from the mediators. Two Elec- 
tric typewriters had been in- 
stalled in the bedroom, and 
phone messages were stuck in 
the lampshades. 

In the community school 
board suite, which is appointed 
in green, extra chairs were 
brought up, and the. school 
board representatives simply 
waited. It looked like a juty 
room. The community boards 
have no power over the con- 
tract, but they can advise. 

.In the computer room, which 
faces 58th Street and is done in 
blue, Ronald Rudolf of the 
boar dstaff estimated costs for 
various contracts through _ a 
terminal that is tied to the City 
University'S computer, into 
which all the teacher data has 
been fed. One printout lying on 
the bed yesterday was titled! 
"6% Salary Increase Per Year' 
Uncompounded on Each Step.” 
Not Much Sleep 

*7 haven’t had much, sleep 
lately,” Mr. Rudolf said in be- 
tween printouts. “Every time 
another proposal comes out -by 
the union or the board it means 
new costing.” 

On the second floor, the 
UJ.T.’s suite, in brown, was 
empty except for several decks 
of playing cards and room serv- 
ice tables waiting to be carted 
off. 

Down the hall, in the press 
suite, whose cost is bring 
shared 'by the union and the 
board. reporters watched 
Shampoo” on the cable TV 
and waited in line to make 
phone calls. 

The board estimates that ail 
of this will cost them about 
$15,000, which it hastens to 


Axnofcn Btttlit 
BadboD hn. it Hit Su««t 
1*45 Ub-CttldHB'a Owes 

i 11, Dr. W. Wedey Shrwlw. Minbtw 


. 44 
John 
SL 


„„ JPAMT" 

:CJIu Cue at 10:45 iJQ.i 

JOHN STREET 

* otle sf TBatftftUat C7£n»j£«Wrta . 
DsTkICHABD Z> FRANCIS. Tula, 

»:45 A.M. BtBLS CLASS. 
SUNDAY SERVICES’! A. K. , . 

■ vxltt 'em Be (We inawwti .'em . 

St MARK'S 'wJgSS,.. 

Dti John. J. Hicks. Minister 
ll a. M. Boircomnraalon 
■‘All Hsu's Trouble” 


rBNFFY-i 

■ 143 W. Slat SL ■ 

ERIC BUTTERWORTH 

Minister 

Sunday 10:45 an A 12:30 pm 
"Haw To Break Tha 
■ Tm Co«aandm«flt$" #5 

EricBUHwwortti on nrd»a 
WEVD-FM (97.9) 

Mon.-fri. 7:15 aja. 

Sat. only 7:45 a-m. 

Sunday 6:30-7:00 p.m. 
tiiilv 

Smday inly 7:45 j.m.U'HFM ii<AU 
For m formation tilt Wg-fiJS. . 


v.r 


CH 


im 

OK CM 

• J 

Sun 6rl 

tOpra 




FROV 


CHRI STIAN CHURCH — DISCIPLES 

PARK AVENUE 
CHRISTIAN 

m “Ag^'mnlster 

YOTaTA^" 

Karo UcFailiw. nirwwr ot Made 

Bible Claii at U *Ja- 


SALEM 


st.-. 

AAua Poj»eH Bird. 
iTtb Ave,) 

•m The Heart Of Sariem" 

Dr. V. HoWrt saeeWjJ „ . 
11 AJL "Oor RdUtonsniP to Goa 


PRESBYTTRIAN 


COLLEGIATE CHURCHES 
(Rrfanud C hurra U Aanflaal 


OlflliegiatE 

Kecmiit Arenne and tthSfa yt 
DR. HARVEY B. HOFFMAN. MUtawr 
11 Dr. Hoffman w ill nw e b 
•«U2INC EACH DAY STgOTJCtfr 1 
Oanfcm A. Bnamvn Omnht 


Marble Collegiate Church 

Ftlth A venae a nd 89t h teert 
(Sea iMepIos AdeerHaenMt) 


WEST END THeWl SS B 

il a m. worship, i Child Ca m 

Fort Washington 

m. nufTY. f 

H »-m- The Rev. Gas Mtafcncr 


HINDUISM 


RAMAKBISHNA IITEUHUDi CEKTIH 

IT EU M St. Snai A fltrear mnanda 
Mhiuur. Sa n. U:W a at ragAi 


INTERDENOMINATIONAL 


Riverside 

BJvendde Drive at lZ2nd Street 
DB. ERNEST T. CAMPBELL, Minuter 

SUNDAY lfc4S AJS. 

DR. JAMES McCORD 



«Mtd nr 


MKPwiaM 


BRICK 


PARK AVE. 
AT 

Bisr ST. 

Dr. JAMES SSTE STEWART. Minister 
- SUNDAY 11 Lit 

DR. VICTOR BAER 

“1 bQiYF TEAT MATI MB" 

Dr. t. C 3«arlea'L*e. Orranist-Cholnnafiler 
(Nursery Carr atu ajn.1 


PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL j — 

EPIPHANY f t wt' 

deiar: Emott Hunt. Bertor:. Within 
Tnllj. Came: Lee Belfort. AfiwCaw 
8 un. 12:13 a.m. Boiv Communion 
10:20 s-nz. Holy Cummoniog and dennoE 
PrtO&tr: MR. TCLL1 
Jfsrtc: BncJt. rnmot. Pom. S irmaan 
iKunerr core at 10:30 ; ajn.i 
lee tea riUmriBc 10:30 Service . Garden' 

GRACE CHURCH 

R-mdway -t Troth Blrrel 
The Rev. C FICSImMU AUlaon 

Rector- S' err 

Sunday: 9 a_m. Holv Conun anion 
11 tm. Cnned Service ai 
Charcb of Ti-c AW 1 
(Err DiKukii Adel. 'kU too* 1 
Wrtni rt ay 8 am- Holy communion 









Olftitral 


FARX ATX. 
at Mtb ST. 


ROEXRT A EDGAR 
DONALD P. SCOTT 
Paaton 

Joint service* with _ 

SL Prtert Lutheran Omrch 
Lh. DR. RALPH &- PETERSON 


^FaiiFtilgiEwt 

n«k Apr. of W'ft atrr"! 

0:00 a M . uoly Communion 

I0r30 AM. PARISH SERVICE 

Holy Communion— Sermon — Qilld Care 
Wed. 6:30 P.M. Wtekciuhn' Seiner 
Thar:. 13 N Holy Communion u Healuu 


Fifth Avenue 

■Fifth Avanee at KVh Stwe 

DR. BRYANT VL KIRKLAND 

Sunday 11 :00 A.M. 

•TO STRUGGLE OR OTBKBNDKR 
<U0 P.M. Mr. R- DAVI D HOF FELT 
■-HEUCIOUS ROULETZS'’ 
DIAL-A-PRATXR. Ctate «-U00 

assFffltoffs. 

Nursery 10:30-11:30- gl n d er aartei U aj 


Wit st llrrairglrr tan ( r Ufitr ri} 

Fifth Ave. bet. U * 12 Street! 

JOHN O. MELLIN— JOHN B. MACNAB 
il— UNlorr SERVICE (aee adJ 


^Srcferides said that during 

the third irfia* - — 

Vienna eariy last wojtn, jjf Dutch Are Smoking Less 
n^vtash "undertook the obh-i 

S tartTysicoitnl Statiaics 

•T 1 , _ l. AnnFsr xnth DQ 


A Woman’s Model-A Ford 
(s 47 Years Old and Useful 


point out is $6,000 less than 
it spent at the Regency Hotel 
for the 1972 contract talks. 
The union has not figured out 
the tote! cost, but it did nego- 
tiate the price of the suite 
down from $180 to $148 a day. 

The hotel, of course, is not 
exactly used to contract nego- 
tiations. A maid, found an 
empty room, with a bed that 
had not been slept in and re- 
ported that its occupants had 
cshecked out The desk prompt- 


,f But so far, he has 
do either” Mr. Clend* saiij 
“He has gone K * r ' k 00 

— » J ff 

wore. 


LOST CITY, W. Va. (AP)— 

Naomi Kohne’s family car is 47 
years old this year. 

The Model-A Ford was pur- 
chased by her late father 
Joseph Kohne, an ordained 
minister, in 1928. 

"Recently three men came, 
here from Columbus, wanting jly assigned it to someone rise, 
to buy the car," Mrs. Kohneja honeymoon couple. i 

■ - — «■— ^ thereafter, Joseph! 

assistant to Chan- 1 
went into the! 
sleep. | 

The honeymooners were talk-, 


Fo?ma £c]^j M*rH** »»t. i» s*-i 

Buffet Rmeam — soon to a pm. 

. BnaAout Sunday wkvh-FM (ue.71 
UK *5 lb. a na « pja, 

9:3S tlsl Tbou md Perpecti^# <*i 

sgEasvcmsttff’. 

hSi: Joshua smim. 

CHURCH ADt-COKDmOHSO 


MADISON AVENUE 

SSL Madison An. at T3rfl SL 
David H. c_ Head. Senior Minis! er 

10:30 A.M. Worship Service 

holt onpicNiaN _ .. 

Sermon: AN INVITATION TO R2ST 

The Rev. Norman D. Stanton. 

pmdilnc 

ptrtirfe ai 10:33 A.M. 

ic Farrell i. Cnart Ornnld 

10:30 AJS. Ounch Srtnd A nuaat Can 
Axes 1-S 

Dr. Heed la boat of -Pulutt astt Pwph." 
rrhMnnti ii-TV. Fridays at 32:30 tun. 


LIBERAL CATHOLIC 


#L Mirks ris 


LUTHBtAN 


TSU1W 

IUHB0 


^nigSlrinihi "i 

Dr. A. JAMES LAUGHUK. Jt. PMte 
Ftedtndc Crtaaea. Orfanlat-ChOlxmaEUr 

10 s in, fourth Scbsol A Adult PDTUzn 

11 I “ ' “ 


<wra. 
Wednesday B pm. 


imk Bento 


IMMANUEL 


88th St. sad 
LealnxtMi Are. 


Die Rev. Raymond a Schulz e . Tutor 
~ (v. Leonard R. KJem. associate 

KT SERVICES'. 8 *ad U, AJL 


ST. JOHN’S 

"Tha bdmn Church « OK* vmotr 
81 OntaUDbcr Sort 
Her. Dr. FasD P. BBCKUPr .lWt r 
lo a-m. C hc rth Srfiool. U aja. WPntito 


RUTGER S ™ 

cyan, mncnoi' ati-rt- te- 
H UL “A i‘i 1 IUDE8 TO UTE" 
ir.^.n ar miiwunn fl wiiid 


PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL 


CATHEDRAL 

ST. JOBK THE DTVnni 
•"The OaVitOrol asm-site errra ionZmpr*. 
ben of Ud mourn ft man." am Morton 

Sunday: 8. 8. 10. U a.m. end 4 mb. 
_ 1 L. Lltnzuy and Sermcn Dean llorton 
■ 4 Bum. Bvcsaonx 

lOCT Amstcntain Ave. u lUth. 878-0868 


HOLY TRINITY 

116 Eut 66 St. 289-41001 

Tbe Rev. ClarVe K_ OUr. Rector 
The Rev. Part B. Fenenutn. Conle 
Sunday: 8:30 am. Half Comm anion 
10:30. Holy GJom nnloii. 

.Sennou: Tbe Sector 
Wadnmday k 45 Baa. Hoiy Ummanlon 


Stadiaoa Are. | 
at 33th St. 


iiuaraatum 

HI. CANON ROBERT J. Lewis. Rector 
Hif iv Ba.— .eti. EArvnor of 3IuHc 
8:30 A.M. Holy Communion 
11 AJL-Hoix Communion. Sermon-Rector 
Wed.. X2:0S TL3L Duly Communion 
dir oondHtoned for aU semen 


Little Church ^ C0Mn 

TRANSFIGURATION. One Eut 39th SL 
Her. Norman J. Catir. m.a. s.tj„ Rector 
S'mrf»T- a A- a e.m. Roly Conmunioa 
IL SUNG EUCHARIST and .SERMON 
. Pr eacher: FR. CASTR 

■ RESURRECTION 

113 EAST >4lh STREET 
SUNDAY S eJn. Holr Enchartat 
loan. B unx Euchartxt and Ssnran 
WIUUUJAYS: 7:IB a.m. Dailv lexc. Sat.) 
Wednesday 10 ua: Saturday 9:43 ajn. 


&L Uartlfnimnna'sl 

Park Avarae at 5 lit Street 
REV. TERXNOS J. FINLAY, D.D.. Rector 
8 and 9 : 30 ami. Holy Communion 
1 1 a jn. Holy Communion and Sermon 
THE REVEREND 

ANDREW J. V. MULLINS. MJJiv. 

E.C. Menu. Taes. and Frl. 12:10 P.m. 

^ wol. S ajn.. L10 and ili ojd. 
niur*. ELC. * HwJInir Senlcv 12:1B ajn. 

Enailnc Prayer dallr at a:15 B-m. 
Snn«7 Care San. 10:38 a. el - 12: 30 a.m. 
Church compleMv atr-coatQUor.ed 


(.PI 

TRANSi 

■ C 

TR0 

The Rev. Hq 

TRINITY 

Holy Ort B 
Sermon: 1 

. ST. PAUL 

Holr 
Sermon: 31 

I ST. LUKE 

noir Cob 
Sermon: TL 

ST. AUGL 

Holr Common 

Sermon: T 

(NTERCE 

U asset: 9. 
10:30. The Re 
12:30. S 
The RL 
Blaboo of 

AO 

AVEM 

Catho! 

SIS MAPI 

v& 

tra: 

LATI 

SUNDAYS' 

HOLY 

FIRST 

FIRSTS/ 

otyrt 
on C 2 ca 

RADIO 

Co 






; m 












ALL SAINTS 

Tfce Hat. R. Dewitt MaJUry. Jr„ Hector 
SUJTTAY: B ajn. Holr EUCharlB 
1L Sour Eodmrfct & sermon: Tbe Rertor 
■■JOBS HEKKY HOBART** 
Wrtneedwy 5:30 p.nu Eoty Eucbailtt 


AsretiBiou 


FIFTH A7. 
at Ulh ST. 

The Rev. Donald R. Goodness 

Hector 

8 AJS- 9 A JL. S PJL— Holy Omunsnlra 
ir Prayer, ood Sermon 


il &AL-WBniBZ Prayer 

(Smm earn at u 


Sermon 
an.) 


Holy Onwjurtflo 8 AM. Taaa.. Wed.. Pel. 
6PJL wed- 12 N. unm.. a Aja. sat. 

Tbe RW. JAUES F. KIrZHOLLS Jr.. CanU 
_ VERNON DS TAS 
OroinUt and raMitnraster 


3U uiii'U’n acnoui- u uu hkhm [ u J 

-'orp&Ano y sr s-OPiKitB- __ i (EaltlctnJ 

feSnfars ““ ' 


tes per nw.» L-i ^n’t for sale at anyi The l 

or while I live? Jing, he 


608 Wed 
4dth Street 
rsuMMin . 

fow BMh Wnt 9f Tima_6 quare) 


1969 figure was 1^62. 


1 Tbe Rev. DALE P. SAMS ES. . 

11 - -• 'The Badm> of Eanwn*!bnuy’, , 


THE CHURCH ON 
GRA MERCY PAKH 


rtffl : Avannj South atDxt >5tr-rt 
The Rav. THOMAS PttSE. S*tor 
Saoday: 9 ua Holy Oamaunloa 
-J 1 y®* gSSto Sermon 
Th» fi«T. ?na*HEK 3. GAHmey 
T hun. J21Q BJn. H.C. i Hailing Ertini 


ST. IGNATIUS’ 

WeatBIth SI rl Stock Tnl nf Broadirayi 
The Rav'd. Charles A. Weauirrbr 
ThrRev'd. Fmrard T. W. sure 

Sunday — vm. 

_ , 11 UL Smut Mass 

Tuesday. Thursday— a a.m. Mjus 



ST. IGNAT 

U A 


ST. JAMES’ 


Madlaan Avenue 
at list Street 

Tbe Rev. John B. Cob urn. D.D„ Hector 
SnadM- 0-m. Hoi* romtmmhm 
Holy Com Btontai and Sermon 
Preadw: tt» Rev. Frederick: Hill 
_ _ (OdU care at 11 ajn.j 
H.C. Wed a.m,: Thun, is IfOm 


IN -THE- SO WERT 
2im Ate. A 7 nth si 


ST. MARK’S 

ST. MARY THE VIRGIN “ 

Ibe Rev. DONALD U OARITELD Pj*tm 
Rgy. Joftu Pm! Boyer 
!«««■ BW-wn. THrretor o: music 
,, ■ :3 °- 9 - '• tm. 5 n.m, | 

Mam Bin*, sermon r ft. Garfield 
C. EvriUue Praiev aud Benedtctton : 
_ Mass ilaUy 1.30. i:-w and a:u ! 

'ST. STEPHEN'S 120 ^ 

| a 

1 \jtwv Cart ai in.-js oj4. 

f 


WOODS! 

St Paul** Ou 

Sand ay. ! 

Cele wanu » 
UN IT ARP 

"allsc* 

WALTODCBM 

sin 

Tbe ATT. 
••A 8RKA1 


Comtm 

Rev. 
-Wi 
•I Celel 

<rt 

A Churd 

FIRST UNI 

iWTfSt 







Q 





■ -WM-' 
■- 

.C j~? 


*BOj 


M 7TNUIA y, SEPTEMBER 6, 1975 



M 


21 


3/j Captures a New Stronghold-the Lecture Hall 


* O u $ 




E R 


txiifoy 



FERON 
ar figure— the 
making him 
■voizable — as 
wersial perso- 
j, i distinctive 

unis, Moshe 
V jor attraction 
circuit, which 
iis past year, 
aeginning his 
, . V appearances 
'■ i colleges and 
? was all of 
s well as an- 
id why before 
2,000 at Fair- 
in Connecti- 

ud. is being 
latest disen- 
ement nego- 
tary of State 
what - Egypt 


has consistently refused to 
provide — "a commitment 
that they recognize an. end 
to belligerency.” 

Resents Pressure 
"Just words, perhaps,” the 
former Israeli Defense Minis- 
ter argued, "but that’s the 
point of it alL” Israel's accep- 
tance of the accord, he- went 
on, was obtained through 
heavy American pressure 
"and I don't like it very 
much.” 

Mr. Dayan, . looking 
somewhat uncomfortable in 
suit and tie. was speaking 
to the casually attired stu- 
dents of the Jesuit school 
and townspeople just four 
hours after his arrival from 
Tel Aviv. He will appear be- 
fore 25 other undergraduate 
audiences before returning 
to Israel in one month. 


He was frank, describing 
his own doubts about the 
future of the accord, aid 
selectively diplomatic, offer- 
ing segments of Cabinet dis- 
cussions while avoiding de- 
tails on the still unpubUsbed 
portions of the latest agree- 
ment. 

He pleased bis audience 
by refusing to comment on 
American political affairs, 
but annoyed some with cha- 
mftililETAOI 

racteristically blunt phras- 
ing as he spoke of the role 
of American technicians in 
the Sinai. 

"We are told your Congress 
will approve them because 
they win be there only as 
long as it won’t be dange- 
rous." Mr. Dayan said, refer- 
ring to the civilians who will 
monitor early-warning sites 
in strategic mountain passes. 


, iM3 "If there is any danger 
of fighting, they will be 
pulled out" he said, and then 
added with a smile: "Maybe 
as early warning it is enough 
because when we shall see 
your people running, we will 
know that war is coming.” 

Laughter filled the hall, 
but the concept of Americans 
running did not go down 
too well, and be was ques- 
tioned on ft later. 

“I apologize," he said. "I 
didn’t mean it literally. They 
would go only if ordered, 
of course, but when you put 
civilians armed only with pis- 
tols between two nations at 
war and tell them to get 
out when the fighting starts, 
what can you expect?’' 

For each engagement, Mr. 
Dayan is paid S3, 500 plus 
expenses — they Tan to nearh 
$1,000 last rug£it — for. 


engagement. His agent, Har- 
ry Walker, says he can fill, 
a month with very little ad- 
vance notice. Ed Cassidy, 
president of the Forensic 
Union at Fairfield, explained 
why. 

"There is tronendous in- 
terest ‘here in the Middle 
East, not only among the 
students but in the communi- 
ties in this area,” he said. 
"Dayan is also a fascinating 
speaker end very coopera- 
tive. On the way in. he asked 
if I wanted more speech or 
more questions, whether he 
should concentrate on some 

particular aspects, etcetera.” 

“We just about broke 
even," Mr. Cassidy said, "but 
it would have been worth 
it if we took a . loss." He 
said they had sole 2,100 tick- 
ets, at $1 for students and 
$3-50 for outsiders, “It was 



the first night of school and 
that cut into the potential 
student audience,” Mr. Cassi- 
dy said. 

Enjoys Controversy 

As a lecturer, Mr. Dayan 
speaks extemporaneously, 
usually for 35 minutes, and 
then asks for an hour of 
questions. Many ere hostile, 
and demonstrators are usual- 
ly asked to come forward 
and speak their piece before 
tbe speech, he said. 

"I like it,” he added. *1 
want to tackle it. I don’t 
want them to go home and 
say Dayan avoided the Pales- 
tinian issue. Sometimes they 
come with flags and often, 
there is the bomb threat, 
but I stay and the audience 
stays." 

The former defense chief n» mm «*m 

Continued on Page 36, col umn 1 Moshe Dayan speaking Thursday night in Fairfield, Conn. 


-Truth 


* • ■ i. 
p i 1 i 


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MMo.UfliV;-! 

SHClii H; 

yrua 

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*-*■»« r*.- - » 


:> iT. V / , 

'S . li . 
y-i l - ••Jrti... f 


-*V • 


CHI' 7 - 


KT :• :■= 

• 

W."** *y— - 
- ' 

va-i-. 



im 


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j-* -.Us 


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: . - 


Itirm 



Norwegian Windjammer Docks Here 


By GEORGE VECSEY 

Leif Ericson would have 
felt at' home watching 90 
young Scandinavian sailors 
gaze at the New York sky- 
line yesterday. 

Were tbe ancestors of Vik- 
ings thinking about the 150th 
anniversary of the beginning 
of Norwegian immigration? 
Not exactly. In acceptable 
Viking style, they were think- 
ing about the good things 
the new port might offer. 

“They say they want to 
find a discotheque and meet 
some chicks,” reported one 
young sailor in perfect Eng- 
lish. 

The sailors were arriving 
on the windjammer Christian 
Radich, which will be tied up 
at the South Street Seaport 
until next Friday. She will be 
open to the public today and 
tomorrow from 10 A-M. to 6 
P.M. 


The subject of tbe movie 
“Windjammer” of the nine- 
teen-fifties. the Christian 
Radich has survived auster- 
ity threats and still serves as 
a training ship for the Nor- 
wegian Merchant Marine. But 
this voyage is a special one. 

Other Ports Visited 

The Christian Radich. one 
of. Norway’s most visible 
symbols, left Stavenger on 
July 4, exactly 150 years aft- 
er a ship full of Norwegian 
Quakers left there, seeking 
religious freedom. The origi- 
nal ship, the Resumption, 
sailed directly to New York, 
but the . Christian Radich 
stopped in the Canary Is- 
lands. Miami, Norfolk, Va., 
Baltimore and Philadelphia. 

"Now I know why they 
say a sailor has a chick in 
every port,” said 17-year-old 
Mats Bielkelov, one of five 
Swedes in the crew, whose 


accent-free English sounded 
as if he had come from 
southern California. [He 
learned to speak English dur- 
ing eight years at the Ameri- 
can School in Singapore, he 
he said.) 

Some of the crewmen, fair- 
haired and blue-eyed almost 
to a man, ae are only 15 
yearn old. The crewmen are 
chosen through exacting 
tests. Their three - month 
cruise includes 550 hours of 
instruction — from working in 
the galley to fighting fires. 

“If we* are not washing, 
we are painting,” said Mr. 
Bielkelov. "If they cannot 
find something to do. they 
make it up. But this js good. 
I’ve been sailing all my lifenc 
and this trip has convinced 
me. I want to make this 
my career." 

bEx-Crewman Reminisces 

Harald Tusberg, the execu- 


7ta Hot! YorfcTtnas/Cvl T. Court 

i Radich, Norwegian vessel that was the subject of a movie, “Windjammer,” passes the Statue of Liberty 



Tha Hew York Tlne^rnwH Dukef 

Members of the crew of the ship. They’re interested in discotheques and girls. 


?'Wr 


e Rises 
Imposed 
1 hristmas 


T • ^ 

ft +r- i 

»*>.i .'1 






1 . , -T .... 


■■-Vt 


i - ..y - . 

'.v** > ’• '■- - 




V . ' # 


' “T 


■vYflrt Times 

l. Sept. 5— The 
Postal Service 
>t to increase 
r letters to 13 
ants until after, 
gency reported 

higher rates 
ain to be im- 
fter Christmas, 

: Cm aster Gener- 
ailar. 

; would be to 
the new rates 
ten, the volume 
ak. 

‘nice is likely 
the next two 
under a recent 

*stal Rate Com- 
rty for a new 
-cent first-class 
new rate could 
90 days after 
was made, but 
1 that the in- 
lot come until 
-istmas. 

fficials fear an 
.al rates before 
backfire, caus- 
Hoff in holiday 

e increases foe 
isses of mail, 
•Is, periodicals 
ents. have not 
nined, a Postal 
an said, 
e ' expected to 
s for the first 
lary first-class 
opropriate" in- 
her classes of 

ative judge for 
te Commission 
led a reduction 
ite andsubstan- 
•r other classes, 
immission over- 


News Summary and Index 

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1975 

The Major Events of the Day 


•rvice says that, 
s of more than j 
the fiscal year; 
million for the! 
5. which, ended 


International 

Gen. Vasco Gonsalves, forced out as Pre- 
mier of Portugal a week ago because of his 
pro-Conununist leanings, was stripped of all 
authority yesterday. Facing tbe open defi- 
ance of the army and the air force as well 
as the deposition of the major political 
parties, General Gongalves on his own gave 
up his appointment- as Chi^ of Staff of 
the armed forces. [Page 1. Column 1.3 

Two persons were killed and 63 injured 
when a bomb exploded shortly after noon 
in the crowded lobby of the Hilton Hotel in 
London. The Hilton was filled to capacity 
with 750 guests, many of them American 
tourists. The bombing was one of a number 
in London in the last two weeks, and some 
officials believe that a fringe group of the 
Irish Republican Army did it 11:4] 

National 

A young woman in Sacranenta. Calif., 
pointed a .45-caliber automatic pistol at 
close range at President Ford, who was 
there to address the California Legislature, 
but a Secret Service ageni saved Mr. Ford 
from possible harm by grabbing the gun 
and forcing it from the woman’s hand. A 
White House spokesman said that the pistol 
contained a magazine with bullets in it but 
that there was no bullet in the weapon's 
chamber when it -was seized. The - woman 
was identified as Lynette Alice Frcumoe. a 
26-year-old former associate of Charles M. 
Manson, the leader of a group convicted of 
murdering Sharon Tate, an actress, and six 
others in 1969. Mr. Ford delivered his 
speech, in which he urged a nationwide ef- 
fort to curb rising Violent crime. [1:8.3 

The White House said that Lynette Alic9 
Fromme, who was charged with the at- 
tempted assassination of President Ford, 
was’ not on the Secret Service computer list 
of persons regarded as a potential danger 
to the President’s security. The chief spokes- 
man for the Secret Service, John W. War- 
ner Jri, would not comment on how Miss 
Fromme was able to get so close to Mr. 
Ford with a gun despite all its security pre- 
cautions. which have been increased many 
times since the assassination of President/ 
Kennedy. £1:7.] ■ 

Mora than a half dozen advertisers with- 
drew their commercials from last night's 
CBS telecast of a tom documentary on 


hunting after receiving calls from the Na- 
tional Rifle Association and hunting groups 
around -the country. The 1 90-minute docu- 
mentary, “The Gtms of Autumn," depicted 
bunting as a recreational activity and had 
graphic scenes of the killing of animals. CBS 
said the calls were “clearly a campaign to 
intimidate the advertiser.” [12-3.1 

Employment in the nation continued to 
improve somewhat in August, mainly for 
experienced workers, but inflationary pres- 
sures that pushed wholesale prices up 0.8 
per cent got worse during the month, ac- 
cording to the Labor Department. Tbe over- 
all unemployment rate was unchanged from 
July at 8.4 per cent of the total work force, 
but the number of employed persons, espe- 
cially those on regular business payrolls, in- 
creased significantly.' [12-3.] 

Metropolitan 

Governor Carey called on a reluctant 
Legislature to approve his $2.3-bIllioji plan 
to prevent default by New York Cits'. He 
termed the threat an “tmparalleled disas- 
ter." But after objections from the Republi- 
cans that were more procedural than sub- 
stantive, the Legislature recessed until Mon- 
day. The Senate majority leader, Warren M. 
Andeison, Republican of Binghamton, said 
his house needed more time to ponder the 
complicated plan. [1:4.1 

Officials of three municipal organizations 
said that mayors across the nation have ex- 
pressed fear of the impact that a New York 
City default would have on their own cities, 
including an expected curtailment of. 'pro- 
grams. Meanwhile, Representative Henry S. 
Reuss, Democrat of Wisconsin and chair- 
man of the House Banking and Curran ry 
Committee, proposed a seven-point program 
to help New York and other cities in fi n a n - 


The Other News 

International 
European Socialists pledge 
aid to Lisbon parti'. Page 2 
I.T.T. cuts off funds to Portu- 
guese subsidiaries. Page 2 
Talk of Estoril; A fading 
haven. Page 2 

Rebellion is crushed in the 
Sudan. Page 3 

Cambodia and South Vietnam 
stress normality. Page 3 
Laos Premier says he plans 
to retire. Page 3 

Syrians term nerw Sinai ac- 
cord .“disgraceful.” Pages 
Kissinger expects Soviet un- 
derstanding on pact Page 6 
Soviet has made clear its 
■ feeling about pact. Page 6 

Government and Politics 
Labor Dept. Atlanta office is 
called biased. Page 7 
Panel backs amnesty for 
war's opponents. Page 7 
Senate rejects lunch Ml as 
over budget Page 7 
Anderson asks U.S.' involve- 
ment in city’s crisis, Page 8 
How state board would con- 
trol city finance. Page 8 

Intelligence panel to begin 
public hearings. Page 15 

Energy 

Greenspan warns against en- 
ergy loan proposal. Page 7 

Threat to independent re- 
finers doubted. Page 7 

Saudis to hold the oil price 
line. P&ge 27 

General 

Bomb explodes in Kennecott 
offices in Utah. Page 7 

ACX.U. files suit over police 
- bias. Page 7 

Provenzano heard by- Hoffa 
grand jury. Page 15 

No serious incidents in Louis- 
ville basing. Page 16 


Quotation oi the Day 

*'l saw a hand coming up behind several others in 
the front row and obviously there was a gu/i in that 
IvmtL " — President Ford.- [1:8.] 


cial trouble. His proposals include an emer- . . .... . 

gency Federal loan to New York City and 3 “** 1“™!} 

immediate action by the Federal Reserve cfiarges - Page22 

Board to accept any city notes and bonds 
now held by banks. [1:3-3 
Water began flowing into Trenton's trunk 
foies from the city’s main filtration and 
pumping plant yesterday afternoon, bring- 
ing an end to the weeklong water emer- 
gency. Officials said that it would probably 
be Monday before near-iwnnal water pres- 
sure was restored to all parts of die sys- 
tem that serves Lawrence. Ewing and Hamil- 
ton Townships as well as Trenton. [23:3-6. i 


Metropolitan Briefs. Page 23 
City won't agree to SI bridge 
tolls. Page 23 

Suffolk District Attorney 
fears “goon squad.” Page 23 
New VUlard Houses plan pre- 
serves Gold Room. Page 23 

Industry and Labor 
Public employe unions urge 
New Y» jk aid. Page 9 


Firemen here angered by pro- 
posed contract. Page 9 
Counting of farm labor votes 
Barred on Coast. Page 15 
Education and Weliare 
Mediators see some gains in 
school talks. Page 2l> 

Courts craak down on strik- 
ing teachers. Page 20 

Brooklyn Diocese cites drop 
in school funds. Page 20 
Court reinstates teachers 
and counselors. Page 20 
Religion 

Temples filled as Jews mark 
Rosh ha-Shanah. Page 22 

Amusements and tbe Arts 
Teen-agers of yore line up 
for Sinatra. Page 1 0 

Arthur Williams's “Tragedy- 
Queen” is staged. Page 10 
New York Dance Festival of- 
fers spoofs. Page 10 

Met Opera and union in ten- 
tative accord. Page 10 
Court orders inventory at 
Indian Museum. Page 11 
Autographs of Declaration 
signers are sought. Page 16 
Study of George Howe, archi- 
tect, is reviewed! Page 17 
Drawings by noted artists 
shown at Modem. Page 17 
TV" s "Family Holvak” aspires 
to simple decency. Page 37 

Going Out Guide page 1 1 

Family /Style 
Cooking schools in New York 
and Long Is! add. page 24 

Obituaries 

Concetta Scaravagiione. sculp- 
tor and teacher. Page 22 
Alex DiLorenzo Jr., real es- 
tate man. Page 22 

Business and Financial 
Dow drops 234; trading con- 
tinues sluggish. Page 27 
World Bank and IJII.F. face 
decisions. Page 27 

Copperweld is fighting - take- 
over move. Page 27 

No dumping of foreign autos 
is found. Page 27 

Patents: Electronic device 
suppresses pain. ' Page 27 


Paqe | Pijr 

Amw. EicJHnjf .32 . Hart« IndicalDrt 28 
Bwd SalK ..30 Kaii«. Place .. 28 

Businas Briefs . J* Honey 52 

Business Records. 30 Mutual Funds 33 

CammodiliH ...31 K Y. Start Eicli. .23 

DicfOEndS 33 Qut-ol-Tmoi 1> 

Foreign Exchange 32 Over the Courier. 33 
Crains 31 

Sports 

SeaJyham named best in show 
at Tarrytown. Page 12 

People in Sports: Flyers re- 
ward Schultz. Page! 2 

Misses Evert, Goolagong win; 

title match today. . Page 12 
Giants drop Gogoiak after 9 
years, 646 points. Page 13 
Yanks open Oriole series in 
Baltimore. Page 13 

McMillan's tactics raising* 
some eyebrows. Page 13 
Soy Numero Uno on Futurity 
:Es Verdad?- Page 14 
Sc breeder leads by 2 shots in 
Southern golf. Page 14 
World Series of Golf drill 
halted by rain. Page 14 

Motes on People Page 25 

Editorials and Comment 
Editorials and Letters. Page IS 
Russell Baker: the gorilla 
who drinks. Page 19 

J. H. Duffy: New York's in- 
equitable education. Page 19 
Al Gartner, M. Gellerman: the 
U.S. job divide. Page 19 
Joshua Resnek: Brooklyn 
ravaged. Page 'l 9 

News Analysis 
James Markham discusses So- 
viet Mideast role. Page 6 


CORRECTION 


As a result of a typograph- 
ical error a dispatch from 
Washington in The New York 
Times Friday misquoted a re- 
port as saying that “drawing 
only on its offshore reserves 
and those of the Po Hai Gulf. 
Peking appears likely to 
reach" the currenL oil pro- 
duction of Saudi Arabia bv 
198S. It should have said 
"onshore reserves." 


five. producer of Norwegian 
Slate Broadcasting, stood 
proudly on deck yesterday 
and recalled his love affair 
with the Christian Radich. 

“1 became part of the 
crew,” he recalled. “When 
they tried to dock her in 
1974. 1 knew they shouldn't 
do thi>. They wanted their 
sailors to wear while coats 
Oil the supertankers and 
press buttons on data ma- 
chines. They wanted their 
ships to be like factories. 

“But until you have sailed 
on the Christian Radich, you 
don’t understand the cur- 
rents and the winds. We 
know that the sea is still 
part of the subconscious of 
every Norwegian. It is like 
in the cities where people 
say, ‘What became of the 
trees?: In Norway people ask. 
‘What became of the 
ships?’ “ 

Mr. Tusberg helped galva- 
nize supPort for the ship, 
with private contributions 
leading to a government 
commitment- Recently. 
Crown Prince Harald of Nor- 
way recalled the poet Bjom- 
stieme Bjornson. who wrote 
about “our honor and our 
power brought to us by white 
sails. . 

Ship Is Welcomed 

1 However, the Christian Ra- 
dich did not get much 
mileage from her new white 
sails on this voyage. Three- 
quarters of her current jour- 
ney was under motor power 
because of poor sailing con- 
ditions. including yesterday, 
as a north w r est wind kept 
most uf the sails furled. But 
Capt. Kjeii Thorsen directed 
the approach to New York, 
under the Verrazano-Narrow 
Bridge, between the hills of 
Bay Ridge in Brooklyn and 
the towers of Wagner Col- 
lege on Staten Island, both 
centers for Norwegian- Amer- 
ica ns. 

As fireboats sprayed a sa- 
lute, the Staten Island ferry- 
boats tooted a greeting and 
helicopters flew overhead, 
the Christian Radich chugged 
past the Statue of Liberty 
where, on Oct. 9 — Norwe- 
•? gian-American Day — King 
Olav V will present a statue 
! honoring Norwegian immi- 
[ grants. 

; At te South Street Sea- 
! port, the ship was welcomed 
| with a brief ceremony and 
bv a small group of Norwe- 
gian - Americans, including 
Evelyn Edwardsen of Bay 
Ridge, who recalls having 
her picture in The Daily 
News in 1939, when the 
Christian Radich visited the 
World's Fair. 

Yesterday she conversed 
in Norwegian with many of 
the crewmen, trading names 
of friends and relatives. She 
also said she would direct i 
them to shops in Brooklyn 
where they could find a . 
touch of Norway. The sailors ; 
had a few questions of their • 
own. Roger Bigne. of Kung- 1 
sfonJ, wanted to know where 
he could buy clothing; Jom 
Olsen, of Oslo, wanted to 
know where he could buy 
records. 

All the sailors will be 
guests at parties and tours 
during the week, which have 
been scheduled by various 
Norwegian groups. 

The reception for the 
Christian Radich yesterday 
was certainly a better one 
than the Restauration re- 
ceived in 1825. When the 
Restauration arrived in New 
York harbor on Oct. 9 that 
year, she was immediately 
fined for being overloaded. 

4 Women Will Have Role 
In Mother Seton Ceremony 

ROME, Sept 5 (Reuters) — 
Four women will take part in 
the ceremony Sept. 14 when 
Pope Paul VI will proclaim 
Elizabeth Ann Seton the first 
American saint of the Roman 
Cathoiic Church, ic was an- 
nounced today. 

The women will describe 
four stages in Mother Seton’s 
life — as a young girl, a wife, 
a widow and the founder of a 
religious order. 

The announcement, by a spe- 
cial American press office, said 
I the four women, yet to be 
: named, would also formally 
' petition Pope Paul to proclaim 
•Mother Seton a saint. • 










BANK IS INDICTED Aie* DiLorenzo Jr. Dies; 

Leader in Real Estate , 5o 


3 Ex-OffiGiaJs Also Accused 
on Contributions Made by 
Security National 


A 

Declar- 

ation 

of 

Principle 

August 19, 1896 


When Adolpt) 
S.Ochs became pub- 
lisher of The New 
YorkTimesin 1896, 
he wrote what he 
called a “business 
announcement." It 
appeared on the Edi- 
torial Page oyer his 
signature. It read, in 
part: 

“To undertake 
the management of 
The New-York Times, 
with its great history 
for right-doing... is 
an extraordinary task. 
But if a sincere desire 
to conduct a high- 
standard newspaper, 
clean, dignified and 
trustworthy, requires 
honesty, watchful- 
ness, earnestness, 
industry, and practical 
knowledge applied 
with common sense, 

I entertain the hope 
that I can succeed in . 
mamtainingthehigh 
estimate that thought- 
ful, pure-minded 
people have ever had 
of The New-York 
Times. 

“Itwillbemy 
earnest aim that The 
New-York Times give 
the news, all the news, 
in concise and attrac- 
tive form, in language 
that is parliamentary 
in good society, and 
give it as early, if not 
earlier, than it can be 
learned through any 
other reliable medi- 
um; to give the news 
impartially, without 
fear or favor, regard- 
less of party, sect 
or interests involved; 
to make the columns 
of The New-York 
Times a forum for the 
consideration of ait 
. questions of public 

importance, and to 
that end to invite in- 
telligent discussion 
from all shades of 
opinion." 

' The world has 
changed since 1896. 
The New York Times 
has changed with it. 

• But the principles that 
guided The Times in 
, those days still guide 
the day-to-day cover- 
age you expectfrom 

Hie 

New York 

limes 


By MAX H. SEIGEL 
The Security National Bank 
and three of its former top 
officials were indicted by a 
Federal grand jury in Brooklyn 
yesterday on charges involving 
more than $200,000 in illegal 
political contributions. 

Among those benefiting, ac- 
cording to the indictment, were 


By CARTER R HORSLEY 
Alex DiLorenzo Jr., who with 
his partner, Sol Goldman, built 
and operated the largest real 
estate empire in New York 
City, died yesterday of a heart 
attack in his office in the 
Chrysler Building. He was 58 
years old and lived on Kings 
Point Road Jn Great Neck, LJ. 

Mr. DiLorenzo underwent 
open-heart 1 surgery at New 
York University Hospital a year 
ago but returned to work sever- 
al months ago. 

The pinnacle of his empire — 
which today encompasses more 
than 400 office and apartment 
buddings in Manhattan alone 
that are worth close to Sl-bij- 



former President Richard It ^ 

Nixon, Mayor Beame, the Nas- ! Chrysler Build-. - 


Conwy, ms 
Alex DiLorenzo Jr. 


sau and Suffolk County Repub- j j ngi 0 n which foreclosure 
lican Committees and various j proceedings were begun only 


local candidates for office. 

David G. Trager, the United 
States Attorney for the Eastern 
District, said the three top offi- 
cials had approached lower 
echelon bank officers and 
asked that they make monthly 
personal political contributions 
of $100 each to designated 
political candidates or bodies. 1 

In return, Mr. Trager said, 
the officers were told they 
would receive pay -increases 
to cover both the contributions 
?nd any additional taxes they 
would have to pay on their 
higher . income. At least five 
of the nine bank officers ap- 
proached, he said, were given 
wage increases totaling $1,700, 
and several of the others re- 
ceived a total of $2,000 more 
a year to cover the contribu- 
tions and the taxes. 

Former President Named 

Named in the 22-count in- 
dictment, in addition to the 
bank, which is now undergoing 
liquidation, were Patrick J. Clif- 
ford, of 500 East 77th Street, 
its former president and chair- 
man of the board; David J. 
Dowd of .Huntington. UL, for- 
mer senior vice president and 
now president of the Nassau 
Trust Company of Long Island, 
and Frank B. Powell, former 
executive vice president, now 
the acting president of the Se- 
curity National Bank Corpora- 
tion for liquidation purposes. 

Mr. Trager said the 15-month 
investigation of illegal political 
contributions was continuing 
and it was possible there would 
be additional indictments. 

One of the persons called 
before the grand jury, was Wil- 
liam A. Shea, the lawyer who 
was instrumental in getting 
Shea Stadium built 
Mr. Shea, who served as 
counsel to the bank -and who 
was a member of its board 
of directors and chairman of 
its audit committee, was cam- 
paign manager for Mayor 
Beame in 1974. Between Feb- 
ruary and March of that year, 
die. indictment alleged, bank 
contributions were made to the 
Beame Birthday Committee. 
Contributions Listed 
The indictment also charged 
the bank with making the fol- 
lowing contributions: 

Sin October, 1972. to a Nix- 
on rally. 

qin January, 1973, to the 
Roncallo for Congress Commit- 
tee. (Angelo D. RoncaHo, a 


last week. Known in the indus- 
try as a brilliant, shrewd and 
unsentimental tactician. Mr. Di- 
Lorenzo was said to have re- 
garded the flagship building, 
in which he had an office two 
floors above Mr. Goldman S, 
as “just another building.” 

Shielded From Public 

Shielded from the public eye 
by a welter of corporations 
with names such as Wellington 
Associates, Avon Associates, 
Chatham Associates. Sutton 
Associates and Lancaster Asso- 
ciates, Mr. DiLorenzo often as- 
sumed Bany different names 
m his dealings with real estate 
brokers trying to make a deal 
for office space. 

One long-time associate said 
yesterday that he had on sever- 
al occasions heard Mr. DiLoren- 
zo identify himself on the 
phone as a Mr. Lawton who 
would end a conversation by 
stating that he was not sure 
that his “boss’ 7 would approve 
of the proposed rent level. The 
as&odate said the often abrupt 
Mr. DiLorenzo would do so 
“with a big grin.” 

Both partners were "myste- 
ry" figures in red estate circles 
and the objects of immense 
cariosity because of their rela- 
tively rapid rise to power. 
Brooklyn-bred, they did not ac- 
quire their first Manhattan 


Nassau Republican, lost to 
Thomas A. Downey, a Demo- 
crat. in his bid for re-etection 
last year.) 

qin April 1974. to the 
Wydier for Congress Commit- 
tee. (John W. Wydier. Nassau 
Republican Conservative, won 
reelection last year.) 

q Between September and 
December, 1972. to the Suf- 
folk County Republican Com- 
mittee. for various state and 
local elections. 

q Between March. 1973. and 
October, 1974, to the Suffolk 
County Republican Committee, 
to be used in connection with 
various state and local elec- 
tions. 

q Be tween May, 1973, and 
July. 1974, to the Nassau Coun- 
ty Republican Committee, to 
be used for various state and 
local elections. 

qOn Sept. 9, 1972. a contri- 
bution to the Committee to 
Elect Bernard Meyer to the 
New York State Court of Ap- 
peals. 

q Between August and Sep- 
tember, 1972, a contribution 
to the Committee for the Elec- 
tion of Sol Wacbder to the 
New York State Court of Ap- 
peals. 

Limitation-Cited 

Mr. Trager said the exact 
amount of each contribution 
was not available. He added 
that the indictment cited only 
those contributions made start- 
ing in September. 1972, because 
they were the only ones that 
stift fell within the statute of 
limitations, which was short- 
ened last year from six years 
to three years. 

On one occasion, in October, 
1972, the indictment alleged, 
the bank used.three of to own 
checks, totaling IW00. to 
make political contributions. 
Mr. Clifford was charged with 
directing tha tthe bank officers 
designated to make the political 

contributions . 5? 

bank. It was understood, the 
indictment said, they 

would -then be reimbursed by 
the bank, in turn. 

According to the indictment, 

the conspiracy to have the bank 

make the ille^l contributions 
started in 1^66 -wfeoi Mr- 
CUfford came to Security Na 
tiooal as president He tola 
officials- he was “initiating a 
new method by which the bar* 
would make political contribu- 
tions, 1 * the indictment said. 

in October, 1967, Mr. Powell, 
the. bank's executive vice pres- 


property until 1955. But Mr. 
DiLorenzo was the more silent 
and less visible operator. 

Their lifelong friendship was 
such that they never signed 
a contract between themselves 
and, according to an associate, 
"never gave each other a piece 
of paper.” They argued often, 
but always compromised, he 
said. 

Not a Joiner 

Of medium height, the be- 
spectacled Mr. Di Lorenzo was 
prematurely gray and had a 
dark complexion. He was de- 
scribed by an old friend as 
"sedentary” and his mjor 
pleasures away from world 
were reading and relaxing in 
the sun. Not a joiner, he was 
not active in clubs or organiza- 
tions and generally spurned the 
prerogatives of wealth because 
he did not want to "spoil” 
his children. 

His office was large, but ap- 
parently becuse he enjoyed 
practicing his golf putting on 
carpets, rather than for show. 
He hired a chauffeur only after 
his surgery last year, and when 
going to one of his favorite 
restaurants, Gino’s, 19 blocks 


placed but distressed property, 
improving it to increase its re- 
turn and then using it as se- 
curity for large mortgages. 

They bought the Chrysler 
Building, for example, in 1960, 
one of several buddings once 

held by William Zeckendorf 
and his* Webb & Knapp com- 
pany, which passed into their 
hands for about 542-niilIion, 
most of which was in mort- 
gages they assumed. 

About four years later, the 
mortgages bad been reduced 
to S3 9-million, and they refi- 
nanced the building by obtain- 
ing a $47-mil!ion mortgage 
underwr i t te n by a Wall Street 
investment company and sold 
to about 30 banks and insur- 
ance companies. The SS-miHion 
left after the old mortgages 
bad been paid was used for) 
other investments. 

In 1965, Mr. Goldman re- 
called that, the acquisition of, 
the 77-story Chrysler Building 
at 405 Lexington Avenue, once 
the world’s tallest building, 
"was a big gamble for us, but 
I looked at the potential and 
T told Alex. ‘Let’s go ahead.’ 
But we laid awake many 
night over it.” 

A strike by building em- 
ployes quickly arose, and the 
partners tried to keep. the build- 
ing open by personally running 
elevators. During the strike, a 
firm called S. G. S. Associates 
offered its services and was 
retained as a labor consultant. 
In 1963, Mr. Goldman said he 
got a Dun & Bradstreet report 
era the firm but revealed that 
Carlo Gambino, the reputed un- 
derworld leader, was a member 
of the firm. “I got rid of them 
fast ” Mr. Goldman said. 


north of the Chrysler Buildinj; 


Michael S. Striker, 69, Dies; iff. PAGE CROSS DEAD; 
Internationa! Patent Lawyer' ARCHITECT WAS 85 

Michael S. Striker, a leading; H p^g Cross, an architect, 
patent lawver, died Thursday at; Aug. 28 at the Lenox Hill 

Mount Sinai Hospital after a 'Hospital following heart sur-j 
short illness: He was 69 years' gery. He was 65 3 <«ud| 
old and had homes at 2S5 also had ^ office. i 

itral Park West, m New City. ^ Cross who favo red the 
N.Y., and in Duncans. Jamaica ,. Geor ^ m style, specialized in 
W.L . ; designing homes in the North- 

Mr. Striker, who was born jew* and Virginia. His clients 
Budapest, came to New York ui|j nc iuded Paul Mellon, the pliil- 
1938 and founded a patent lawjanthropist. The architect also 
office, now at 360 Lexington! designed the Hellenic Studies 
Avenue, which is -one of the jcenter in Washington., the Trin- 
largest international patently Episcopal Church in Upper- 
firms in the country, special- jville. va, and the library, at 
[zing in cinematography and; the Choate School in WalJjng- 
c&m era equipment. ford. Conn. 

He received a degree inj For about 30 years. Mr. Cross 
mechanical engineering at the was the treasurer and secretary 
Vienna Poly technical University, joF the Coffee House Club, a 
a Ph.D. in economics at the|private luncheon club for pro- 
University of Budapest and' a Sessional men at 54 West 45th 
patent attorney degree in Ber-j Street. He was also a member 
lin. He was a member of che|of the board of tiie National 
Federal Patent Bar and the New [Collection of Art at the Snuth- 
York State Bar. Isonian Institution. 

He leaves his wife, the for- 
mer Hilda Wachter; two sons, 

Michael J. and John M„- a daugh- 
ter. Dr. Michelle Boffa. a sister, 
brother and two grandchildren. 

Robert B. Hobbs, Headed 
First National of Maryland 

Robert B. Hobbs, who retired! 
in 1968 as board chairman off 
the First National Bank of| 

Maryland in Baltimore, died 
Monday at the age of 72. 

Mr. Hobbs was a special as- 
sistant to the Secretary of the 
Treasury in 1942-43. He also 
had been a member of the Fed- 
eral Advisory Council of the 
Federal Reserve System, 1961 
to 1964, and vice president of 
the council in 1963-64. He was 
vice president of the Associa- 
tion of Reserve City Banks in 
1962-63. 

After receiving a B. S. at the, 

University of Viginia in 1926, 

Mr. Hobbs was a vice president 
of the Bankers Trust Company 
of New York before joining the 
Baltimore bank as executive 
vice president in 1950. 

He leaves his wife, the for- 
mer Margaret Leigh; a son, 

Robert B. Jr.: a daughter. Mrs. 

Henry M. Covington Jr., and six 1 
grandchildren. 

ANNA POSNER 
Anna Posner, longtime own- 
er-manager of the Brickman 
Hotel, a resort complex in the 
Catslall Mountains, died Wed- 
nesday at the Community Gen- 
eral Hospital in MonticeUo, N.Y. 

She was 87 years old and lived 
at the hotel in South Fallsburg. 


9**4* 

n » PK -JnmHw Gj In BritioteSt. Cl., 

sort Mn IKS. Dorothr Giwu.v 

enartc* E. curie, iwtewr PW" or 

isa'saii.T s-rfs&j 

Sm wik at Chari** C. OfW»V. otl 
5«trCT. N.H. AW taivIMM W * CWJjtu*- ; Both*. Kt,|n 
drrt. She was nr»wci*n hr Bonin, Rjrmwd 

H—* °*j C™*r.«W« 

tun Smi. 9. ** 2 P M - 
CONLIN— Aan W. On Swtembff ‘ ' " 

U 8«HM V. Atan** M curt.OOTT^c. 
William A umjj J; CotiIW, Ann M. 

Ab " ~ *nd «w lair Francis. ** • C*to». Mlchaal J 


Alanun. him 
A shton. Lrsll* O. 
Bereti . Isaac 
Bakin sun. FU 
Brennar, Renta* 
Blank. Lam 


Catalano. Mary 
Chamber^ Erahr 


naunrflu and tha lair rrantiy — ~i 

w-vi-ed bv 39 grandchlldim ->nd 23 Crawford 

Funifil from CV DOKJ, B. Crawford. «*Hmi 

i.ET impwl a**- CW1M J - 

u«^k ay** 

* Doile. Uana.fl 


t :07S up i Eloan. Sw 


is «"*'» (ssmn. 

z-i a MV pa 

T ” d Con™*** l‘ j EnMP. tan 

io.-.oHinc FmihII. W iUliv 

Oartnrfa 

WfKS.SrTiS’f'*! 


"ml? BwVlw" fr#nto ., 

“is. ^ G,, “° 


mtil Sh 

heure iro«i 


The architect was a graduate 
of Yale and the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. In 
World War II he was a major 
in the Marine Corps. 

A memorial service is to be 
held Sept. 17 at 11 A.M. in the 
chapel at St. James' Episcopal 
Church on Madison Avenue at 
71st Street 

Elena Sorokin, 81, Botanist, 
Widow of Sociologist, Dies 

WINCHESTER, Mass., Sept. 4 
(AP) — Elena Sorokin, a noted 
botanist, died Tuesday at her 
home. She was 81 years old. 

Mrs. Sorokin, widow of Pit- 
rim A. Sorokin, the sociologist, 
was expelled with her husband 
from Russia after the Bolshe- 
viks took over in 1917. She 1 
came here in 1923 and received 
her doctorate in botany from 
the University of Minnesota. 

For many years she edited 
the translations from Russian 
of the American Institute of 
Biological Sciences and recently 
completed a translation from 1 
Russian of her husband’s 
"Hunger as a Factor in Human 
Affairs,” to be published in the 
falL _ 

She leaves two sons, Petei 
and Sergei. • 

JOHN M. WILLIAMS JR. 

John M. Williams Jr., a law- 
yer, died Wednesday at Bergen 
Pines Hospital in Paramus, NJ-, 
after a long illness. He was 58 
years old and lived at 336 
Westview Avenue, Leona, NJ., 
where he had a private practice. 

In recent years, Mr. Williams 
was also an insurance agent for 
the Nationwide Insurance Com- 
panies. He was a graduate of 


A pioneer in the Catskills re- 
sort industry, Mrs. Posner, her 

For many yep. ramore. {husband, Joseph, and her paf-l^^'uJ^sdtyln Coimec- 
persiked about the source of Abraham and Molly Brick- 1 - ✓,_! — us- 

toe partners’ funds, but gov- founded toe hotel, first 
eminent and private sources called toe Pleasant Valley Farm 
maintained that no foundation House, in 1910. Its name was 
tor the rumors of underworld changed to toe Brickman in 
connections was unearthed. ; 1920. 

Other Interests [ Surviving are two sons, Mur- 

,‘ray and Ben. now owners and 

office 311(1 Ijjianagers of the hotel; a daugh- 
ter. Bebe Toor, and three grand- 
children. 


on Lexington Avenue 
Street, he would take toe sub- 
way, 

Mr. DiLorenzo learned about 
real estate from his father, who 
ran a real estate and mortgage 
office in Brooklyn. His father 
urged bim to study pharmacy, 
which he did at St John’s 
University after he had already 
bought his first property, a 
brownstone, for which he bor- 
rowed $1,100 at the age of 
17. 

Mastered Leveraging 

After serving in the Army 
in World War IL he studie 
at the Brooklyn Law School 
and was admitted to toe bar 
in 1950. One of Mr. DiLorenzo’s 
early clients was Sol Goldman, 
one year his junior, who had 
already quit his father's groce- 
ry store business and had be- 
gun to acquire properties with 
i«ome money borrowed from 
his neighbor Alex DiLorenzo 
Sr. 

In 1951, the boyhood friends 
teamed up to boy a 600-unit 
apartment house in Brooklyn, 
where Mr. Goldman already 
owned 44 properties. They 
quickly mastered the art of 
leveraging by purchasing well- 


la addition to 
apartment buildings, the hold- 
ings of the two partners 
included major interests in 
shopping centers, industrial 
buildings, the National Sugar 
Refining Company and several 
hotels, once including the 
plaza and toe SL Regis and 
still including toe Gotham and 
the Stanhope: Mr. Goldman 
acted as president of all their 
enterprises, and Mr. DiLorenzo 
was secretary-treasurer and 
half-owner. 

One associate said that Mr. 
DiLorenzo “had no sense of 
security and never locked his 
door and was frequently 
robbed.” He usually carried 
large amounts of cash, the as- 
sociate continued, because he 
ifelt it would be safer to rave 
a mugger a lot of money than 
get physically hurt. 

Both partners were indignant 
over accusations that tenants 
in the pornography business 
were in some of their proper- 
ties, and they instituted large 
lawsuits recently against some 
publications, arguing that they 
had no control over such activi- 
ties and had been vigorously 
trying to evict toe tenants. 

Mr. DiLorenzo is survived 
by ’his widow, the former Jean 
Ttuffel; a daughter, Lisa; two 
sons. Alex 3d and Mark; a 
granddaughter; two brothers, 
Patrick J. and Luke, and a 
sister. Elizabeth. 

A funeral mass will be of- 
fered Monday at 10 A.M. in 
SL Agnes Roman Catholic 
Church. 143 East 43d Street 
Burial will be at Holy Cross 
Cemetery in Brooklyn. 


ticut and the Columbia Univer- 
sity Law SchooL 
Surviving are his widow, the 
former Helen Sessinghaus; a 
son. John M: 3d; a daughter, 
Ann Cook; his mother. Anna; a 
sister, Joy Bagg, and two.grand- 
dailghters. 


DR. ANDREW L. NUQU1ST 

Dr. Andrew L. Nuquist, pro- 
fessor emeritus of political sd-f 
ence at the University of Ver- 
mont died Thursday at his 
home in Jericho, Vt He was 69 
years old. 

Dr. Nuquist, who was con-, 
sidered a specialist on state and 
local government, wrote “Ver- 
mont State Government and 
Administration,” published by. 
the university press. He re- 
ceived MA and PiuD. degrees 
at the University of Wisconsin. 

Surviving are his widow, 

Isabel; a son, Andrew S.; a 
daughter, Elizabeth Sobrino; a 
brother, Robert E.; a sister. 

Inna Laase, and three grand- 
children. 

DANIEL FLYNN 

Daniel Flynn, a former State 
Assemblyman, was killed Mon- 
day evening in a car collision 
on toe Garden State Parkway 
in Clifton, NJ. Mr. Flynn was 
68 years old and had homes at 
5 Peter Cooper Road and in 
Spring Lake, NJ. 

Mr. Flynn, represented Wash- 
ington Heights m the Assembly 
from 1933 to 1946. He was a 
graduate of the Fordham Uni- 
versity Law School and spe- 
cialized in admiralty law. 

Surviving are his wife, Mary;, . „ - 

three daughters, Dr Mary 

den, Ann Flyntz and Rita Villa; 

two brothers, Robert and Fran- 
cis; a sister, Anne McQuade, 
and seven grandchildren. 


* O-l J 197$ ;«AHTeU-S«BW 

CRAWFORD — M»rlDO *" t ? n r ™L,a hv.n-il ; 

£Xr 4 cf C M£ ;*r r Lv 

**«■ 

Ing hours. 2 to * • *« ’ 

SF'mhJZi bSSor 

SrgUUSW-'Sf 

toTPj*. wv.il. 

Chanel. Inlwmffllf. UwU CemclWV. 

AuwMSvilk, N.Y. 

all attar TP.*' iJwurtW ■»« "» 

D(LOR£KICV^aJK»“l«’ Jf- Husband of 
fRKt LM aM MfliJ 

Rapnlnt at E CamoWI. : 

Ave. SI 51 ». Sal and Sun JA9 PM. 

Mass of Girtsrtan burial al Si aww 

SmMfl E. a st- .i wtwJ LN 1 ?: 

In lieu of flovffH contrlbutwns » «» 

Jtoart F«id wouW bo anoredaled. 

□(LORENZO— Alex. The Manaoemenr 
of Iho Srsnhoo* WW 
deep j«tw the .paalw of 
DlLomso. We evttod our slnare con- 
dolence to his entire family. 

DILORENZO— Alaxandar Jr. The ott'cert and 

U em5oye efWelHiio/on . w™ 

the passing of their beteroi empire - 
Alex W Lorens?. Jr., and *«wv*l Welf 
huiffalt WtMrtrjJteJus fam.hj 

The Officers s Emal9>rs m 
W alllMton Assrc. 


:iev(4 J-Jer 

b«b? ant a 

Kj-4-.li inj D; 
ii9 a: f-;nx £ 

ST W.utm 
air ''on 3 to 
Fmv's: maa C 
Pj. a«c. at 
ini.vr-K.ir Caiv. 
McHALE — G erald 
Ftk' 
In, 

H.iir. uMicr oi 
i>,rj| ■ 

i.'-.Lf 8-i tlm. 

0, at >0 A M 
Cemetery, Bam 
ing hours. 
HURRAY— Robert 
or Wantnh. 
K4'.«n (Noe 
Charles, Ravine 
vried father of 
Ma'lann. Edrra 
lurvtwrd bv h 
at the Fomra 
R:uae. int. : 
Mau of Chris 
AM Sr. Franc 
interment u N 

■ l. 

QUINTAL— Mabel 

N J.. on Thun 
«sth roar. Beto> 
jam Quintal, r 
C Outotai. Or 
Robert E. Btca 
tal. Service wU 
The C-le*i RM 
Riooewood Ave. 
NJ.. Saturday 
RICHTER— Jam* 
Emanuet. Dea 
Sf^erd. Alan 
Dear S’vil-ora 
Rose Filler I 
dtra held on r 

rokrtson-jw 

i I0?s. Widow 
privale 

ROSENTHAL— EM 
to 5. Pa'rwd 
Virginia Cohn- 
jnd Alljon J; 
Cr-i-n. sleo-moti 
E-'i»vd 1. R 
pr>va>». I" **» 
nut* pe seel tr 
i a w. ?? *ti st 

■ swish Board 
Stieef. New Yo 

ROSENTHAL— Enl 
Hrii.-al -Ccnfw 
nwl r o! -Eni 
of tch" Reset 
oember of opi 
P-.- enmal, a: I n 

coavc s. wao ■> 
h-r it.im, rorr 
b; e'?;tir mi;i 
to her hi.ishjnd. 
of VM-r family. 


EDNA POTTS -REED 

Edna Potts Reed, former 
president of toe Appeal Print- 
ing Company, a law publishing, 
bouse here that was founded 
by her father, died Aug. 29 in 
Buffalo. She was 92 years old. 

Mrs. Reed, a graduate of the 
DeLancey School for Girls, was 
the widow of Julian Edward 
Ingle Jr., a lawyer, and of 
Edward Everett Reed, president 
of the Reed .Tissues Corporation 
of Tittle Falls, N. Y. 

Survivors include two daugh- 
Dana L. Ingle, and two grand- 
children. 

Con Edison Aide, 101, Dies 

William Cullen Morris, who 
retired In 1942 as vice president 
in charge of gas operations of 
Con Edison, died Tuesday at 
his home in Great Neck, LJ. 
He was 101 years old. Mr. 
Morris had been an engineer 
and executive of three utilities 
that, through a series of merc- 
ers. were absorbed tor Consoli- 
dated Edison in 1937. He was 
the oldest graduate of the Stev- 
ens Institute of Technology in 
Hoboken, NJ. 


ffpatfps 


ident, was said to have told 
his secretary to keep records 
of a group of bask officers 
who would be making political 
contributions of $100 a month. 
Starting the following month, 
the indictment charged, various 
bank officials were approached 
by one of the three defendants, 
were told they had been chosen 
to make political contributions 
and were given toe reimburse- 
ment formula. 

Change Cites Denial 

In addition to the charges 
of conspiring to make political 
contributions, Mr. Clifford is 
charged with having denied to 
the Controller the controller 
of the Curreney that the bank 
was reimbursing its employes 
for their political ayments. 

If- found guilty on all counts, 
Mr. CHfort faces a maximum 
penalty of 35 years in jail and 
$125,000 in Ones; Mr. Powell 
faces 17 years in jail and $55.- 
000 in fines, and Mr. Dowd, 
1 1 years and $35,000. The bank 
itself faces $45,000 m fines. 

At tha Nassau Trust Company 
in Gten Cove, Mr. Dowd’s secre- 
tary said he was away on vaca 
torn and could not be reached. 
She added that no one else 
was available for comment 


Concetta Scaravaglione Is Dead ; 
Prize-Winning Sculptor Was 75 

Concetta ScaravagUone, sculp- 1 in 1935 hse woo the Widener 
tor and painter, died Thursday Gold MedaL She created 


evening of cancer in Calvary 
Hospital, the .Bronx. She was 
75 years old and lived at 441 
West 21st Street 
She won a Prix de Rome in 
1947 and studied and worked 
in Rome for hearty three years. 
She completed one of her ma- 
jor works in this period, a tall 
metal figure, ."Icarus Falling," 
which stands in toe lobby of 
an apartment building at 60 

Sutton Place South. 

Her last ofte-woman show 
was held early last year at the 
Kraushaar Galleries here. 

At toe age of 16 Miss Scara-{ 
vagtione began studying at the 
National Academy of Design, 
where she won a number of 
medals. At 25 she was showin 
her works and had begun a long 
teaching career. 

Over the years toe taught at 
the Educational Alliance, the 
Master Institute, New York 
University, Black Mountain Col- 
lege. Sarah Lawrence College, 
and, most recently, at Vassar. 

During the Lepression of toe 
nineteen-thirties she was em- 
ployed by the Works Progress 


figure of a railway mailman 


Administration art project and Keepsie, N. Y. 


tor the Post Office Department 
and many sculptures for the 
New York World’s Fair' of I 
1964-65. 

Miss ScaravagHone was 
versatile artist, using woods, 
terra cotta, welded copper and 
bronze and other matelals. 

A tiny woman of great en- 
ergy, toe was often seen by 
neighbors in the Chelsea area 
as she shoveled snow off her] 
walks while in her early 70’s. 

Her works are in the collec- 
tions of the Museum of Modem 
Ait, toe Whitney Museum of 
American Art, the Roerich Mu- 
seum, Vassar College, Arizona 
State College, Dartmouth Col- 
lege. the Glasgow useuin, the 
Art Gallery of Hamilton. On- 
tario. and toe Pennsylvania 
Academy of Fine Arts. 

She leaves four - brothers. 
Gus, Louis, Frank and Dr. 

Angelo Scaravalone, and a sis- 
ter. Fannl Gallichfo. 

There will be be funeral serv- 
ice Monday at 9:30 A.M. in 
the Torsone Memorial Funeral 
Home, 218 Mill Street, Pough- 


AJAMIAN— Hflta. wi Se£. *■ W5J Wowd 
trittmr at Alls* PlmMt !>nd« „■> Pw'* 
Brewirtw, fltanfrund* erf Kwwwttir Etb*- 
beth and Cto Brew Hw. Qra wny ten- 
ires MbdI* Grin* Cemetery, Monday, 
2PJHL 

_n, ImJJb a. TTw staff of 

Uni- 
versity Medical Carter mourns the Msshn 
of Or. Leslie O. Ashton, mind col- 
Irarae and rnamher at our Staff tor over 
SO vmrx. 

SAJCERMAN— Gdario. of Richmond, Virginia, 
on September 3nL Skiers, Florence Graen- 
heri, Reno Klein and Anita GJIdoran. 
Brothers. Hamid, Bertram. Theodore and 
Seymour. Burial In Richmond. 

BERGER— Isaac. Devoted husband of Mildred. 
Father of Murray, Arthur and Ihe lala 
iao*. Grandfather of Madeline. Jack, 
James. David and Judith. Services were 
conducted on Friday ef Schwartz Brothers 
"Forest Parte Chanel*." Forest Hills. 

BLANK— laora. Beloved wife of the late 
Irvine. Devoted mother of Gloria J. Blake. 
Dear sister of Fred Cohen. Oierished 
erandmolhar of Kenneth D. WMtelaw, 
Susan C Pravflle end John N. WMtelaw. 
Adored ereat-wandmother of Elizabeth D. 
PrevIHe. Services ’‘Part Weef .115 W. 79 
Sf., Monday Scot. 8th at 10 KM. 

BORUS— Karin, dearest and beloved daughter 
of Sheldon and Mvma, loving sister of 
Dovid and Shoftanle, cherished grand- 
deinmtr of Tobla Bonis and Aldlda Kogan. 
Services Sunday. IB A.IIL, Schwartz Broth- 
ers, "Forest Park Chapels." Queens Bhnt 
and 7Mh Road, Forest Mils. 

BRENNER — Regina (Jeaal, on Scot. 4, 
adored mother of Harriet Baron and Bev- 
erly GMdunan. . loving grandmother of 
Richard Baron, Ronnie Hirsh, Howard 
Gleldunan and Peter GMdonan. a noted 
sister of Mall Boxer, Lillian Hart and 
Carl Sdioen. Interment was held Friday, 
Sflnt. 5, at Mount Ararat Cemetery. 

BUNIN— Raymond E.. husband, tether, grand. 
Titttur. toother and friend Servtaes "Part 
West." 115 W. 79 St. Monday, Saul. 8,-at 

CARPOU— Aristide (Harry), . of Babvfen, 
N.Y., on Sent. 4, 1WS, beloved husband 
of the late Mary, devoted fattier at Anna 
beila Tim. Miriam ' Bader and Heda 
Careeu, also wretved tor etoto grandchil- 
dren. Reeoslng at the Boyd Funeral Home, 
■W Wot Main St., Babvfon. Burial Mass. 
Sf. Nicholas Hellenic OrflwW Church. ]] 
A JR. Interment Pfnelawn Memorial Park. 

CATALANO— Manr. Beloved vrihr at the lute 
Josmh. Devoted mother of Anne Nearr. 
Loving mofber^nJaw or Thomas Nesrv. 
Deer aster of Bex Gfardeno. YoUnd* 
Messina. Madeline LaMorte, James Rk 
cluttt and Ihe late Joseph Rlcciuttl. R« 
nosing Jemei W. Rcsso Funeral Homo. IBS 
Blncker St., until Monday, 9 A.M. Mass 
Si. Joseph'} Church at 9:30 KM. 

CHAMBERS— Cvslyn, beloved vrife of Fred- 
erick, devoted urendnwilw. mother el Wcndr 
Richer and Dr. Donald Chambers, sister 
of RoxUno. Bvmes'and Or. Irving Bletnr. 
Rtneslng at Frank E. Camatall, Madlsm, 
An. at BlU St. on Safurdav, Sept. &, 
frori A PJ*. to 9 P.M. In Heu of tiowei? 
donatton to. the Cancer Fund. Interment 
urlvatk. 


e.nress tneir nr 

of its esTccutnl 

her. e-'st Ch>:»n 
m flit Cmtw M 
member ■’( toe 
ment CnmmiHw 
and deen U"<.-«r 
mil be sorely i 
pathv to her 
family- , , . 

Pfiliiu J. 

Walter Motuh'lw'u . 

Jcramc M. Go I dsn . 

ROSENTHAL— Entt 
rectors « ttw J^ 
Hs Women's C ■ 
the nnslng of f 
wife of John Be 
leaoue and Nor 
the ynm she 
humanitarian * 
profound svrmat) 
children end lh» 

■THi 


DOYLE— M urea ref (nee Lunllun), an 5u?t 
3, I »7S. beloved wite nf the lam John 5 
Dovfe Sr^ lovino motoer a* Rita «-sn 
and John R. Owl* J' ■ dev ?* ri 
mother of Donna. Teranc* *"d Tlmmas 
Fox- Kathleen, Ellon and John F- !>■*'■* 

3d. Reposing Saturday and Su^j 
2 to 5 and from T to * P.M a' to* Jite 
W. McCaba Funeral Home. 3». 

Ave, Bronx. Max at Chrlrt.an Btr-al 
Monday, 10 A.M.. St. Nidtolai ef Tolcniln* 

Church. Interment Calvary Cemetery. 

DOYLE— Marearol. The Directors. Offiar-. 
and Employees of The Tremont Savings & 

Loan taSKtetton W« to exiwllno sincere 
condolence to Donald J. Fo«e, Member or 
our Board, on the tragic death of h - 

"^■'"■^■Ewoo* v. O'Brien. Present 
Martin S. Berwr. Chairman 
EfGEN— Ruse. The Officers and Board of 
Directors extend Iheir sincere condolences 
to Honorary President. Lllyan Banmf, on 
ttw passing of her mother. 

ROSE ASHB1TZ, President 
Sisterhood of toe Jcw.sh Center | M 

or Kew Gardens Hills i 

EPSTEIN— Anna. On Seotember 5. 19.'5. ! ROSENTHAL — 

Friends will be Informed el toe memorial [ Tnisioes of. toe 
service. 

FOXHALL— Wllltem B- on Sent. *. <975. of 
Yorirtown HOT dirts, H.Y.. hwjand of Bertha 
Foxhail. father of Richard, brother of 
Kerry, Mrs. Mary Hemlmvar and Mrs. 

Doris BoYSnowsiti. Sleoso/1 or Mrs. Cdcrlyn 
Foxhail. A Baha'i Service w.Ti oe held at 
the Clark Fimral Home, Yordawn Hciihis. 

. Saturday at 10 A.M. in lieu of Ito.rere 
donations may be made to to* Heart Funa. 

Yolanda, also survived hr dear sisters 
and brothers, Edith, Helen ami GHda 
Rubino, Flimy, Fanueie. Anna DeGeorge. 

Joseph A. Rubino and Anoelo V. Rubtoo. 

Friends may cajl. it .Lyons Fu neral Home. 

Klndericamadc RtL. Westwood, NJ.._2 to 
5 P.M. and 7 to 9 P.M. FueerM .M ep on 
Monday, Sent. a. 1V.1S AJtU at Church 
of the Assumption, .Emerson, NJ. Jnter- 
meot S». Joseoh's Cemetery. Hackensack, 

NJ. 

GAtNES-Gvtrode. 71» Mayor ^ end ttw Board 
of Trustees of tho Villax ' HewWt Har- 

bor extend deepest sympathies to Mr. 

Stanley K. Gaines, member of ttw Board 
of Trustees, end to hltf family upon ton 
death of his wife, Gertrude. 

MARTIN SCHOEHFEU), Mayor 
GAIN^— Gertrude The Hewlett-East Rocka- 
war Jewish Center records with sorrow 
the passing of Ms esteemed member* 
extends Its. hcertfett sympathy to H» be- 
reaved family. Sheldon W. Switkln 

Harold R- Elson. Presldem 
HUHN— Sarah 8- Sent. 4. 1975. Survived hr 
husband, John B. Hvhn, daughters- Mrs. 

William H. Murdock Jr. and Mrs. William 
S. Cox. nine Brand children and turn srwt- 
urandchlldren. Services at Van Hist 4 Cal- 
lagan. Point Pleasant, NJ., '-0:30 AM.. 

Saturday. Graveside services ? P.M . West 
Laurel Hill Cemetery, pmiadrlanla. Pa. 

Family reouesls no Mowers. All donations 
to Point Pleasant HosoHai, Point pleawnr. 

NJ. 08741 Philadelphia papers * tea sc 
copy. 

JAGLOM — Abraham, beloved hirjanj ni 
Nadia, devoted fattier of Nellie Ga-dner 
aid Regina Wachter, loving grandfaiher ol 
George and Paul Wodtter. Ralph- John, 

Peter aiyj Janet Gardner, beloved br.-JW 
o» Simon, Joseph and David Janiom. Smv- 
‘ Ices Monday, 1? noon. "Tha Riverside," 

76th St. and Amsterdam Ave. 

JOHNSON— Fred, on September 4. 1975. in 
Catttomia. beloved husband of toe late 
Mildred (nee Wsriman), devoted father of 
Peter end Frederick. Also survived bv five 
grandchildren. Raoralng Walter B. Cooke 
Funeral Home, ?I35 W estchester Avenue. 

Brow. Funeral Mass Monday, 18 A.M.. SI. 

Raymond Church. Interment. SI. Raymond 
Cemetery. 

KING— David Wooster of Fort Hill. Chester. 

Qmoedkut on Friday, Seoteniber 5th, 1975. 

Husband of Dorothy E. Kina and tether 
of Louise W. King. Services will be private 
at ttw rermnlence at the lamlly. 

KLE l MAN— David P. Manhattan Region 

ZOA. notes with deep sorrow Ihe oasslng 
of the Veteran Zionist Leader, beloved 
husband of Esther, tothar of Its President. 

Honorable Alfred H. Kleinian, Associate 
Chairman of the Administrative Board, 

HKda Bane, and Hanv Kleinian (London). 

Our heartfelt condolences to the bereaved 
family. 

Bernard M. RifUn, Chairman of Board 
M. E. Sanhlr. Executive Director 
KLEIMAN— David. The officers, trustees and 
membera of The Jewish Center ot New 
York dwojy mourn toe passing of David 
Klelman, beloved tother of one of Its es- 
teemed and dedicated Vice-Presidents and 
• tormer Presidart of Its Men's Club. 

Juflx Alfred H. Klelman. Our profound 
condolences are extended to all tha be- 
reeved family. 

. _*■* Stem, President 

William Felnbero. Chairman of the Board 
LUHItt C Hy r H., Sept. 4, 197S, of Hlns- 
jWe, III. Husband of Mary Mabel tuning, 
ftt^r of Mura (Joseph) BtudhoHne, grand- 


J2E Z, TlIS l»"S;).«Mhoirae. grand- 
iJSLi"? Ha, i ttrother «f Awt 

ilL 'If % no S n * may bo 

5*L*» toe Hematology Rgsaenti Fund ol 
Oiiogo Jrerinrferian St. Luka's Hospital. 

Sept. J, be- 
GerridCi haring 

renc e^James GerfMs, teire^hMBerriSc 
nod Greggr y k. Garrick Jr Rnoslnv at 

^M'&SISEaSSs;: 

S.S5" I P,S£.. K " « a **'-«* 


MASEE-Otra H. on Fridur, 
loved nattier of Audrey M. & 
Oran dm other of Veronica Cavi 


ROSENTHAL- _ 
mil tee and Staff 
Canter of the J* 
are profoundly g 
beloved friend j 
Chairman, she t 
toe drvriopment 
ices to children, 
jwtendri to her 
family. 

Mre.Cdmunc 
Peter B. NeotW 
ROSSBACH— A Hwf 
Boanl W, Brom 
sorrow the pass 
Rossbach. betoimc 
Board Member, ; 
SCHLICHTER— Gorff 
son. September ■ 
Frederick. Funera 
8- 10 AM., at ; 
Inc.. S32 Broad 
Interment Wocdl* 
dar. 7-9 PJVL, S 
SEIDNER— SoL jud 
loved husband ot 
of Irwin and Rich; 
of Slaear. daar t» 
father-in-law at L ; 
Ires were hold Ff« 
Westchester. 
SIEGEL— E» Mtwtft i 
the late Charles. . 
end Pnuilne. Dear 
and Asnoa 0*Cor 
two aranddiUnreiU 
inq at Redden Rr 
14 st. Funeral « 
Monday, 8:45 Altf 
SIKORA-Gwirude. I 
Devoted mother- d 
lino daughter or t 
Dear sister ot H 
Tjmarin. Servfcds 
tember 5th. 
STRIKER— Michael 
beloved husband 
of Dr. Mktaflte 
John M., grar 
B-ifte. brother efl 
Striker. Sendee 
Madison Ave. at 
EHTWORTH — RW 
1975, In Bmnlngt 
were private. 
WHALEY— OMries A 
beloved husband o 
loving father of 
Mary. Also surety 
Funeral tram Woe 
41-45 58th Sf* M 
AJA. Mass Cornu 
9:45 AM. tnterme 

(Sard a 


MURPHY— Lawim 
laie Lawrence P. 
all reUHves end 
expressions of svn 
during their reran 




WOLKEMBERG— Dore 
Wolbenbero extend 
friends best vl*f 
and peaceful New 
HENRY I. COHEN 
Ave. vrish Hielr i 
New Yew full of ec 



Frank E. Campbell 

IHE Funeral Chapel,’ L 


1076 Madison Avenue (cr. 81st Street) 
BU 8-3500 


rs 




o 



THE NEW YORK TIMES. SA TURD A Y, SEPTEMBER 6. 1975 


Hard Houses Plan 
rves the Gold Room 


be 


By PAUL GOLDBERGER 
sley. the real - 1 that financing could ^ 
said yesterday longed for the project 
■ sent a revised , n * w plan was made 
the ci tv for' 1 ?™ yesterday at a meeting 
•I-nffice build the ^-estate committee 
■ " of Community Board 5, the 

local planning board whose dis- 
approval of the proposal has 
been a further official reason 
for its delay. 

Kevin McGrath of 


the landmark 
an Madison 
or the preser- 
ed Gold Room 
ling the hotel 


ling Lilt J UJlvl | m _ 

nation to in- Gouia. CJimenko and Kramer, 

.. a I • i 


as well, 
is considered 

Imark preser- 
iad been bat- 
■leimsley and 
js owner, the 
w York, since 
a* the original 

uses’ two-sto- 
Room, which 
: gold-leaf de- 
by John La 
onsidered one 
: 19th-century 
litectural his- 


and his ar- 
Roth Jr. of 
vans, said at 
bial plan was 
» preservation 
was impracti- 
' an, however, 

. ito the hotel’s 
* i a cocktail 

be reviewed 
. relay by the 
' iarks Conser- 
organization 
,th Mr . H elm 
tiocese during 
; and on Tues- 
v York City 
rvation Com 
.. jected earlier 


lawyers for the Archdiocese 
of New York, presented the; 
[new plan to the committee and 
[smd that Mr. Helmsley was 
withdrawing his earlier propo- 
sal “effective imraediatllely." 
Pressure by Archdiocese 

Although participants would 
not comment on the matter,, 
( it was understood yesterday 
that the revised plan came 
about in part because of pres- 
sure placed on the archdiocese 
by.krge donors to save the I 
Gold Room. The archdiocese 
then instructed Mr. Helmsley, 
to whom it leases the Property, 
to prepare a new plan In which 
the interiors would be saved. 

The new plan also eliminates 
™ _ arc bed motor entrance on 
50th Street, which had been 
criticized as a visual conflict 
with the brown stone vnhud 
Houses, and simplifies the fa- 
cade of the tower itself to 
ja straightforward wall of dark 
bronze glass to provide a more 
symathetic background for the 
landmark houses. 

The redesigned tower is 57 
stones high, an increase of 



23 


City Rejects Order by U.S. 
To I mpose T oil on B ridges 


By ED WARD RANZAL 


Tto Hw York Times/Frank C. Oauntarty 

Workers coord ina ting emergency action from Civil Defense center in the basement of Trenton’s police headquarters 


V Redesign 
ilcesmen for 
ithm would 
ill until they 
. plans. Susan 
iirector of the 
d vesterdav 
is “delighted” 
but remained 
he compatibi- 
me with our 
ful preservA- 

f these extra- 

tionists have 
sed concern 
t certain oth - 
e interiors of 
ot being pre- 
ess, the new 
to bring to 
le city’s most 
■at ion battles', 
aid yesterday 
to begin con- 
n as possible, 
cial interests 
cf New York 
been happen 


Water Returns to Trenton , 
But Boiling Recommended 


five floors oyer the original 
buildine 


ned confident! GovernmenL 


scheme. Biifc the new building 
is somewhat narrower, and the 
total flor-area ratio— the ratio 
of floor space to the area of 
the site, an important figure 
for zoning consideration 
mains unchanged. 

The apartments would occupy 
the top 10 floors, and would 
be available on a rental, rather 
than sale, basis. The amount 
of office space, reflecting the 
sharp downturn in the office 
(market, has been reduced to 
nine floors. 

The ViUprd Houses constitute 
one of the first major works 
in New York by McKim, Mead 
& White, the architectural firm 
that was to become the city’s 
major designers of buildings 
in the Renaissance and classical 
styles. 

The Renaissance. U-shaped 
brown stone grouping was com- 
pleted in ISS6, and received 
landmark designation in 1968. 
By coincidence, the buildings 
were placed on the National 
Register of Historic Places on 
Thursday, a move that prohi- 
bits the use of Federal funds 
in any demolition plan without 
the approval of the Federal 


TRENTON, Sept 5 — Water 
began flowing into the city’s 
(trunk lines from its main filtra- 
tion and pumping plant at 2:30 
!p.M. today, signaling the begin- 
ning of the end of the weekloug 
water emergency. 

Mayor Arthur Holland re- 
ceived the mews at the Civil 
Defense headquarters and 
shouted to more than a dozen 
workers standing nearby, “Hur- 
ray, we're pumping out of the 
plant at the rate of 13 million 
gallons!” 

The stream of the water was 
the first that was pumped into 
the system since Sunday, when 
a backup valve was left open, 
allowing water pressure to 
build up in the basement well, 
buckling the floor of the pump 
room and flooding the building. 

Today, water was expected 
to take several hours to travel 
through the hundreds of miles 
of pipes -to all parts of the 
system that serves the city 
and La wreeeencccce , Ewing an 
miltnn townships and officials 
said it would probably be Mon- 
day before near-normal water 
(pressure was restored. 

Bolling Urged 


By JOSEPH F. SVLI4VAN 

Spenitlto The New Tart Tim,-. 



TtoftevYorfcThnu 

he proposed hotel -office building behind 
uses on Madison Avenue. Richard Kottfs 
rigned tower now has 57 stories. 


State officials warned repea- 
tedly today that the water 
would probably be polluted — 
possibly even by sewage miter- 
ing the system because of the 
reduced pressure — and that wa- 
ter for drinking and cooking 
purposes should be boiled for 
at least 10 minutes or cbemical- 
|ly purified. 

David J. Bardin, State Com- 
missioner of Environmental 
Protection, said residents 
would “be risking sickness for 
themselves and their families” 
if they drank any of the water 
without purifying it first 
He said teams from his de 
partment would start, taking 
water samples from various 
points in the system over the 
weekend and tests would be 
run at the State Health Depart- 
ment laboratories. 

Mr. Bardin said tank trucks 
loaded with, potable water 
would continue to be stationed 
around the city, even though 
water should again be flowing 
from faucets. City welfare 
workers also will oontanue to 
carry pure water to invalids 
and shut-ins. 

In addition, Mr. Bapdin an- 
nounced that several schools 
and facilities of the Young 
Men’s Christian Association 
just outside of the water emer- 
gency area have volunteered 
to allow residents to use their 
showers. All of the facilities 
are on routes of the Mercer 
Metro bus system and Eugene 
Howard, a Mercer County Free- 
holder, began giving out infor- 
mation last hight about the 
service and the timetables of 
the bus route. 

Mr. Bardin said there would 
not be enough water in the 
system for bathing until Mon- 
day. but he predicted Chat by 
then near-normal water servi- 
ces would pennit the reopening 


of businesses and industries 
closed by the water emergency. 

However, Mr. Bardin said 
kige water users would have 
to practice “drastic waste con- 
trol” for the foreseeable future. 
The repairs to the water plant 
restored only .50 per cent of 
its pumping capacity and the 
rest of the repairs probably 
wfll not be under-taken for 
several months. 

Emergency Measures 
“We are going to be running. 
| much closer to our remaining 
capacity for some time to 
come," he said. "Residents will 
be asked not to sprinkle their 
lawns and to place a brick or 
plastic bottle filled with water 
in their toilet tankc , to turn off 
showers while soaping up and, 
in general, to reduce water con- 
sumption to the bare bones 
needed for life and health.” 

The water plant has a rated 
pumping capacity of 50 million 
gallons a day and will be pump- 
ing 25 million gallons into the 
system when full operations are 
(resumed over the weekend. 
(Since the daily usage is ap- 
proximately 35 Tin! linn gallons, 
the 10 million gallon difference 
Iwfil have to be made up by new 
: connections with Bordentown, 



Joan Munn of State Department of En viro n m ental Pro- 
tection testing tap water sample in Lawrence Township. 


with the Trenton State College 
well system and with the Eliza- 
bethtown Water Company sys- 
tem in Princeton. 

Because the volume of water] 
will be consumed 
(almost immediately, Mr. Bardin 
said it would takeeeeeetttta 
said it would take “about nine 
weeks” to fill he city’s reser- 
I weeks" to fill the city’s reser- 
voir. 


be pM, 

could have nrevemod th* nmh-iP® fore the voters in November! 


“If we've learned anything, 
it r s that a permanent intercon 


was included in Governor 
Byrne’s $S82-million bond issue 


could have prevented the prob- 
lems we experienced this week 
and eliminated the need for 
the heroic efforts by thousands 
of volunteers who pumped wa- 
ter into the city through fireho- 
ses.” he said. 

_ He, noted that money to plan 
six major interconnections of 
water systems around the state 


if the State Assembly com- 
pleted action Mcnday on enabl- 
ing legislation. 


LOTTERY NUMBERS 
Sept. 5, 1975 
N. J. Daily-^66877 
N. J. Pick-It Lottery — 653 


i The' city will not consent 
to an order by the Federal 
Environmental Protection 
Agency to impose SI round-trip 
oils on the East and Harlem 
River bridges to reduce air pol- 
ution by discouraging traffic, 
(Robert A. Low, the dtyrs Envir- 
onmental Protection Adznihis- 
jtrator. said yesterday. 

.Mr, Low said such tolls were 
unnecessary because the city 
(had already agreed to “eight 
i stratagems” that would accom- 
plish toe air- pollution reduction 
mandated by the Federal agen 
cy. 

Mr. Low said it had been 
(agreed in private consultations 
(and meetings with Federal re- 
presentatives that the idea of 
j tolls on the bridges would be 
dropped. However, the plan 
was resurrected by the Federal 
agency after President Ford 
suggested, that the city could 
raise revenue to help during 
the fiscal crisis by imposing 
tolls on the bridges. 

Copies of the Federal order 
were served Thursday on Mr. 
Low and the State Environmen- 
tal Conservation Commissioner, 
Ogden Reid, who are jointly 
responsible for developing 
Jdean-air plans for the city. 

In addition to the tolls, toe 
order mandated a 32 per cent 
reduction in street parking spa- 
ces in midtown and lower Man- 
hattan. 

Deadline Next Week 
Mr. Low was given until Sept 
12 to consent to the Federal 
order. Refusal to consent would 
(probably mean that both the 
Beams and Carey administra- 
tions. which have opposed the 
tolls, would be subject to a 
Federal court action. 

The deadline for imposing 
tolls .on the four East River 
bridges and the nine Harlem 
River crossings was set at July 
31. 1977. 

Judith Dwoskin. associate di- 
rector of the Scientists Com- 
mittee for Public Information. 

private environmentalist 
group, said it thought that the 
“eight stratagems" agreed to 
by toe city and state were 
“not sufficient to accomplish 
the necessary air- quality 
goals.” 

•Other measures are necessa- 
ry” she said, “primarily the 
redaction of parking-area spa- 
ces.” 

Miss Dwoskin said studies 
indicated that the toHs would 
eliminate about 5 per cent of 
toe vehicular traffic over toe 
bridges. More important, she 
said, is the need to eliminate 
toe unnecessary car trips to 
conserve energy, as well as 
to reduce pollution. 

Mr. Low contended that toll 
booths at the bridges would 
increase the pollution rather 
than decrease it because ve- 
hicles would bav e to slow 
down, wait and then accelerate, 
away from the booths. 

He said the earlier celan-air 


orders issued by the Federal 
Government and agreed to by 
the city, would achieve virtually 
all the air-pollution reduction 

These orders call for regular 
inspection of vehicle exhaust 
systems, installation of exhaust 
filters, setting up express bos 
lanes; and stricter enforcement 
o t parking regulations. 

Politically Sensitive 

Most elected officials consi- 
der the impositi on of tolls on 

toe Harlem and East River 
bridges to be a political hot 
potato. Nevertheless, the City 
Council President, Paul O'D- 
wyer. introduced a bill last 
week in the Council that would 
mandate the tolls. At the time, 
Mr. O’Dwyer had begun an 
effort to save the 35-cent tran- 
sit fare, which was increased 
to 50 cents on Sept. 1. Ho 
said the bridge tolls would raise 
5125-million a year. 

It has been estimated it 
would take about two years 
to implement any legislation 
on Federal order mandating the 

tolls. 

The East River bridges are 
the Brooklyn. Manhattan. Wil- 
liamsburg and Queensboro. The 
Harlem River bridges are too 
Willis Avenue, Third Avenue, 
Madison Avenue, 145th Street, 
Macombs Dam, Washington, 
University Heights and Broad- 
way. 

According to Joan Kain, a 
research assistant at the Munic- 
ipal Reference and Research 
Center, the statutes that au- 
thorized the construction of 
toe Brooklyn and Williamsburg 
Bridges in 1875 and 1895 per- 
mitted the collection of tolls 
on these bridges. 

In 1903 the cky’s Corporation 
Counsel G. L. Rives, ruled that . 
tolls could also be established 
on the Queensboro and Man- 
hattan Bridges. 

What the Tolls Were j 

The only record available for ; 
the types" of tolls paid was i 
for toe Brooklyn Brdige. ' 
Foot passengers" were free, t 
The tolls included the follow- - 

in? 

Railroad fare — 3 cents or 10 - 
tickets for 25 cents or two 
for 5 cents, collected by toe 
elevated railroad company. Pas- 
sengers going beyond the 
bridge terminal in Brooklyn 
paid no bridge fare after paying 
carfare. 

One horse and me man. 3 
cents; one horse and one ve- 1 
hide. 5 cents; two horses and ; 

vehicle, 10 cents; for each horse j 
beyond two to any vehicle. 

3 cents; meat cattle, each, 5 j 
emits; sheep and hogs, each, 1 
2 cents, and electric cars* per ; 
round trip. 5 cents. : 

In 1911 Mayor William J. ■ 
Gaynor suggested that the tolls r 
be abolished. A month later, on . 
July 18. toe Board of Aider- 
men abolished toe tolls except 
“those charged for the passage 
of railway cars. ” 


Jews Observe Start of Rosh ha-Shanah 


By IRVING SPIEGEL 
Rabbis asserted in Roch ha- 
Shanah sermons last night that 
the Unied States must assure 
Israel's territorial and political 
integrity because of Israel’s 
concessions lo achieve a tenta- 
tive peace agreement with 
Egypt. 

Temples and synagogues 
were filled with worshipers ob- 
serving the holiday, which 
marks the Jewish New Year, 
5736. 

The Rev. Dr. Edward E. Klein, ! 


to its pre-1967 borders.” 

Israel, he added, can no lon- 
ger “take risks without face-to- 
face talks with the Arabs, lead- 
ing to a lasting peace with 
secure borders.” 

Speaking before Congregation 
Shearith Israel, Central Park 
West and 70th Street, Rabbi 
Louis C. Gerstein, voiced a 
prayer for a “better climate 
of understanding among the 

noKrvic -fn tha r. pf” 


speaking at the Stephen Wise 
Free Synagogue, 30 West 68th 
Street, said that the establish- 
ment of Israel was an answer 
to the Nazi holocaust He added 
that the Jewish state “has been 
harassed and threatened and 
attacked by Arabs and a dozen 
oil-rich empires.” 

Citing what he termed Israel’s 
'great concessions” to obtain 
a peace agreement. Rabbi Klein 
asked the United States not 
to be influenced by toe Soviet 
Union and the Arab state to 
exert additional pressures on 
Israel to withdraw completely 


as a result of the peace pact 
; between Egypt end Israel. 

In a cable to President 
Ephraim Katzir of Israel, Mrs. 
Faye Schenk, president of the 
American Zionist federation, 
said that Israel had demon- 
strated to the world that it 
wished “to live in good will 
and harmony" with the sur- 
rounding Arab states. 

Joseph Rattier, chairman of 
the American - Israeli Israel 
“will remain a bastion of free- 
dom” in the Middle East 
Other sermons emphasized 
the spiritual significance 
Rosh ha-Shanah. 


Rabbi Menacbem M. Schneer- 
son, spiritual leader of toe .Lu- 
bavitrfi Movement, the world- 
wide body of Hasidic Jews, 
appealed to Jews to intensify 
their studies of the Torah, their; 
observance of all Jewish holi- 
days and festivals and their 
adherence to the mitzvoth, the 
commandments. 

Rabbi Schneerson, speaking j 
at 770 Eastern Parkway, head- 
quarters of the Lubavrtdi 
movement, stressed the need 
for toe observance of toe Jew- 
ish Sabbath and toe lighting 
of the candies that usher in 
the Sabbath. 

Rabbi Dav id Kahane, preach- 
ing at the Sutton Place Syna- 
gogue, the new hou se of wor- 
ship at 225 East 51st Street 
said that Rosh ha-Shanah and 
the Bicentennial year “have a 
common theme of retrospect 
and prospect of reviewing past 
values and setting new goals.” 

Rabbi Kahane said the two 
events called for a “return to 
or) righteousness and a rebirth of 
unwavering freedoms.” 


; D.A. Fears Police ‘Goon Squad’ 


Mr. Kelley, who is 47 years old [Park, 'LL, grew out of a prior 
and an appointee of the County jinvestigation that the Police 

j Department had conducted into' 


’ GUPTE 

. Vcrtr Times 

LX. Sept. 5 — I Legislature, denied that any 
i, the Suffolk j “goon squad” was after homo- 
attorney, said! sexual evidence on Mr. O’Brien, 
ne R. Kelley, ! However, sources in the Police 
lice Commis- 1 Department confirmed that a 
miiticfli rival [special squad had been assigned 
the O’Brien cm. » ^toer 
s homosexual evidence on- five forth- 

coming charges involving al- 
leged sexual abuse. 

Members of this squad, the 
sources reported, had visited 
bars in the Westhampton Beach 
moseviial and i area “d around the State Uni- 
re trumped-up j versify of New York’s Stony 

■aid of a sum- Broc^ campus, where Mr. 

:ause o f this ‘O Bnen frequently plays basket- 
■ power.” [ball. 

i bachelor, the 1 Asked if additional charges 
to be e-!ecled|' volJ ld be filed against Mr. 

* y’ in this rradi- 0’ Bnen Commissioner Kelley 

/ wican court v. replied: “No comment” 

I »;*' ?t Wednesdav He then disclosed that 

- sc and related Wednesday’s charges, in which 

' { *. a per: filed in Mr. O’Brien was accused of 

* re by Commis- aoiioiny involving Roger Barry 

' Republican. Petersen, a 21-year-old unem- 

hcr interview, ployed handyman from Deer 


e lies” in an 
t him. 

:ned for my 
said in a tele- 
dris afternoon. 


reports of a conspiracy to 
blackmail the prosecutor dining 
bis election campaign last year. 

Mr, O’Brien has contended 
that those charges were po- 
litically motivated because his 
office was investigating the 
Commissioner on corruption 
land other charges. 

Commissioner Kelley said 
that police officials had alerted 
Saverio J. Fierro, chief of the 
District Attorney’s rackets 
bureau, about the conspiracy i 
bu£ that Mr. Fierro did sot act! 
on the information. Tonight, 
Mr. Fierro angrily denied that 
he had been told that there! 
(was any such conspiracy. | 
“Commissioner Kelley's a ! 
desperate and 'insane man who! 
should undergo psychiatric [ 
examination," said Mr. Fierro,: 
who is now chief assistant dis- , 
trict attorney. ! 



71» Rm YarK TTrftts 

Cantor Misha Raitrin, left, and Rabbi David B. Kahane with Torahs before ceremonial 
opening and Rosh ha-Shanah service at toe new Sutton Place Synagogue, 225 East 51st 
Street The congregation, which serves the United Nations and surrounding area, had 
been holding services in temporary quarters, including toe Waldorf-Astoria. 


Metropolitan Briefs 


Food Prices Here Rose 3% in July 

Retail food prices in the New York-Northeastern New 
Jersey area rose 3 per cent during July, the Bureau of 
Labor Statistics reported, the largest Increase in toe last 
17 months. Herbert Bienstock, a s sista nt regional director of 
toe United States Department of Labor in charge of the 
bureau, said that the sharp advance largely reflected higher 
prices for meats and for fresh fruits and vegetables. "The 
striking thing is that for three months — May, June and 
July — prices of foodstuffs purchased for home consumption, 
in this area rose at an. accelerating pace,” Mr. Bienstock 
said. 

Eviction of Indians Barred 

State Supreme Court Justice Robert Lynch has rejec- 
ted a plea from ‘property owners to force toe state to evict 
Indians who are occupying state land fei the Adco n d a d a 
near Moss Lake. Hie landowners charged the Indians were 
posing a threat to b»nd around the lake. The Ind i an s said 
the area was rightfully theirs under a treaty signed during 
the Revolutionary War. The judge said it was a Federal 
matter. 

3 Held for Seizing: Woman From Sect 

Eric Schuppin, an Essex Junction, Vt, lawyer, said he 
had ordered three men to kidnap his daughter, Tamara, to 
“rescue" her from the Rev. Sun Myung Moon’s Unification 
Church. The three men were charged with kidnapping, for 
seizing the woman at a Windsor, Conm, shopping center. 
The Unification Church has tangled frequently with people 
hired to seize its members, whose parents believe have 
been brainwashed by the sect 

Court Backs City on Rehiring of 1,500 

A challenge to the city’s right to rehire 1,500 recently 
dismissed employes in jobs formerly held by workers under 
a federally financed manpower program was dismissed in 
Federal District Court by Judge Lloyd F. MacMabon after « 
three-day hearing. He indicated that lawyers for the em- 
ployes hired under the Comprehensive Employment and 
Training Act of 1973 should first press their claim with toe 
Department of Labor. 

Biggest Animal-Import Center in U.S, 

The largest animal import center in toe United States 
has been established at toe Metropolitan Transportation 
Authority’s Stewart Airport in Newburgh. The 55B-naHka 
center, leased by toe Department of Agriculture, will check 
all animats, except dogs and cats, coming into this coun- 
try’. There are smaller such centers at Miami and Honolulu. 

Connecticut Abortion Curb Backed 

Federal officials have backed the policy of Gov. Ella 
T. Grasso of Connecticut of denying abortions to women 
on welfare unless there is a medical need. A regional com- 
missioner of toe Department of Health, Education and Wel- 
fare said toe department "has clearly spelled out the f art 
that elective abortions are up to toe state.” 

End of Crossing Guard Protested 

About 300 angry residents from across toe dty dem- 
onstrated against the elimination of toe school -crossing 
guards in Bayside; Queens. The rally, organized by 
State Senator Frank Padavan, Republican-Conservative of 
Queens, fea tu red Representative Mario B ag gio. Democral- 
Conservafcive of toe Bronx, and local civic leaders. 

Jobless Rate in City Stays at 11.1 % 

The unemployment rate in the New York-Northeastern 
New Jersey metropolitan area remained nrvflumg wd ja July 
at 11.1 per cent, the Bureau of Labor Statistics announced. 
The area had- 762.000 people looking for jobs in July, the 
second consecutive month -in winch the level of unemploy- 
ment exceeded three quarters of a million. 





24 


j&mily/sfyle 


THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1975 


Cooking Schools in the City: It’s a Mouth-Watering Arr 

t- J .. Approach: Emphasis is ( 


'.The American Coo 
- Trince, Apt. 2C, 220 
751-0976. 


Tutor* Pamela 
54th Street, 


l Hates: Year round, two hours In length; 
:by appointment 

* Type: Participation and demonstration. 
E m phasis American cuisine, with proper 

■ techniques extracted from French, Chinese, 
' Mexican and other styles. For beginning to 
'advanced stud ent s. Any number of lessons 
'may be taken, no minimum obligation. 

* Instructor Pamela Prince. 

■* Cost $30 a lesson. If a student wishes to 
: share instruction with friends t maximum of 
four) price is $15 each for student's friends, 
■who charge for owner of kitchen. 

Annemarie’s Cooking School, 164 Lex- 
- ingtrai Avenue, 685-5685. 

Dams: Underway. Ten classes on Tuesdays, 
1 10 AM to 1 PM, Thursdays 6 to 9 PM 
-- Type: Demonstration. 

" Emphasis: European cuisine, equipment 
..and entertaining. 

J - In st r u ctor : Annemarie Hosts. 

. Cost $180. 

JL 

^Arts & Crafts at Riverside, The River- 
»■ side Church, 490 Riverside Drive, 
f 749-8140. 

' Dates: Oct, 2. Medieval English Cookery, 
"seven classes, from 6:30 to 9:30 PAL; Oct 2, 
Canning and Preserving, 14 classes, from 
. 9-30AM to 12:30 PM; also starting Oct 7. 
.from 6 to 9 P.M.; Oct 6, Natural Food Cook- 


tBread Baking n, seven classes, from 7 to 
.10 PM. 

Type: Participation. 

Subject: Emphasis in Medieval English 
'Cookery will be on recipes of the 14th and 
.15th centuries. This historic cuisine calls for 
'■•unusual flavoring combinations and exotic 
/spices. All recipes will be oriented toward 
: ennhling the student to prepare a medieval 
-.feast ac home. In Canning and Preserving, 
'-basic methods and techniques for handlin g 
rand preserving fruits and vegetables will be 
'taught with emphasis on preparation of 
. gourmet products. Natural Food Cookery 

■ course concentrates on preparing dishes of 
< various health foods, using honey as a nutri- 
' tional replacement for sugar herbal teas, 
-'.yogurt making, bean sprouting. In bread- 

baking classes, students will be introduced 
. to basic techniques. 

Instructors: Janet Davies, Jane Markel, 

- Hollie Pappas. Loma Sass. 

![ Cost Medieval English Cookery, $50; Can- 
-.nlng and Preserving, $70; Natural Food 

■■■CoSbeiy. $50: Bread Baking I. $70; Bread 

- Baking il, $50. Registration: $10. 

James A. Beard School of Cooking, 167 
; West 12th Street, 675-4984. 

f Dates: Oct 6 through 10, French CuMne, 
?five classes. 6 to 10: 3 0 PM. Oct 14 through 
.“16. Desserts and Decoration, three classes. 

- 6 to 9-JO PM: Oct 20 to 24, A Tasting of 
-.Great Cooks, rive classes, from 10 AM. to 
- 1 PM. and from 6 to 10 P.M.; with different 

instructors each class. Nov. 5, Carving Dem- 
onstration and Discussion, one class, 6 to 
.8 PM Nov. 6 and 7. Holiday Cookies and 

■ Cakes, 10 AM. to soon and 8 to 8 PM.; 
•Nov. 1C 

* classes. 

’ 14, IiwHan _ 

"P.M. DSC. 1 through 5, A Battery of Cui- 
^ sines, five classes, 6 to 10 PM. Dec. 8 
. through 12, Baking, five classes, 10 AM. to 
> noon and 6 to 8 PM. 

Instructors: Jacques Pepin, Maurice Bonte, 
■‘Leon Uanides, Julie Dannenbaum, Alfredo 
\ Viazri, Madhur Jaffrey, Michael Ba tt e i be rr y, 

• Oreste Carnevali, John Clancy. 

Cost: French Cuisine. A Tasting of Great 


Indian COO 
parti 


‘Cooks, Creative Cooking, Indian 
, A Battery of Cuisines, Baking, e 
• Desserts and Decoration, $200. Holiday 
■ Cookies and Cakes, $65. Carving Demon- 
stration and Discussion, $35. 


Steve Biennan’s Cooking School (East 
Side, location to be detennined), 
249-4594. 

Dates: Oct 6. series of eight three-hour 
classes on Monday or Tuesday evenings. 
Type: Participation and demonstration. 
Emphasis: Making cooking easy and fun 
for both, beginners and expats. Covers bak- 
ing, frying, roasting, simple sauce-making 
and most of the basic cooking processes. 
Also on dishes that can be prepared in 
advance for easy entertaining. 

Instructor Stephen K Bierman. . 

Cost $200, includes meals. ■ 

Helene Borey School of Creative Cook- 
ing, 255 East 7 1st Street, 249-3883. 
Dates: Oct. 15 and 16, six classes: Wednes- 
days at 1130 AM, Thursdays at 630 PM. 
Type: Participation. 

Emphasis: Northern Italian, classical and 
regional French cooking. Students are taught 
bow- to present and decorate both food and 
table. Limit, seven students a class. 
Instructor Helene Borey. 

Cost: $130, includes meals and wines. 

Buffet Party Services, Studio 5A, 361 
East 50th Street, 753-2777. 

Dates: By appointment; two hour classes. 
Emphasis: Food presented with simple ele- 
gance, including courses in hors d'oeuvres 
(hot and cold); food garnishing*, gourmet 
cooking, fruit and vegetable platters, custom 
catering. 

Instructor Elizabeth de Undo. 

Cost $25 per class. 

China Institute In America, 125 East 
65th Street, 744-8181. 

Starting dates: Sept. 25, Chinese Cookery 
and Nutrition, for beginners, nine classes, 
from 11 AM. to 2 P.M - also classes for be- 
ginners on Mondays and Tuesdays from 6 to 
9 PM.: I or intermediates on Wednesdays, 6 
to 9 PM. A gourmet cooking class, seven 
sessions, wi be held on Fridays from 10:30 
AM to 2 PM Each session meets semi- 
monthly. 

Type: Participation and demonstration. 
Approach: Emphasis is on demonstration 
lectures with student participation. Course 
features a Chinese grocery tour, concludes 
with formal banquet. Gourmet classes fea- 
ture Chinese cooking from various regions, 
including Szechuan, Shantung, Soocbow. 
Canton and Hunan. Classes limited to 15 
persons. 

.. Chinese Cookery and Nutri- 

Florence Lin. Dorothy Lee; Avert] Tong, 
Lee, Ben Lin. Gourmet Cooking: Florence 

tin. 

‘ Cost Chinese Cookery end Nutrition: 
teachers, 550; associates. 570; others. $75. 
Gourmet course: Associates, $100; others, 
-SI 10. 

* 

Vfldanw cam’s Chinese Cooking Classes, 

- Apt. 6B, 370 Riverside Drive, 663- 
: 2182. 

- ■ Dates: Starting Sept 17. basic Chin Me 
cooking, seven classes, Wednesday II AM 
'to 2PM, Thursdays 6 to 9 PM. Sept- 24. 
^banquet and gourmet cooking, five lessons, 
Wednesdays 11 AM. to 2 PM. Thursdays. 
6 to 9 PM; classes for this course are small 
jand limited. 

% Type: Participation. 

- Emphasis; Includes guided grocery tour in 
'Chinatown, lunch hi a restaurant, and a 
^planned banquet at end of course. 

r Instructor Grace Cho. 
s Cost Basic Chinese Cooking. $160. in- 
icludes seven meals; Banquet and Gourmet 
•Cooking. $130, includes five meals. 

John Clancy’s School of Cooking and 
fj£kh® 167 West 12th Street, 243- 

■*&30 P-M- 

■. Type: Partlcipatlon- 
; Emphasis: Learning baking techniques. 

Solidly Coot 

■ ■ 3es and Cakes, $60. 


- 


Confronting a list of the cook- 
ing schools in the metropolitan 
area is like facing a mile-long 
smorgasbord. You know you can't 
eat the whole thing. But which 
delicacy to choose? Should it be 
the chance to learn to make Chi- 
nese dumplings— or to prepare a 
medieval feast? Should you be 
concentrating on the alimentary 
rudiments, or on the subtleties of 
food as art? 

The costs of the classes, which 
are proliferating even in this time- 
of tight money, vary widely: It's 
possible to spend a few dollars on 
a single class dealing with a single 
dish, or hundreds of dollars on a 
full-course course. One thing that 
is not obvious from the description 
of classes is the quality of Instruc- 
tion, and inclusion in this list is 
not intended as an endorsement 



YoftTUns/Mhad Ww**- 

Cooking schools vary widely, both in what is taught and in facilities available. Above, 
Helene Borey, facing camera, instructs some pupils in a class in her East Side home. 


Emphasis: French cooking., including tak- 


A La Bonne Cocotte, 23 Eighth Avenue, 
675-7736. 

Data*: Starts Sept 16, four lessons. Tues- 
days at 6 PM Thursdays and Fridays at 
10 AM 

Type: Participation, 
mg. classes 
Cost $30. 

Cooking With Colette, 114 Suflivan 
Street, 431-5344. 

Dates: Starts In November, elgit Satur- 
day? from U 30 AM to 2 PJfc. for children 
ages 8 to 15. 

Type: Participation and demonstration. 
Emphasis: Appetizers, main courses and 
desserts, follo wing the instructor's shows In 
the fall on WNErl 
Instructor: Colette Rossant 
Coat $125, includes meals. 

Cooking With Love, 754 Madison Ave- 
nue (comer 65th Street), 794-9077. 

Dates: Sept 22, Brunches Only, 1030 AM 
to 1 PM: Calorie Conscious. 2 to -430 PM; 
Fabulous vegetarian. 7 to 930 PM Sept .23, 
Basic Baking in morning, French I In after- 
noon, French n in evening. Sept 24, Chinese 
I in morning, Chinese II m afternoon, I t a li a n 
I in evening. Sept 25, Middle Eas ter n Cui- 
sine in morning, Chinese I and Fabulous 
Restaurants m afternoon. Basic Cooking in 
evening- Sept 26, Cook Ahead, Party Later 
in morning. Infinite Variety in afternoon. 
Wine Connoisseur In evening. Sept 27. Basic 
New York Markets 
dts from 1230 to 2 
PM, little Chefs from 230 to 4 PM 
Emphasis: Covers a broad spectrum of 
cooking- Source for utensils, china, cutlery, 
cookbooks, fresh herbs and spices, tea and 
coffee shop. All classes meet once a week 
over five-week span except Little Chef 
fiaMHi which are single drop- In ses sion s. 

Instructors: A staff of 10 professionals. 

Cost little Chefs, $10 a child a session. 
Young Adults; $75. All other courses $95 
except the following, which ore $125 each: 
French IL Chinese IL Cook Ahead, . Party 
Later; Infinite Variety and Wine Connoisseur. 

Culinary Arts Shoppe and 
School, 133 East 65th Street, 

0066. 

Dates: Year-round, Monday through Fri- 
day. MomJng classes, 10 AM to noon,- 
aftemoons, 2 to 4 PM; evenings, 6 to 8 
PM Morning classes schedule: Monday, 
French; Tuesday, International; Wednesday, 
Chinese; Thursday, baking; Friday, basic; 
Saturday, baking. Afternoons: Monday, Chi- 
nese; Tuesday, French; Wednesday, Chinese; 
Thursday, International; Friday, baking; 
Saturday, basic. Evenings: Monday, Chinese; 
Tuesday. French: Wednesday, baking; Thurs- 
day, Italian; Friday, International. 

Type: Demonstration. 

Emphasis: French, Chinese, Italian, bak 
and basic cooking; tested shortcuts, fc 
buying techniques, - basic nutrition. Class 
meets once a week for five weds. Classes 
are tailored to meet requirements of begin- 
ning and intermediate students. 

Instructors: Italian and International Cook- 
ing, Ralph- Annibale. Chinese; Sbni Yim Fa. 
Basic; Baking and International, Lawrence S. 

James 2d. French and B aking , Janeen Sarifa. 
Cosh $75, Includes meals. 

Andrea DodPs Cooking Classes, 333 
East 18th Street, 677-8473. 

Dates: Sept 11, four Thursdays from noon 
to 230 PM 

Type: Participation and demonstration. 

Emphasis: Practicality and short «*nt« to 
classic cooking in Northern Italian and 
French cuisines. 

Instmcton Andrea Dodi- 

Cosfc $60, in c lu des meals and wines. 


Mary McCabe Gandall, 225 West 12th 
Street, 691-6749. 

Dates: Oct 7, five classes, starting at 8 
P.M. each Tuesday, second series starts 
Thursday, Oct 8- 
Type: Participation. 

Emphasis; Designed to provide sound un- 
derstanding of basic techniques for roasting, 
frying, poaching, baking, etc. One session 
will be devoted to stews and pates. Classes 
limited to eight. Private lessons in the morn- 
ing can be arranged. 

Instructor Mary McCabe Gandafl. 

Cost: $125. 

The Gourmet Chinese H l tfkw Caterers 
and. Cooking School, Apt 74, 884 
West End Avenue, 749-0550. 

Dates: Oct 14. six classes, Tuesdays and 
Thursdays 1030 AM to 130 PM; Tuesdays 
and Wednesdays, 730 to 1030 PM 
Type: Participation. 

Emphasis; Different Chinese cooking tech- 


niques, regional cuisines. 
Instruc 


actors: Lilah Kan and Natalie Am- 
brose. 

Cost $120 each class. Indudes full meal 
and wine. 

Gourmet Cooking Courses by Edith 
Themal, 513 East 82d Street, 268- 
7955. 

Dates: Sept 17, five three-hour classes, 
once a week. Wednesday or Thursday eve- 
nings. Friday or Saturday daytimes. 

Type: Participation. 

Emphasis: Hot and cold hors d'oeuvres, 
French and International cooking. A three- 
day seminar is planned In the fall on how 
to prepare a hot-and-cold party buffet 
Instructor: Edith ThemaL 
Cost: $125, includes meals and wine. 


Emphasis: Traditional fine Italian cooking, 
particularly of the north. 

Instructor: Marcella Tfaran- 

Cosfc $200. includes meals, wines and 
espresso. Deposits accepted tor waiting list 
for fall *75 courses; in case of ca n cella t ion, 
those on list get preference. Deposit re- 
funded if no vacancy o c c ur s. Places avail- 
able in sessions starting January 1976 and 
October 1976. 

Jeannette’s Cooking School Apt 54, 

333 Central Park West, 749-8551. 

Dates: Sept 22, six classes, 10 AM to 
1 PM and 6 to 9 PM 

Type: Participation apd demonstration. 

Fm pha<d«t- Gourmet and simple French 
mninTig. Classes limited to five students. 
Basic course will feature making French 
bread, ole crusts, pates, soups and home- 
made 

Instructon Jeannette Seaver. 

Cost: a class. i nr-l ndes meals and wine. 

Kosher-style Home Cooking, Family and 
Buffet Catering, 782-7913. 

Dates: Eight two-boor classes, Wednes- 
days and Thursdays from 730 to 930 PM, 
starting in October. 

Type: Participation and demonstration. 

Emphasis: Stresses over-all aspects of pre- 
paring hot and cold kosher food both tor 
family and tor larger groups. Students re- 
ceive instructions in preparing fancy fruit 
displays and a wide variety of fishes. 

Classes; Wednesday evenings at Forest 
wills Adult Center. 67-01 110th Street, For- 
est Hills, Queens <263-8066); Thursday eve- 
nings at Sheepshead Bay Adult Center, 3000 
Avenus X, Brooklyn (SH 3-5021). 

Ins tructor. Wfflram KrelL 

Cost: Approximately $12, plus food costa. 


A list of cooking schools in Westchester Copnty and 
nearby areas of New Jersey and Connecticut will be 
published next week. 


Bert Greene’s Cooking Classes, 240 
West 12th Street, 243-8882. 

Dates: Starts In October, six evening 

rlamteg. 

Type: Participation and demonstration. 
Emphasis: Advanced cooking, with, stress 
on French Provincial- 
Instructor. Bert Greene, with guest chefs 
helping out. 

Cost $150. 

Helen R. Heller, 41 West 58th Street, 
688-6093. 

Dates: Days and hours offered at mutual 
conveni ence. Each class is 90 minutes. Li m it 
one person, man or woman. 

Type: Participation; demonstration only 
when necessary or requested. _ 
Emphasis: Teaching French cooking meth- 
ods to the expert or the beginner u nder con- 
stant aopervirion. Course is based on the 
individual's needs and desires. 

Instructor. Helen Heller. 

Cost $200, five classes; $50, one class. 

International School- of Cookin& 143 
West 94th Street, 749-5000. 

Dates: Oct 2, six classes, Thursdays, 1030 
AM to 1 PM and 7 to 10 PM 
Type: Participation and. demonstration. 
Emphasis: Professional techniques adapted 
to home kitchens. 

Instructors: Pilar Tuner and AdeUa 
Nathanson, who also teach cooking at the 
New School- 
Cost $150. 

The School of Italian Cooking, 155 East 
76th Street, 861-2825. 

Dates: Starts In October, six classes, Tues- 
days and Thursdays at 1030 AM; Wednes- 


G3da Latzky Cooking School, 42 East 
64th Street, 549-1646. 

Dates: Sept. 23. five classes, Tuesdays and 
Wednesdays 1030 AM to 130 PM and 
730 to 10:30 PM 
Type: Participation. 

Emphasis: French, Chinese, Northern Ital- 
ian cooking and fine baking. 

Instructor Gflda Latzky. 

Cost $105. 


Avenue, 


days at 
Type: 


at 6 PM 


Participation. 


Karen Lee’s Chinese Cool 

Apt. 30L, 142 West 

SU 7-2227. 

Dates: Sept 15, six classes, 
classes meet once a week from 11 AM to 
2:30 PM on a regularly scheduled day 
(Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday or Thurs- 
day). Evening desses meet from 6 to 930 
PM. the same days. 

Type: Participation. 

Emphasis: Beginning, intermediate and 
advanced Chinese cooking. Classes limited 
to eight students. Strong emphasis -On par- 
ticipation. Twenty-two dishes will be learned 
hi each coarse. 

Instructor Karen Lee. 

Cost $125, Includes meals and wine. 

Lee Chinese Cooking Classes, 
Mott Street, MU 9-8723. 

Dates: Starts In September, eight dosses, 
choice of afternoon or evening classes Tues- 
days; Wednesdays or Thursdays (Mondays 
and Fridays also possible, depending on de- 
mand). .i i&ut 

Type: Demonstration. 

Emphasis: Regional Chinese cooking. 
Classes usually limited to 10 persons. 

Instructor Virginia Lee. 

Cost: 3180, includes meals. 


Type Participation. 

^Subject: Emphasis is on simplif ying for- 
sign, cooking into practical ways tor either 
special occasions or normal entertaining 
Courses: Hot and cold hors d’oeuvres: 
fruit and vegetable sculptures; Italian re- 
Potpourri; French I; 
Baste Skills I; Chinese Banquets and Great 
Besteurants and Chefs of New York. 


For Instruction on Long Island 


Mrs. Laden Benedek’s School of Conti- 
nental Cookery, 18 Robbins 
Lake Success $16) 487-3722. 

Dates: Oct. 6, five-class sessions on Mon- 
days, Tuesdays or Wednesdays from 10 AM 
to 1 PM 

Type: Demonstration. 

Emphasis: French, Hungarian, Viennese, 
Italian and Spanish fishes. The instructor 
will also teach courses in the Adult Program 
at Garden City and Rockvffla Centra. 
Instructor: Mrs. Luden Benedak. 

Cost $60, Includes meals. 

Les Chefettes Gourmet Cooking School, 
123 Middle Neck Road, Great Neck, 
L. L (516) 466-4022 or 487-8099. 

Date: Sept. 29, classes on Mondays, Tues- 
days end Wednesdays from 11 AM. to 
1 PM, through December. Classes con- 
tinuous through the year. 

Participation and demonstrati on. 
jhasac Complete menus, hois d'oenvra, 
pastry, special holiday foods for T h anksgiv- 
ing and Christ mas . 

Instructors: Rhoda Sate and Miriam 
Perie. 

Cost Series of four lessons. 870; 
nation series. $35 each; special 
foods, $25 class. 

Classical Chinese Cuisin e , 23 Trent 
Lane, Smith sown, L. L (516) 265-7183. 

Dates: Starts in October, four classes on 
Wednesdays and Fridays, 10 AM- to 2 PM 
Type: participation and demonstration. 
Emphas is: Beginner and advanced courses 
In classical Chinese cuisine. 


Instructor: Jacqueline M. Newman. 

Cost: $50, includes lu n ch e s. 

Cooking Ad v ent ure s, 14 The Oaks, Ros- 
lyn Estates, L. L (516) 484-2533. 

Dates: Starts late September; six sessions; 
Tuesdays and Wednesdays, Chinese Cookery. 
Cooking for Special Occasions and Interna- 
tional Cooking. 10 AM to noon, 1 to 3 PM 
or 8 to 10 PM 

Type: Participation and demonstration. 
TTnmTwsia- Advance preparation, menu 
Panning, ofing seaso n al foods, making enter- 
. raining more interesting; what to serve at a 
barbecue, cocktail party. Small groups can 
be taught in their h om es. Advance prepara- 
tion is emphasized. 

Instructor Nona Dreyer. 

Cost $60. . 

The Creative Kitchen, Bay Crest, Hunt- 
ington Bay, L L (516) 367-3009. 

Dates: Oct. 7, six classes, Tuesdays and 
Thursdays, 11 AM to 1 PM 
Type: Participation and rfpiHfl ndnififln. 
Emphasis: Chinese and party cooking and 
International Tn#rmii. 

Instructor: Joan Bloom. 

Cost: $55, including food. 

The Delights of Chinese Cooking with 
Eleanor Tessler, 85 Arleigb Road, 
Great Neck, L. L (516) 487-8124. 

Dates: Oct 7, five classes; beginners, 
TuedHys, 11 AM to 2 PM Advanced course 
starts Oct, 9, same time. 

Type Participation and demonstration. 
Emphasis: Learning classic recipes from 
the major provinces and the basic techniques 


in Chinan cooking, 
chide shopping tour in 
Instructor. Eleanor Ttosler. 
Cost: $75, includes lunch. 


classes in- 


'1 

and 


29 


Gour-Mei Chinese Cooking School, 
Pine Drive, Woodbury, L. L 29 S 
Lane, Laurel Hollow, l. L (516) 6i 
6591 and (516) 692-9550. 

Dates: Starts Oct 1; classes on alternate 
Mondays and Wednesdays, 1030 AM to 
2 PM. 

Type: Participation and demonstration. 

R basis: On beginning. Intermediate r ro- 
und advanced gourmet cooking, 
trip for shopping and a gourmet 
lunch induced. 

Instructors: Mind Schoen and .Glory 
Kleiner . 

Cost $43, four desses. 

Ellen Greene’s Continental Cooking 

Classes, 15 Tain Drive, Great Neck 
L. L (516) 466-2759. 

Dates Oct 9, five classes, Tuesdays and 
Thursdays, 10 AM to 1 PM 
Type: Demonstration. 

Emphasis: Continental cooking; a complete 
meal is prepared in each session. 

Instructor: Ellen Greene. 

Cost $70, includes lunch. 

Florence Hyde Gourmet Cooking School, 
1 Whitney Gate, Smith town, (516) 
584-7077. 

Dates: Starts Sept 15, six morning or 
evening desses. 

Type: Participation and demonstration^ 


Emphasis: Classic French culaine 
patissiere. 

_ Inst ru ct or : Florence Hyde. 

demonstration classes, $60; parti d- 

Llbby Hillman’s Cooking School, 17 
Lawrence Street, New Hyde Park. 
L. L (516) 437-6155. * 

Sb ^ ts Jfii sessions, con- 
seortive weeks 10 AM to 1 P.M., Monday 
terou^Ttosdmw. Informal, limited to eight 
to 12 students. Though May 1976. ^ 

Type: Demonstration; some participation 
Emphasis Continental cooking and halting 
Cmrkailum uj flexible. StudratsTmay request 
certain redpes or techniques. 

Instructor. Libby Hillman, 

Cost $80. 

Herricks Adult Education Program, 
Shelter Rock Road, New Hyde Park. 
L. L (516) PI 1-7800. ** 

Dates: Starts Sept 23. Co-Ed Workshop 
$30 fp3F G0 “ naet3 ‘ TQesda T 3 . 7?30tO 


Emphasis: A full menu, prepared by 
eatea by the students. v 

Instructor: Beverly Fetner. 

Cost: $20, ]das food costs. 

Rt ^ yn J ^ as ^ rst ™ m 197 Blackheath 
Road Lido Beach L. I. (516) 432-88 fid 
Dates: Starts Sept. 30; five dassesTW 
days from 10 AM. to noon and 1 to 3 PM. 
Type: Demonstration. 

Emphasis: International food, low rhniM. 
terol and low calorie foods/^ W choles- 

Iwtructar. Roslyn Wasserstroffi. 

Coat: $40. 


Mar-Grets Cooking School, 106 8 2d Ave- 
_ nue, Kew Gardens, Queens, 544-9207. 
Dates; Sept. 9, five classes one a week, 
each about 3)4 hours, taught in two day 
courses and one evening course. 

Type; Participation and demonstration. 
Emph asis: French, German, Viennese and 
Dutch cooking; preparing casseroles, party 
dishes that can be prepared a day ahead; 
desserts and pastries. Each session will 
cover a full-course meal. Also available, a 
special baking course. 

Instructor: Mary Simons; 

Cost: $100, includes meals. 

Aim Mariottfs Cooking School, 70-37 
Ingram Street, Forest Hills, Queens, 
263-2992. 

Dates: Starts in October, tour classes, 
Mondays and Wednesdays from 1 to 3 PM, 
Tuesdays and Thursdays from 7 to 930 PM 

Type: Participation and demonstration. 
Fm phasig Italian, Greek and French cook- 
ing and a new course. Epicurean Vegetarian 
Dining, which includes vegetable dishes from 
European peasant recipes; eggs, cheese and 
fi*h fishes. Limit six students a class. You 
base your own breads and cook with no 
additives. 

Instructor: Ann Mariotti. 

Cost $55, includes m e als. 

Hie Mariqne School of French Cooking, 
170 East 83d Street, 879-4229. 

Dates: Starts Sept 9, NouveDe Cuisine, 
six Classes, Tuesdays at 230 PM, Wednes- 
days and Thursdays at 7 PM Starts Sept 
16, Classic French, same times. Each class 
lasts about three hours and the two courses 
will alternate each week over a 12-week 
period. 

Type: Demonstration, some participation. 
Fmnfingig- Nouvelle fni-ring How to pre- 
pare tasty dinners quickly, using fresh in- 
gredients, lowering richness of fishes; also 
how to organize weekly marketing and plan 
menus. Classic French: Menus to be pte- 
ahead of time, advance preparation 
iques. 

.In struc t o r: Isabella Marique. 

Cost $125, includes meals and wine. An 
introductory trial class, $22; also individual 
classes, same price. 

Mexican Cooking Classes, 230 Riverside 
Drive, 222-1938. 

Dates: Starts in September, hours and 
dates not yet decided. 

Type: Demonstration. 

Emphasis: Cooking basic and regional 
Mexican food. 

Instru c tor . Diana Kennedy. 

Cost $20 per class. 

Moare-Betty School of Cooking, The 
Cgrrigg House, 162 East 92d Street, 

Dates Oct. 7, eight classe s, 6 PM, Tues- 
days. Starting Oct 8, eight lessons, 10 AM, 
Wednesdays. 

Type Participation and demonstration. 
Emphasis: International cuisine, menu 
plannin g s tressing dishes that may be pre- 

instructor: M a uri ce Moore-Betty. 

Cost $225. 

Anna Mnffoletto’s Cordon Blea of New 
York LtiL, 332 East 84th Streep 
628-0264. 


egn cooking Into practical 
special occasions or 2“ 

Curriculum 19 s tructured , 

for maximum progress 

Classes, restricted » ID 

so the determined a m attor t 
aspiring professional , chef. .- • 
Costr $90 to $500, depend^ 
Instructors: Anna Muffotottt ■ f 
ghi. Lynne Kasper and Lfiah .14* 
The New School of Fren • 
Riverside Drive at 91st 
8807. 

Deter Sept 24 and Oct 
6:30 PM. Wednesdays. 

Type: Participation- 
Em phasis Basic and 
cooking methods. French 

wffl be given in the fiaU, 
desses is January. Limit 
class. 

Instructor: Nan Mahon. 

Cost 590. including dinner 

New School for Social I 
West 12th Street, 741,-56 
Dates: Sept. 22. seven d 
will be taught in mo min, 
classes at different locations 
diction of the school. The 
teg of Great Cooks, Tech 
Battery of Cuisines, Classic I 
sine, France. Italy and Spain; 
What's Cookin'? and- Wine. ■ 
Type: PartldpaUon. 

Emphasis: Tastings, baking, 
and classic cuisine, wine, brt 
nutrition. _ _ 

Instructors: Julie Dannenh 
Jaffrey. Alfredo Vbzzi, Ba 
Jacques Pepin, John Clancy. J . 
berry, Adele Nathanson. PQtr ' 
Kutner, Lvnne Skreczko and £ - 
Costs: From $95 to $250; t 
the course; includes meals, war fc 

New York Institute of D 
West 14th Street, 675-66 
Dates: Storting first week 1 
in February. Catering. 12 let 
or Tuesday afternoons, 1-30 tt 

6 to 9 PM Baking, IS daw 
Tuesday evenings, 6 to 9 PJ 
12 lessons. Wednesdays 130 
or 6 to 9 P.M. 

■ Type: Participation and den 
Emphasis: Elementary and a 
ing. pastry and cafio baking ar 
decorating. 

Instructors: Catering, Jea 
Baking. Stanley Rosen. Dec 
Schneider. 

Cost: Elementary catering. $ 
$240. Baking, $345. Decora tin 

Penny Gourmet Cooking Sc 
84th Street, 688-2238. 

Dates: Oct. 15, four classes 

7 to 930 PM 

Type: Participation and dec 
Emphasis: Basic cooking. 
Instructor. Lewis D. Davis. 

Cost: $75, includes dinner 

St. Peter’s Lutheran Cht 
Cooking Classes, 16 East 
753-4669. 

Dates: Sept. 17. six Wedr 
classes for beginners, 6:30 i 
Wednesday evenings for int 
dents starting Sept. 24. 

Type: Participation and dan 
Emphasis: Chinese cooking 
Intermediate and advanced. C 
held in kitchen on sixth fk 
Presbyterian Church, 64th SI 
Avenue. Discussions will Inc 
nese dishes can be incorporat 
can menus. A tour of grot 
Chinatown is included. 

Instructor Margaret Spader 
Cost: $46. 

Registration: Deadline Is S 
Edward L. SchoenfekTs C 
ing Classes, 250 West 
666-4422. 

Dates: Starts around OcL 
td according to student’s 
,pe: Participation. 

Emphasis: On Szechuan/Hi 
darin cooking: cutting and 1 
For groups of five or less, 1 
kitchen of one of the student 
Instructor Edward Schoenf 
Cost $125 (variable) each f 
three-hour lessons (with fi 
class). Classes for smaller gr 
expensive. Classes may be cc 
stuctoris own kitchen on n 
lessons available at $10 per 2 
minimum) plus expenses, an; 
or suburbs. 

Scoola Italians Di Cutina, : 
ica-ltajy Society, in ki 
James Episcopal Church, 
Avenue. 838-1560. 

Dates: OcL 23, six classi 
noon to 130. PM. and 5:30 ti 
Type Participation and den 
Emphasis: Northern Italian 
plete menus. Limit. 12 studen- 
Instructors: Andrea Dodi. 1 
allL 

Cost: $120, includes meals a 
tor society members. 

The Seasonal Kitchen, 1! 
Street, 289-0556. 

Dates: Sept 15, five classes, 
Wed ne s d ays at noon. Mondays 
at night 

T>pe Participation and dm 
Emphasis: Classic French am 
cuisine, peasant cooking of E 
will feature dishes from the 
rents of Europe where the ins 
each year. 

histructor Peria Meyers. 

Cosh $150. 

The Anne Sekelv Cooking 
East 79th Street, 744-05C 
. Da tes: Oct. 7, morning and c 
m French gourmet and Internal 
2* Todays; breadbaking o 
Other baking classes on Frida] 
Troe: Participation In eoa 
participation and demonstrate 
classes. 

Emp ha si s: Gourmet cooktas 
rekes, pastries and' bread bakin 
rtndents per class. Instructors ■ 
fiict market tours. 

H hurtroctor3: Anna Szekely 

Cost $220 for gourmet con 
oaking course. 

Soho Cooking dosses. Loft 3 
ter Street (SOD) 631-S680 
-Pates: N°v. 10. Monday ter 
“ to 9 P.M. Limit 12 students 
Type Participation. 

Emphasis: International menu 
Fe hpe Rojas-Loml 
Cost $250, 5 classes Include 
wme. 

The Helen Worth Cooking ! 
East 31st Street, LE 2218: 

Dates: Starts in September, ft 
ner or experienced cook. Pri 
taught Monday through Friday. 
Tour-Lunch sessions for men 0 
through Friday, noon to U30 P. 
Type: Participation and demO: 
Emphasis: Help In tills, bel 
New York's oldest private coo 
“for the beginner who'd like tt 
art of cooking, and for the expe 
who wants to enlarge her repeno 
of food presentations, wine t 
instruction In purchasing equips) 
mg. Group classes for men reatiu 
specialties. 

Instructor Helen Worth. 

Cost: $100 per hour, plus# 
tor each additional student: Inc 
and wine. Men’s course, $35 a 
nation fee (applied to course), 
fundable. All lessons by reserp h 
Sherri Zi iron's School of Gin * 
Cooking, 75 East End' A y- 
09587^ — 

__ Dates: Oct 7. six dassas, . 
Wednesdays and Thursdays. 10 AJ 
Type: Participation and demon 
Emphasis: Basie, intennefiai 
danced French cuisine, covering- 
toques and preparation of a JW 
foods (predominantly Frendt 
ethnic foods are included). StH 
select menu. Enough food h J> 
each student takes home food fta 
two. Limit, tour students a class. 
Instructor: Sherri Zitron. 

Cost $150. 




■** 


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a J e n n 



§ he Arias Is Bride 
. t rlos Brillenibourg 


THE NEW YORK TIMES , SATURDAY,. SEPTEMBER 6, 1975 


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The Mew York Timas 


' ‘<ndo Brillembourg and his bride, 
• '■' ibe Arias, married here yesterday. 


daughter of gent of guests from Caracas, 
Arias, the # Venezuela, including the 
- m diplomat, bridegroom's parents, Arturo 
e yesterday j Brillembourg Bravo and 

• • 3s Fernando ciara Tamayo de Briliem- 
‘‘ Venezuelan bourg, -who lived in Cedar- 

;v Kenneth hurst, L. L, for 15 years 
-■* “* when Mr. Brillembourg was 

ian Catholic m'th the’’ Inter-American 
omas More, company and 'the Meadow 
- vi J*™* Brook National Bank. He is 
ide s father now involved with insurance, 
ther. Dame banking and sugar interests 
who came , n Caracas, 
t r ^' Martha Thompson was 

raaid of honor for the bride, 
“rube Sous who wore a dress of white 
*®T ?*, batiste and cotton lace, 
modeled after a Panamanian 
<££ costume and designed for her 
in by Giorgio di Sant’Angelo. 

Elizabeth Brillembourg, sis- 
Panamaruan ^ ^ the bridegroom, was 

. ‘ _ . the bridesmaid. 

lehem °Pa Arturo E. Brillembourg and 

i n’ Gustavo Brillembourg, broth- 

jddine here ers of the bridegroom. were 
ided by 350 ^ )est man aai - h® ad ^sber. 
members of The bride, a graduate of 
the com- the Holton Anns School and 
jch Dame Briarcliff College, has been 

• - associated, with the Mobil Oil Corpora- 
•-'a reception tion’s public relations depart- 

Line excur- ment here. She is a grand- 
daughter of the late Harmo- 
different in dio Arias, who served as ■ 
d the bride. President of Panama, 
envisioned Mr. Brillembourg gradu- 
i gathering a ted from the Canterbiay 
SO to 100 School and Fordham TJniver- 
eption was sity and received a master’s 
ill Barton’s degree in architecture last 
-gh’s Upper December from Columbia 
a use, where University. He . and his bride 
ame Margot will live in Caracas, where 
they are in he is with an architectural 
firm and is on the faculty of 
a contin- of Simdn Bolivar University. 


Thomas Graham , 
Wendy Vilas Wed 

' Ann Wendell Vilas, daugfa- 
1 ter of Mrs. William Howard 
Vilas of Greens Farms, 

. Conn., and the late Mr. Vilas, 
was married yesterday after- 
noon to Thomas Graham, 
who served with the Peace 
Corps in Lucknow, India. 
The Rev. Robert W. nhoff 
performed the ceremony in 
Trinity Episcopal Church on 
Broadway at Wall: Street. . - 

The bride, known as 
Wendy, is with Stuart Broth- , 
ers, investment bankers 
here. She is a graduate of 
the Walnut Hill School in 
Natick, Mass., and Garland 
Junior College Her father 
headed the motion picture 
and television departments 
at J. M. Mathes, a New York 
advertising agency. 

The bridegroom, son of the 

late Thomas Graham of Phil- 
adelphia and the late Mrs. 

. Frank A. Keen of West 
Chester, pa., is a graduate of 
■ the Baverford (Pa.) School 
and Georgetown University. 
He received a master’s de- 
gree in business administra- 
tion from Columbia Universi- 
ty, where he is a candidate 
for a master’s degree in in- 
ternational affairs. 

Suzanne Groome 
Bride of T. S. Stier 

Suzanne Starkey Groome, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
William R. Groome of Syos- 
set; L. L, and Sarasota, Fla., 
was married last evening to 
Timothy Stephen Stier, son 
of Mrs. Albert Henry Stier of 
Columbia and Charleston, 

S. C.. and the late Mr. Stier. 
The ceremony was performed 
by the Rev, Malcom Bertram 
in the Community Church of 
Syosset, which is affiliated 
with the United Church of 
Christ. 

ibe bride! is a cum lands 
graduate of the University of 
New Hampshire. Her father ; 
is a vice president of Fuller 
& Smith & Ross, an advertis- 
ing agency here. Her great- j 
great-grandfather, W. T. Gal- 
liher, was national chairman 
of the Republican party in 
the Administration of Presi- 
dent William H. Taft. 

' Ibe bridegroom, an alum- , 


Notes on People 

Burger Dedicates Law School 


The American judicial sys- 
tem could learn from the 
British about legal ethics, 
self-discipline and the de-~ 
comm that keeps a trial from 
turning into “something re- 
semblaig a bar-room brawl." 
Chief . Justice Warren E. 
‘Burger said yesterday in 
Provo, Utah. 

Speaking* at the dedication 
of Brigham Young Univer- 
sity’s new law school, .the 
Chief Justice called on : Amer- 
ican judges and law-school 
faculties to support efforts to 
regulate and discipline law- 
yers guilty of unprofessional 


On Wednesday to halt de- 
terioration of her sight by 
glaucoma. Maria Olsufieva, 
a family friend who is the 
Italian translator of Mr. Sak- 
harov’s works, said, “Things 
couldn't be better.” But in 
Moscow, Mr. Sakharov told 
Western journalists that an 
anonymous telephone caller 
bad told him Min. Sakharov's 
condition had “seriously 
worsened” because of a heart 
complication. He attributed 
the call to “organs of state 
security" and said it was 
“just a continuation of the 


yera gouty or unprofessional threats. that have been made 
co n duct- The “reguIation and against ns in the past year.” 
discipline” of Britain's law-. # 

yers/bomes not from the Mamie Eisenhower, aged 78 
“^1°^ SUP™! and. pheued wift m 


or judges,” Chief Justice 
Burger said, but from “self- 
imposed standards estab- 
- llshed and enforced by the 
legal profession itself.” 

His audience included 
Spencer W. Kim ball, presi- 
dent of the Church of Jesus 
Christ' of Latter-Day Saints; 
both of Utah’s Senators, nine 
Federal judges and 20 state 
judges from Mountain States. 
Honorary degrees were con- 
ferred on Chief Justice Bur- 
ger and Associate Justice 
. Lewis F. Powell Jr. • 

Senator Philip A_ - Hart, 
the Michigan Democrat who 
has announced he will not 
seek re-election, has been 
admitted to Bethesda Naval 
Hospital for tests “to find 
the primary source” of a 
small cancerous growth found 
on his arm, his office said 
yesterday. 

• 

In Siena, Italy, doctors for 
Yelena Sakharov, wife of An- 
drei Sakharov, the dissident 
Soviet physicist said they had 
encountered "no excessive 
difficulties" in the “risky” 
eye surgery she underwent 


earlier this year, has accepted 
an invitation to christen the 
nuclear aircraft carrier named 
for her husband, the late 
President Dwight D. Eisen- 
hower, Oct. 11 at Newport 
News. Va. Vice President 
Rockefeller is to be the prin- 
cipal speaker. 

' • 

Clad in scarlet-velvet cap 
and gown, Cohn G. Campbell, 
president of Wesleyan Uni- 
versity at Middletown. Conn., 
was delivering the traditional 
opening-convocation speech 
Thursday night on such sober 
topics as the school’s omin- 
ous financial condition. Sud- 
denly, two cream pies splat- 
tered a chair just to his left 
The 39-year-old Mr. Campbell 
managed a laugh and con- 
tinued speaking, to applause 
from the equally startled 
audience. The pie-throwers, 
who had approached virtually 
unseen from a side aisle, dis- 
appeared out a side door. Mr. 
Campbell’s only public com- 
ment on the incident was 
‘Tm glad I didn’t get hit” 

It sounded richly Shakes- 
pearean in its potential for 


public and private confu- 
sions, Illyrian or otherwise, 
but it hapepned yesterday in 
Detroit Wearing identical 
wedding gowns. Italia Or- 
lando and her identical-twin 
sister, Sicilia, married Rosario 
Badalamenti and his identi- 
cal-twin brother. Salvatore. 
Ail are 19 years old. After 
a joint honeymoon in Europe, 
the two couples will live 
together in a house being 
vacated by the husband’s 
parents. 

• 

Hawaii’s Gov. George Ari- 
yoshi, the nation’s first Japa- 
nese- Am eri can Governor, is 
in Tokyo, where he will be 
received by Emperor Hirohito 
and Premier Takeo Miki. ibe 
Governor, his wife, Jean, and 

S r, Lynn, will visit the 

ces of his parents in 

The president of Mozam- 
bique, Sam ora Machel, is to 
many his minister of educa- 
tion and culture, Graca Sim- i 
bine, tomorrow in Lourenco 
Marques, capital of the for- 
mer Portuguese colony. The i 
first wife of the 42-year-old 
head of the black-nationalist 
Mozambique Liberation Front 
died several years ago while 
they were in exile. The bride- 
to-be is about 25 years old. 

• 

- The Oglala Sioux language 
rolled out over the United 
States Senate yesterday as 
Chief Frank Fools Crow, holy 
man of his tribe and guest 
chaplain for the day, deliv- 
ered a prayer for peace and 
understanding. His appear- 
ance was arranged by Sen- 
ator James Abourezk, Demo- 
crat of South Dakota and the 
prayer was translated by 
Virgil Kills Straight, an Og- 
lala Sioux. 

LAURIE JOHNSTON 


A Westchester Consumer Bill Is Vetoed 


a contin- 


7. Dryfoos Is Married Dynamics in New York, is a 

- graduate of the University of 

louglas H. Mazonowicz 

- Knmnr ie nnKlicliar -twYnr Tin* Tarrytown. - 


s Dryfoos, 
ian S. Heis- 
Orvil E. Dry- 
sd last eve- 
s Howcroft 
ector of the 
stone Paint- 
k. Justice of 
■n J. Murphy 
:eremony in 
it the home 
mother and 
ew Heiskell, 
ie board of 

-hose father 
rf The New 
im 1961 to 
-granddaugh- 
t Adolph S. 
er from 1896 
randdaughter 
vrthur Hays 
i publisher 
1961. Her 
Ochs Sulz- 


or the Republican party in sp^cui to nw Nr® Ycrt Time* government as anyone else." Genera! in a Suffolk County 

the Administration of Presi- WHITE PLAINS Sent l The present head of.the office case said that the sealer — who 

dent William H. Taft. Alfred B DelBelln the Wpct is K® 00 ®* is under the supervision of the 

The bridegroom, an alum- “ e According to Mr. DelBelk), State Commissioner of Agricul- 

nus of the University of cpcsier county Executive, bill he vetoed would have ture and Markets — may not be 
South Carolina, is associated signed a consumer-protection set up a policy board to super- placed under county control 

with the Stier Supply and De- code into law today, but vetoed vise the Sealer — a board con- without state legislative action, 

velopment Comppy, the fam- a bill giving enforcement pow- sisting of the County Executive, The Westchester Board of 
ilys home-furnishings and ers to ^ g ea j er 0 f* Weights c hairman I* 1 ® County Legislators has 30 days to de- 
home-improvement firm in . M „ ai _ e ^ Board of Legislators and a third cide whether or not to try 

Columbia. . ^ paraon. to override the County Execu- 

Ibe two bills were approved The establishment oF this tive’s veto. Mr. DelBello said 
Wnntiala 4, A }*f’ 3?. by ^ , C .° 1 unt y Board board would violate the separa- that he did not know how 

iNupuais in acarsaaie . of Legislators, which is mostly tion of power between the exe- the board would react to his 
For Marti vn TC "Lewi^ Republican. Mr. DelBello, a De- cutive and legislative branches, veto or to his new bill, but 
y mocrat, said today that in for- said Mr. DelBeUow, and might that he planned to meet in 

Marilyn E. Lewis, daugh- £ flula j? n £ P ew bill _ the be illegal, since a recent opi- caucus on Monday with the 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Paton Legislative Committee nion by the State Attorney board’s Democratic minority. 

Lewis of Scarsdale, N. Y.. ignored a compromise calling ~~ = 

ST " HOUSE VOTES TO END f tt “^ tbin . 90 

sandro, son of Mr. and Mrs. “e County Executive's office. rjuUTfrFNrV Ml 10 Q 9 fore the first anniversary of the 
Armando D’Alessandro of Accenting to Mr. DelBello, CmEnuil/il. I Ur Woo day they were declared. 

Yonkers. The Rev. Paul Beam the enforment bill usurps the One of the other emergen- 

performed the ceremray in V* i^nuiWity fSi WASHINGTON, Sept 4 (UPR des a dedaration by p^. 

the Scarsdale Community scures roe responsibility lor — The national emergency de- . . Tr ,, ma _ __ tw 1fi 1Qsn 
Baptist Church. . j consumer protection. ’and con clarcd ■ ig33 b p^dent ? D . t Truman 16 ’ 1950 ’ 

■ The bride, who attoided gms "mternal contradictions, _ y j . declaring a national emergency 

Trinity College in Hartford b atant drafting errors and gar- u -/^ osevei . t Decauac ; because of the Korean war. 
and the Katharine Gibbs bled provisions.” of the Great Depression wouJd two' were by President Nixon— 

Scho<^ in Boston, is an execu- Responsibility Issue end m 1977 as “ e result of 0Q Marc b 23, 1970, during a 

pS" Mr. DelBello said these defi- “ tion Thursday by the sM(e Au& I5i i 97I- 

H^fati^r ^ retired pres?- ciendes could only be corrected House. because of an international! 

dent of Boucherd-ewis Preci- mcb e ^f n °? S balance of payments crisis. 

Models. Inc. 15 P re P ann S Md ^ present dared years ago-long-forgot- 

The bridegroom, a ^aH ac- ThTiew'biirSd^t ten bUt UchnicaJy “ effect Woman Is Stockbroker \ 

S^Sc's iTNew^riE; 6 ^ U P a ’®“«im®r affairs office ™ JACKS0N - Miss - (AP)-Lynn 

of the University of a director “responsible P 355 ^ 388 to 5 - by the house, giggs, an employe of a major 

Miami. IBs father is vice prest- the County Executive and Tlw> "J" 1 . 10 stock brokerage firm, has be- 

dent of County Asphalt, Inc., f°M? D?mSlo h ^d d he would tesi^l^t^ 11 a s ™^ ar come Mississippi’s first femae 
in Tarryto wn. no t oddosc the involvement of The bill also would provide stockbroker. Miss Biggs joined 

| the office of the Sealer of for an automatic end of fu- the firm as a secretarial worker 

fhe Owner of Guns Seized Weights and Measures, a Civil ture declarations of emergen- in 1969 soon after graduating 


Trinity College in minora 
and the Katharine Gibbs bled provisions. 
School in Boston, is an execu- Responsibi 

ave wastry with Moly- ^ DelBeUo , 
corp, Inc., m wlute ; Plains. Hencies could on 
Her father is retired presi- ?v a m wb 1L w 
dent of Boucher-Lewis Preci- ™ I * J 

sion Models, Inc. . .. +n CSS 


berger, is publisher now. The w not oppose the involvement of The bUl also would provide 

bride’s grandmother Iphigene p the office of the Sealer of for an automatic end of fu- the firm as a secretarial worker 

Ochs Sulzberger retired in Tkg Owner Of GuilS Seized Weights and Measures, a Civil ture declarations of emergen- in 1969 soon after graduating 
1973 from the board of direc- ..«-»* wrn Call Thom Service appointee, if he was des unless the President takes from Vanderbilt University in 

tors of Hie Times, of which In 19 /t Will oeii mem responsible to county specific action to have them Nashville, Tenn. 


the bride’s mother is a mem- _ „ . . 

ber. MARIETTA, Ga., Sept 4 (AP) 

The bride is a graduate of — Mitchell L. WerBell 3d of 
the Nightingale - Bamford Marietta has agreed to quit the 
School here and Lake Erie arms trade, which in the past 
College:. Her husband is a has frequently involved him m 
graduate of the College df" international intrigue. 

Art in Swindon, Wiltshire, in a deal worked out : yester- 
En gland, where his parents, day before a Federal judge, Mr. 


MARIETTA, Ga, 


DID YOU SEE THE GUNS OP AUTUMN?. 


the late Mr. and Mrs. James 
Mazonowicz, lived. He has 
been married twice previous- 
ly and divorced. 

The bridegroom is the 
author of “Voices From the 
Stone Age," published re- 
cently by the Thomas Y. 
Crowell Company. His ren- 


WerBell agreed that he would 
stop manufacturing and selling 
guns if the Government al- 
lowed him to sell $325,000 
worth of arms seized by Fed- 
eral agents last December. 

The guns, called “the largest 
collection of private guns in the 
world" by Mr. WerBell and 


derings by silk-screen process Federal attorneys, include 2,000 
are on tour in the United machine guns and silencers. 



States with the Smithsonian 
Inti tution as sponsor. 


Mr. WerBell said his com- 
pany, Defense Systems Interna- 
tional, Inc., would continue “to 
do what we have always done 


- , 

P--." 

■ '*N **, 


■Jd Weds Janet F. Burlingame \ ~ sarve ^ counliy -' 


h Burlingame, 
Lr. and Mrs. 
urlingame of 
was married 
rames Michael 
Irs. J. William 
nville. Conn., 
Mr. Tanski. 
/as performed 
liam Donovan 
More Roman 
i in Darien, 
vho plans to 
en name^for- 
assistant buy- 
& Straus in 
father is a 


vice president and group ex- 
ecutive of Ihe International 
and Canadian Group of the 
General Electric Company in 
Fairfield. Mr. Tanski’s father 
was a cost analyst with Gen- 
eral Electric in Plainville. 

Hie bride, graduate of 
Newton College of the Sacred 
Heart, is a thud-year student 
at the University of Connect- 
icut School of Law in West 
Hartford, as is her husband. 
Mr. Tanski, who served as a 
captain in the Army in Viet- 
nam, graduated from the 
United States Military Acad- 
emy at West Point 


School for 2 t*6 yoarohto 

now accepting enrollments 

-KssamsessA 

Bureau ot Child Health ot.N. Y. City. 

- Certified Jttfl. 

< ojrtdoeMictivItle* In Central Park. 

- - Attar SchooT Program 
tor3-l0y«aro!da. 

■ -sswasssswui-F 

wider bhIn 4 a** gutdanea. 
eonorbroehm* 

JVIRONMENTS 421 -3282 

J MEN 861-2338 

9th ST- N.Y.C. Stale Lai. Phectcir. . 



swasw LEAWTM0UT seen 

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If you did f you want to do something. If you didn’t, ask someone who saw 
this incredible expos* of the “sport” of hunting. 

The Fun for Animals is the largest and strongest anti-hunting organization 
in the world. 

The Fund has one purpose — to eliminate cruelty whenever, however, 
wherever it occurs^ ^ 



In the heart of Ike Theater District 


Cleveland Amory, President . 

THE FUND FOR ANIMALS, 1*0 Weal 5Tth SL, New York, New York 10019, 
Here Is my check for S — 


Address 

City State Zip : 

•as bcm U om Ux daducdblc. K your shack b Iw *12 or men r$u ne*h* • tree eepr el Mr. Amonfr bM^Mtag book 
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0 26 ' 


THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 6, 1975 




Ford Safe as Guard Siezes a Gun That Woman Pointed at Him on West 1 




Assassination Attempt 
; Laid to Manson Backer 


’Continued From Page 1, CoL 8 about four individuals ’beycmd 


and, as Mr. Ford passed by 


the spot when the scuffling 


shaking hands of spectators,!. 


Service 


- 7 JmJwTT a 8«its surrounded the Presi- 

j»Hited it toward the ftesuicnt Lg nt _ she ^ ^ ^ Fard - S 


Ron Nessen. the White House f -n™d completely 

press secretary, said that Mr. ™ . „ v 3 

Buendorf, had given the follow- .. _ _ ^ a 

ing account of the attempted Feet Away 

attac fc Mr. Nessen quoted the agent. 

Walking beside Mr. Ford, Mr. Mr- Buendorf. as having said 
‘Buendorf saw the woman’s [ ^ ^ I r eside ?;. wa l^° ut 
■ land being raised between two f r0 ” ^ 

spectators 6 and aimed at the i^en Mr. Buendorf salted the 

: president He grabbed tbe|’ 4 tf^ er Sand g 1 ?’ a a - 
; weapon with one hand and Biel **’ Mr. Buendorf 



lOWHING HSSDGDU Mrs. Ford: ‘ Something You Liv, 


IS EASY ON COAST 


i u junui. WJL1 vviwi WASHINGTON, Sept. 5(UPIV . . ■ , ,_.,i £*r,,f 0r 

I I— -it's something you just have jtions restirred Congressional smd Stmtor 

...-to live with." Betty Ford said j debate about gun control. ; Gov 
Stores Can Sell Them to AH (today after learning of the as-: Representative Robert E. Bau -^i a b ama w jf 
DufThnea u M r<nur+ Isassination attempt on the man. Republican of Man-land..* _ 

But Those Curbed by Court j n Sacramento, Calif- Isaid. today’s incident did 

J J Tm very grateful to theichange his opposition to fiun,. Q £ vrceid 

rv i irw cnotnunr Secret Service and the great | Ctratro |. ‘There is not necessar-- lv - 

_ By LACEY FOSBUKGH j 0 ^ do.” she said m com-juy a correlation between gunz, nl „ 

SM * w «**i***v«re*-« merits relayed to reporters by (control and the actions of Fana-;^’ ^ 

SAN FRANCISCO. Sept 5— sheila Rabb Weidenfeld, Ger ties such as in this incident," “ "J* 

California law. Eke that of most ip ress secretary. (said. 

[sutes. cams virtually no re-. Mrs. Weidenfeld said that; B t ■ itia , reaction 'wSnaSsaidf 

isrnelions whatsnpv<»r nn the 1 n;r.v.,^ri ifaicM- of the *“*■ 1 ► MMT, 


Echoes from earlier assasina- the President 





£ 





>'V.*.^f~ ,.y. ^:' : 'A-£[;y r :%*•>>. &£? 




woman’s am. with the other.ii "! ? Of. 


: h«r7nd "8ht hand, sustaining a cut 

forcing the arm behind her and hjs thum ] 3 info, 

■ XfSSu?,? Weap ° n “ “* “ m>gTto ISriteSvSi “ 

Mrluendorf turned the al- s £ ™ t « 1 
, fi,. sician, Dr. william rL LPXasn. 

: J5l SS ^?rr?shp wi According to the White 
™ r ' j ® hv House spokesman, Mr. Buendorf 

. S3S “e^ef ?bo b i — Ss 

dldDt E ° taw.been -on the firing ham- 

; ^3£F3B ^aar.: 

«*# ripheral figure in the socaUed 

handcuffed the w^on family’— where she 

Add “ Fromms Tte of- ^ tatwn „ S queaky-Mr. 

ficer ? re a Nessen saaid that she was not 

nearby tree, where she kept re- , jsted in ^ fjJes kept by 

: , ...M-w. corvani Secret Service of individuals 

••He is not a publw servant who migh| . ^ a security 

He is not a public servant. threat to the President 

A Code Warning Mr. Manson and three of Ms 

As Mr. Buendorf subdued the women followers were con- 
woman, another Secret Service victed in Los Angeles on Jan. 

. agent shouted, “Get down. 25, 1571, on 27 counts of first- 
Let’s go.” degree murder and conspiracy 

■ The phrase was later said to murder for a series of kill- 
tn be a Secret Service code in gs . These included the slaugh- 
meaning that a serious problem ter of five persons, among them 
had arisen and the President Miss Tate, the actress who was 
should be moved away quickly, eight and one-half months preg- 
Two of the agents with Mr. nsr , tt , n an expensive home in 
Ford grabbed his suitcoat, the hills above Hollywood in 
forced him to bend double— 1969. Two other persons were 
evidently to reduce the pos- i^ued in a separate incident. 4 
Ability of becoming a target— Manson Follower j 


**- +ts> V ’ -> •' 


' /* ^a;***/ ■ 

- • -- ■ •; '-/-Vfg ■ 


[states, carri« virtually no re-: Mrs. Weidenfeld said that; B t ■ itia , faction was Smwd. ^ 2 

istnctions whatsoever on the 'Richard Keiser, head of the! Jf uch for gun control. -W. 

ownership of nfles or to*xrhivt 'Representative John M. Murphv. w 

B 0115 - detail, had telephoned Mrs. Ford ; ngmocrat of Staten Island, said dmwed t ' 

Only collected felons, narco- to teU her of the incident. Mrs. -5£Jhaps the opponents of gun SossibSitvof^- ■ r — ^ 
tic addicts and people judged. Weidenfeld said that Mr-Keger cinSrt^gislation will soon be- S^Snst apub>^. 

by the courts as dangerous -had told Mrs. Ford *what hap tired of losftifi their na- ‘The Presk - A 

for mental reasons are prohibit- pened" and she was tion’jt most cherished leaders to' i; n official, af. 

edfrom owning such weapons . Saful" her Jmsbnndwas safe 
The average citizen, without .The secretary said Mrsu Ford “ * p«rkrfell»r Sn-rdSr . 

a iicenee or a permit can waikjdid not speak to her husband V»ce Pnaident Pockef can c do 

into any weapons store and (immediately after the incident. Jf it t 2S C t-.E! l |f wni ne &»S2 S&Jt ’ 

purctase a rifle, a pistoL or Mrs. Weidenfeld said she did That’s *e nsk vou ttte ifvmi Sewnr Stim . 

a semiautomatic weapon. Cer-lnot know how Mrs. Ford felt go mto public life. Mr Rocke puhlKanof^o^ ? ^ 
tain forms of firearms however, about the President’s travel feUer was / 4 ; 

such as machine guns and (pace or whether she thought security guard was increased frw socieQr 4-^ ^ .■ ' 

sawed-off stfiotguns, are prohi-jthat he should cut down the heavily. . . v--n»n«» SlSiSflJS C ' f -Ji 

bited. trips for security reasons. - Other men who might become; people to pass ; i j ■ 

, t. P'S?. _ - i .-G i iu. eaifl thpi' sorrViHe .. 




Uader current law people / "She was Just gratified the (President Slid they 

ying firearms from a regis- secret Service was there,” die lit happened but were glad Ger-!ma> have to- 

■ ^ i * j _ _ i . . I** IJ tii 4 ^ earo . DPUnrirM JA 


buving firearms from a regis- Secret Service was there,” she it happenea but were gtaa uer-imay nave ro 
tered dealer are required to! said. aid Ford was safe. . ,pearances to 

fill out a registration form that ! Meanwhile, the incident "I am shocked by the inci-. closure^ Gc 


five-day waiting period while : Republican leader. 


their identification is checked) Rhodes, of Arizona^ said after) "This is a terribly disturbing! in our couptrT 


se saia Ronaia Keagail. me lurinei w«u nreuiw^ r , 
J I California Republican Governor, (used for surv^v 
sri “This is a terribly disturbing! in our countr 
(thing and I ju st thank God that .the President* ^; 

t-w c 3 r hat 


UttUad Press InferaUtonal 


Lynette Alice Fromme in custody in Sacramento, Calif. 


against Department of Justice hearing about it. (thing and I just thank Goa tnai.me rresiaenc 

records in Washington, P r ~ ' — ~ 

to determine if they are ineli- 1 . . - — — 

‘^Sg'r ffii niMta! Suspect Was a Defender of Mans 

form or going through the iden-i A ' 

tification check is obviously) 

unnecessary when the weapons | Cont inued From Page 1, Col. 6 m '-: r --&£SM f 

purchase is private. { — - 

The only real restriction on I trial, Mr .Nixon, in a casual 
guns in California law, or in reference to the case during a 
most other states, concerns; news. conference, said that Mr. 

how and where the gun isi Manson was guilty. 

carried. Miss Fromme was quoted in ■ tyjl* . : : 

It is specifically illegal herejthe interview as having said: / ■■ ^W- 

to conceal a gun on one’s bodyj'Tf Nixon’s reality wearing a . , ^jgrej E Jv. 

or in one’s car without having new Ford face continues to \ jflv .*• S 

a permit from the local sheriff run the country against the '• W ;,>l 




or the police department to (law, our homes wDl be bloodier 
do so. than the Tate-LaBianca houses 


and agents swiftly surrounded Manson Follower contact* with the public and dictive attitude toward con- In recent years, according and My Lai pat together.” 

the President as soon as they The police said that Mss ^ ^ victed offenders.” But he said to Bion Gregory, chief counsel Leno and Rosemary La- 

heard the code phrase. Fromme was one of three for- ..j thankful to the Secret it was appropriate to take ® Senate Judiciary Com-! Bianca, a Los Angeles couple. 

The agents quickly escorted mer followers of Mr. Manson „ . f rf ■ <. ine rh fob ” into account that "the vast raittee m Sacramento and an were slam m their home on 
„ T +um ™i.m rhiroA o Qarrampntn re«i- service ror aomg a supero joo, inzo account mat tne vase m raeo th* niaht aft»r 


Mr Ford past therest of the who shared a Sacramento resi- n “J expert on state gun laws, these Aug. 10, 1969. the night after 

crowd and into the Capitol deace. , ^ ? nt orI “ I Jhat[niajonty of vtcons (rf violent ^ getting har der and'M.S Tate and four of her 

huiidine about 100 yards away. iMiss Fromme was one of four they had done it I thought Tdicnme in this country are the; bar ^ er togeL I triends were killed in Miss 

uuu “ rn .1 : 1.1 I, . 1 .. mnn,hnM trim U.tr n.f MM nnrk fko .oof nfinnnr if-ho nlrl diha voru irnuncv I T— .tU., U.:. V.. 





One reporter following the-Manson clan members who better get on with the rest of poor, the old, the very young, | In addition, other state legis- STate’s Hollywood home by 
President asked Mr. Ford if (were sentenced to 90 days in the day's schedule.” the disadvantaged minorities, -lati on, Mr. Gregory explained (members of the Manson gang, 

he was all right Grim-faced, j jail ir. April, 1971, for attempt- Aft#r conferring privately the people who crowd our today, makes it illegal to cany . obsession With Race War 


state officials and then gavelfittte more "than seven >' ears fj^JnStutiSS SaSSee'rf Mr ‘ ^ 0rd to Washing- jf ornia gu„ laws are average. broukht" oS^deteils 

his prepared speech on crime after Robert F. Kennedy was “ ton late tonight I New York and Massachusetts J£“ J ««, v-anri-SrSoc 

to a joint session of the State shot and killed as he moved jjgjf* gJSJS'lSjnlS n - -hTiT I" 8 * f ? r ^ first place " in , hav ‘ communaU^ of^he NtS 

Senate and State Assembly. In through a kitehen of a Los mter South Africa Tells Lisbon | ing the most restrictive laws, gg™ ! “ d Mr mS 


oencue aiiu oww *» uiruugii «. wi*™ « » na f; nna i harmonV ouuiu muua i &iig >-iowwii 

Su«SSr»"»!S n"o cetb^ed ..25SL-. m . °f Troop Move Into Angola r«trictive .?!. & 

. Address on Crime „*r.JS». Z»~B* “e" se^R^^ufh^S ^ “ 

The President told the legis- g was convicted™^ Desert.” he said. **One man or| today published the text of a m S?yJ,iacf^ytirae with no .The scenario of Mr. Mason’s 

lative audience that crime had ™ K enned£^ J d just ^ she sent to Portupti EpwSoa of ^ny kind re- ^ef concluded with Macks 

become “a threat so dangerous i m “ h CO nristently dead from a switchblade admitting that her troops had wmnmg the war then finding 

and so stubborn” that it could ££ spectator at pci£|2ftf “ frotn a nuclear m,5Slle crossed into Angola, where ^ New York st&te Su]IjvBn themselves incapable of nmnmg 

be contained only by a con- j. ^ a schedule ofi^ ^?* . rival nationalist movements are ] a w makes it almost impossible “td- turning to Jnm, a 

ceded effort of covern meats at .1 iL . l L.. ,- n | He said he had no "patent fiahtine. !r«^ ,var,™ ojktst, Ki,«l w hite man, for national leader- 


he said. 


I - 

r 


SfW aw? fiSff'Hfti* travel that has accented in 5L5E* : “JSS ^“2?: 


all levels. He called for 


abandonment of partisanship S^aTT^o^and^re °and|“ clear, y’ f iin ? ns ? f doIlars Published here on the troop “ '^15' forixds 'ownership of ®e™bere of his “fam- *-yneie .Mice nonme being taken to a cell li 

on a scale comparable to clos- in the 52* ^o* s P ent ^ M t j2P of ST 11 ' movements. anvHnd of a V *“5?^ Mr. Manson in December, 1970, when she and others we 

ing ranks in wartime against ^ g schedu]ed to return ” ent n ,? a d S n ! . 5 0U ? 1 newspapers permit issued by the police de- t0 ffve a drugged hamburger to 

an external enemy” to meet the J Caiifomia hTtwo weeks on! ^ nse had been baired wider the partment. New York City, ac- ^ d VbLSe?wd Slit tiS Charles M. Manson murder tr 

problem. _ f JLT riav n anc j m crime. . Defense Act from publishing ^rriino to the rifle association, wou fS Diara “ 400 inac 

Returning to the hotel across J t 0 ^ y P° He urged adoption at state any reports about the troop hasoniy 550 such permits in w ^tf Jl tri J* er J> If e race , . j 

from the Capitol, Mr. Ford told 031 *"**■ f levels — and by Congress as movements. effect to people who are not - WhlJe “? defense jailed no to have spirited the witness,; four others we 

reporters that he was ‘Very em- President Thankful a stimulant to the states — of in a statement tonight policemen or private security vntnesses in the tnal. Miss Barbara Hoyt, off to Honolulu] the murder of 
phatically” grateful to the Se- The President will also go to Administration proposals to set through the South African partis. - Fromme was one of several «id to have fed her a haniburger,ren Willett, wh 

cret Service and other law en- New Hampshire next Thursday mandatory prison tenns for press Association. Deputy For- Last April. Massachusetts P? rsons , ?* s 5“ l ?® 111 Mr. laced with the hallucinogenic (slam because si 

forcement officials who were to campaign in behalf of Louis those who are convicted of eign Minister Brand Fourie said passed the so-called Bartley- ^ a { lson 3 behalf during a pre- drag LSD to keep her off the: tell the author 

on hand when the apparent c. Wyman, the Republican can- dangerous weapons to that the Government had in- Fox Act that requires manda- W1 ij ess st ® nd ; !nc u S ? f ^ he « 1 

attempt on his life had been didat 5 ^ a re-run of —the in- commit crime or who are re- formed Portugal that South toiy imprisonment of one year testified of hw devobon The followng Ortober. Miss; 26. He had alley 
made. conclusive Senate election in peat offenders. African troops went to protect in jail for anyone who possesses “ ms Fromrae and four other ’family” [filler 'because. 

■ “I also wish to express to the the state last November. Next The legislators applauded, a water-pumping station at »nv handgun without having co mm une, expiamed how she members were charged with tell the autho 


l tee poo oi stemming me nse had been barred under the Partment. New York City, ac- OCTS , “ ^ UU F ™ u “ ac ^ 
| in crime.’ . Defense Act from publishing t0 the rifle assoc^tion.^S^^^^i^l^ 11 * 


Lynete Alice Fromme being taken to a cell ii 
in December, 1970, when she and others we 
conspiring to give a drugged hamburger to 
the Charles M. Manson murder tr 


He urged adoption at state any reports about the troop has only 550 such permits in W( ^ , .. tri . 


' the race war. 

defense called no to have spirited the witness. (four others we 


TP- levels — and by Congress as movements. Lff-ct to neonle who are not WfuJe defense called no to have spirited the witness. (four others \v< 

President Thankful a stimulant to the states — of in a statement tonight 'nolicemen or^ private security witnesses in the trial. Miss Barbara Hoyt off to i Honolulu | the murder of 
.pnM Win .bo «> to Administration proposals to set through the South African Fromme was one _ of several iwd to have fed her a hamburger jren Willett, w 


4 


* “ — me suite taw. ivuvcuiuci. ns.u . , “ . __ • • , . - •» *>~“^>***e ant jwuugkui niu*u ut k.j • r .j- , , __j ■ J. . , ... p — , . . 

people of California my grati- Friday and Saturday. Mr. Ford paruoilariy when Mr. Ford said Calueque, on the Angolan side gone through a double licensing ^oupand in- aiding and abetting the escape series of rqbbei 

tude for the very, very warm tour Missouri and Texas. that . 11 ' wz ? ^ me to place as Lf the border with South-West procedure. This procedure ia- f n ° therManson /9 11 1 °'? rer who powers wrth v 

-.1 .1 n >• 1 ■*“* - . . . miTr.li amnhucic nn th« nohtol rr_- t-'-L r. ,t . *_■ I r . J _ ._! ” I During thft tnal. Eho Was nn» hail Knon ru»* nr, M,l f Qr rob- Wife had been 1 


welcome they’ve given me,” he He said following the inci- Q i u ? h emphasis on the rights Africa 
said. *'l would not. under any de nt here that he still believed the admhli 

circumstances, feel that one in- j t y^s essential to maintain n8 ,'Ji s of accused vlolato rs- __ 


Africa which 
administers. 


te Sudes acquiitog £ &SS v*- % , tri ^ she w “ l( one K *** P« on trial ft 

Imit, and then receding a Mas- ?L a ! >ei ^ r . 1 in . a pl °? 1 




that al- 


charge 


dividual in any way repre- 
sented the attitude on the part 
of the people of California.” 

The President said that “this 
Incident under no circum- 
stances will prevent me or pre- 
clude me from contacting the 
American people, as I travel 
from one state to another and 
One community to another. 

“In my judgment, it’s vitally! 
important for the President to! 
see the American people,” he 
went on. “and I’m going to con- 
tinue to have that personal con- 
tact and relationship with the 
American people.” 

Ford Leaves Hotel 

Mr. Ford had emerged from 
the old hotel to applause from 
a crowd of several hundred 
persons and crossed the street 
to the Capitol grounds this 
morning when the gun incident 
took place. 

After he had walked briskly 
about 50 yards from the hotel, 
shaking hands hurriedly with 
people lining a crowd control 
rope along a curving walkway. 
Mr. Buendorf suddenly leaped 
toward the crowd. 

Linda Marlow, a secretary 
for the State Assembly, told 


Isachusetts state identification JJ 110 camped outside thejlegedly involved an airliner hi-iFromme was la 


Agent, in Ford Attack 
Is an Ex-Navy Flier 


| “Government should deal i< e Q nu ; 0 + TiaiL-p Pocumo card that authorizes the he ar er courthouse, narranguing pas- Jacking to win Mr. Manson’s'&ne of being a 
equally with all citizens” ho U.S.-Soviet Talks Resume party:ipants in the|releas^ This charge was later! ramder. and it v 

said “but if it must tilt a little MOSCOW, Sept 5 (Reuters) tnal. ■ dropped for lack of proof. lack of evident 



said “but if it must tilt a little MOSCOW, Sept 5 (Reuters) trial. di 

to protect any element more The United States and the Sacraments Off List Several months after Mr. 

than any other surely it should Soviet Union resumed talks Manson and his co-defendants = 

be those who cannot afford to here today aimed at tighten- WASHINGTON, sept, o (AP> were convicted, the trial judge, 
be robbed of a day’s food ing up last year’s treaty ban- — A Ford Administration drive Stephen Strothers, sentenced 
money, those who lack the ning large-scale underground on the use of illegal hand guns Miss Fromme and three others 
strength to resist, those who nuclear testing. The two sides directed at 11 cities does not to 90 days in jail after they m 
even fear the consequences of are seeking agreement on how include Sacramento, Calif., pleaded no contest to a charge t 
complaining.” to distinguish between tests where a woman was charged of conspiring to dissuade a wit- 

Tbe President emphasized for peaceful purposes and those today with attempting to mur- ness from testifying at the trial. 

1 that he was “not urging a vin- with military alms. der the President She and the others were said 


dropped for lack of proof. 


In 1972, Miss Fromme and 1973. 


H to 


-*■ **■ 
■ f < 



Woman Not Listed by Secret Service as a Threat 


United PfWS InhroatlBUil 

Larry M. Buendorf on duty 
after disarming woman. 


Continued From Pane l Col 7 out a Secret Service ad- intently, keeping note of facial .45 -caliber semi-automatic pis- 

i^jnan ea rrom wy • vance party well before the expressions, moves toward the tol that was manufactured Tor 

all «ruritv nrecantmn? President’s arrival. President and hand motions, the United States Army in 1914. 

despite ail security precautions. ^ aervice seeks the help of When the President moveTThe bureau did not release the 
According to press reports, ^ police and the Federal among a crowd shaking serial number. 

Miss Fromme was charged with Bureau of investigation in mak- hands, as he was doing today 

attempted murder in 1972 but ing the check. In some cases, when Miss Fromme pointed the precautions for ancfcrfpliw 
the charge was reduced and the former officials said, sus- gun at him. it is considered s* w , ( , T h.ita.»- kT , 
then dropped. Recently she had pected threats to the President an especially danger-fraught _ 

publicly made statem4ts criti- are put under surveillmice or, situation by the Secret _ Service. ffvt 

K . . -- - . it non nrrasion even, detained. pf 0 Orders to President l- ^ y precauuons Ior Vlce 


cal of Mr. Ftwd. 


upon occasion, even detained. 
Since the killing of President 


President Rockefeller were con- 


How to get 

Tlie New York Tin 

by mail 

Just mail this coupon with your 


.■w; 


A former Secret Service agent OT novT 22. 1963, the Secret Service also uses siderably tightened here today 
rid that the computer list was nrotection given the President sophisticated tedinology in- after he received word of the 


SpcdU to The Xrr Tort Tlmeo 

WASHINGTON, Sept l 


reporters that she had observed Larry M. Buendorf. the Secret i threats against the 

aiiamwf n gj jjj j ■■ . iPrMidpntfi. Tp^tifflonu 


said that the computer list was proteetton given the President wter ne receiveu worn Of the f 

composed chiefly of the names K bSi Rubied Ld redon- Msaaamation attempt on Mr. 

;!of Jenrons who had madelbfcd. budget of the agency. •j’JSSS, ^ r | 

t I threats against the lives of ; which was_ about ^million at different Presidents present 


wwraiftww Mail Subscription Dept 
Times Square, New York, NIY. 10036 


.*•*>*• \ 


in^K^SSS Service officials last M^rch dis-|sixties f is about $_98-rmUion in Sec ret1£nr&> L^iS whti Sfff ^ new /.^ ^ge Hos- . 


long red dress and with long the woman allegedly trying ^rvice officials last March dis- Ae Secret Service agents, who Di£aI and famn v3w« 

red hair tied behind her head *r> choot President Ford to- closed that 47,000 names were the current fiscal year. The r 3n j^ake suggestions to the medicine j 

—asking a Sacramento police- day, is a former Navy flier op list, including political number of President but cannot give him attended a I 

man if Mr. Ford would pass who joined the Secret Service dissidents who may have made more tiian tnpled and now Qrd ^ Foni, who enjoys ffiSS&Ss I 
by the spot about 10 minutes in 1970. a &**** a ^ ns J.'? e President stands at about 1,300. mingling with crowds and shak- nevre (SStence 

before the President did so. Mr. Buendorf. who is 37 aildsor f who had not. Some of Om added strength ing hands, presumably is a 2* iZrSJS? 

The ooliceman save a non- years old. was bom in Wells, Miss Fromme s name appears is used for additional duties more difficult President to pro- jzF} r 872 t0 1 

Sordina to Mankato on toe records of the FWeral mven to the service, such_as tact than, say, Richard P M. I 


Please mail The New York Times to my address 
checked: □ 1 mo. □ 2 mos. O 3 mos. □ 6 ma 
$13 - 60 5 23 - 95 $34.20 ?6Z70 
□ Weekdays 6.85 12.05 17.10 31.35 

Q Sundays 6.90 12.00 17.15 31.40 


"4 **. 
nwa 

; -%r. : 

- v ^ 


before the President did so. Mr. Buendorf. who is 37 
The policeman gave a non- years old, was bom in Wells, 




Miss Fromme’s name appears! 


(Please print) 


State Co lleze in nearby Man- Bureau of Investigation in con- the protection of all bona fide Nixon, who was fairly aloot zL . m 133 °- 1 

kato about 80 miles south- nection with criminal charges Presidential candidates. ?ut a (from crowds on most occasions. „ .® n . « e spoke at Highland { 

wtfnf Minnaanolis He was previously raised against her. substantial portion of the in- Vincent Bugliosi, who wrote Hos P lta i m the morning, the 

«Sfuated with a Bachelor The former agent said that crement is used to protect the (the book “HeHer Skelter” about stage was flanked by two Se- J 

of Science degree having since toe service had publicly President and his family. the Manson grotg). told The aet Service agents. | 


behind several secretaries. west of Minneapolis. He was pre« 
One of them, Irene Morrison, graduated with a Bachelor 
said that Mr. Ford had just 0 f Science degree, having since 
shaken her hand and walked majored in business admin- acsn 
oast toe group when the Presi- istration, in 1959. He was on 
SS suddenly lurched away, the college football team ^ 
Zs Marlow" dropped » Se He served ^ a Naiy flier Dig. 


Address 


State & Zip 


ground, [^Hthe^Naval^vStigative jcuss security measures taken j death of President Kennedy. Nixon. 

SiSmJow Sen^. He joined toe secret (to protect the President. But Thee agents are toe conserva- The Alcohol 
aid Miss mariow aei» w* J the former fluent and another tivelv dressed, huskv. senous- Rnnon nf th. 


Mr. Warner 


the gua- She said 


the President is considerably dangerous and had previously of the stage. There were many I Tenei«»*4i^TT — 

declined to dis- larger than it was before the made threats against President! more local policemen on the[ * «« cnee* or money order for $ 


SysJKjSS s&,, 0 »i L® 5 ^SteS«i 2 fS 3 SiSSS 5 !- 


* • •'.* 

*i \ir 7 jp 


toe wayan's puree- SSSSmSSSu Divi- the list , who were in 

■ Don Cannon, a Ootf spec- ra wen to ^ vnsrted by tfae 

thT^. Forf ^d go^i 1972. vvere supposed to be 


orcemeni racea young men one in vena my merit has been assigned to trace Poucemen were stationed 
lames on sees in photographs of the the weapon with which Miss waist-deep in weeds a couple 
an area President making a public ap- Fromme allegedly threatened of hundred yards from the hos- * 
President pearance. the President. It was described! pifal while Mr. Rockefeller was 

checked The agents watch the crowd as a standard 1911 Model Colt (speaking. 

:a 


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' 1 1 On 


V- f *■ 


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1975 


£■?/.' ■. .■ . 


3 si-_ - , 


ite Profile 

perweld Is Fighting Back 
i 


2 &Ur fck SittteS businbss/financb *>'■ 

COURT APPROVES Retailers Drop Major Appliances CONSUMER DEBT 

mrnmu^^^ ■uaneMsci fumunju 


: i* iz m .i 


)£*m#**0*& 

m L-****r+~ , *;y ■ 



Northwest Energy Proceeds 
With $25 a Share Tender 
for Oil Unit's Shares ! 


Korvetie and Gertz 
Set ‘ Phasing Out ' 
as Profits Dip 


s 


spcet VV. 






‘“i. V/*.. a . 
V_ • i - 



- By ISADORE BARMASH 

for Oil Unit S Shares The Korvette stores and 

Gertz Long Island, two of the 

New York area's largest retail- 
An order permitting the ers, are currently phasing out 
Northwest Energy Company to their "white goods” major ap- 
proceed with a revised cash pliance business after a long 
tender offer of $25 a shar p for period of lagging profits in that 
common stock of hte APCO 03 type of merchandise. 
Corporation was issued by the "White goods" appliances 
United States Ms- are such items as refrigerators, 
tnct Court for the freezers, washers and dryers. 

Merger District of Dela- "Brown goods” appliances are 
News ware*, yesterday in television sets, radios, phono- 
Wihniflgton, it was graphs and tape recorders, all 
_ ancoraiced by John 0 f which both Korvette and 

G McMiUrn chairman and ^ continue to sell. 

dnef executive of Northwest Trade reports of the chains’ 
EnjfSy- _ ■ decision were confirmed yester- 

Competing cash offers by bis day by spokesmen for the corn- 
company and the Alaska Inter- panies. Ironically, the moves to 
state Company. Houston. Tex. discontinue the merchandise 
for APCO stock had been pre- come at a time when major ap- 
Imnnanty enjoined, pending re- piiance business is apparently 
visions in the outstanding offers beginning to come alive after 
required by the Court. more than a year of lagging 

According to Mr. McMfllian, sales 
Northwest has made the neces- Earlier this week. Sears Roe- 
saiy c h a n ges and a, revised buck & Co., the country's larg- 
am ended offer to purchase 1-5 est retail chain, reported a 6 
million sh^es of APCO .com- per cent rise in its August sales 
m on for $25 a share -mil be over the year-ago month, its 
distributed to APCO stock- bluest monthly gain this year, 
holders soon. and said that one reason was 

The offer will expire not less the fact that appliances sales 
than 13 days after distribution, were beginning to pick up. 

He said that his company will c . . „ 

not purchase any APCO shares Significant Move 

prior to the expiration date and According to Korvette and*~ 


m mSSmm* 

HF' 


mr: 




I " ; :.r 

»**•*•*»■ u 'St* 




Th* Now Yurie Times 

This was a scene in the major appliance section at Kor- 
vette’s on 34th Street on Thursday. Korvette and Gertz 
are currently phasing out their appliance operations. 


tendered Gertz, 


decision 


increase of 1.02-Billion Was 
the Biggest Monthly Rise 
Since October -of 1974 

GAIN HELD A GOOD SIGN 

Auto Loans Outstanding Up 
by $383-Million — Personal 
Lending Also Advances 


WASHINGTON, Sept. 5 (UPO 
— A vigorous stimulus from 
auto from auto and personal 
loans raised new consumer 
debt by $1.02-billion in July for 
the biggest monthly gain in 11 
months, the Federal Reserve 
Board reported today. 

A willingness to take on. 
added debts is considered in 
good sign for the economy, im\ 
dicating consumers are con- 
fident of having jobs and being 
able to meet their obligations. 

The sudden rise in auto loans 
followed almost continual de- 
clines since last October, the 
[Fed said. Auto loans outstand- 
ing grew by 3S3-miIlion- Per- 
jsonal loans rose $3S9-million. 

I Total credit outstanding on 
•July 31 was estimated at 
SlST^-billion. the Fed said. 


h e££ JUS? * •"SHE? * 52“ ^.beeauseiDes^; ihe°bi’g increase in July,’ 






• .dv-'7- 


__ r-- - - - 
■ 

,?ijQ jut • . , 

. •4ki4 > • 


7-*" 

* > *••*: • 

^ if • »-,« 

►*>**, • ••• 

-• - 

W .• 

t*.’ . 

. s r- 

ivv-.- 

'.'V . > -V 

Ate •• • 

wr-*»r* v — ■ 

.*si • * 



what the 


nd aluminum 


und out. 


the company 
target of a 
pt by Societe 
is. controlled 
French Roth- 
iirough their 
holding com- 
iie du Nord. 
•argest produ- 
i Europe and 
ablish a foot- 
Inited States. 
ie willing to 
sent of $1 IS- 
lion for Cop- 
n stock and 
entures and 
uses) to gain 
rweld. 

esistance 
nee immedia- 
1 , a company 
et income of 
the first six 
on revenues 
~an, declared 
ght the take- 
<1 that it had 
3 of its em- 
mayors and 
ies and states 
5 plants and 
a might have 

, Copperweld 
dnst Imetal, 
ions of Fed- 
and antitrust 


3 mos. ended Juno 30 1 975 1974a 

Revenues .$76,400,000..- $83,000,000 

Net Income 3,800,000 '.3,700.000 

Earnings per share 1.47 «... 1.41 

12 mos. ended Dec. 31 1974a 1973 

Revenues..- ...» .$321,900,000.. $223,100,000 

Net income. - 1 2,700,000 9,200,000 

Earnings per share..- -6.42.- 4.83 

a - Restated to reflect change to l IF O. 


Assets, Dec. 31 , 1974^_ 

$158^17,000 

Stock price, Sept. 5, 1975 (N.Y.S.E.) close: 

40 

Stock price, 1975 range: 

...42V»-19l/« 

Employes, Dec. 31, 1975; 

- — 4,654 


less than aU the shares ten- Degan snowing new vitality. The move is particular^ sig- inated Korvette’s sales until * K 
dered are bought, the shares In Korvette’s case, the move nificant in the case of Korvette. about a decade ago when the. Non-Car Goods a Buoy 
(purchased will be bought on a was also influenced by the which operates about 30 stores concern shifted heavilv intoj The July increase was the 
I*® JSS 8, . ^ derail of the New York statute in the New York metropolitan apparel and other soft lines. largest since consumer credit 

Mr. McMIhan also announced on fan- trade, according to the area. Founded in 1948. the chain The w. T. Grant Comnanv Srew SI. 76-billion in August. 

that a motion for a preliminary company^ spokesman. The end became New Yoiic’s third-largest ** 1974 * 

injunction by Alaska Interstate of the fair-trade law is expected retailer after Macy and Abra- 1 Continued on Page 34, Column 4 Buoyin'* the Julv renort was 
to halt the ranoval of ks chair- a $67‘-million rLre in non-car 

? flI \. 0 -.. Charl e ? i» yv r^i _ a _. 'consumer goods. $30-million for 

I& Saudis to Oppose Sharp Oil Price Rise; Sn ERS 

had been r«noved as a member ^ credit and $207-miHion for 

E. I. du Pont Plans Iron Fiber Ventxire!te 1 OT«wSSfi^ 

Alaska Interstate said that _ j The Fed said consumers got 


1 Noting that Amax. Inc., a 
major copper producer, 
owned 1 1 per cent of Imetal. 
the suit said Amax and 
Imetal had "combined and 
conspired to restrain trade 
in the capper market in the 
United States.” Copperweld 
is a major copper purchaser 
but, the suit said, currently 
buys “very little” copper 
from Amax. 

Hie suit further noted that 
Imetal itself produces copper, 
aluminum, lead, nickel and 
molybdenum — bought in 
“large quantities” by Copper- 
weld— and charged that the 
effects of the proposed ac- 
quisition would be to lessen 
competition substantially in 
those markets. 

Copperweld further charged 
Imetal with failing to make 
material disclosures to the 
Securities and Exchan ge 

Continued on Page 29, Column 2 


Tm Mew York TTmes/Sest. 6, 1975 


,••• 



to halt the removal of its chair- = 
man O. Charles Honig, from 

the Northwest board was de- C« n J 1c , fim 
nied by the Court Mr. Honig Od.UU.lb LL> UU] 
had been removed as a member 

of the board, effective Aug. 26. TT 1 T n nv , 

In Houston, a spokesman for Hi. i ( UU JT UI1 

Alaska Interstate said that 
company was withdrawing its] 
offer. He explained. that Alaska q. j r 
had determined that the Court’s 25 tanQ As oCnedUiea 

opinion and order as well as f nr nPFP Mpp t in tr 
“certain other events,” had Ior IVieetUlg 

made it inadvisable to proceed! 

with offer. I sp«i»i u> Tbe xrw rerk nma 

The company said the Court’s BEIRUT. Lebanon, Sept. 5- 

0 Dim on found that there were- .. . .. . . . . . 

1 deficiencies in both its andjf^ Arabia in tencU to hold 
Northwest Energy Company’s] ^ ^ ine against a stiff oil pnee 
offers for APCO. Alaska said it'rise when the Organization of 
would “continue the pursuit ofjPetroleum Exporting Countries 
remedies sought by it and legal; meets in Vienna SepL 24, ac- 
proceedings pending hiDela- ; cording to Saudi statements 
ware and Colorado Courts. All . i_ dustrv source- 

shares of APCO common, which 1 £ 
have beeen tendered to Alaska ^ 
will be returned immediately 

to tendering eteekholdem, g|™^i ^T™y 

. ally strengthen the Saudis’ 

International Harvester case with the Arab members 

In Mcdouth Dad of OPEC, but the accord is not 

The international. Harvester ex P ect£d to be a decisive issue. 
Company said yesterday that it Ahmed Zaki Yamam. the 
had reached an agreement in Saudi Minister of Petroleum 
principle to sell the operat- and Mineral Resources, stressed 
ing assets of its Wisconsin in an interview with the Itaban 
Steel division and the Chi- weekly 1 TEunopeo that his gov-- 



Associated Pnss 

Sheik Ahmed Zaki Yamani 


.extensions on $I4.-3S-biUion in 

f n ct nf TnirH- TPffnrt debts due in Jul y* an increase of 
^OSt or joint ^riort S 419- m illion from June. 

HelH at Half Rillmn ! The Sl.02-billion increase in 
neia at nail -Dim on iDUtstaildillg debt was more ^ 

‘double the $545-million rise in 

Rv FRir PArF IJune - A m °dest $72-million in- 

En«ai 1 # too ;; e* Ten nmc-: i^rease in debt in May followed 

ISFAHAN, Iran. Aug. nnkin B COn ‘ 

E. I. duPont de Nemourl & Co.,i Sumer ob!l Sations. 

Inc., in a joint venture with; “ 

Iranian investors, is to start! Sugar Prices Raised 

rTJl 5 ^L S ,T a r°[hfL- r ^;' The Amstar Corporation, the 
ciol fiber plant near this central ; National Sugar Refining Com- 

Iraruan city that will be one Of-pany, the Sucrest Corporation 
,he country’s costiiest pnvate; CPC international’s Corn Prod- 
mdustnal development projects. (UCts unit yesterday all raised 
All told, several hundred 1 the wholesale price of industrial 
million dollars — perhaps half aisugar by 30 cents a hundred 
billion dollars — is expected to pounds, ’effective Monday. The 
be invested in the joint enter- increase pushes the price for a 
pnse, the Polyacryl Iran Trad- hundred pounds of extra-fine 
ing Corporation, which was granulated sugar to $23.95 and 
formally incorporated last year, raises the price for two other 
The Iranian Government en-j industrial grades, bulk grann- 
courages such projects as part lated and liquid No. 2, to $23.35 
of its effort to create industries I a hundred pounds, 
that will foster prosperity herel ^ Ame rican Cvanantid 

f? er Iran s D v‘ es ??r : Company’s industrial and pias- 
rex enues. now more than $ 16 - tics division has increased the 


caeo. West Pullman and South- ernment was waiting to see . .. now more than $16- tics division has increased the 

ern°RaiIroad to the McClouth whether the indurtriaiized na- 'u™ a r 2p^L sl f tt ?n taper off Pn' ce o f Cvmel 1077 melamine 

material disclosures to the Phillip H. Smith, chair- Steel Corporation of Detroit bon truly intended, as he put ts eo m P ! Y er ■ 1 mo,din S compound to 48 cents 

Securities — and Exchange preset oTZ McClouth proposed t o puruhsse tewer^dte pnees uf the f? “| ide e’oTulf SjjSS ?£& 

Continued on Page 29, Column 2 Copperweld Corpteatum. Continued on Page 31, Column 5 Increase Ureed companies Venezuela, Ecuador, | about such huge industrial proj- ^Quantities of 24 000 pounds 

— ■ ■ increase urgea Algeria, Iraq, Gabon and Libya. je cts on enrironmental grounds. „!■ „ nr( » pfFpptive Sent ^2 

“ff you realty mean to lower Sheik ZaJa was quoted as hav-lThere is also uncertainty in or ®” ectJ e 

City Ills Depress Stocks; NO DUMPING 

Dow Off by 2.34 to 835.97 OF FOREIGN ADTOS STS- zt H-vFSSrr^ 

J true, we, too. will be for an Conference Scheduled ito provide the petrochemicals ’ ° y per cent 10 o p*. 


iioiuno ^ ^ true, we, too, will be for an Conference Scheduled ito provide the petrochemicals 8 

— _ . increase.^ However, not a dras- a 27-nation conference of de-!^ that are to constitute the raw | 

— air irmvnFn u ftahtmfr Producers Praised for Role tic one. veloping and industrial states 1 material for the plant. D -i r- r _- • + n..|: nD . fl 

By ALEXANDER R. HA1MMER - Dfts+raininjr Prices In another interview with a ,5 expected to convene in Paris] However. Curtis D. Liddi- Rail Freight Declines B 

.M.F. List 7116 stock market, increasing- terday that dM wholesale Price In Hestraining Prices Cain) week]y aj Mussawar, the - m o^ember to discuss energyjcoat. a veteran DuPont execu- WASHINGTON. Sept. 5— The J 

ly cone eroed with the financial Index rose 0.3 per «nt in Au- Saudi minister noted that some raw materials economic devel-'tive who is the project’s works Association of American Rail- s 

to Carry tribulations of New York City. gust, down from the 1.2 per WA - WTM _ TVV . ajpn - . - OPEC members were urging an 0 pment and, if the Saudis baveldfrector. said in an interview roads said today that freight 0 

. decb'ned yesterday m continued cent nse m July, and the^unem- turi; sept, o ^ ^ price ^ . cru de ^eir way, monetary issues as here yesterday that “I think traffic on United States rail- 1 

ements sluggish trading. ploymerrt remained at 8.4 per ^ ftwn its current level of $10.40 we ll. a preparatory conference'the need for something like this roads during the week ended g 

Prices on the New York Stock . cent in August, the same as «««£» ™ j,™ for a 42^aUon_ barrel. for a similar meeting of oU pro- 'for the economy over here is Aug. 30 was an estimated 15 H 


id to Carry 
greements 


Prices on the New York Stock . cent in August, the same as 


United States market but have 


. DALE Jr. 

v York lima 

SepL 5 


^ , ii» oniL a/ — rum uic vwuwiwiuu w uauu^r iawiu i i huw im " VJa&f* onH PrirP StfthWitV mifl ’"’r" . . . , , _ ^ idaaiciai ^wiiuiuji. oiioud jiuwu.i^ *•» iiiojaww. . _ ' ' 

i a world Bank the Dow Jones industrial aver- fore. todav «on«y «j do not think Iran wants a whoi the oil ministers meet in From a cavernous office in cars - 15.2 per cent below the 

ni!n 'WiMonef^rv ase was off 2.34 points at Gene J. Seagle, technical re- The rmmcil annealed for an drastic increase. It wanto an m- Vienna there may not have been downtown IsFahan, Mr. Liddi- cotrespondm" week m 1974, 

' JW , $ — =ss» <^4 ««--=s55. K 


TJ: r , p 

# # «-e t 


Thfl 

I 


•k* • .% _■ . i » - 


Electronic Device Designed to Curb Pain 

f . ^nents in prm- an 8-to-5 ratio, with 811 stocks fi na ncial crisis, a “chilling effect” on foreign /x v Kj LA KJ±LJ. V/ r iw lks V-/ IX X KS A. Ulit 

hii j.^re this week dowrr and 491 im^Elevai iKues ^ Seagle said that he did car manufacturers trying to : 

li f ' ee ^ n ^ s J® 5 ® new 1975 highs whda not bejjgve that a further delay make sales in the United gy STACY V JONES 

’ cisions involve 10 iS5,ieS . P0Stfidl0 ?- , in solving New York’s problems States. . 

„ v . 0 _!! Statistics Are Ignored would prevent the market from The council said its review toAcwrwrTaw =; fmm thrw» tn fiw minute 

Brokers noted tiiat many in- eo-tfn S 5 S l 2 «**«. t talc UP- jLl^ ^ ^ 

: jrjsaTi ware ana ^ «***» 

’ international by the New York Stete Le^- «ady parted * up- were ^ pro^ 


because of the tore on a plan to avoid a swifi? from its August lows “ *° battery-operated, portable 

default by New York City on and is now ready to resume tov^one^ instrument has two elec- 

iddresses were its debt a major adnvance,” he ««L trodes to be ap- 

Robert S. Me- Investors tended to ignore Virginia Electric Active ^ wou j,j ^ave a “grave ira- Patents plied to the skin, 
t (rf the World Labor Department reports yes- p our utihty issues were mediate impact on consumer of the According to a 

- - “ Week 


ihannes Witte- 
director of the 

Outlook 

nference later, 
aid there was 
3 r hope that 
be an oil price 
is year. But he 
informal inter- 
this was not 
peeific eonver- 
had on prices 
. from the oil- 
■ies. 

n spoke cau- 
^uestion at his 
?. sajing only 
ouraged by the 
jf cooperation" 
While only the 
xme out force- 
urther oil price 
tes of numer- 
rich ajjd poor 

»e 29, Column 2 


Market Profile 

Friday. Septembers, 1975 
New Y« ksock Betimes 
Mumell^aSJWOsfivM 


j: j Unchanged 


among the 15 most actively prices.” 

traded stocks yesterday. There Dent Triggers Action 

°F W ^,i commission began a 

Strwt that interest rates will study into auto imports on a 
decline soon and this would complaint from representative 
benefit utilities generally. The j 0 h£ h. Dent, representative ot 
mo st a cti ve s tock wa s Virginia Pennsylvania, that foreign man- 
Electric Power, which ended unfacturers were dumping — 
unchanged at 12 , /J on 338,300 cutting prices here below 
shares, including a block of charges in their own countries. 
272,900 shares at 12ft crossed Federal law prohibits dumping, 
by Salomon Bros. The council said imported, 

The other utilities on the ears have played an important 


ISSUES 

TRADED 

1,764 


N.YS.E. Index 45 AS -CL 3 Q 
S.&P.Canp. 85J2 -0.58 
Dow Joreslnd. 8 SSJ 7 ,-aJ 4 j 

Tfw Nor York Tines 


; SSdSSSitnr * An electitmic pain suppressor the instrument m regarded. as 

’market has el- Canada, Europe and Japan is being offered for the re- 
. ready started a renewed up- dumping, their products jjgf 0 f arthritis. The small, = nressed. The contacts are 
* sw ^ fro™ its rf Au g l5t lowS mwanted D i^entorS' * ° ^ battery-operated, portable to be placed so that the one- 
^ and is now ready to resume Qn the contrary the council instrument has two elec- way current flows through 
a major adryaaca," be wd. Jg* trodes to be ap- the 1 rerves associated with 

3 Virginia Electric Active tion would have a^grave im- Patents plied to the skin, the pain area. 

Four utihty issues were mediate impact on consumer of the According to a ^ Among the institutions us- 

among the 15 most actively prices.” Week 5?? nt H ! 8 S 16 P® 1 ", su Ppr es ® or 

traded stocks yesterday. Him Dent Triggers Action 1 )115 ”*■ J™ Il ? ntute f0 J R f' 

is a srowine belief on Wall n*. . . , . suppression is ef- habihtation. Orange, N, J.; 

Street that interest rates will ■ ^ onu te S51on a fective for from one to eight the Pain Rehabilitation Cen- 

£ e Sf titiTtoSd • tu *l hours. Of two models now ter, La Crosse. Wis., and the 

reprerentatiVQ available, the larger is about university of Southern Cali- 

° f lorria,. S S °Aogel ? . Several 

shar^ metedJnsr a liS^W c ^ tm S . pnees Jjfijj engineer, is president of the ably to Mr. Liss. Various 

272J»0 shJlShlf i m SS' distributor. Pain Suppression athletic teams are reported 

ceos&&i Federal law prohibits dum Labs, Inc., Paterson, N. J. He to be using it on their mus- 
by Salomon Bros. The councB said imported aml _ ^inventor, George <.!«. 5 

Feldstein, also an electrorJS At Purdue University in 
active Ust were Northern India- role m curbing prices charged pnemeeT were awarded Pat- Indiana ™ Pra l hnraes that 
na Public Service, which closed by American auto makers, ir SfSmsML 

unchanged at 15ft; Texas Utill- Sports are blacked or slowed claims no cure- ESJEES 1 duueaI 

ties, unchanged at 17ft, and dow^the council said domes- tiv^ef^^fo^toeapparatS, P t- * 

““ Missile Guidance Simplified 

i-rsrrssBs S£ -a a^ 

and advanced 1ft to 28ft. On tured 21.7 per cent of toe £^^fSout side ef- ward a target has been in- 
Thursday, Great Western Unit- United States market, an in- 811(1 vented in the defense and 

ed announced plans to buy crease of 5.4 per cent from th*» vnltan*. ic low— 18 “Ktromcs systems center of 

all of the issued and outstetd- August a year ago when for- yo Jg ™ Adjustable ^ We stingiioase Electric 

Continued on Page 3fl, Column I Continued on Page 31, Column 4 timer limits operation for Continued on Page 3!, Column 1 


instrument has two elec- 
trodes to be ap- 
Patents plied to the skin. 

0 f the According to a 

w _ k patent granted 

this week, pain 
suppression is ef- 
fective for from one to eight 
hours. Of two models now 
available, the larger is about 
the size of two packs of 
cigarettes. 

Saul Liss, an electronics 
engineer, is president of the 
distributor. Pain Suppression 
Labs, Inc., Paterson, N. J. He 
and a co-inventor, George 


ine otner uuunffi on ipe ean> nave piayea an yddstein, also an electronics 

active Ust were Northern India- role m curbing prices charged . ‘TT’ awarded Pat- 
na Public Service, which closed by American auto makers, ir 902.502. 
unchanged at 15ft; Texas Utiil- imports are blacked or slowed ^ ^ rTt ,; m<t n6 cura _ 

ties, unchanged at 17ft, and down, the council said domes- +ive effects for the apparatus, 
Florida Power and Light, up tic manufacturers may raise . *. rp^norarv peijpf 

«>o2’ 1 / 1 - Z** Pri<« becu«e of w«X- 

Bates Manufacturing was toe ened competition ^ t __ SSHortisoS shots in joints. 

inflamed muscles and other 
areas, and without side ef- 
fects. 

As the voltage is low— 18 


best gainer on the active list Im port sales in August cap- muscIes ^ other 

and advanced 1ft to 28ft. On tured 21.7 per cent of toe e J nd side ef . 

Thursday, Great Western Unit- United States market, an in- 8110 WIUU> 

ed announced plans to buy crease of 5.4 per cent from ■ ^ voItaEe « i ow — 18 
all of the issued and outstend- August a year ago when for- - and in Adjustable 



Saul Liss, co-inventor of a battery-operated device that . 
is designed to suppress pain. 








f CtP. 


28 


THE NEW YORK TIMES , SiirFJlPXy SgPTEJfggft 6, 1915 





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I H.Y. residents please add applicable sales tax. Forein rates available oa, 1 
, request (No ass tomcat of this agreement will be made without subscriber's A 
^muscat) 


The Holt Advisory Selects ... . 

2 Short-Sale 
Candidates 


Outpacing the general markeL these. two glamour stocks 
advanced ultra-sharply during the early part of this year.- 
In June, both stood close to their 1973 nighs and both were 
nearly double their late 1974 lows. 

This swift recovery was undoubtedly spurred in part by 
good earnings growth. Both companies are expected to have 
a super 1975. But selling at lofty earnings multiples and yield- 
ing few than 1%, these stocks may well nave fully discounted 
this prospect already. Indeed, we think they are terribly over- 
priced. 

Crest of the Boom 

Meanwhile, our analysis suggests that world-wide demand 
for what these companies have to offer will soften materially 
beyond 1975. Instead of ever rising profits, therefore, they 
probably report unfavorable comparisons from then on. It 
so. disappointing selling, especially by institutional investors, 
will almost certainly increase markedly. 

In our opinion these two issues — which have already 
weakened somewhat in recent weeks — will eventually decline 
a whole lot more. For the venturesome, therefore, wiling them 
short can represent a conservative way to build capital in a 
bear market. 

Caution; No one can predict exactly when a major mar- 
ket move will start. Moreover, even overpriced stocks often 
keep on rising, especially if they enjoy persistent institution- 
al support. A sustained rise would, of . course, seriously 
squeeze the short seller: While selling short can be profitable 
in a bear market, therefore, don't even cbnsider it unless 
you have the temperament to stay with fundamentally 
sound short positions, and unless you maintain a balanced 
overall portfolio that protects you against being forced to 
cover your shorts prematurely. 

Introductory Offer 

We will send you this special report recommending two 
short sale candidates, as a bonus, with a 2-month Introductory 
Subscription to The Holt Investment Advisory. To enter 
'gaur subscription (a $24 value), just send 310 with the coupon 


jDi T.J. Holt & Company, Inc. 

277 Park Avenue, New Y ork, N .Y . 10017 

Please send me the special report recommending two short sale 
candidates, with my 2-month Introductory Subscription to The 
Holt Investment Advisory. My 310 iaenclosed. 


F-Name — 
Address. 
City- 


.State. 


.Zip. 


Your subscription not assignable without your consent. 


toit 



THINK 

jis-LGVE 

k _& associates 

bonded Dealers in Commodities. 
3 ullion and Rare Coins. . 
•*Uerir*8kmAw™*e _ 

Sew York. N.Y. 10022 JSS-JHJO 



Weekly Service 


TO* D»»m n*W» *W*h44 "a*" “2? 
41 NYSE ami ASE STOCKS. The CHANT, 
emu WEEKLY SERVICE t» nragrammsd to 
out you OOtipM* 9-000 raiffM* 
nlonncdaiL You 

. Mtorawa MM (LoN E»*T « ' N+ 

etfdiBto *rc Clangs* IIMr Chinjoo) 
• Buy or SH 5tanm - Nne* «i*«wO ■ 
LM»iynfc-Rd**wSWi'g»iFig»*». 

4 WESC TWM. AAflJ CWflTCWFT 
utmooaooitartYttiSD. 

Wlwi VOU U*« ■ Wo* wtoatoSO" w 

3ERU.CE-OMI 

tkoandby Fkd »" 

M* bwW*»>0 CWWin 

yflW ohook tof SI2 JaWdOT tNYC « 

. bl«* idd iW^eoW* 

Charter* ft. Inc. W» *-**•■ 1 We5f 

itardtmcntN-Y- 1 


Market Place 

Commodities; Stocks and a New Idea 


By JOHN H. ALLAN 


For more than a year, com- 
modity prices have given in- 
vestors, very good dues about 
the direction ! of the stock 
market When commodity 
prices began to decline, stock 
prices began to advance, and 
when commodity prices began 
to advance, stock prices Be- 
gan declining. 

The Bureau of Labor Sta- 
tistics .wholesale spot com- 
modity price . index started 
moving downward in late 

summer a year ago, a short 

time before the Dow- Jones 
Industrial average of stock 
prices hit 584.86 in early Oc- 
tober, 1974. Stock prices then 
wavered and the Dow index 
dipped to 577.60, a 12-year 
low, m early December. 

The commodity index kept 
declining until late June, and 
the Dow rose during this ex- 
tended interval, reaching a 
peak of 881.81 on July 15. 


1 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 


Since mid-summer, the 
wholesale spot commodity 
index, which is a measure of 
current prices for such basics 
as wheat and sugar, has been 
rising and stock prices have 
been declining! 

William Jiler, whose Com- 
modity Chart Service keeps 
close watch on dozens of 
commodities, believes that 
the rise in commodity prices 
over the last two months has 
passed its peak. If this view 
proves accurate, it could be 
good news for stock prices, 
for they should tend to rise 
as commodity prices decline. 

While stock and oomnodity 
prices have gone in opposite, 
directions over the last year, 
the relationship is still rela- 
tively new, ana Mr. Jiler is 
un willing to accept it as very 
significant. Be has charted 
trends in commodity and 
stock prices in the United 
States going back to 1915, 
and little correlation between 

the two shows tip before 1973. 

■ ■ • 

Throughout the years from 
1915 to 1973, Mr. liter's chart 
shows, wholesale commodity 
prices remained much more 
stable than stock prices. 
From 1950 until 1970, the 
commodity wholesale price 
index showed relatively little 
movement, rising gradually 
from a low of 45 to a high of 
55 over 20 years. 

Stock prices, however, zig- 
zagged much more dramati- 
cally in the same two decades. 
Standard & Poor’s 500-stock 
composite index climbed 
from 15 to 110, and it went 
through five major setbacks 
along the way. 

“In the long range, there is 
very little correlation be- 


tween stock priced and com- 
modity prices,” Mr. Jiler in- 
sisted. “If you want to point 
out a correlation, I think it 
will be incidental ” 

In the last year or two, 
however, investment analysts 
have found an increasingly 
close relationship between 
rampant inflation and falling 
stock prices. 

• 

Rising prices cause the 
Federal Reserve to tighten 
the money market, driving 
interest rates higher. As in- 
vestment funds are attracted 
to higher -yielding fixed -in- 
come securities, money flows 
out of stocks into notes or 
bonds and stock prices toad 
to decline. 

If this reasoning is correct, 
investors could get a head 
start in forecasting stock 
market swings by watching 
commodity price trends. This 
is difficult because the com- 
modity market is a diverse 
place where thousands of 
contracts trade without the 
dominant price trends that 
are characteristic of the stock 
and bond markets. 

Mr. Jiler’s Commodity 
Chart Service, however, pub- 
lishes a commodity futures 
price index that utilizes 27 
commodities. Dow Jones pub- 
lishes a futures index made 
up of fewer commodities. 
The Bureau of Labor Statis- 
tics calculates its wholesale 
spot commodity price index. 
• 

With these three indexes, 
the dominant trend of prices 
and future prices of basic 
materials can be detenmned- 
With this information, stock 
traders have one more key 
to help determine which way 
their market is likely to 
move next. 

Whether the recent rela- 
tionship in stock and com- 
modity price moves will be 
lasting remains to be seen. 
It may turn out to be inci- 
dental, as Mr. Jiler believes, 
or it may become an impor- 
tant technical indicator. 

In any case, it . has been 
close enough for the last year 
to give investors a new idea 
to test. It also has been close 
enough this year to make 
tht stork market worry aver 
the rise in wholesale prices 
since July. 

\esmark deal set 

BY RAPID-AMERICAN 


ADVERTISEMENT 


Which 5 
Mutual Funds 
outperformed 
the market 
5 times over? 

See Forbes new 
report on 547 
Fluids. 

Since the market turnaround 
ten months ago, five Mutual 
Funds have shown -gains more 
than five times the average. 13 
others performed four times 
better. Yet, 31 Funds declined, 
one as much as 2596 . Which' are 
the performers? Which are the 
laggards? la its August. 15th is- 
sue Forbes 'rates the perform- 
ance of over 500 Fonds during 
the past year. You can see 
which Funds are “alive" for the 
next leg of the bull market 
and which have been asleep at 
the switch. Forbes also shows 
you which- Funds have per- 
formed consistently better than 
the market over the long terra. 

Tours as a Bonus. 

Forbes Mutual Fund Survey is- 
sue will be sect as a bonus with 
an introductory subscription to 
Forbes magazine — the only 
business magazine that regu- 
larly features lop Wall Street 
analysts. You get the Mutual 
. Fund Survey — a SliO value 
— and 12 issues of Forbes for 
only $7.50. You will also re- 
ceive a. directory of No-Load 
Funds, the Funds that have no 
sales charges. Well bill you 
later if you prefer. Mail this ad 
with your name and address to 
Forbes, DepL 2 05, 60 Fifth 
Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10011. 


The Rapid-American Cor- 
poration announced yesterday 
that it had advised Esmark, 
, that it had reached an 
agreement in principle with all 
its institutional lenders to con- 
sent to the Esmark acquisition 
of the International Playtex 
division of Rapid-American. 

Meshulam Riklis, Rapid- 
Ameri can’s chairman, said that 
the previously announced 
transaction was expected to 
be consummated Oct- 31. 

Under the agreement with 
lenders, Rapid-American will 
retain $ 60 -mtilion of the sale’s 
cash proceeds and will apply 
the balance of the $ 210 -miliaon 
purchase price consisting of 
cash. Esmark notes and Esmark 
preferred stock to the payment 
of $150*nyllion of Rapid's ex- 
isting $200- million, bank term 
loan. The remaining term loan 
balance and the short-term 
h ank lines will be restructured 
into a new seven-year term 
loan payable beginning in De- 
cember 1976. 


N.Y.SJS. Closing Index 

High Us* Lea* On*. 

Index 45J8 45J6 45J6 -OJO 

industrial ....SOM 5047 SW7 -034 

Traraoort ...29.40 29.W 29.77 -022 

yitntv .oa son son -ou 

Finance .....ASM J4.ZS- UJ2 

Up-Down Volume 

advanced decTImd 
NYSE 2450lUsham 6.72UttSftVei 
AMEX 49IJ10sh«re* SmfiWnan s 

Amex Closing Index 


Stock Market Indicators 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 5. 1975 

N.Y.S .E. Changes 


Hlfltl 

85.92 


Low 

SS.40 


•5J5 


da 

-J9 


S&P Avenges 

High Low Close cna 

425 Industrials 97.86 9060 96.07 -JA 
T5RallroatiS 3i» 34J2 34,93 -.23 
60Uftiltte5 41.11 4048 --=* 

500Stada 1047 *5.19 8062 -.58- 

, NASDAQ Index 

Week Month 

Index Close.. .Chfl... Ago... .Ago. 

Commits 77.78 - 035 7001 7055 
fndUSf ttJ2 - 041 83.70 

Ffnand 77.72 - 019 79.19 11.14 

Insurance 77.97 _ on 7069 80JB 

Utilities M -53 - 027 6442 64.90 

Banks 73/4 - 0JT 7546 77.49 

Transport 8026 - 041 9012 8742 


The Dow Jones Stock Averages 


Coen High Low Close Chg 

36 Industrials 836*6 *4X63 03046 035.W - U4 

£ Transport ISL32 UA7J 15446 MUZ - 1.B3 

15 77.97 TUB 77J6 77.74 - IMS 

65 stScte 251.87 24011 24943 - 142 


N.Y.S.E. Most Active 


VaEIPnw :. .330300 1214 

MaglcChri mjm Stt - 46 

NorlndPS 178.900 15U> 

ussteei I42.no 6ra * % 

atfcaro man sou - 

XerakCo .114,700 5496 -1 

HOughMAfff 100400 14% + ft 

TexUfll 104^00 17 ft 

Texaco Inc .101.300 ZW, - ft 

FldPowLt 87400 21 ft * ft 

GenMotars 79,700 49ft - ft 

Polaroid 7OW0 34ft -ft 

BflfesMfo 70200 2Bft +lft 

COBPWMCP 74.200 40 - ft 

GtfftHI 49400 20ft - ft 


N.Y.S.E. Market Diary 


Today day 

Advances 491 728 

Declines m 3*9 

Unchanged *a £3 

Total Issues 1764 1732 

New 1975 hiohs 11 is 

New 1975 lows 10 10 


Odd Ltit Trading 


Purchases of 140.219 sham: sales a* 
275,211 shores Including 3406 shares sold 
short. 


Name 

7 un FidefllY 

2 CNALafwn 

3 Fansttal 

4 WriVltCB 

5 Cl MW Gd 

6 LM1 inv 

7 Incom Can 
I Tennc wtA 
9 RIAUSOf 

10 Can it MW 


Name 

1 cit sjarfc 

2 UMET Tr 

3 Cardura Oa 

4 BT Mtg Inv 

5 5av A stop 

6 Suave Shoe 

7 KenKSP Cep 
1 smith ao 

9 Perm Cent 

10 Shakespre 


UPS 

Last 

5ft 

lft 

9 

lft 

lft 

1ft 

4» a 

lft 

20ft 


Chg 

4 - ft 
* ft 
+ 1 
+ ft 

-a ft 
4> ft 
+ ft 

4- ft 
4- lft 

+ ft 


PCI. 

Up 112 


Ud 

Up 

Up 

Up 

Up 

Up 

Up 

Up 

Up 


ILi 

125 

124 

10.0 

10.0 

LI 

u 

7.9 

7.7 


□OWNS 


Last 

»ft 

lft 

ir* 

2ft 

2ft 

2ft 

lft 

lft 

lft 

4ft 


-V 

- 'A 


Pd. 

OR 14.5 


. ft 

- ft 

- ft 

- ft 

- ft 

- ft 


Off 
ft Off 
Off 


Off 

Off 

Off 

Off 

Off 

Off 


14J 

11J 

10.5 

mo 

1.3 

t.l 

7.7 

7J 


N.Y.S.E. 
Dollar Leaders 



Tot (51000) shares (tub) Last 

U5Sted 


SV.78S 

1429 

68ft 

IBM 


17,289 

403 

180 



tun 

1147 

54 s * 

All Rich ' 


S4J23 

462 

9S’v 



14.101 

3383 

rr* 



S3.9SS 

wr 


CltlCoro 


13.906 

1286 

30’« 

East Kodak 


S3J71 

422 

91*4 

HevrtettPdc 


5X307 

365 

■Ws 



S3J12 

195 

166 



1X025 

496 

eOft. 



S2.V49 

742 

40 



S28S7 

3*0 

Wi 



12.146 

3JO 

S6’» 

MooreMcC 


12,793 

434 

64V. , 


Amex& 


mtianknet 

Arming 

ComxAiEq 

tmperOU A 

5vntexCorD 

Frlgllronc 

Champ Ho 

Court aulas 

BrascanA ..... 
interpool 


Amex M.' 


Advances ... 
Declines 
Uncha n ged .... 
Total issues .... 
Naw 1973 Mghs 
New 1975 tows , 


Moat Ac* 

Name VOKhds) 
FISNFia ... 1995 
PiUtOffB... 1351 
Lib NtLf... 955 
atntano ... u» 

AmExo ... 539 
Rankdrs... 334 
ForcsIO ... 432 
Natcss ... ca 
GravTl ... 423 
LowcsCo... 3K 

O.T.C. Mj 


Advances 

□ecitrm 

unchanged 

Total issues 

NewMohs ...... 

New lows 

TotalsalHthds)..,, 


New York Stock Exchange Transaction 


1975 Stocks and Div. Sales , Hal 

in Low In Dollars P7E 100s High Law Last On 


TO 

4 

22 

7 

4 


30ft 20ft A Cyan 1 JO 


er% AmOist .120 
16ft ADfstTtl J6 
3ft AmOualvt 
11 ADul pf.Baa' 
14ft AmEIPw 2 
3ft AFamliy 3A 
2ft AmFIn .10 d 

8 AmF uT.75o 
20ft AGIBd Utoe 
14ft AGenCv 1 J2 

9 A Gnlns M 
17ft A GlnpnjD 

8ft Axn Hobt .70 
27ft A Home .92 
19lft 728 A Home of 2 
38ft 25ft AmHoap JO 
5 lft Am invest 
7ft 3ft A Medfd .72 

1ft AMedtcorp 
3ft Am Motors 
30ft ANatG 2-54b 
3ft Am Seating 


13 

29ft 

4ft 

13 

21 

12ft 

6 

14ft 

24ft 

19ft 

13ft 

2ZV* 

16V, 

43ft 


A— B— C-D 

AbbtLab AO 16 86 36ft 35ft 35ft + ft 

I 30 40ft 40ft 40ft- ft 

4 31 8ft 7ft 8 - ft 

... 40 9ft 9ft 9ft.. 

... 1 4 4 4 ...... 

74 90 7ft 7ft 7ft- ft 

... 15 7ft 7ft 7ft 

13X124 71ft 21 21ft- ft 

34 34 - ft 

5ft 5ft + ft 

6 378 tft 6ft 8ft 4. ft 

9 14 3ft 3ft 3ft- ft 

17 170 65ft 64ft 64ft- ft 
9 4 10ft 10ft 10ft.. 

A- 74 19 18ft 19 + ft 

5 26 2ft 2ft 2ft.. 

43 29 17ft 17ft 17ft + ft 

6 18 13ft 13ft T3ft'+- ft 

9 16 lZft 12ft 17ft 4- ft 

17 5 6ft 6ft 6ft4- ft 

9 1 19ft 19ft 19ft- ft 

49 22ft 22ft 22ft+ ft 

16 lift lift Hft-l- ft 

11 22 ft 22 ft 22 ft 4 - ft 

21 5ft 5ft 5ft- ft 

17 3ft 3ft 3ft- ft 

10 7ft 7ft 7ft+ ft 

26 26ft 25ft 26ft 4 ft 

... 3 33ft 33ft 33ft +- ft 

9 54 16ft 16 lift- ft 

12 5 10 9ft 10 4- ft 

7 203 34ft 34 34ft- ft 

5 1 lift lift lift 

97 38ft 37ft 37ft + ft 

‘ 2ft 2ft.. 

9ft 10 + ft 

6 4 7 7 7 - ft 

4 4 8ft Oft 8ft.. 

13 137 47ft 46ft 47V, + ft 

3 5 37ft 37ft 39ft- ft 

10 352 S3 ft 53 S3 - ft 

... 3 128ft 128ft 128ft 4* ft 

5 22 lift lift lift- ft 

6 3 5 - 4ft 4ft 

... 1 29ft 29ft 29ft 

4 129 lift 18ft lift- ft 

... 30 4BYz 48ft 41 ft — ft 

10 43 17ft 17ft 17ft- ft 

... 131 t - 7ft 
26 2 9ft 9ft 9ft + ft 

7 66 37 36ft Sift- ft 

8 49 toft 18ft 19ft.. 

8 6 10ft 10ft 18ft- ft 

6 193 30ft. 29ft 29ft- ft 

... 1 30ft 20ft 20ft + ft 

... 22. lft 
6 2 17ft 

7rM 24ft 
41 11 7 
10 15 Zlft 

... 35 4 

3 IZVr 
19ft 
•ft 
2ft 
9ft 
22ft 
15ft 
lift 

... 17 19ft 

5 18 13 

23 61V 33ft 
... 2149 


41ft 34 

47ft 33ft ACF In 2J0 
10ft 7 AoneCIv JO 

11 7ft AdmEx .77e 
6ft' TH Adnts Mlllis 
9ft 3ft Addressog 

10 7ft Arivinv JBe 
29ft 19ft AetnaLt 7.08 
435» 31 AetnaLt p(2 ... xl 34 

7 4ft Aguirre Co 27 2 5ft 

12 6ft Alvnans JO 
4ft lft Afleen Inc 

77ft 44ft AlrPrd -20b 
13ft 4ft AlrbnFrt JO 
23ft 10ft Aired nc l . 

3ft 1 AJ Indushis 
1 Tfz W% Akzona 1 JO 
14ft 7ft Ala Gas U8 
17ft 9 Alaska Inftrs 
8ft 4ft AltwiDC J6 
20ft 12ft Albertan JO 
26ft 18ft AlcanAhi JO 
13ft 7 Vj AkoStd J6- 
29 15ft AtconLb M 
aft 2 ft Aleaodrs .16* 

6ft 3 AlisnMt ^8C 
lift Aft AltogCp j45c 
26ft 20ft AllgLud 1 M 
3 Aft 31ft AllgLud Dt 3 
10ft 12ft AllgPw 1 J2 
lift 4ft AllenGrp ^0 
42 27 AlldCh 1J0 

15ft lift AlldProd 1 
40ft 15ftAUd5trU0 
4 2ft Alld suwwct ... - 10 Zft 
12ft Aft AllisChal J6 5 27 10ft 

8 5ft AIlrtAUt J6 
XEh 7ft Alpha P J60 
SP/A 27ft Alcoa 1 J4 
46ft 2 Bft AmalgSug 3 
56ft 28ft Amu 1.75 

135ft 77 Amax D&25 
IS 6 AMBAC JO 
5ft 3 Anword ja 
33ft 36ft Amro Df2-40 
23ft 15ft A Hess JQb 
57ft 42 AHcs PI3J0 
22 7ft' AAlrFHt .44 
10ft 5ft Am Airlfn 
14ft 3ft A Baker JO 
43ft 30ft A Bmds 2.68 
27ft 13ft AmBdCSt JO 
12 ft 5 AmBWM J6 
34ft 28 .A Can 2J0a 
23ft isft A Can pHJS 
3ft lft AmCen Mtp 
19ft 13ft A Quin 1 JO 


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 1975 

Day* , -Year to Dal* 

SUM Itorabr YmtHo* 1975 W« 

11490.900 12410409 15.1X400 3. *33.1 73.010 2JRJ96J09 


9 314 
6 30 
13 9 

... ZlOO 

... X» 
... ♦ 
5 115 


lft lft.. 

17ft 17ft + 

23ft 24 - 

7 7 4- 

21 21 .. 

3ft 3V- ft 
12ft Uft-K ft 
lift 19 - ft 
ffft Ift-f- ft 
2ft 2ft- ft 
9 9 .. 

22ft 22164- ft, 
15ft 15ft- ft 
lift lift 4 - ft 
19ft toft* ft 

12ft 12ft 

33 31 - ft 

148 148 - 3ft 


7ft 

7ft 

38ft 

9ft 

15ft 

16ft 

SB 

9ft 

29 

52 



Cash Prices 


. Friday, Sept. 5, «7S 
Seat. 5 

Wheat, No. 2 rad, QiL, bo. i/utiPhn 

Com, No. 2 yal- bn. 148n 

0ah.No.2bu. l.47ftn 

Rn. Ho. 2, Mats., bu. ... 3J0 

Flour, «hitw, lb. wt. 142S 

.So i bM W . No.r yajkw .. 5.53V, n 

Cottar. CokmbK, lb. Vlfto 

Santos, 45 lft. Mo Quota 

Cocoa, CMoa *.*. 

Bahia, lb. ...... .Oft 

Sour, raw (doniesHc) ... 4600 

Sugar, raw (world) 4400 

Bettor, (721, scora A 49 

Eaii, oied., dot J6 

■(Jslletl, prtino 53.00 

' (JollitX, cMca SJB 

METALS 
Iran. No. 2, Mdwstra, ton 11040 
Steal, billet. Pith, tun . . . 23040 
M, soaok Ho. 4 1 haavr 

Pitts- delivery twT 7349 

Anft many. lb. 15840 

Owpst. ehc, lb JBS 

Load, lb 4D 

Platt nan 18040 

Oulckillw.M lft. 14640 

Alum buna, Inonts. lb A 1 

Silver, N.Y. Troy, OZ. .... *J1 

Tin. N.Y 125ft 

Zinc, Prime western, lb. 49 ' 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Wool, lb 144S 

Rubber. 2 No. 0 Standard 

rib-smoking, lb. . - JW5n 

Hhtos, UuM-cows, 1 to. ... 42ft 

Gas, laiC dlv., oal. 412 

Foal oil. Mo. 2. nl JOES 

Booth's Commodity Index 7914 


Seat. 

SX9S 

346ft 

.1428 

*•& 

4H 

.1600 

4U0 

47 

AN 

SZJS 

18040 

20340 

W 


45 
HUH 

JO 

4J4 

IMS 

4Tft 

■W, 

4R 

JOTS 

791J 



■ All This 

• For Next 8 Weeks 
i Only $1.00 

■ I (H you aorae to take at bast 13 more meks senrin payable qiwtidy at only SI .43 
IpermoK — average rimlyS0J3 per w«lr for tne entke subscnptton period.) 

Ja«?nSmio emffydarraMas artaf to 

■advisory service and advice eveiy we* for the next 8 weeks. Alter Bat yog vim 
.continue to receive lbe weekly Forecasts for 13 more wefts at die speoai price 
■of only SI .43 per waft (we «iD trill you quarterly). Oms averaging only SO. 93 per 
| week tor the ontira subscriptHHi period. Tm Sm H2.47 ir iwrWfc few tie reptir 

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-ZIP. 


10ft 

13ft 

lift 

20ft 

5ft 

19ft 

22 

22 


7ft 

4ft 

31ft 

44 

8ft 

70U 

8ft 

20ft 

22ft 


4 

7 
34 
30ft 
53 
28 
17ft 
8ft 
47ft 
19ft 
2 4ft 
31ft 
25ft 
10ft 
5ft 
19ft 
710 
51 

73ft 

5ft 

9ft 

65 

6 

7ft 

lft 

23ft 

38ft 

9ft 

9ft 

Sift 

24ft 


82’ 31ft 31ft 31ft+ 

7 8ft lft 8ft + 

5ft AmShto 48b 550 13 11 10ft 11 4- 

8ft AmStWKf .80 6 137 14 13ft 11ft- 

... 6 49ft 49 . 49 ... 

18 18 7 6ft 7 ... 

6 19 27 26ft 26ft + 

9 406 47% 47ft 47ft- 

... 41 5Zft 51ft 52ft 4- 

... 4 43ft 43ft 43ft 

... 9 42ft 42ft 42ft 

5 6 9ft 9ft '9ft*. ft 

...ZlOO 12ft 12ft 12ft- ft 

15ft l«ft 14ft- ft 
.4 36 17 16ft 17 4- ft 

4 12 4ft 4ft 4ft 

T 32 17ft 17ft 17ft- ft 

12 157 17ft 17ft toft- ft 

3 18 16ft lift 16ft.. 

31 279 29ft 29ft. 29ft- ft 

4 55 9ft 9ft. 9ft- ft 

13. 38 5ft 5ft 5ft 

... 7 2ft 2ft 2ft 

2x21* 31ft 30ft 3>ft 4- ft 
... x5 42ft 40ft 4Zft+ lft 
... X4 7ft 7ft 7ft + ft 

5 M *lft 6 lft 61H+ ft 

4 24 6ft 6ft 6%+ ft 

* 156 17ft 17ft 17ft- ft 
8 15 2llft 19ft 20ft 4- ft 

14 32 31ft- Sift- ft 

3 5ft 5ft 5ft-. ft 

6 14 . 13ft 14 - ft 
T4 13ft toft Tift- ft | 

6T 22ft 22ft 22ft- Vi 

19 3ft 3 3 .. 

18 10ft 10ft 10ft- ft 
24 3ft 3ft 3ft 4- ft 

69 42ft 41ft 42ft 4- ft 
44 8ft Oft 8ft 

56 31 3Mb 30ft 

... 8 3ft 3ft 3ft 

... 27 2ft 2ft 2ft- ft 

7 51 Uft 14ft toft- ft 

... 4 6ft 6ft 6ft- ft 

7 10 27ft 27ft 27ft- ft 
... 40 2ft 2ft 2ft...... 

* 5 5ft 5 5164- ft 

5 147 29 28ft 28ft 4- ft 

... 36 27ft 27 27 + ft 

...ZlOO 45ft 45ft 45ft* ft 

24 128 19ft 19ft 19ft- ft 

10 7 lift lift lift. 

27 56 6 6 6 - ft 

... 140 1M 35ft 36 - ft 

* 2J9 74ft toft toft- ft 

4 50 19ft ,19ft 19ft 

10 17 241b 24ft 24ft 

6 3 22ft 22ft 22ft- ft 

3 25 7ft 7ft 7ft- ft 

... 10 2ft 2ft 2ft...... 

7 12 17ft 17ft 17ft* ft 

14 462 (tfft 94ft 95ft- lft 

...2310 45 43 43 - 2ft 

... 103 64 «2ft 62ft- lft 
... 18 3 2ft 2ft- ft 

* 54 lft 8ft 8ft* ft 

27 4 52ft 58ft 52ft- ft 

5 35 4ft 4 4ft 

122 5ft 5ft 5ft- ft 


41ft ASM OfA75 
6 AmStorn JO 
26ft AmStrs 1J0 
44ft AmTAT 3.40 
56ft 49 AmTATpf 4 
46ft 40ft ATT PTB3.74 
46 3 9ft ATT PIAX64 
8ft AWPltMC M 
11 AWnrfl.25 
14 AW4.1M 1.43 ..Z3000 
8ft Ameron 1 
2ft ArmsD -10e 
10ft Ametefc 1 
9ft AMF in 1J4 
15ft Amfac Inc 1 
40ft 23ft. AMP Inc J7 
14ft 6ft Ampco -40a 
2ft Annex Corp 
lft Amrap Corp 
25ft Amstar 240 
36 An>stprX65 
7ft AmstrofJB 
35Vk Amsted 3J0 
5ft Amtol J2 
Uft Anaoond JO 
_ si _ 14 AfidirH 1J0 
34ft 20ft AndcrClay 1 
8ft 4ft Anoallcs .12 

22ft 13ft AnuMGo J3t 
15 9ft AMffM JO 

23 9ft ApooOII jK9 

4ft 1M6 Apeeo Corp 
13 9ft APLCp JO 
4 . lft AmlM-Meg 
56ft 38ft ARASv 1.06 
lift 6ft ArcalaN -36 
35ft 16ft ArctrO .230 
4ft lft Arctic Entr 
4ft 2ft Aristor 
16ft lift AilzPSv 1 36 
7ft 4V. AriiBesT J8r 
2Mb 20ft ATW.G* 1.70 



OctNovJn^Jm.Fefi.ManAprJIflfjBnjJatyAuff^mt 

4974 1975 . 


7 

7 

3 

9 

IB 


12 

6 

75 


... StocXs and Div. Sato* Net. 

High Low In Dollars P/E 1 Mb Moh Law L*u oSi 


1975 Slocki and Dlv. Sale* 
m Low InOwun P'E IK 


37 

2ft 

18' ■» 
3Tt 
51'* 
IP. a 
\rs 
1/ft 
n'.'i 
I3ft 
20ft 

15 
IB’-w 

16 

ZT.» 

25 

17ft 

13Va 

20>. 

18'.« 

62 

W.4 

14 

6ft 

9*.« 

3Pa 

8ft 

4?b 

43ft 

38 
67 
3771, 
Iflb 
lift 
31ft 

6ft 

13ft 

13 

14ft 

2ft 

3>t 

4ft 

21ft 

18ft 

103ft 

48ft 

25-t 

37*b 

« 

92ft 

39 
50ft 

6 

4ft 
9ft 
19* a 
34'*, 
14ft 

7 

103ft 

28ft 

13ft 

8 

lift 

13ft 

7ft 

13’. 

12 

lft 

lift 

lift 

20ft 

17ft 

93'i 


20*: CBS iff 1 
ft CC1 Corp 
lift C CCD Co 1.15 
25ft Cel « roe J.BO 
41 Cdn PTA4.S0 
5 Cemex .12 
ir.b CenHud 1.72 
71ft Cenllia 1 .60 
25 '. 4 CnILt PT2.I7 
9 ^, CenllPS 1.20 
14' . CenLoE 1.38 
HFe CeA*Pw 1.34 
ll^b Cen50W 1.16 
10 CrnSova AD 
16' s CenTel 1.20 
6ft Cenlrn Data 
Uft Cen-o 1.20 
#>4 Cert-teed .» 
11 T » Cessna Air 1 
10ft Cnampinl T 
46 Chml 0<5 5O 
ipi Cftmf on jo 
9 Cham So .60 
4ft CharCo .ffih 
lift Chartr ny 2 
oiaseFd JO 
26’ : ChascM 2.20 
2ft CtiaaT 1.730 
22* a Chenrfn 1.10 
29*.a ChrnNY 2.88 
78 Cheva l.Ma 
37’.* Chesbg 1.36 
26 Cheuie 2.10 
10ft CWEasll .65 
5ft CWMMw Co 
23' . CWPfNHlT 7 
2>« Chris Craft 
S*» ChCff evot 
8ft Chromal .70 
Vt Chrvsler 
Tft Chrvsler wt 

1 Ci Mtg Gd 

r-s a kh tnv 

IHi ClnBell 1.60 
MJ 4 ClnnGE 1.64 
96ft CinG off. 28 
40ft CinGE Dt 4 
164. cinmiia 1.40 
27»4 CIT Fin 2.20 
74‘- CIT otBSJO 
80'.- CIT DtC5J0 
28’k Clllcoro .88 
36 '. 4 OtlesSv 2.40 

2 arzSR 1.179 
lft Ciliins Mto 
4ft CHvlnvst .66 

lift Cilvm pf B2 
22 ft ClarkE 1.60 
7ft ClarkOII .» 
2»i CLC Am .34 
66 ft CIvCIII 2.60a 
23»b CIvEKil 2.48 
6 >. CloroxCo .U 
3 ' 4 CluerPea .30 
7ft CluettP pt 1 
6 ft CMIInv Co 
CNA Finl 
6 ft CNA Of ALIO 
9ft CNA I 1.08a 
ft CNA Larw 
6 CNAL OT2.10 
Pi CoastSt Gat 
IP. CsfSG pfl.83 
11 ft CsfSG on. 19 
Mft CocaCol 2.30 


6 

... 13 

5 2 

17 M 

... 3 

to to 
7 13 
S • 
...7410 
198 


10 
19 
68b 
35 
16 
56 
30 

... Mil 

6 a 

B 34 
... an 
... 9 

8 33 

3 46 

4 61 

... 153 

4 106 
... 25 

J 45 

5 270 

5 5 

is a 

6 31 

5 2 

... 30 

7 22 
... 623 
... U 

5 55 

... m 

... 25 

... 4 

... 13 

I A 

... ISO 

...mo 

7 42 

7 5V 
... I 
... 1 

II 1286 

8 213 

... 29 

... 5 

it m 


34 

*37 

> 

32 

29 

148 

37 

2 

2V 

32 

2 

23 

6 

8 

no 

10 

4 

211 


lft Alien RltyO 
4 ft Armada Ca 
23 Armco I -60a 
23ft Arm pf 2.10 
43ft Armr pH-73 
19 ArmstOc JO 
I Oft Arms! Rllb 
5ft Arvtn J2t 
33ft ASA Ltd JO 
toft Asarco JO 
16ft AsMOH 1 JO 

toft AsdDrG 1 JO 
17ft AsdSpg 1J0 
5ft ARlione JO 
2ft Attco lJOe 
12ft AtiCvEI 1_54 
75Vi AHRMI 2J0 
43 AttRconjS 
82 A1IRC Df2J0 

lft Attoa Coro 
3ft ATO Inc JO 
27ft AutDeta JO 
lft Autam Ind 
2ft AvcoCoro 
ft AvcoCo wf 
9ft AvcoCo W 
21 AvervPd JO 
5ft Avis Inc 
4ft Avnetlnc JO 
27ft AvonPd 1 ja 
12% AztecOG JO 


toft 
52 
51ft 
27ft 
7ft 
. 3ft 
5 

lift 

40ft 

63 

36ft 

6ft 

ISft 

toft 

33ft 

4 

31ft 

27ft 

22 


Mto Banff CP IJ5 5 MO 16ft 16ft t6ft„... 

37ft Btnaf RT4JS ... ZlO 44ft 44ft 44ft* 1 

38 Benef pf4J0 ... 6-45 44ft 45 ■>.... 

21ft BnnjWZSO ... Z710 26ft 26 • 26 


3 BenfStd Mtg 
2 BengtB J07b 
2ft Berkev Pho 
2ft Bat Prod 
24ft BethStl 2a 
35ft BloThre M 
20ft Black Dr JO 
3ft Blair Jhn J2 
TOW BlIsLau 1.10 
10ft BlafftHR .80 
12ft BJuaBafl JO 
lft Bobble Brits 
75ft Boeing JO 
lOft BolseCos .65 
75ft BkMont 1 JO 
26ft 20ft Borden 1 JO 
19ft 13ft BarWar 1J5 
1'A Barmens 
15ft Ba*Ed 2J4 
70 BOSE pfflJS 
9ft- BOSE Dfl.17 
5 Branlff JOe 
Uft BrigosS 1 jo 
46ft 8rlslMY 1 jo 
4ft BrffPeT joe 
12ft BritwvGb 7 
lift BklyUG 1 J2 
13ft BwnGp 1 JO 
4ft BwnSftrp JO 
5 BrwnFer JO 
9 Brunswtc JO 
VA. BrushW m 
21A BT Mto .90* 


3ft 

24ft 

90 

10ft 

8ft 

50ft 

69 

12>A 

2014 

17 

19ft 

8ft 

9ft. 

15ft 

16 

7 


20 Uft 
42 15ft 
3. 6ft 
28 «ft 
75 lift 
M 12ft 
— 77 3ft 

18 144 45ft 

54ft 49ft BuddCo pf 5 ... zHO 50 


...6 11 1 i 51ft a SucyCriei 

... S3 20ft 20ft 20ft- ft 1 TO* 7ft BuddCo Jo 
20 19 23 1 22ft 22ft* ft 
8 10 6ft 6ft 6ft* ft 

4 146 lft 8 8ft 

20 597 38ft 37ft 37ft- ft 
15 31 18ft. toft 18ft* ft 


... 8 3ft 3 3 - ft 

5 105 2ft 2ft TU 

... 15 3ft 3ft 3ft 

U 31 8ft 8ft . tft 

4 60S 37ft MV, 31ft- ft 

21 73 55 54 55 +1 

27 3S3 ,24ft 26 26U- ft 

22 8 4ft 4ft 4ft.l 

4 Xl5 13ft toft 13ft-' ft 

9 44 13ft T3ft 13ft- ft 

9 32 29ft 2914 ft 

... 28 2ft 2ft 2ft 

8 164 27' 26ft 26ft- ft 

9 200 24 23ft 23ft 

7 4 SOM 20 20ft 

8 65 22ft 22ft 2 Zft 

9 23 17- ‘16ft 17 + to 

5 27 2ft 2ft 

8 3Z 22ft 22- 

... Z190 79ft 79 
... 51 10ft 10W 

6 47 7 6ft 

1« 7 4SW 45. 

15 256 61 60ft 

5 158 lift lift 

17 19W 19ft 
15ft 
IS 
6ft 
6ft 
lift 
12ft 
3Vm 
44ft 
7ft 


lift BabckW JO 
3 Bedw JOe 
4ft Bakertn JO 
32 BakerOtl J2 
6ft BaWDH JO 
lift BallCo JO 
lift 17ft MhrMt .02 e 
32ft Uft BuJGE 1.96 
45ft Baft ptB4JD 
Uft BanCil U4 
25ft Bandag Inc 
Vh Bwv Punt 
V BangP pf 2 
24ft BfcoTNY 2J0 
rti Bkorva JO 
31ft BankTr 3 
19W BorbOt! 1 JO 
Uft BanJCR JO 
6ft Baslclnc jo 
toft BatetMf JO . 

39ft 21ft BauscM. JO 
51ft 31ft BaxtLab .19 
14ft BtovStG 1J0 
Wft Bearing JO 
lift Beotfds .76 
17ft Bcdcmn JO 
28 BccttHdt JO 
6ft BeechA.n 
15 Beker J8 
lift fletcoP Joe 
5ft BeldHe Job 
1DW Ml How J4 
13ft BemtsCo lb 
44ft 7M6 Bendbc 2 
66ft 36 Bendbt pf 3 


27ft 

7ft 

lift 

56 

Uft 

20ft 


54 

lift 

41ft 

4 

77 

34 

13ft 

42 

30ft 

lift 

lift 

31ft 


18 

24ft 

24ft 

31ft 

37ft 

14ft 

31 

22 

lft 

2Zft 

18 


7 114 21 20 20ft- ft 

W 12 5ft 5ft Sft 

ID 80 9ft 9ft 9ft 

18 365 S2W Sift S2W+ lft 

6 2 9ft 9ft 9ft 

7 1 lift lift Uft- ft 

... 44 72ft toft 17ft- ft 

7 130 20ft 20ft 20ft- ft 

... zao 49 49 49 

I 7 15ft 15ft 15ft- ft 
22 96 32 3TV» 31ft- ft 

... 15 3ft 3ft 3ft -. 

... 4 10ft 10ft 1194+ ft 

34 28ft 27ft 27ft- ft 
17 Uft 11 . 11 - ft 
94 33ft 32ft 32ft- 1 

20 29ft 29 29ft 

24 13ft 13V* 13ft- ft 
2 8ft- 8ft 8ft+ ft 


5ft 

27ft 

Oft 

22ft 

8 

15ft 

28ft 


S 
5 
5 

’fa 

3 

. 3 782 29 26ft. toft* lft 

15 49 37ft 31ft 31ft- 1 

27 333 35W 34ft 35 - ft 

5 A lift 16ft 16ft- ft 

■9 1 as a a - ft 

11 3K 19ft 19ft toft- ft 

14 107 24 33 33 - ft 

79 10 33 32ft 32ft- ft 

5 17 lift lift lift- ft 

4 69 22ft 21ft 22 + ft 

3 27 17ft 16ft 17 - ft 

9 > Aft 6ft Aft- ft 

7 336 Uft lift J»ft- ft 

6 9 13ft 13ft 13ft 

9 S3 41ft 4 Oft -iltt+lft 

... 10 61 60 + I 

.j 


4W BudCa pt jo 
12 BuffFor 1 jo 
5ft BulwaW JO 
16W BunkHII .1 ja 
3ft BunkrR JOp 

9ft Burner on jd 
14ft Bortind uo. 
42ft 29 BUriNO J5p 
7ft 6W BurlNo pf_55 
32 Uft Bumdv .82 
[ iTOft* A1W BOrrofta jo 

5ft 2ft CabCab For 
3ft lft Cadence Ind 
Aft 2ft Caesars Wrl 
4ft 2W Xal Rnam 
toft 13ft CalP Ut 1 J2 
18ft 7ft Call aim .ar 
36ft 21ft CamRL'joa 
34 znectmaoua 
17ft Uft CtkiPac J6e 
1» 7ft CdnaIR K10 
43V* 22 Capat Com 
28ft 20V* Cap Hold ja 
3ft Tft Caplt Mtg 
47ft 21ft Carter 1.70 
14ft 9ft Carlisle .88 
AA 53ft CaroCMbs 
4ft CaraFrQ-JQ 
isft 11 caraPw 1 jn 
26ft 24ft carp pf2J7 
24ft 15ft CarTec ] M 
13ft Aft CarrCo J2 
13V* 10 CarrGn ,90c 
-25 13ft Cart Hwt JO 
42ft 24ft CartHw nf2 
10ft -6W CartWall jo 
9ft Aft CascNGs .92 
17ft 13ft CastICk job 
TBft 41 CotorTriJO 
54 21ft CBS U6 


4 5ft 
18 23 
26 6 

5 19ft 
TO 4ft 
XI Uft 
21 


5 

55 30 
2<S 93ft 
23' "3 
.4 Zft 
13 5 
T7 2ft 
2 15ft 
» 1« .. 
A? 34ft 24 


13 


37 31ft 
33 14ft 
10 12ft 
9 37 
13 109 22ft 
... » lft 

6 X 


2ft* 
ZZVn- 
79ft- 
Hft + 

7 .. 
43W+ ft 
60ft- ft 

Uft 

1991+ . ft 
15ft- ft 
1$W* ft 
«ft- ft 
Aft.. 

lift- ft 
12ft+ ft 
2ft- » 
44ft- ft 

49ft SO 

5 ' 5 - ft 
22ft 22ft+ ft 
5ft 5ft- ft 
ft 

4*+ ft 

.... I 314 13,4 + to 
S' 6 N 

30ft 30 30 L ft 

6ft 6ft : Aft...... 

2% 2914.... . 

» .a - 2?b 

2ft 3 + ft 
2ft 2ft* ft 
4ft 4ft- ft 

14ft lavs-, ft 

-tow 


5*5!*: a 

Stf*; 1 5 

22 22 + ft 

4ZV* 42v, 

» 2 * il* JT: ,* 

ui ,55 5,4 

» i asa*...?. 

** »«. r-r. * 

/ , 7 1 * * s 

11 253 44ft 43ft Oft. £ 


12 


7Aj Coh*ct Mia 
5 Combo com 
Z5W CombE 1.90 
22ft ComwE 2J0 
258-* ComE DfZ.87 
19 ComwE of 2 
17ft ComE pH .90 
74ft ComE ofl. 42 
S',* ComwO .221 
9ft Compugrp 
lft Commit Set 
28ft Comsat 1 
3'* ConAgra 
15ft ConeM 1 joa 
4ft Conoolm .40 
10ft ConnM 1.60 
109* Conrac .10 
7VS ConEd l.lOe 
41ft ConEd pt a 
36ft ConEd pf 5 
12ft ConFds 1 J5 
43ft ConF of4J0 
9^* ConFrgt .m 
21ft ConNGs 2-18 
97* ConsuPow 2 
49 ConPow pt 6 
52ft CnPw pfSJO 
31ft CnPw pfijo 
3ft Cant Air Un 
22ft ConCen 1.80 
6ft ConlCop JO 
lift CtCop pri.25 
32ft CfintCn 2JQ 
36ft CMC PTA2J0 
3Sft CMC p(B2J0 
26ft OmllCo 2J2 
Aft ConllP uie 
40ft canton 2 

10 ContTele I 
i Oft Control Del 
19ft Gonwuod 2' 

•ft 1ft CoeftUn JOt 
51ft 21ft Coop Ind- 1.44 
9ft a'a Cooper Lab 
Bft 5ft CoopTR JO 
12ft 10 COOT pH J5 
Uft 71b Cooetnd .60 
Mft 17ft COKRg JOe 
42ft 19ft CopwCo I JO 
3 1W Cordura Co 
55ft fllft CernG 7.17* 

9 4W Cowtesc JO 
26ft 10ft CoxBdct .40 
50W 32ft CPC Ini 114 
52ft 26ft CraneCo 
6 3ft Credits: 

26ft CrockN 1., 
lift 7 CromoK 
22ft 12ft CrouHtn ... 
56ft 46ft CroHI Bf3.3S 
Oft toft Crown Cork 
40ft 24W CrwZd 1.80 
T* *4 7ft CTS Co JO 
Sft Cullloan JO 
15ft Cum Eng la 
75 Cum nto.SO 
3ft CunnDro .20 
9ft Cur Inc l.OBe 
5Vb CurtlsWr .40 

11 CuMarH 1 JO 
16W Cyclop uoa 
22 Cvpru* 1J0 


5 

lift 

57ft 

29ft 

30ft 

23ft 

22ft 

toft 

12ft 

27ft 

Aft 

44ft 

9ft 

27ft 

13ft 

16»b 

22ft 

14ft 

AOft 

46ft 

ll'il 

56W 

1714 

27 

19ft 

76 

59ft 

42ft 

Aft 

28ft 

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13 

43 

47 

46W 

46ft 

10ft 

75 

14ft 

23ft 

29 


2 

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17 

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IP* ColuSOh 2 

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IllpvVork 


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25ft 

90 

1R> 

33ft 

24ft 

31ft 


9 277 
9 6 159 

70 . W 
74 21 '< 
ZlO 84<- 

10 5V: 
18 10k 
49 ll’i 

6 27V 

18 IF* 

11 24V 




V . 

etmt* 


17ft 

7ft 

34ft 

28ft 

32 

38ft 

14*4 

22ft 


W Damon .20 
4'.« DanRIv .1(0 
15ft DanaCp 1 JA, 
12 ft Darting job 
28<b Dartlnd ot 2 
W Data GeM 
DavcoCo JO 
6ft DavtHud .72 
TtobOJ DavtPL 1 JA 
72 62ft DPLBT 7.70 
5ft DeanWIt JO 
34ft Deere ijq 
9 Del map l JO 
20ft DelMon 1 JO 
Uft DellaAIr .60 
lft Del tec Inti 
3%i Deffona Crp 
12ft DennMfg 1 
6ft Darmva J2a 
23 Dentaoiv JO 
Deseret .25 
5ft OeSotaln .40 
Oft DetEdls 1.45 
53 Det E pf7js 
7ft Dexter J6 
6ft Dial Flnl .60 


13ft 

47ft 

13ft 

27ft 

41ft 

5ft 

8 

19ft 

19ft 

39*4 

16ft 

10 

13ft 

71 

15ft 

lift 


4& nr, 
33 ■ 5*i 
8 32 3W 
8 12 2381 
.. » 2Sft 
19 213 29V> 
4 4 MW 

63 21V- 
45 16U 
UP 72 , 
16 la'll 
256 43* 
247 Uft 
45 34% 
99 37ft 
26 4V“ 

6 4ft 
ID to 

7 15ft 

a 

3 12ft 
58 9ft 
42 IF- 
ZSD 66'i 
I lift 
16 9 


to 




: *js 


Conlinued on Page 29 







ir >dk 


THE HEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6,1975 


' 1 -’-*> 


AMEX 

DECLINE 


Copperweld Corporation Fights Back 


II. « , . 




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UUUdJM Continued From Page 37 

• I • Commission, and failing to 

. r\if n 70 aJlow Copperweld stockhold- 

1 UTT 003 ers time to withdraw any 
; Decrease stock tendered to Imetal.-The 

speciality metals company 

also charged that knowledge 
. NAGLE of the Imetal tender 1 offer 
' ■ merican Stock “leaked” to some insiders' 
the over-the- and that some shareholders 

■ ropped y ester- of Copperweld had sold. their 

; , reding- stock without knowing a 

« et vahie index tender offs’ was in prepaia- 

; ’ to 85.45 as tion. 

iverage share Like many other American 
V y ire were 305 corporations, Copperweld 
• i f 265 advances, was built on an idea. In 
; ichanged. Vo- this case, it was the idea 
1.3 million of using a secret process 
with 1.33 mil- for bonding copper to steel 
nous session, developed by Jacob Mo Roth 

■ . were traded, of Pittsburgh. 

. r * ^y- Mr. Roth a banker and 

market, the two broth ers- in -1 aw founded 
• ?ial index fell the company in 1915 Eugene 
■=. ' -^ e £ 2 ^F°S^ Brauer, one of the brothers- 

to 77.78. De- in-law was the general mana- 

■ : ed advances. ger and first president. 

' , 1,856 issues There were other methods 
'■ ’iged. volume 0 f bonding copper to steel 
: • llion . shai^, used^ previously but none 
■ 25 ( million the that produced a material that 
^ . , _ _ _ _ _ could be either hot-rolled and 

\ cold drawn while main tain - 

>tnat tne tirsi j ng ratio of copper 

O’ a t 1 to steeI and ™ which the 

‘bV lftni copper did not peal off. 

■ . * and the is- Additional Strength Provided 

... .^? Nr Department The material, which almost 

. ‘v* jobless rate from the beginmng was 

< , August and trade-marked “Copperweld,” 

. ‘he wholesale provided additional strength 
,J vd during the to electric wire conductors 
and was especially useful to 
ye issue cm the utility industry since the 
i ' International added strength of the wire 
, , . y, Inc., which made it possible to place 

4 on 56,000 towers farther apart, with 


and butit the Copperweld 
Steel' Company in Warren, 
Ohio: 

Copperweld was a factor 
in rural eiectriftcation in the 
nineteen thirties. It also 
made a re-enforced copper 
fabric that was used by the 
United States Corps of En- 
gineers to sustain the em- 
bankment of the Mississippi 
River are thereby control the 
river. 

the Warren plant was also 
active In the I end-lease pro- 
gram providing some steel 
for the Soviet Union and 
produced steel for armor- 
piercing shells used by the 

American armed forces. The 

plant was converted to make 
alloy steel in billets and aars 
for use wherever high- 
strength-to-weight steels are 
required sudi. as in gears, 
forgings, oil well drilling bits 

Studies Are Started 
On Coppenaeld Trades 

The New York Stock Ex- 
change and the Securities and 
Exchange Commission were 
reported yesterday begun 
routine investigations of in- 
sider trading in stock of the 
Copperweld Corporation. The 
Big Board confirmed that the 
inquiry had begun but the 
S.E.C., by custom, refused to 
comment. 

In Pittsburgh, in a suit filed 
against Sotf 6 t£ Imetal, Cop- 
perweld charged that advance 
information of the French 
company’s bid pushed up the 
price of Copperweld stock 


a block of important savings in cost, roughly 1 1 per cent in heavy 


Florida Na- The company was the only 
■ the most ac- one using the process untu 
ounter mark- after World War n and- bad 
nged at 9 % little competition. In 1939. 

realizing that- war was 
ipment Asso- Imminent, the company de- 
e. losing 74 ended to make its own steel 


trading on Aug. 25 through 
Aug. 28. 

The most -likely source of 
the leak, the suit charged, was 
one of IraetaTs agents or em- 
ployes. or employes or agents 
of an Imetal affiliate. 


ipment Asso- imminent, the company de- ployes. or employes or agents 
* s. losing 74 cided to make its own steel . of an Imetal affiliate, 
ime of 45.000 ■ ■ — - ■ 

!L b i°brica 0 t- World Bank and l.M.F. Facing 
Decisions on Fulfilling Accords 

ration. % to ; 

e Industries! Continued From Page 27 

ndv Coroora- JAB. countries. Mr. McNamara 

3 ^ — mentioned in their speeches indicated agrement in principle 

rrn thP Ampv 1116 *™pact of higher oil prices with this today, saymg that 
t JrJ+t. on their nations' economic the replenishment "should be 
isSShfaL situation. , supported both by traditional 

trenSh It Mr. Witteveen said «i donore and by those additional 
xScretion of hope we can overcome” the coimtnes whidi, since our last 

Sn. Trad- balance-Df-payments problmi 
13 174 con . of most of the less-developed “A™ Aiajor increases m cneir 

i Thureda^s countries this year, partly™* 1 ?^ in « ,ines »► ?« 
i the Chicago "J* °E IT^eign- 

■ change there weck mgeSSi* 

♦rorforf- and partly through the con- exenange n -r 


and other mechanical struc- 
tural components. 

In 1951, the company 
bought the Flexowire Compa- 
ny of Oswego, N. Y., end 
the expanded its line by mak- 
ing fine-gauge Copperweld 
wire. In 1953, it bought the 
Ohio Seamless Tube Compa- 
ny of Shelby, Ohio, a Major 
supplier of alloy cold-fi- 
nished tubing. Later, Copper- 
weld began production of 
heavy -wall welded tubing 
and became a world leader 
in marketing the tubing un- 
der the designation DOM, 
which stands for “drawn 
over Mandril .' 5 the form over 
which the tube is fabricated. 

During the nineteen -sixties, 
the company developed an 
aluminum covered steel wire 
and marketed it under the j 
name of lumoweld, a compa- 
nion to Copperweld. that has 
been widely accepted by uti- 
lities. Additional capacity for 
Aluraoweld ' has been built 
in Japan to serve that coun- 
try «nd Southeast Asian 
markets. 

Recently the company built 
a plant in Fayetteville, Term., 
to make copper-clad alumin- 
um wire for use in CATV 
closed-circuit television and 
other electrical applications. 

In' 1973, Copperweld 
bought from Lear-Siegler, 
Inc., the Regai Tube Compa- 
ny of _ Chicago, to produce 
welded' structural tubing for 
budding and highway con- 
struction, and Copperweld 
invested in new facilities for 
large diameter DOM tubing. 

Since 1968 the chairman 
of the company has been 
Phillip H. Smith, an Austra- 
lian mining and me talurgi cal 
engineer. Mr. Smith, now 48, 
is a graduate of the Universi- 
ty of Sydney and was a 
Fullbright Scholar at the 
Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 


New York Stock Exchange Transactions 

. W5 Stocks and Dtv. SUh N«t] wi S locks and Div. Safes Met j 1WI Stocks and Div. Safes Vet 

High law IftPajjars P/ETOOsNjgh Low LjgCfjpjHlBh Low in Dollars P/E lOOs High Low Last CM High Low - In Dollars PJE ion HMD Low Last CM 


Continued From Page 31 


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4ft 2ft DonUrf Jen ... 6 2ft 2ft 2ft- ft 

24ft 17ft Donneftv M 13 43 sth 20 20ft+ ft 

16ft *ft Dordiu ,10e 7 11 Uft 14ft Uft- ft 

S 17 5M 5ft 5ft + ft 

7 SB 36ft 36 36ft + ft 

94 EM OowCh XJA 1< 293 93ft 92ft 92ft+ ft 

... 5 4ft 4ft 4ft 

9 4 41ft 41ft 41ft- ft 


1 3ft 3ft 3ft 

7 Uft 16 16 - ft 

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53ft 29ft 
29 13ft 
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8ft 3ft Dorsey .10 
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94 EM OowOt 1 A 
Sft 3 DPF Inc 
44ft Uft Dravo 1 JO 


49ft 38ft Dresser U0 ID 137 67ft 46ft 67ft- ft 


17ft Uft Drex8d 144 
8ft 3ft Dreyfus Me 


DrexBd 144 ... 9 16ft 16ft 16ft- ft 

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10ft Dufc Pw 1^0 73 H6 14ft 16 16 - ft 

48 Duke ofUO >..;100 77 77 77 

Duke pf7J0 ...Z100 72ft 72ft 72ft- ft 

Duke DfS-75 ... 10 69 49 49 + »A 

... 27 25ft 25ft 25ft + ft 

18 66 27ft 26ft 26ft- ft 
... 2 2ft 2ft 2P.+ Ym 


71 63 Duke pf7J0 

72 55ft Duke Df6_7S 
26ft 24 Duke oOM 
30ft 18ft DunBrad 1 

4 lft Dual an CD 


133ft 87ft duPont 4.75c 31 119 124ft 123ft 124 - 


42ft 57 duPltr BT45D ... 2 50ft 58 5Bft+ ft 

so 44 duPnlntUft ... i 45 45 45 + ft 

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26ft Uft EnalP 14Mb 7 57 25ft 24ft 25ft + ft 

13 -7ft EascoCo JD 5 7 lift lift llft+ ft 

6ft 3ft East Air Un 21 74 4ft 4ft 4ft+ VW 

33 23 EastOsF .10 7 116 27 ■ 26ft 27 + ft 

16 8ft EastUtl 1J0 7^ 8 14ft Uft 14ft- ft 

110 63 EasKd lJ6a 24 422 92ft 91ft 91ft- ft 


57 duPnt Bf4-50 ... 2 50% 58 5Bft+ ft 

44 duPnl otLSB ... 1 45 45 45 + ft 

12ft DtWLt 1.72 7 74 16ft 16 16* 

48 Ouon PftJD ...2100 73ft 73ft 73ft + ft 

19ft DUQLt 40« 2 . .. zllB 21ft 20ft 20ft- ft 

" “ " “ ... 228 26ft 26ft 26ft 

4 2 8 0 t 


29ft 19ft Eaton 1 JO 
30 iBft Eddin .42 


7 46 27ft 27ft 27ft- ft 
15 16 2Dft 20 20 - Vi 


28ft Uft EdcrdJk JO IS 40 22ft 21ft 71ft 

16ft 6ft Eckd NC JB 11 7 14ft 14ft 14ft+ ft 

41ft 17ft EdbBro MB 8 12 36ft 35ft 36 + ft 


41ft 17ft EdbBro MB 

in« 10 EG&G .12 

3ft Tft Elect Assoc 
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lift 8ft Emeryln .40 
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38 24ft Esnwrk 1 JO 


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IV. 


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lift 

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37 .. 


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35ft 

34ft 

35% + 

% 

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38ft + 

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6ft 6ft+ 
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6 ft + Vi 27ft 15ft 
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tft 1ft- V. 17 6¥j 

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22ft 

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19ft- Jft 
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29ft- ft 
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7ft 

13 - ft 
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lift- ft 
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lift* ft 
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im 

Uft 14ft- ft 

12 Uft 

6ft 6ft 


7 16 18ft Uft !»-?.» 
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6 56 17ft 77ft 17ft- *Vm 

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a» 

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13ft ISft+. ft 

42 41 

71 21ft- ft 

Uft Wft+r'.a 
10ft 10"i..... 
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lffft 

16ft 16ft- ila 
42 42 -’ft 

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19ft 20ft. .r... 

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6 169 22ft 21ft 22ft- ft 
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76ft 62 ICInds of 6 
36ft 27ft lOnd PIX5D 
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47 14 13ft 13ft- ft 
6 67 67 67 + ft 

W 33ft 33ft 33ft- ft 
10 3ft 3ft 3ft + ft 

14 26ft 26ft 26ft + ft 
I 14ft 14ft 1 4ft— ft 

15 7ft 7ft 7ft 

10 2ft Tft 2 ft+ ft 
27 23ft 23 23 - ft 


12 15 21ft 21ft 21ft„..r.I W* W IIPOW pf3JB ... Z2D0 39ft 39ft 39ft- ft 


3ft Estertine J2 IB IS 


5 U Oft 9ft 9ft 

5 6 28ft 28ft 28ft+ ft 
9 15 18ft 17ft 17ft- ft 

6 252 37ft 36 37ft + lft 


37ft 23ft Ettnrl 1-30 
49ft 34ft Ethyl pf2.40 


6ft 6ft- ft 


37 29ft 26ft 28ft- 1 
8 40 1 * 39ft 39ft 



.... 


7ft Zft Evans Prod ... 147 5ft 4ft 4ft- ft 

17 10 ExCdlO 1 5 21 Uft 13 13 - ft 

20ft 16 ExdarMta ... 17 19ft 19 19ft- ft 

92ft 65 Exxon SJOe 7 330.86ft 16 86ft + ft 
7ft 4ft Fabros AO 10 23 6 5ft 5ft- ft 

62ft 17 FaTrCam JO 16 138 4Bft 46ft 47ft- ft 

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12ft 8 FalrmtF JS 8 > 2 10ft Uft 10ft- ft 

10ft 6ft Fansted AO S II 9ft 8 9+1 

7ft 4ft FarWlt FBI ... 9 5ft 5ft 5ft- ft 

9ft 3-7, Far aft MfO ... S 7ft VU TA- ft 



racts traded- P^7 through the con- 

?«i 5 tinued abflity of these coun- r«»gffltion that many of the 

^81 2 Hurra- ^ borrow in world capi- oi^exporting countries are now 
f amounted S P spSW their eirnings m fast 

!• 1_ Mr. McNamara, in Ws re- “ ^ ”“ 1« ftam-md lira- 

ntVATflB marks, urged nations that ? ot I ? cc H” lu * at * n S^ e ^®' 

LKLAi UK ninnnprf tn mntrihute mnnev implication was that they may - 

Vr** A T 7 A for inter«t subsidies to° the 1101 as ^ ced to contribute. ****** Pros »ft 11 % 

{Si? rf H. Johannes Witteveen , ft « 

HI. (AP) — Worid Bank for lending at re- not accept view ‘ in v* 

reator of the duced interest rates to “makfc Hopeful on Bates 0 1 TTTlTO fPA AnAAffTl nw T 
“Dick Tracy," their pieces m wily as pos- Edwin H . Yeo 3d, Under bAUDlu iU UllUSlS 3® ^ 

but he says sible." He said he now had Secretary of the Treasury for wau v 

er from his enough pledges to make P«s- Monetary Affairs, said at a ATH ATT ADT^l? DTCU 37 w 

sible only «S 00 -miUian of Ipans MVS conference he was 'Very Dili UIL I lUllJjl lUull If 

sider retirmg under this new facility, which honeful” that agreement could tb% io^ 

years." says is “substantially below the ^ reached in January— at the * 

ias drawn the originally planned level of meeting of the 20-nation Continued From Page 27 ' 

s. “I love my $l-billion ” interim committee of the LM.F. . — 

r . Target Signaled in Jamaica— on the issue of ““ch substantive progress on w. wa 

he success of ■ M M future rules for currency ex.- the December meeting, which i 6 im 

3 ^ a ^“ajo^SeS^^ change a^ „ J would arm those OPEC mem- £ % 

ideas i all tim tiation among the richer coun- . How f eve V™L no bers pressing for a price nse. 

or a two-way tne®. including some ofl-pro- of . “.J*"? <<Tlie whole thing hinges on 3i*» 22 ft 

!^«m£ £ during ocmAs, thati/to atlitnde of ** Iranians ” ^ 

tors following start ^rtoyear.^ « ™ * 


12ft I FalrmtF M 
10ft 6ft Fainted .40 
7ft 4ft F«rWst Fnl 
9ft 3ft Far oh AMU 
6ft 2ft Fodders Cp 
30 9'A FerklCa 1.40 

19ft 12ft FedMooul l 
19ft 13 FedNMt JO 
Z7ft 15*6 FodPao 7-50 

11 3*6 FedSlonl A0 

52 25ft FedDSt 1 J4 
29ft 15V. FerraCo l 
14ft lft Fibrebd .30D 
5ft Tft FldFin J4e 

32ft 25ft FWelUn 2.40 
14 7ft Fielder Mil 1 

12 6ft FlltrolCO JO 
lift 5ft FlnSanB JO 
12ft 7V, FlnlFed J2f 
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27ft 16ft FstCWc .96 


5 II 91k I 9 4-1 

... 9 5ft 5ft 5ft- ft 

.... S 7ft 7ft TA- ft 

... 181 4ft 4ft 4ft 

7 13 79ft 19ft 19ft- ft 

10 16 13 12ft 12ft- ft 

6 331 13ft Uft 13ft- ft 

4 6 24ft 24 24ft-t- ft 

5 4 9ft 9ft 9ft 


21ft 17 ITW JO 16 7 25' 

lift 7ft ImoiCDA JO 5 312 S 

40ft 28V. INA CD 2.10 10 M0 » 

18ft Uft INA Inv 1J? 9 17 

5ft 2ft income Coo ... A 4 

Oft 7ft IncCCu ,93» ... 18 V 

20ft 1414 IndlanGas 2 S 1 19 

85 70ft IndlMptUS ... ZlW 75ft 75 
71 57ft ImflM Dt7.7A ... zTO AS A8 

22 13 IndDlPL 1-82 10 16 20 

17V* 10 IncflNat 1J0 20 59 14 

•ft S<A inexco Oil ... M2 ■■ 

84ft OVA InoerR 2AS 12 32 71 

52ft 31 IllOR DtZJS ... S 41 

39ft. 2144 imam MOa A 4 37* 

4414 32V4 InbStl 2.40a 5 224 421 

8*4 5ft Inmont JO A 4A 71 

914 Site InedlcD JO A 38 8 

13ft 10ft Insil ptAIJS ... 7 121 

40ft 26V, InsuCup 1.20 39 13 27 

3ft lft instil invTr ... I 11 

7ft 4y« Inteoon J2 8 MA 7* 


18ft Interco 1.46 
tft Intrant Dlv 


Intrcnti Dlv 
Intrtfcetnc 2 


% 227ft 15T4 IBM 7 


16 7 25ft 25ft 25ft- ft 

5 312 lft 814 8ft- ft 

19 140 32ft 30ft 31ft- I 

... 9 17*4 17ft 17*4+ ft 

... A 4ft 4ft 4ft+ ft 

... 18 8ft 8ft 8ft- ft 

8 1 19 19 If - ft 

...ZlDO 75ft 75 75ft + 2ft 
... 220 68 A8 68 + 1ft 
10 16 20 19ft 19ft 

20 59 14 Uft 13ft- ft 

...M2 Oft Tft 8 - ft 

12 32 73ft 73 73ft + ft 

... S 48 48 48 + ft 

A 4 37ft 37*4 37ft 

5 224 43ft 42ft 43ft* ft 
A 46 716 7ft 7ft- ft 

A 38 8 Tft • 

... 2 1214 12ft T2V4+ ft 

39 13 27 27 27 - ft 

1 -lft lft lft 

8 146 7ft 7 7ft + ft 

7 17 32ft 31ft 32ft* ft 

3 15 Aft Aft 6ft- ft 

4 18 37ft 37ft 37ft* ft 

15 483 182 179*4 188 -2 


? ^ ^ *1* 35ft 23ft IntFlav JOb 30 577 26ft 24*6 34ft- lft 


.. 15 9 A 9 .. 

5 2 3ft 3ft 3ft.. 

6 211 30ft 30 30ft* 


7V FWderMil 1 

35 

7 

12% 

12% 

12% + 

Aft FlltrolCO JO 

5 

9 

9% 

9% 

9%.. 

5ft FlnSanB JO 

5 

2 

9ft 

9% 

9ft.. 

7% FlnlFed J2t 

4 

35 

9% 

9ft 

9ft- 


20ft 13ft Flrestn 1.10 I 492 20 19*6 20 + ft 

16ft 9ft FstChor J7t 7 89 10ft 10ft KM- ft 

27ft 16ft FStCWc .96 • 17 22 21ft 21ft- ft 

46ft 35ft FslInBn 1.10 12 33 39ft 39 39ft* ft 

19ft 12 FstMfas 36 2 159 13 12*6 12ft- ft 

32ft 22ft FstNBfl l.K 5 104 22ft 22*6 22ft 

22 13*6 FstPa 1.32 6 56 17 16ft 17 * ft 


Continued From Page 27 


32ft 22ft FstNBo l.K 5 
22 13*6 FstPa 1 J2 6 

5ft 2ft FPOM1 l-47e ... 
10ft Aft FstUnR .96b » 
6 4ft FstVdBk AS 8 
20ft lift FWIsCp 1.76 6 

39 1916 HsdlM 1.10 • 

16ft 9ft FIlhFdt A0 6 
14ft 4*6 FbhrScf JO 11 
18ft V.t FfeetEnt J4 25 
14*6 10ft FfentlDO JO I 
13ft 7 FlexIVun JO 5 
20ft 11 FlKitkot MA. 9 
ISft - 8ft FlaGas .90 5 

26ft 13ft FUPOW 1.95 7 

27 15ft FlaPwL 1 A6 7 
26ft M FfoStt 1 JO 4 
49 .15 FIuotQj JO 17 

lift 10ft FMC .92 A. 
32 25 FMCpOJS ... 

Aft 4ft Fd Fair JO ... 
9ft 5ft FooteCB JO 7 
42ft 3Zft FOTdM 240 27 

T4ft 10ft ForMcK .92 5 

36 19ft FMK pflJO ... 
16 Uft FtDea 1J4« ... 
30ft 13ft FtHovrf* 48 13 

34 15ft FootWh 1.10 8 

41ft 23 FCKbore JO 11 


56 17 16ft 17 + ft 

3 2ft Tft 2ft* ft, 

5 10ft 10ft 10U 

14 5 4ft 4ft 

1 17*6 17ft 17*6 

18 26ft 26ft 26*6+ 16 

26 12*6 1216 1216 

40 Uft 13ft lift 

9* lift lift 11*6- ft 

24 14 13*6 13ft + ft 


30ft 19ft IntHarv 1.70 
12V« 6ft IntHold Me 
48ft 30ft IntMlftCh 2 
49 42 IntMinr pt4 

lift Aft Hit Mining 
26 17*4 IntMultl 1.3A 

29ft 21*k InNIck 140a 
60ft 34ft intPaoer 2 
9*i 3ft intRectit .15 
25ft 14% IntTT 1^ 

51 3416 ITT 0»4JD 

45 31% IntTT pfJ4 

44*6 32ft IntTT pfK4 
30ft 21 ITT pfN2J5 
24 lift Intrpde 1J0 
19 8ft intnxJbGp 1 
15 5 IntrsBrd JO 

16V* lift lntrsPw-1.40 
5*6 3 IntratUn J4 

34ft 12‘6 low* Beef 


4 92 25ft 24ft 24ft- % 

... 3 lift lift lift 

5 442 4316 42ft 43 + ft 

... 1 45*6 45*6 45*6+ 1*6 

9 34 8 7*6 7*6- ft 

7 15 23ft 23ft 23ft + lft 

■ 204 27ft 26ft 27ft* ft 

11 373 60ft 59ft 60ft + lft 

9 64 7*6 Tft 7ft+ ft 

5 429 20 19% 19*6- ft 

... 29 45ft 44*6 44*6- *6 


Menasc -lOr 
MercStr JO 
Merck 1.40 
Moreditti .70 
MorrLvn .60 

lift 
23 
7 

12ft 
Sft 
64*6 
29*4 
8 Y» 

8ft 
14*i 
fft 
9ft 
10 ft 
12ft 
lft 
10ft 
XTh 
4ft 
43 
13% 

Oft 
9 

16% 

10ft 
14ft 
B 

.34% 

IM 
8 W 
lit 
8 % 

14*6 

9 . . _ 

5% Monorm Ind 
7 MnnrEq JO 
4i Monson 2.60 
48 Mans DI2.75 
24ft MonDU 2J0 
21*i MonPw 1 JO 
19ft MonSt 1.80a 
4*i MONY .70e 
27ft Moor Me M0 


It 1 

13 U1 
... 1 

A 3 

in 3 

18 1A 
5 2 

9 205 

8 I 

... 5 

10 91 
26 373 

• 14A 

14 52 

9 81 
... 1 
9X1760 

7 24 
9 2 

5 51 
A 2 
4 72 
... 3 

9 103 
7 7 

AS 13 79 
I Or 5 14 
80 14 | 

O 23 255 
.70 4 5 

.60 S 156 


45ft 45ft- 2> 
46 46ft- .ft 


46 46ft- tft 

15ft 15ft* -V 
17% 17*i..^.. 

1914 1V4..J:.. 

45‘.i 45 , .V-i , 4 
25 2R«+4.ft 

33 33 

17 17*4- .14 

9% V.t* '4 
16ft 16**- jft : 
33ft 3*'«+ .'k 
M 16ft- •••*! 

3 3 

15ft. 15%+-*% 
11*4 11**- ft 
4ift 48%- % : 
68ft tfft- % i 
9% *%- ft 

16*6 Wh- ft ' 
.05 16 124 25% 24*6 25ft- . ft j 

UD ... 56 SH 28*6- '% : 

.14e 9 77 10 9% 9ft f 

6 109 16*4 15% IK. 

8 149 13ft 13V. 13ft- -ft 

...1150 71 70 71 

... X50 33ft 33li 3V‘2...... ( 

... 409 13ft 12% 1J%- 'ft I 

A 11 13% 13ft 13ft- "ft i 

5 1 24 24 21 ...I.. 

4 24 12% 12*6 12%+ ‘ft i 

8 9 16>4 IP* 16*4+ "4 I 

8 33 12% 1214 12*4-*% 


7 135 13*4 13% 13*-...?.. 
... 8 lft lft lft- "ft 
5 11 16% 16ft 14**+ 3 b 
10 11 M 27% 27*4- “ft 
12 25 1 0ft 9ft 9ft- ^4« 
21 282 54ft 54 - 54 - fifc 


7 5 17 16ft 17 .J7.. 

• 17 1214 1214 12*5..—.. 

6 10 10ft 10>ft 10ft- 'A 

4 62 20% 19ft 20 + *4 ! 

... 12 14ft 14ft 14ft..™. 

7 U 20% 2014 20ft..™. 

7 4 9% 9% 9%- ft 

5 522 42*4 62ft 42V.- % 

... 13 3*4 3% 3 ft 

5 134 14ft 14% 14ft- ft 
... 106 3ft- 3ft 3ft 

4 9 15 14*6 14*4- ft 

5 45 18 17ft 17% 

4 16 18% 18ft 18ft- -ft 

5ft Monorm ind 3 s Aft 6% 6ft + % 

7 MnnrEq JO 16 51 8% 8ft *ft- % 

41 Monson 2.60 9 349 71ft 71 71ft- % 

48 Mons OI2.I5 ... 2 78ft 78ft 71ft+ tft 

24% MonDU 2J0 8 2 26 25*4 26 ...... 

21Vi MonPw 1 JO 8 85 23% 23% 2316+.% 

19% MOdSt 1.100 ... 37 21*6 21% 21%...... 

4ft MONY .70e 9 15 0% 6% 6%+ % 

27% MOOT Me I JO 5 434 66*6 62 - 64% - 3% 

51V. Morgan l.K 12 151 55% 54% 54% - .% 

13% MorrsKn .88 6 2 21ft 21ft 21%+ % 

4% 1% MorseEl Pd ... 17 2ft 2%‘ 2%.—.. 

7% TA MoneSh .20 7 HI I 7% X +• -14 

4ft lft MteeTr Am ... 21 3 2H 2U..n.. 

11% MorNor J8 I 37 WA 12% 12*4- «% 


21% IHk lowaPw 1.84 


2 41ft 4016 40ft 15V« 11% MorNor J8 B 37 1214 12% XVA- -% 

20 39*6 39% 39ft- ft 57% 33*6 Motorola .70 27 208 46% 45% 45ft- 0U 
46 25% 25ft 25% - ft 44ft 25% MtFuel 1J8 14 26 35ft 35 35 - -% 

7 20% 19*6 20%+ % 20 16ft MtSfTef 1J2 I 35 18% 17% II + *•% 

1 15*6 Uft 15*6+ ft 8ft A ft Muntard J6 5 13 7% 7 7 ..X.. 

3 14 14 14 - ft 5% 3% Munfd of JO ... 2 5% 5 5 - % 

11 14% 14% 14*6+ ft 16% 11 Muons 1.N 32 7 14% 14% 14%.. 

6 4% 4% 4ft- % 17% lOftMmhCUO A 15 15% 14ft 14*6--% 

58 24ft 23*6 23*6- *6 28% 15% MuroOfl JO 4 33 21% 21% 21ft- % 

12 12% 11% 11% 17% 12 MumtOh 1 5 5 14% 14ft 14ft- ft 

27 16% 16% 16*6- ft 15% 12% MutlOm 1-32 ... 14 14% 14% 14% 

13 20ft 20 20ft- % 9*6 4 MversL JO ID 44 6% 6% 6% 


7 20% 19ft 20%+ ft 

1 15ft Uft 15*6+ ft 

3 14 14 14 - ft 


16ft MtSTTel 1J2 
4ft Muntard J6 
3% Munfd st JO 


11 14% 14% 14*4+ ft 16*6 11 Muons l.K 32 

6 4% 4ft 4ft- % ITVa lOftMurehCTJO A 

58 24ft 23*6 23*6- *6 28% 15% MuroOfl JO 4 

12 12% 11% 11% 17% 12 MurrvOh 1 5 


13% 8% Iowa El 1 JB 170 12 12% 11% 11% 17% 12 

18% 10% lowallG 1-56 7 27 16% 16% 16*6- ft 15% W 


27 16*6 16% 16*6- ft I 15% 12% MutlOm 1J2 
13 20ft 20 20ft -ft 9*6 4 MversL A0 


9 32 18% 17% 18%-"% i22S r JS ^ S «% 22ft Nabisco 230 11 52 35 34*6 34*6+ % 


9 32 18% 17% 18ft- % 

5 27 14% 14% 14%- % 

7 29 24% 24 31*6 

7 875 Zl% 21 21ft + ft 

4 6 22ft 22% 22Va- ft 

17 363 39% 39% 39%+ ft 

A. 79 16*6 16 16ft- ft 

... 4 28*6 Kft 28ft- ft 

... 17 4% 4*4 4%- % 

7 10 8ft 8*6 8*6- % 

27 312 31% 38 3116- ft 

5 24 12% 12*6 12*6 


Aft 2% IPCOHMP 
21*6 13V. ITE I mo .72 
14% 5ft Itek Coro 
9ft 3ft riel Coro 
12ft 8ft IU Inti J5 
32 22% IU Int A 

13% .8 JomesF .48 
16*6 9% Jantzen .70 


.. 18 9* 

5 19 «V 
4 139 11 
.. 2 28 


3% 3ft- ft 

18 II + *6 

9% 9% 

6 6 % 

19ft 11 + ft 
27 28 + 1*6 


1516 4% NaroScI .60 

22% 10*6 NoshuaC JO 
15ft 7*i NatAIrl JO 
15% 7*6 N Avia .We 

13% 9Vi 
52*6 29V 


2 10% 10% 10*4+ ft 
5 U'i 12*4 12W 


9*6 5*i 
44% 29*1 


24 12% 12*6 12*6 I 112 

I 22*6 22ft 22ft 1 75 


it 13% FtDea ljla ... 13 14ft w 14 - . ft 

30% 13*6 FtHawP AS 13 137 28 27% 27% - % 

34 15% FastlMtl 1.10 8 27 28 27*6 27ft- ' % 

41ft 23 FCKbore JO 11 64 28ft 2f*6 27% - ft 

32*6 Uft FmkbiM JO 15x506 27ft 26% 27%..,... 
31% 22ft FreenM 1 JO 5 74 23% 22% 23 


11% 5% JOoonF .93e ... M 8ft 6 8 «« 29ft 

38*6 27% Jeff Pi lot .72 12 106 28*6 27% 27*6- % 

112 101 JeC si 13J0 ...8140 118% 109% 110% 1JS 

75 58 JerCe 018.12 ... *40 71ft TO 70-2 « ^ 
25% 17% JrwnlC 1J0 7 39 18% 18% 18%- *6 5ft lft 

5% 2% . — ... 32 4 3% 4 7% 3ft 

44 22*6 “■ 


20% 14 Frueftf 1 JO 
7ft 3ft Fuqua Ind 

wra louuwlUfi set; ■**■* 7SJF&SFSS ^v^-s^jbut <^1 2 % 

ago he gave 1977, of the funds of the World or m the Wzfcjrt SH» pMcy a very bjg J & i» 

i, but removed Baflts zero-interet “soft loan” favomg very lunited ^mtCTven- Iran> along with fellow OPEC 35% 26% GArtTlJm* 

i later when subsidiary, the International tion by CMral banks to m_ members — Algeria, Venezuela g.. S.. SSSyfu? “i -X S 1 * 5 % * 2 % 

s pouring into Development Association. Mr. fiuCTce rates -wd Iraq — has lately become an! m% WftGamSafijB ..1 ^ »% Sft »ft- ft] 34 ^ 12 +, 

McNamara said the total The question ^or exmmge rates unpqrtaut borrower on the Eu- a 17 % eoms onj# ... .3 »% T9%- 19% £5 

confident that amount should be more than must be settled to ropean money market, and pub- &% u*6 cardDanJA 12 « mo h% 22 %+ ft ^ *ix. 

will never- die the present three-year contri- motion a large part of the pack- gdy Shah. Reza Pahlevi has 14 % 6% oartwci m 7 3 u 11 % 12 + ft ™ ins 

ill "outlive his bution of S4.5-baiion even after age of othw a^i^ents rrarii- been giving the impression that ?2£ ’IS fOo l »% mi m2- ’** 3 a% iwj 

he had an as- adjusting for inflation. ed here ; tfau week, mcludmg he i# feeling a strapped. ^ Efh^vi? .* 2 "* w T...* SS 1S> 

d carry on in The. United States has em- the begnung of sale of a pan 1^-5 oil revenues are slumping 

J .l_. ■ 1.1 . t- .... nf tl.A TMT’e nnm 1_.-1_ 1-u: -1-. _ . Uft. 5% venWM COP 


10 34 17ft 17 I7%+ % 

8 19 5% S 5 

A 12 8ft 8% 8ft 

... 32 1% 1% 1% 

5 52 10% 9% 10 - ft 

... 2 15*6 15*6 15%- % 

6 49 27% 33% 27*6- % 

1 37 37 37 +1 

4 Z7 22ft Zl% 22 + ft 


47*6 28 
17% 14 
Zlft 18 
36*6 19% 
99% 72ft 
15% 8 

14*6 5 

55 50ft 
31 24% 

34% 11% 
90 42% 

5% 2% 



9 275 35% 35ft 35% 9% 

... 16A 39*6 39 39%+ *6 »•? « 

... 24 l*ft 16% 16ft + % *£■ WA 

... 4 19% 19*6 19%+ “*6 9ft 

9 123 22% 22’6 22*6+ -ft 1J% 

21 137 05% 84% 84ft- 1 11* 

9 4 12% 12*6 12% - ft IS? 325 

19 9 9ft 9*6 9ft <5% XPA 

...Z100 53ft 51ft 53ft + ft 7ft TV, 

4 6 29ft 29 » + % »» 23U 

7 Z76 18% lift 18%.... .. 

12 46 75*6 74*6 75%- % ,g* 

... 4 2% 2% 2%- % ]» 

23 20V* 

5 35 29*6 29 29%+ % 18*6 14 


Ip hasized that it expects con- j erf the LMJ.’s gold. 


wtoget 
me delivery c 

sNevvAbik 

Justfill in and mail the coupon today. 
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4% lft Gateway In ... 72 4 3% 4 

B 8*6 2% GCA Ora 8 5 5% 5 5% 

^6% Uft. 5% GemM Cap ... 6 9*6 9% 9%- ft 

while ambitious military and 13 % 11 Gem Min ia ... 14 12 % 12*6 12 % 

development investments force it% 7 % GnAinv J4e ... so 9*6 9 % 9 %- % 

ahwiri 6 31% GnAOfl JOb 10 4 34*6 34*6 34*6 

ao S a * « 11*6 7% Gen Banc JO 5 4 9ft 9% 9*6 

The Saadis are expected to 12 % 7% Gncabie .72 5 50 10 % 10 10 % 

flrsufi thsf thp nnmiirv nhiM*. 15*6 10% Gwu9 1J0 7 5 13% 13*6 1 3*6 .... .. 

0DjeC 2i 7% G anma M 8 20 17*6 17% 17%+ V6 

live of the OPEC countries now o% 2*6 Gw Dwah* 4 3 4*6 4% 4% 

is to see a real urowth' in the mw if G«n Dvnani a m 47 45 % 4S%- 1*6 
rionMTuTfnr ^1^ ^ 32*6 GCTEI 1 JO 16 451 46% 45% 46ft + % 

demand tor oil; this means en- 27 % is% GnFood us 12 199 25% 2 M am- *6 

couraginc the recovery of the 1 *% 12 % GnGtti iJ2» 17 22 ia% u% ia%+ % 

European and American econ- ® f I « 10 % ^ w - ft 
omies. 31% 24%'GnInstr pi 3 ... 2 29% 28% 29%+ *6 

/’«*«» Ware IranmA 20 6% GenMed JO 10 6 ISft 15% 15*6- *6 

Case May Be Weakened 57 % 40 % g«imih 1 jo i6 u 53 52 % 52 * 6 - % 

Rrrf tViic /Ml CO mtxr Vo eliohtKr 53% 31ft GnMol 2JSe 16 797 50 49*6 49*6- *6 

But this case may be slightly ^ „ GnMut^i 5 ... 1 - 62% 62% 62%- % 

weakened, in the opinion of 51 % 45 % gam oeus ... 1 47 % 47 % 47 %+ ft 

some analysts, by the strength- » gfuSui'iS * a ill lift i«S »*-"« 

ening of demand for oil m u<a 5 % g Refr joe 32 s 7 % • 

recent months 42 % 23 % onsionai .7» 12^02 as* 35 ft 35 % 

ra»r fo koi;„m 5% 2V. G«1 Sftel 4 14 3ft 3% 3ft- ft 

The Saudis appear to believe ^ ia% GTdEi ijo 11 313 22 21 ft 21 %- *1 

that an oil price increase might »% gtiei pR-» 

lead to cuts in consumption in 5| ft gtf! £n jo 

the industrial wwld, possibly 17 % w% g nr* 1 . 1 ® 5 mi ia% 15 % i«6+ % 

Btr-ninin? OPEC’s unitv as mpm- 2% Gcnasco Inc ... 20 4ft 4% 4%— % 

■treioteKuru. s unity as mem WA o^pj, j* ,21 2 M 33 % 33 33 ft- ft 

ber states arrange unilateral as 2SftGoPacJ® li 3» 45 44ft Mft- ft 

discount deals 69% sb GflPw po.so ... H30 mu as% *s%- i% 

^ ™ Gtrtur ,J5 10 30 20*6 20% 20%- % 

One analyst here predicted 12 7 % cattvoii a* 

that if the Saudi position pre- 11 i*ft Geito pn jo 

Sd. there woulSte a ti^e « ^SSS* * 5 A A AT- l 

to six-month pnee freeze be- 12 % 7 % Gjt*f in j*t 5 ia 9 s% 9 

yond tiie current deadline of J 1 10 i 1 wL imS 10 %+"% 

Sept 30. 35*6 21ft Gillette 1-50 9 320 26*6 25% 2S%- % 

But this prediction is not uni- j* 
versally shared. “I don’t think ^ joy, Global Mar 
there’s any .question” said an- ]7% wggj»i 
other well-placed informant, caodrti 1.12 

who believes the Iranians will 20*6 12*4 Goodyr i.io _ 

rwlVv. ViarH fnr an increase. 15% 6% GorJwlA J2 S 3 10% 10ft 1»6- % 

push hard tor an increase. w Goutdin l jo 7 M 25% 25ft 25*6+ % 

“There will be an increase— 22*6 13*6 Goutd urtJS ... as 19 % iff iff%- % 

thniish nntsihlv a modest One 29*6 22% Grace IJO 5 63 26% 26% 26% - % 

tftougn possimy a rauu “ L uuc - 29% 17ft Grolnoor JO 18 » »% 22ft 22*6- 1 

. " 1 Z 15% 7*6 GTOVlUfl JO 10 13 14% 14% 14%+ ft 

Foreign Exchange *, » «srj* * .£ ™ 

13 Aft GravDrg JO 5 15 11 n 71 

nDr tktn Friday RnUn 13% 7% GlAllFac ... 35 12 lift 12 

-NEW °, RK w £d54r.^fa 17 1 * 10*6 GILkOrl JO Iff 1 15ft ISft ISft- ft 

Y^ ISeefrf 17% 10% GINOlrl.lO* 18 7 17% 17*6 17%+ % 

dallir, New Yoik w«* ■! 2 B - J V 40 ft 28ft GTNorN 1J0 4 45 27% 36*6 37ft + ft 

. Jws" 1 'jnn n 18% GINN on JO ... 2 2!%.J1% 21%+ ft 

• ,_a£, ijmS 19 12 GIWnFln A* 6 61 I3*6 13*6 13% 

.Kra 46*6 20ft GrtWU Z92e 2 1IB 41% 38% » + ft 

AUM* bgHjnO flSSB It IS GlWn pHJ8 ... 25 17*6 17 17ft...... 

79% 13% GrGlant LOB 9 8 MV6 17*6 Uft- ft 

SS&JfiS? ilim 2-1085 15ft 10% GrwM 1J4 10 101 13ft 13 13%- ft 

7 2% 2% 2%+ ft 

... 22 2ft 2 2 

5 21 15*6 15ft 15ft- % 


13*6 4% Gen Host JO 

14ft S Gen VtvsJtu 9 48 lO* 
31% 24%'Gnlnstr pi 3 ... 2 299 

20 6% GenMed JO 10 6 15* 

57% 40*6 GttnMin 1 JO 16 86 53 
53% 31 ft GnMol ZJSe 16 797 50 
60*6 59 GnMotSof 5 ... 1 62V 

51*6- 4516 GMOtnOJS ... 1 479 

8*6 4% GnPort JQo ... 18 5V 

XTfi 10*6 GPUbUt 1 JS 6 112 15V 
lift 5ft G Refr JOe 3 2 8 


42*6 23% GnSluna! .76 12^ 82 »ft 35ft 35*6 1 7^ 


J Apt, in 

» Home derwefy te miHalift r^* tflaiers 

■ far u dt£8 senna charra ifl* nwcf paitt 0 « yK* 

j in^jor cities IhmiBlwul M U.S. f 


26% 18% 
21ft 10% 
18% 11*6 
1716 M% 
18% 15ft 
5*6 2% 
ISft ffft 
10ft 3 
ir* ffft 
11*6 «6 
15 J*6 

7Vi 3*6 
20ft 14 
12 6 % 
43*6 27 
41 30*6 

lift 13ft 
95% 60 
20 15 

23V6 9*6 
49 33ft 
49ft 25 
34ft 24ft 
9ft 5% 
16*6 lift 
33ft 14ft 
12% 4*6 

31ft 20 


25 29*6 29 29%+ % 18*6 14 

I 61*6 61*6 61*6+ 1*6 19% 13 

1 50% 50% 50*6+ 1*6 13% 8% 

2 A 6 A 27*6 22*6 

A 13 12ft 13 - % 14*6 8ft 

35 23*6 23ft 23*6- ft 3A% 18ft 

1 16 16 16 * % 23% 16*6 

8 16*6 16*6 16*6+ 46 91 78% 

A 15ft 15% 15ft 1216 1% 

3 16*6 16*6 16*6- % 97% W 

7 3% 3% 3*6 59% 51*6 


16 12 -11*6 12 ... 
83 Tf, 7ft 7ft - 
3 14% 14% 14%- 


35 29% 

15 11 

17*6 11*6 


5% 2% Gen Steel 4 14 3% 3% 3*6- % 

26 16*6 GTdEI 1J0 11 313 22 21% 2I%- *6 

33% 25% GTIEf p!2J0 ... 1 31*6 31*6-31*6- % 

15 12% GTFI pflJS ... 2300 13% 13ft 13ft + % 

16 13 GTFI f*U0 ... 320 13*6 13*6 12*6- *6 

17% 10*6 G Tire 1.1® 5 Ml 16% 15% 16*6+ *6 

Aft 2% Gcnasco Inc ... 28 4ft 4% 4%- % 

42% 23ft GenuPti J4 , 21 264 3396 33 33ft- 46 

48 25*6 GoPK J® 16 330 45 44ft 44ft- ft 

69ft SB G4Pwpf7.S0 ...H30 66% 65% 45% - 1% 

Zlft 12% Gerber 1.B 10 30 20*6 20% 20% - % 

98% 127% GflttvOJl % 13 106 182% 17* 178-5% 

IS 16*6 GettO pfl JO ... 3 17% 17 17 

5*6 4% GF Bus J32a 4 20 4ft 4% 4%- ft 

14% n GianPGem T 9 17 12% 12*6 12*6- % 

12% 7% GlhrWn J8t 5 16 9 8% 9 

7% 3 OlddLw AOtr 3 IB S* ft 5ft 

13% B GffMHIH JZ S 1 10% 10% 10*6+ % 

35*6 21ft Gillette 1 JO 9 320 26*6 25% 25*6- % 

10 43 8% 7*6 8 - % 

... 3 7% 7% 7% 


5*6 4% GF Bus J32a 
14% n GlanPCem 1 
12% 7% GlbrFln J* 

7% 3 OkldLw J0a 

13% 8 GffMHIH -52 

35*6 21ft Gillette 1 JO 
10*6 4*6 Ginas Inc 

10ft 4*6 Gleason Wk 
17% 10ft Global Mar 
17% 12ft GtabeUn l 
14*6 9% GPHMff Fin 


4ft 2% 

42 34ft 
34*6 20*6 
13ft 8% 

24% 15ft 
7*6 4% 

10*6 ' 12*6 LncGas IJO A 
10% 12*6 LunSos lb a 
13% 8ft LancBrv .72 7 

«% 3% LaaTSieg J3Z A 
27% 17% LeorB PI2J5 ... 
28ft 12% Leeswv J® 10 
14*6 8% LeetfsN JO 7 
13ft 7ft Leesona JO 3 
13% 9 LehPCt JO A 

1% 9-1A LehVai ind 19 
12*6 8% Lehmn .72* .... 

8% 2% Lennar Cro 17 
24% lift Lenox .72 to 


10 5 8% 8% B%- % 18% 13 

34 13 12ft 12% 12V + % 71 59% 

5 3 5% 5% 5%+ % 15ft 12*6 

19 17 19% '18% 19*6+ % 44% 24ft 

7 A 10% 10ft 10ft 10% 5% 

A 2 38% 38 38 - *6 24ft 12*6 

-11 332 34ft 33% 34%+ -% 3*6 2% 

10 7 17% 17% 1746+ % 1*6 ft 

1A 283 86 84% 14ft- lft 10 6*6 

2 5 17% 17*6 17%+ ft 24ft 17% 

5 56 20*6 20% 20*6- % 24% 19% 

... 2 48 47% 47% - % iivfc 13ft 

... 3 43ft 43ft 43ft + *6 70 51% 

7 51 28*6 27ft 28*6+ % 84% 80 

* 31 7 4% 7 36% 15% 

■ 31 13% 13ft 13ft + % 48 41 

14 38 26ft 25ft 26%+ *6 44 37 

5 30 9% 8% S%- % 33% 22ft 

... 2 28% 28% am- % 22% 11% 

8 54 72% 72 72ft- ft 47ft 34 

A 3 3% 3 3% 30% 33*6 

10 39 39% 39% 39*6+ % 35% 1816 

35 281 31*6 30% 30*6- % 14% 1% 

... 3 10 10 10 105% 60 

A A3 21% 2T% 2116+ % 78ft 49% 


12 5% 5 5 - *6 12% 7% 

2 16*6 IMS li%- Vi 28ft »% 

15 13% 13*6 13*6- % 22 10% 

3 lift lift lift at Mft 

» ft fSft 

4 25% 25% 25% lift 7ft 

5 26*6 26*6 26*6+ % " L? 

72 II Iflft 10 * 6 - ft JJJj Sft 

3 11% 11% 11% ™ 

5 10*6 10ft, 10ft ? 2 % 12 % 

■4 lft 1% T% 12% 6 % 

79 11 10 % 10 % - ft 2 * * 


20 2 28% 28% 28% I 

9 9 12% 12 12*6- % 

9 21 12% 12*6 12%- % 

7 5 11% lift 1IU- ft 

... 21 12 11% 11*6+ ft 

4 67 10*6 10*6 10% - V* 

31 7 J3ft 43% 43V- ft 

.... 13 7% 7 7%+ *f 

5 4 39 31% 38*6- *| 

5 45 15% 15*6 ISft- % 

6 6 2Sft-20% 20ft ! 

8 57 12% 12 12 - *5 

... 20 3% 3% 3% 

3 50 616 616 6*6 

... 20 12% 11*6 11%- % 

16 43 14ft 13ft 14 

5. 2 29ft 29ft 29ft + 

25 636 36% 35 35*6- *k 

7 9 9% 9% - 9% 

5 7 Uft 1256 12ft- % 

15 13 42 41% 41*4- ft 

• 5 135 39ft 38 39%+ 1ft 

... 4 5*6 5*6 5*6 

3 33 24*6 24% 24ft- ft' 

8 126 28% 28 28 - ft 

8 10 13*6 15 15*6+ ft 

5 9 lAft 16*6 16% 

...2210 21ft 21ft 21ft + <*i 
...5400 16*6 1576 16*6+ % 

A 127 17% 17% 17*6- ft 

7 5 12 lift 11% ^ 

10 38 25*6 25 25 r ft 

9 8 12% 12ft 12%+ ft, 

10 68 23 ft 22% 22*6- ft 

A 31 22 21*6 22 + ft 

...7200 86*6 86U Uft- ft 

A 128 11% 11% 11%+ ft 

...1400 92% 92*6 92%+ ft 

...2100 54% 54% 54 %- ft 

...2100 32 32 32 

... 3 12% 12*6 12*6- ft 

A IIS 13% 13*4 13% 

A 7B 14*6 14% 14ft a 

9 38 63*6 UFA 62V- »i 

3 17 lJ’i 12% 1756- ft 

13 I 39*6 39*4 39ft + ft 

4 M 6 a a- ft 

8 17 18ft 18*6 18*6- 

5 37 2*6 2% 2Vi - ft 

... 3 13-16 13-16 13-16 

6 225 9ft 9 9 - ft 

7 9 21*4 21% 21*4+ ft 
... 10 21% 21V 21V...... 

• 1789 15ft 15% 15*4 

6 106 67*6 66% 67%+ % 

... Z10 83ft 83ft 83ft - 

8 116 23V 23*6 23*1+ ft 
... 210 42*4 42 V 42*4- ft. 
... 120 39% 39% 39% — 1 . 

5 24 29% 29*6 29ft 

ff 467 20 19% I9%- ft 

9 13 40 39ft 40 + ft 

S 15 27 26V 26ft- ft 

3 41 3146 30V 30*4- ft. 

... 20 14V 14% 14% j 

... 3 93V 92 92 - 1 . 

... 10 71- 71 71 + ft’ 

ff 106 9% 9 9 - ft- 

10 32 36% 35% 3S%+ lft 

4 ff 2396 23% 23%+ ft- 

11 252 19 18% 19 + ft- 

... 14 40*6 W% 40*4+ 

3 2 14V. 14% 14% j 

1 54 8% 7% 8 1 


P 15 13 12% 13 + % 

7 8 17ft 17 17ft+ % 

6 1 10V 10% 10*6- % 

5 10 17U 17- 17% - ft 

9 253 19% 18% 19 - % 

5 3 10% 10V 10%- % 

7 30 25% 25% 25*6+ K 
.. 25 19% Iff lff%- % 
5 63 26*6 26% 26V6- % 


9 4% LewFd Can 

34*6 13 LevfStra M 
6% lft Levttz Fum 
6 2U. LFE Cp . 

22*6 13% LOF JO 
59 48% LOF pUJS 

8% 3V UDbMCNL 
5*6 IV LBxtv Loan 
34 25*6 LloaMV 2-50 

88 74 UflSM Of 7 


... 79 11 10*6 10% - ft « 

17 2 5V. 5% 5*6- *6 73 40*6 

ID 4 1% It W - V IP 

... 3 6% 6*6 6%+ % j™ 13% 

7 12 29*6 28*6 21*6- % =£ » 

88 112 4 % 4ft 4*6- ft 


8 5.8% 8*6 SV- ft 

7 22 11 1014 .10*6- V 

* 17% 17% 17% - 

... 33 9V. 9% 9% 

... 3 56% 56 56V* 

... 13 58 56V 57ft- 146 

30 21V 21% 21% - % 
3 21 17*6 17 17 - •% 


14 4V 4% 4*6+ % IM W 

37 16% 16 16 - % » “ 

5 S246 52ft S2V- ft S 

1 7*6 7% 7*6 50 ° 

12 2% 2*6 2V- *6 » JO 

21 28*6 3% 28%- ft H7% 101 


..3 a 

27% 27%. 


9 134 15ft 15 

15%. 


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too 

100 - 

ft 

.. a20 79 

79 

79 - 

1% 

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42%. 

V 

..ZIOO 43 

43 

43 - 

v» 

.. ZI0 44 

44 

44 . 



79V 57% Lilly Eli 1.10 23 2» 60% 59V 60U- 


Foreign Exchange 


HEW ORK (AF) — FrW»y Foralfln 
UK In ftotiiTri and decimals of a 
dallir, New York wlee* at 2 m* 


25 13ft Granltv 1J0 5 

7% 1*4 Grant WT 

13 Aft GravDrg JO 5 
13*6 7% GtAtiPac 
17>6 10% GILkDr 1J0 19 
17% 10% GINOlr l.lOe 18 


argcntlna i®#! , 
AiOlrUfe Cdoffer) 
Austria (sfOIHlND 

Hftaiom ffrancl 
Brail (craKnal 
Britain «pc««5> . 

30 Day Futures 
6a Dir Futures 
90 D» Future* 
'Cfcudi (Beilin 
ICBlamnla (peso) 
'Dennurt (Krone) 
Franc* tffwcl 
'Uellanf (guilder) 

I Hong Kona (dollar) 
Hraa (pound) 

: ltair (lira) 

-lawn (vea) 

MW0 I Mexico (oesu) 

NonrOr (fcfOne) 
jparttaal lescuda) 
'South Africa Irantfl 
“ j Spain (peseta) 

Sw eden (fauna) , 

' SwHzortmd (franc I 
■ Venezoeit (talhar) ■ 
W. Germany (ddwiOrtl 


M Thur W m CWOfN IJO 
ragi - Sn 22 18% GtNN pfl JO 

i^i iSso IP 13 GtWnFIn M 
^ JOT 46*6 20ft GlIWU Z92P 
ru infi .Q262BD 18 15 GlWn pflJS 

iaS .1235 79% 13% GfGIant LM 

2.1100 2.108S 15*6 10% GTOVM 1 Jf 

2.1040 2.1025 3 1% GWtmd wt 

2J90O 2-0965 3ft 1 GTOitar Inc 

2.0930 2.0915 20 io Grvmm JO 

.9710 -97*0 12 6ft Guardln JO 

J340 J340 4*6 IV Guard Mis 

.1675 .1695 946 Aft GffLfHM JO 

J270 J290 931 /. )7V GuttOH 1-7D 

■iiSS -252 25% 11% GUtTResrc 1 

■2M 55S 40ft 17 GffR Pt*J0 

- r 7 “ 31ft 15% Gift POIJO 

-MW-® 1 4*6 10*6 GltStUt 1.12 

““SS? 56% 51 GW&U ptSJJB 

■!*?! liiz. rofwind JO 


14% 14% 14%+ V 35 23*4 UncNflt 1J0 B AS 25 

(lft 21ft 21*6 a 48% LincMt pf 3 ... 6 49 

3% 3*6 3*6 2ft 1% Lionel Coro ... 16 1 

11 Tl 11 9V 3ft Litton in .131 8 77 7 

12 11% 12 12 4*6 Litton d*c of ... 4 9 

W ISft ISft- ft ]7% 10% Litton d(B2 ... 4 M 

[7% 17*6 1756+ % 3ft lft LMI lnv ... a V 

17% 36*6 37ft + ft 13% 3*6 LodUxl Aire 3 MA 8' 

!1% .21% 21%+ *6 26% 14% Loews L20 « 49 Zl : 

13% 13*6 13% 8% 4ft LMIMRU A0 9 36 6 

(1% 38% S + *k 20% 14% LomM 2Jffe ... 24 15 

JS ™ 5V LondBrt JOe 4 4 8 

I? 4 W 19% ffVLnneSttndl 8 36 1A 

3ft 13 13J6- ft 29% 22% LOrieSG 1J0 6 23 23 

Wr 2V 2%+ % to 99% LSG pf KL32 ... zSB 102 
S ,L— M*lJi«SUU0 A 144 W 

S? 11-64 3J2 LflnolpILt rt ...2720 ' 

* 1,4 m —*180 10 W 

Mfc— V- 74 44 LonoDrn .00 26 U 63 

7*6 7% 7*6+ % 13% 2ft Loral Coro ff 22 w 

U? »- * E% 19V uSZSut 9 m £ 

•ft 17ft 1S%- % 77 8*6 LoPacff JO 7 331 1|1 

7 2,. 7XA 17ft LouisGs 1.88 W 27 » 

?ft ?2ft Eft- ft 13ft 8% Lowers: JO ... > w 


13% 8*2 
25% 17V 


68 25% 24V 24*6- ft 11% 9% 

6 49% 48% 48% - 1 25% 17% 

14 IV IV IV + % 29% 14% 
77 7V 7ft 7*6 26* IW 


..81020 114% 113ft 113*6- Vm 
4 A 9% 9*i Kk- % 
10 I 19% 19% lff%+ U 
...2200 10 10 10 + % 
• 23 22 71% 2I%- V 


.. 4 9*6 9% 9V, - % 13% T 

.. 4 16 JSV 15V+ ft I* 7 1 

.. 3 H6 1% 1V+ % 12V 10 

3 MA 8% 8ft 8*6 12% 7% 

« 49 Z1V » aft- % 15% 3*6 

9 36 6% 5% A 3) 24ft 

.. 24 15*6 15 15 - % Z7 11 

4 4 8% 8*6 8*6+ % 8 

8 36 14V 16*6 16*6+ V 21ft 9 

6 a a 22V a 15*6 tft 

.. 2SB102 102 M2 42% 25ft 


A 144 13% 13V 13*6-"% £* 32 


21% 18ft GtfWInd JO 
dS 4V 3*6 GlfW lltd wt 
3™ 76V 45 GlfW pf 157 

3173 AffV 54ft GttW Dfs.75 
6ft 1** Gotten ind 

i£o 19ft 10% MBi|FB .50 
5s 187 lis MalHWn 1J2 


10 

4 

9% 

9% 

9%- 

% 


30 

196 

IV 

196. 


6 

117 

7*6 

;% 

/*6H 

% 

4 

697 

21ft 

20V 

20V- 

% 

3 

753 

lift 

17ft 

18% - 

% 


3 

27 

77 

77 . 

.... 

... 

2 

22ft 

22ft 

22ft- 

ft 

7 

57 

12*6 

12 

12ft. 


mmm 

160 

53 

53 

S3 .. 


5 

300 

21ft 

Tflft 

21%+ 

V 


274 

4% 

4% 

4*6+ 

ft 



1 

73 

73 

73 + 

7 

, . . 

5 

AAV 

66ft 

66V- 

% 

13 

24 

4*6 

4ft 

4*6.. 


13 

7 

16*6 

16*6 

16*. 


» 

195 166 

M3% 

166 + 

% 


...2)90 % 7-64 7-64 77 62% 

— *120 108% MB% 10B%- ft 74% 68 
26 14 63 62 ev+'lft MV Tft 

ff 22 9*6 ffft 9ft- % 14 11% 

’ J 77 25% 2Sft- 1 »% ]J% 

7 3B1 III! 11 n%_ % i» ui. 

» 7? a 22 » a ♦ ! 8a a 


14 11% PacAS 1.20a 

»% 18% PflcGas 1J8 
19 14*6 PaeLtQ 1 JB 


13ft 8% Lowenst JO ... • 9% 9*6 9V- 

19V 9 LTV Coro 2 306 14% 13% 14 _ 

3Mb 12 LTV A 3J» ... H TB 17% ,7% 

73V 43ft LTVCp nf 5- ... 12 wa u u" 

SPA 35ft Lubrfaoi 1 19 126 48 47% 47V- 

IS? 12 48 14% 14% lift- 


t 9*6 i£ 2?* I5 4 Ptcf,rtrl -» 10 27 22*6 22 

2 3M 5 ?' JS* £*£2 9 IM Wl 18 

w n - % U% 12% P«TT 1.20 I 13 13*6 13' 


17% 17% 75 

**. 44 9*6 


11% M Luttew .72 
30 rr LukeiSt 1J0 
18*6 12% LvkaYna le 
36ft 36S6 Lykes p(S-5A 
5*6 3% LvnCSvs JD 


» 69 PaeTT pf 6 

9% 7V PacTln JOa 
Bft 2ft Painew JOe 
«6 2*6 Palm Be J5 

W -J Pomkla J5e 
5V 2 PanAm Air 


s 55 26 2Sft 25*6- % SV 2 

.! b M M S IS P * nEP ™ 

* 13 4 3% 4 + % Cnotiniieti 


5 a 25% a 25 + >»", 

B 61 26*6 26V. Z6%- *6 

4 13 11 10% 10H- % 

5 13 9 1% 9 +_!*_ 

9 4 12 12 12 

U 8 11% 11% 11%- ft 

14 42 13% 13ft 13V»- Aft- 

5 54 29*6 29 29ft 

18 10 21 % 20 % 211 % 

5 2 12% 12*6 12*6- V* 

10 30 20% 20ft 20ft+ in 

4 15 12ft 12% 12% - ft 

21 44 36ft 36 36 

9 125 44*6 43V 44*6+ *6 

... 2 74 74 714 ....... 

... 3 71% 71% 71%+ 2 

4 7 11% lift 11*6- V* ' 1 

39 12*6 12% T2Yj- % I 

7 42 2BV 20% 20*6- 5a 

6 » 16% 16ft 1096 

10 27 22% 22 22V, 1 

9 143 18V 18*6 1BV+ ft 

8 13 13*6 13% 13% 

.. Z20 73% 73% 73%+ V- 

4 2 7V 7V 7V - % 

3 29 6% 6 M. ' 

4 31 4% 4V 4V- ft 

9 81 6% 6% 6%- V 

.. 167 4 3V 4 ...... - 

6 M2 21% 3Wi 21V,. 


7*1- % 

6 *. 

4V- ft 
6 %- > 


Coo tinued on Page 39 





/ 


30 


THE NEW YORK TIMES , SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 6 . 1975 


City Ills Depress Stocks; Dow Off 2.34\ 


Continued From Page 27 


ing shares of Bates at S26.25 
a share. Bates is engaged in 
manufacturing drapes, bed- 
spreads and processed yarns 
and also owns coal-mining 
properties. Great Western Unit- 
ed rose % to 39. 

CopperweM lost Vi to 40 
after filing a suit in Federal 
Court in Pittsburgh yesterday 
to prevent its take-over by a 
French concern, Societe*ImetaJ, 
which is offering $42.50 a share 

for the Copperweld common 


In the oQ group, Getty fell 5 
to 178: Shell lost 1% to 53 
and Atlantic Richfield dropped 
1% to 95 Vi- In the electronic 
field. Burroughs dropped 2% to 
90: Digital Equipment, 1^ to 
11314; Hewlett-Packard, 2% to 
89%; Xerox. 1 to 54% and In- 
ternational Business Machines, 
2 to 180. 

S unstrand lost 1 to lSV£ aft- 
er the company filed a registra- 
tion with the Securities and 


Exchange Commission for a 

I public offering of one-million 

SiclT in lu7ui't.'coppeTweld; common shares - 


charged the take-over bid was 

a violation of antitrust laws. 

Union Carbide Off 1% 
Union Carbide dropped 1% 
to 60 % after the company 
reported that its 1975 net 
would “certainly’ 1 be lower 
than in 1974 but that it would 
be the second-best earning year 
in its history. In 1974. the 
company earned S530.1 -mil lion, 
or $8.69. a shareon sales of 
$5.32-billion. 

Oil and electronic issues 
were' among the biggest losers. 


Lower earnings for the July 
quarter sent Marley- down 1 % 
to 29%. 

Most or the steel issues 
ended with small gains. On 
Thursday the group registered 
sharp advances without appar- 
ent reason. Yesterday, United 
States Steel, which was active- 
ly traded, added % to 68% 
after gaining 2% on Thursday; 
Armco rose % to 39% and Re- 
public % to 33%. On the down 
side. Bethlehem slipped % to 

Although bullion prices 


ended higher in Europetan mar- 
kets for the third consecutive 
day, gold-mining issues finished 
mixed. Dome Mines rose 1 % to 
42%; ASA, Ltd., dipped % to 
36; Homestake fell % to 38% 
and Campbell Red Lake ended 
unchanged at 24r. 

EQUITY FINANCING 


An offering of 3 million com- 
mon shares of Pacific Power & 
Light Company, at SI 8.625 per 
share, was completed yesterday 
by underwriters headed by Kid- 
der, Peabody & Co. 

* 

The Louisville Gas and Elec- 
tric Company yesterday said it 
registered with the Securities 
and Exchange Commission 
750.000 common shares. 

The- Sundstrand Corporation 
yesterday registered a public 
offering of one million common 
shares to be made early next 
month by underwriters headed 
by Homblower & Weeks-Hem- 
phiU, Noyes, Inc. and Smith, 
Barney & Co., Inc. 


Business Records 


New York Stock Exchange Bond Trading 


BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDINGS 
SOUTHERN DISTRICT 
Fit dir. S«Pt. 1975 

PrtlHon Filed By: 

DUDLEY ED.YARD FERGUSON Jr.. Oiddsll 
Road, ParaMueBle, M.T. Liabilities S26,- 
333; 8»sel* S1X52S. 

BEN D. KAHN, doing business » GRAPHI- 
UUIK. 13 Ifesi Mth St., N.Y. Liabilities 
sitJAS; assets S51S. 

JOCELYN A. RYAN, 133 B West 168tti SI., 
Brunt. Liabilities JiJW: wprts M3. 

HARRIET PACELLI. Ml Pel ban Road, Nn 
RikjiiHIb, N.Y. Uabilltfcs 5127,779; assets 
S1M7. 

Charter XI Petition for an Arraimment hr: 

KEESLER EQUIPMENT CO. INC ST. John 1 * 
St. Goshen, N.Y. Wtrna Keesler, srasteoif. 
Liabilities il ,453.000; assets Si. 373,600. 

PON DON TRADING CORPORATION. S4S Fifth 
Aw., N.Y. Signed by Union Wong, vk o 
oresidaftt. Liabilities S2.2Bi.I5l; assets 
S2J4 1.101. 

5. W. EX PORTERS, INC.. 565 Ffth Aw., 
N Y. Liabilities 51J93.73B; asset sSM57.- 
258. Unsort Wong, Via president. 


Highs and Lows 


Friday, Sept. 5, 1975 


Cana! Rand 
Gartock 
Hit Paser 
MoPrt Com 


Am Fin Sn 
Amstar pf 
BT Mte Inv 
Balova Wat 


HEW HIGHS— T1 
Mono Shoe U* Fidelity 

Scott Fores US Steel 

Starrrtt Wat Mart 

Start! IJBW 
NEW LOWS — IQ 
CITXSOrfC OhEd 8_2Dpf 

Ham mood . OhE 4J6rt 

Houttw jf 
Justice Mtg 


New York Stock Exchange Transactions 


1975 Slocks and Dlv. Sales Net 

High Low In Dollars P/E H»s High Low List Che 


Continued From Page 23 


ii 

lffe 

36 

19ft 

38V. 

16ft 

22 

2ft 

7ft 

«'/. 

2D 

92 

89 

85 

52 

26% 

■43V. 

22 

23% 

80 

29ft 

7ft 

ZPA 

70 

30 

25% 

15% 

M*.*4 

13ft 

7Mb 

2Dft 


6 V, Ponrcft .Mb 
l» Partus .98 
27% Pore DT7-<M 
10ft Park Pen .32 

14 Pasco 25c 

6% Payls nw -35 
9V. PeabGa -OBr 
IV. Peim cent 
3ft PennDix .24 

34’-: Penney I.I6 

15ft PaPwU l.RO 

79 PaPL pfB.70 

73 PaPL DfflJO 

49 PaPL 018. 00 

44% PaPL of 4. 50 

17^. Pennwtt IJ6 

31 Penwt BKL50 

1 8V. Penwl of 1-60 

17 Pennml 1 JO 

*81* Penn: pig 8 

22 PennzpfIJ3. 
3V, pgopDto .20 

UOft PeooGs 2-48 

40V. PepsiCo 1.60 

16 PerkElm JB 

IMS Pet Inc 1 JO 

11 Pet Inc pf l 

10 Petlnc dT.80 

6 'A Peter PI .80 

34 PetrleS JOa 

Sft Petrol an JO 

22 *£ 16% Pefrtm 2.01e 

34% 24 Pfizer .76a 

40% 29 PttetaD 2-20 

15% 11% PtilleEl 1.64 

84 67 PWIE PHL75 

76 59% PMIE pt7.85 

75 57% PWIE.Pf7.B0 

68 % 57 PMtaEJ pf 7 

44H 37 PWIE pf4.68 

35 PMIE pMJO 

32% PWIE pfiBO 

lev. PtinaSutJ .70 

40% PWlMorr .90 

2 Philips Ind 

5'A Phil l of .25o 

37 PhlllPet 1.60 

3ft PhillVnH .40 

7ft Plckwk .08c 

9% piedNG 1,40 

Hi Pier 1 irnprt 

36 Pillsbry 1.B0 

19% Pion CD 1 JO 

11% PttnevB .60 
13% PittFro JOb 
36% Plttslm 1.40 
IP. Pizza Hut 

lft Plan Resrch 
2 ft Playboy .12 
6 ft Plessv 1 JSe 
PNBM -4ie 

15 Polaroid -32 
37 . Panderosa 
ST. PopeTa .60b 

13ft Portec lb 
12% PortGE 1J8 


S ID 9X IX 8ft- % 

7 5 11% 1Mb 11% 

... 3 30 29 30 + 2 

I 8 13% 12% 13U.+ % 

2D 10 37% 37 37%+ % 

T 1 13% 13% 13% 

11 *24 17X 17ft 17%+ % 

... 42 1% 1% 

4 3 4% 4% 

X 247 48% 47% 

7 68 18% 18% 

... 280 81 n 
80 
78 
46 


39 

72% 

sru 

6 

9% 

60% 

8% 

19% 

15 
6% 

72% 

31 

20 fe 
28 

•1«4 
20% 
5*e 
6% 
lBft 
7* * 

43% 

13ft 

11% 

20ft 

17% 

304% 

50 

1314 

56% 

54% 

34% 

32 

12 % 

16 

100ft 

Vs 

38% 

6 


IVi- % 

4% 

48 - % 

18% - ‘A 

81 + W 

Z30 SO 80 M + 1% 
... ZI50 78% 78 78 -2 

... ISO 46% 46 46%+ 1 

B 30 25 2flb 24% 

... 1 40% 40V* 40% 

... 3 20 19% 2D + Vi 

i 143 21% 20% 2D%- % 

... a 75 75 ■ 75 +1 

... 1 26% 26% 24% 

11 7 6 5% 6 - % 

6 62 33% 33% 33% - % 

14 231 5B 56% 56ft- 1% 

22 29 23% 23% 23%- % 

7 7 23% 23% 23%- % 

... 1 13% 13% 13%+ % 

... 1 13 13 13 - % 

23 4 11% 11% 11% 

20 33 61% 61% 61%+ Ve 

8 19 20 19% 19% - % 

... 9 20% 79% 19% - % 

13 357 26% 25% 25% - % 

13 58 35% 35% 35%- % 

8 132 13% 13% 13% - % 

... z2D 77% 77% 77%+ % 

... 240 67 67 67 

... :M 67 66% 64% - % 

... 280 61% 61 61-1 
... 210 42%- 42% 42%- % 
... z» 39 07 39 -1 

... zSO 34 35% 36 + 1% 

7 21 11% 11% lt%- % 
13 308 45% 44% 


7 

6 

1B5 

2 

15 

• 

6 

19 

72 

48 

5 

97 


3% 

6% 

54% 

7 

12% 


3% 

6% 

54% 

7 

12% 


14% 14% 
4V. 4% 


12 105 
9 95 
11, 16 
6 2 
12 6 
30 781 
22 65 
II 7 
4 3 

154 


W 

27% 

14% 

20 % 

72% 

10 % 

4% 

4 

15% 

4% 

35% 

9% 

14 

17% 


68 

Z7% 

16% 


44% - 
3%- % 
6%+ U 
54%+ % 

7 

12 % - % 
14% - % 

4%- % 

68 - 1 % 
27% - % 
16%- % 

19% 20% 

72 72%+ % 

18 18-1 
4 4 - % 

3% 3ft- % 
15% 15% - ft 

4% 4ft 

34% 34% - % 
9% 9% - % 

15% 15% - % 
17% 17% - % 


14% 16 16% 


99% PPG Pill. SO ...Z10D 103 102% 102% - l 


23% Potiaih 1-40 
10 PotmEI 1.16 
50 Put El OT5 -50 
50 PotEI pf5.44 
24% PotEI DT2.44 
24V. PPGIrtd 1.70 
A Premier .36 
10 Premr pf.90 
78% PrectGam 2 
6 ProdRsh .30 
18% Proler 1.40 
4 PSA Inc 
16% ll’A PSvCot 1.20 
17*. 12 PSvEG 1.72 
*112 104 PSE pf 12.25 

a IV*- 66’.: PSEG pfXM 
41 29% PSvInd 2J6 

We 11": PSvNH 1.80 
21% 11% PSvNM U8 
Vo 3 PubtCkT .191 
4% 2% Puebloln .X 

4> ^jPRCe.np 
18% PuoSdP 2.16 
6T'i 38 Pulhiui 1.80 
14V* 7% PurexCp .88 

20 I4«i Puree pfl J5 


8 16 
... 4 

20 2B4 


10 


36% 17% Purrtatcr 1 11 


10 14 49% 49 4V 

9 94 10% 10% 10%+ % 

..1540 32 51% 51%+ % 

... zlO 51% 51% 51%+ % 

.. 3 29% 29% 29% - 1 

8 55 30 29% 30 + % 

10 % 10 % 10 % 

14% 14% 14% + ‘A 

84% 83 84 - 

6% «i «%+ 

10 34 33% 34 + 

22 4% 4 4%+ 

45 14% 14% M%- 

157 15% 15% 15% - 

Z40 107% 107% W7%- 

Z80 73% 73% 73% 

64 33% 33% 33% - % 

16 17% 17% 17% 

IS 17% 17% 17% - % 

58 4% 4% «%+ % 

5 3% 3% 3% 

1 4% 4% 4% — % 

30 25 34% 25 

83 50% 49% 49% - % 

90 13% 13% 13% - % 

2 19% 19% 19%+ % 

5 31% 31% 31%+ % 


Q-R-S-T 


20* 'a 
54 
26% 
7% 

41% 

5% 

10 

8% 

38 

23 

29% 

22% 

59% 

21 % 

55% 

42% 

3% 

27 

4»a 

Ti% 

34% 

aiie 

15% 

7 

18% 

8% 

16% 

10% 

14% 

12 

3Ve 

35% 

10% 


12% QuakOat -80 
38U OukOat pf 3 
15 QuakStO .72 

4 Qunfor .I2r 
36 RabtanP .90 

VA Ramad J19P 
6% Rancoln .40 

5 RapAm J7o 
20% RapAm of 3 
18 Rao |rsf2.2S 
1716 Ravbest 1 JO 
7% RBvmlnt .48 
2S 1 .'* Raytheon 1 
10% RCA 1 

39 RCAcvdT 4 
33% RCA of 3 JO 
1% vIReadp Co 
15% RdoBate .35 
Mb Redman Ind 
71a ReeceCP .74 
16’* Reed Tool 
15% Reeves 1J0 
IOV4 Reich Ch 66 
4% Rntiab St .40 
10% RdlanEI JO 
"4% R el I Go JOD 
7*4 ReG pfCASo 
19i ReG pfBJSD 
8<4 Republic Go 
8% RepFInS JO 
1% RepMto inv 
22*b RepStl 1.60 b 
4% ResrvOil .12 


11 218 
... I 
11 43 
... 4 

16 119 
13 191 
... 1 
... 27 
... I 
1 


22% 13V. ReMHCred 2 
37V* 17 1 ■ ReveoDS JO 
14% 4V» RevCop J5p 
41'*i 47% Revlon 1 JO 
24% 1Mb Rexnrd 1.20 
60% 49% Revlnd 2.88 
68% 52% Rev In p!2J5 
14% RevnMet la 
44‘2 RevM Pf4J0 

7 RcvSec JOa 
9% Rtchardsn 1 

in RIchAtar M 
10% Rkhmnd JO 
10% RleortT 1 JO 

8 RkiGran JO 
Vh RtoGr pf JO 

„ . 4% Rite Aid .16 

34% 11% RI'HmF JO 
16 9 Robrttiw .» 

23% VTA RObrtsn 1J0 
15U VA Robim J4a 
37% 10% Rncno 1 Mb 
13% Va RodlTel .74 
25 Vi 18% TOCkwtlnt 2 
42 50 Rkint P«J5 

2214 17 Rkint nfl J5 

86fa 46Vi RohdlH 1JS 
11 7% Rrtrlnd JO 

22% 11%MIM>J0 
is 91% Rooer 1.20 
25% 18 RorerA .90 


24% 

10% 

12’.^ 

24% 

141* 

17% 

W. 

10% 

15% 


MU 8% RoyCCol .72 13 

39% MVaRartpilte 

7% 3% 52i'?S U* 

3Vk RTE 0» .16 
14 Rilbbml JO 
11 ftueter JO 
5% RussTOP M 
3% Ryder sys 

jl% 55 SiMneR.J* 

1V6 SatOTtt.’nd 


5% 

2SV* 

25% 

12 

V 


16 15ft 15ft- ft 

53% 53% SJ%+ % 

18% 18ft lift 

Aft £ 6 

41% 40ft 41 - % 
3ft 3ft 3ft- ft 

7ft 7ft 7ft+ ft 

5ft 5 5ft+ ft 

21ft 21ft 21ft 

2Bft 20ft 20ft+ 1ft 

13 28ft 28 W/i 

I 9 19ft W% 19%+ ft 
12 142 54ft 53ft 54ft + 1 

16 278 17% T7Yi 17%+ ft 

... 8 50ft SO 50ft + ft 

... Z20 39 39 39 + T 

.. II Vi 2ft 2ft- ft 

6 36 20% 20% 20ft 

.. 6 2% 2ft 2ft- ft 

9 5 10ft 10ft 10ft 

12 65 34% 32% 34ft+ % 
6 1 18>A 18ft 18ft- ft 

4 20 12% 12 lZft 

6 1 6% Aft 6% 

5 38 14% 14ft 14%+ ft 

... ‘ 4 5ft Sft 5ft- ft 

9 9% 9% 9%— ft 

1 12ft 12ft 12ft- ft 

3 8% 8% 8%— ft 

2 9ft 9% 9% 

1 1% 1ft 1% 

138 33% 31ft 33ft + ft 

25 7ft 7ft 7ft 

3 19% 19% 19ft* ft 
62 26ft 26ft 26ft + ft 

26 Oft 8ft S%+ % 

37 70ft «% 70 + ft 
34 22 21ft 21%+ % 

117 Sft 55ft Sft+ ft 
1 60ft 60ft 60ft + ft 
15Z 22% 22 22V4+ ft 

53ft 53ft 

7ft 7%+ ’A 

9% 9ft 

19ft 19ft- % 
11% 11%- ft 
14% 15 + ft 
16% 16ft- ft 
TO UFA 10ft 10ft+ ft 
15 110 12% 11% 12ft + ft 
ID 11 18ft II H%+ % 

I 12% 12% 12% 

4 21% 21% 21%- ft 

50 10 9% «%...... 

29 15% 15ft 15ft- % 

9 11% 11% U%+ % 

74 22 21% 22 

54ft 54ft- 54ft + ft 
19ft 19ft 19ft+ ft 
33ft 74% 74%- 
7% 7% 7% + 
m«- 17ft iTft- 

15ft 15% 15ft + 

19% 19ft 19% - 

37ft 36% 37ft + 

15% 15 15 - 

38% 36ft 36ft- 

5ft Sft 5ft- 
5% 5 3 - 

22 21 % 21 % - 

1 9ft 19% lfl* 

9% 9% 9%- ft 
6% 6% Aft - % 


25 

4 

10 . 
6 
10 
8 


3 54 
16 8 
7 9ft 
71 2Dft 
49 12ft 
9 15% 
9 16ft 


10 


1 

360 

22 

23 

8 

11 

48 

57 

75 

19 

16 

11 

43 

S 

201 


* * 

MV* 2 &K 1 StJoMln 1-20 7 81 

8% StJOLtP l-W 


13 38ft 
6 


5% 2VA 
11% 5tPaf^ Ma 
31% m.STRMPl^> 
7% 3ft Salant .2to 


37% 38ft + 

2ft 2ft 2ft.. 

47ft 47ft 47ft + 

Sft 5% »+ 

32 31% 32 + 

10ft 10ft ioft- 
23ft 23% 23ft- 
UM 10ft iff»- 
30% 30 3M+ 

5ft 5ft 5ft 

10% 10ft...-. 


... 54 

7 134 27% 26V. 26ft..-— 

in 44 27ft 27ft 27ft- 

8 rt 10ft “ + 

8 ? S S5: 

S 2% 2ft 2V 

’*9 12 3% 5ft 5ft+ 

5 4 4% 4ft 4%+ 

is 64 3% 3ft 3% 

15 11 » W 2%- % 

’i S 3% » 


24ft SFet«M*® 
10ft SanPelnt JO 

3ft Saul RHsSl ■ 
6ft SavanE 
l% Sav a Stop 
3 SavOUr 

1% SavInB MCh 
2Vb Saxtxi Ind 
2 SCASvc 
2% Schaefer Cn 


Sft 

8% 

I'k 

6ft 

7% 

V4 


1WS Stocks and Oiv. Sales l%t 

High Low in Dollars P/E 100s Hah Low Last Cho 


67<A 44% ScherpPI .08 
30ft 15ft SdilitzBr JS 
90ft 69 Schlumb JO 
14% 9 SCM Cp -50 

4% SCOAlnd JO 

6 ScotLad J6 
9ft Scott Fetz 1 
8% scoff For .74 

12ft ScottPap .68 
5 Sootiys .10 
8% ScovfllMfpl 
25ft Scovtl p(2JD 
7ft Scud Df.KZk 
10% Saa Cont JO 
18ft SeabCLJJD 
7ft SeabWA .Irt 
Z7 Seagram JO 

3 Seagrave 

7 SenkJPw .80 
13% SearieG J2 
40% Soars 1.40a 

1% See train Un 300 
2lft Sedoolnc .13 8 

3 'A SvcCpInt .12 4 

5ft Servomt JO 7 
j% shakm J8 7 
5ft 5haoeH .10 7 

57% 39ft ShellOn 2.60 6 

10ft 4ft ShtilrGI -56 5 

16% 10ft 5MIGI pfl .40 

17% 10% ShllGI Pfl JS ... 

48% 34ft SherwW2J0 8 

10% Sft SlarrPac .92 8 

14% SlgnalCo .90 5 

32ft Sfonal pf2J0 ... 
Sft SlonodeCo 1 13 
2ft SImPrec .12 10 
12 Si mm J8a 13 
8ft SlmPat JO 19 
9ft SlnoerCo JO ... 
27ft Stngr pf3J0 
10ft SknuflCo JO 
64% 53ft Site! ty l JOB 
lift 6% SMI Core 
14% 5kvtlne J2A 
7ft SmUhAO JO 
15% Smith Inf J6 
43ft SmtthMIne 2 
7% Smith Tr J5 
10ft Smucker JO 
7ft SolaBas JO 
1% Sonesta Int 
5 SonvCp .04e 
» SooUn 3.15s 
9% SCarEG 1 J8 


9>4 

9% 

19% 

14ft 

19V. 

lift 

15 

36% 

Oft 

24V. 

31ft 

6% 

37 

6% 

14% 

25% 

74% 

4 

38% 

7% 

lift 

7% 

14 


19% 
41 'A 
41ft 
9% 
24 
19% 
17ft 
39 
29% 


26 

11 

36% 

57ft 

13ft 

16 

12% 

4% 

13ft 

36 

16% ■ 


30 233 48% 48ft 48ft- ft 
17 *44 19% 19ft 19ft- % 
23 139 75% 75 75%+ % 

■4 44 11% 10% 10%- % 
5 7 8% 8% OVl- ft 

3 21 6% 6ft 6% - % 

9 48 16ft 16% 16% 

5 50 14ft 14% 14% 

0 224 14ft 14% 14% - ft 

11 39 7% 6ft 6ft- % 

1 92 9% 9% 9%~ % 

... 3 28 28 21 

...4 8 « B 

4 21 15ft 15ft 15% - % 

5 91 19ft 19 19%-.... 

5 17 4% 4ft 4% 

14 2 30% 30% 30%+ ft 

16 3 5% 5% 5% 

8 3 11% lift lift- % 

10 3ZT 15% 14% 14ft- % 
26 261 64ft 63% 64%+ % 

11 3 2% 3- 

33 29% 29 29 - % 

10 5ft 5ft 5ft 

18 9% 9% 9% 

11 4% 4% 4H- % 

2 9ft 9ft 9ft- % 

73 55 53% 53% - 1% 

12 8% Sft «%- ft 

2 14% 14% 14%+ ft 

2 16 16 16 + ft 

39 39% 39% 39%- % 


10 

A 

148 

67 

57 

10 

12 

9 

7 

S 

1 


TO 

9% 

9ft 

9ft.. 



13ft 

28 

15% 

14ft 

Mft- 

ft 

27ft 

2 

32ft 

37ft 

32ft- 

% 

24% 

T7 

25 

36ft 

36 

36ft + 

ft 

14ft 

Mft 

6 

6ft 

6ft 

6ft.. 

a.. 

27 

25ft 

14 

18 

T7ft 

17ft- 

ft 

12ft 

8% 

im 

12% 

11% 

lift- 

% 

3 

1% 

91 

17ft 

12ft 

12ft- 

ft 

10% 

■7% 

4 

32 

3lft 

31ft.. 


47ft 

32% 

57 

22ft 

22ft 

22ft- 

ft 

lift 

ffl 4 

3 

A0U 

40ft 

6g ft- 


75% 

37ft 

1 

Sft 

8% 

7ft.. 


66% 

40% 

38 

16ft 

TOft 

16% - 

ft 

13ft 

■ 

TO 

9ft 

8% 

8%- 

ft 

8ft 

2% 

193 

30% 

30 

30ft- 

ft 

13ft 

9ft 

53 

48ft 

48 

48%+ 

ft 

71 

64 

3 

13 

12ft 

13 .. 

... 

47 

38 

9 

15 

14ft 

14ft.. 


26ft 

23ft 

15 

10% 

10ft 

10%.. 


5 

2% 

5 

7ft 

2ft 

2ft... 

... 

50ft 

3Z% 

396 

10% 

10ft 

W%- 

% 

66 

43 


16ft 

13V. 

24ft 

16 

8% 

21ft 

13% 

30% 

59% 

34 

31% 

56ft 

57% 

6'A 

32 

29ft 

8ft 

11% 

9% 

13'A 

34 

48% 

12 % 

10% 

20% 

41ft 

65 

23% 

72ft 


53ft 

85ft 

lift 

8% 

10% 

21ft 

8% 

19 

4ft 

12 

87 

85 

25ft 

17 


20% 

17% 

lift 

42 

31ft 

3ft 

18% 

8% 

14ft 

37% 

40ft 

21% 


9% SoJerln 1J6 
7% Southdown 
16% Sdwn pfl JO 
9% SoestfikB.W 
5% SoeatPS J4r 
16% SoCalE 1J8 
•% SoUthCo I JO 
23% SoInGE 2-28 
41 SoN Res 1.65 
28% SoNETt 284 
24% Sou Poe 224 
40 Sou RV 112 
44 SOURY Of A 3 
5% SOU RV Of JO 
19ft SouUGs 1J0 
15% Southld JOb 
4ft SwstFor JO 
9% &WSIPSV .90 

5 Spartan J4a 
tti SoerryHuf l 

27ft Sorry Hof J 
25% Sperry R .76 
5% Sprague El 
8% Soring M .75 
14% SauarO 1.10 
24% Squibb J4 
34% Staley Ni 1.60 
19% SfPoor 1.92a 
52ft Stflrand 2J8 
50% 28V* StBPalnt J2 
33 22ft StdOHCal 2 
36 SldOIIInd 2 
44% StOllOh 1 J6 
6% SfdPress JO 
6ft StdPrud J6 
7% Standex J6 
12% StanWks .96 

6 Slenray JO 
14% Starrrtt l 

lft StaMut Inv 
9% SfaMS MOe 
40 SfaufCh 2J0 
39% Stau pfl JOa 
IS 1 /* SterDrup JO 
8 Stemdnt JO 
19% 10% SteyenU'.BO 
26% 17 StewWa 1.92 
18% 138. StokVC 1J0 
12% 10% SfokVC pf I. 

72% 33% Stoncweb 2 
12ft 8% SfoneCon JO 
9% StopSlw 1.10 
10% Sterne Tech 
Aft StrldRlte .70 
19 StuWor 1.32 
16 StW pfATJO 
lft Suave Shoe 
11% SubPraGs 1 
4% SuCrext JO 
9% Sun dim JO 
29 SunOfl lr 
32ft SunO pf2JS 
11% Sunbeam 1 
26ft 12% Sundstrd JO 
16ft 9 SumhMfl .36 
26% IS SusVal 1.10 
249 153 SuprOil 1.80 

5' A 3 SupmkG JO 
18% 9% Supcnepe 
7 4 Swank J8 

23ft 12ft Sybran J4 
4ift 38 Svbrn pf2JO 
9V. 3 Systran Don . ^24. 


7 2 29ft 29 29%+ ft 

8 284 15% 14% 15ft- % 

7 3 12% 13% 12% 

2 5 8% 8 I 

3 19% 19ft 19% 

63 12% 12ft 12%- ft 

3 5% Sft 5% 

313 18%. 11% 18ft- ft 
466 12% 12ft 12% - ft 
3 27% 27% 27%- ft 

S3 52% 51% S2 

20 31% 30% 30% - % 
61 26% 38 28 - ft 

87 45% 45ft 45ft- ft 
... 1 49 49 49 

.. 304 Sft Sft 
I 12 31ft 31ft 
13 85 24% 34 
6 33 Aft 6ft 

8 19 10ft 10 

4 3 7% 7% 

12 23 T2ft 13ft 
... 3 30ft 30 

10 236 39ft 38% 38% - 

34 7ft 7ft 7Vi + 

11 9% 9ft 9ft- 

27 18 17ft 17ft- 
27 32% 32% 32ft- 

20 S9% 59ft 59ft- 
26 21ft 21% 21% - 
76 66ft 65ft 65ft- 

21 • 41ft 41 41 - 

171 29% 29ft 29ft 

199 45ft 44% 45 

57 74% 73ft 74ft + ft 

7 lft •»% 8ft 

7 7% Sft 

2 9% .9% 

12 17ft 17ft 

3 6% 6% 

10 19ft 19 
61 lft lft 
18 lift 11% 

196 87 
10 86ft 


5ft 

31ft- % 
24%+ % 
6%- ft 
10ft + % 
7%- ft 

12ft 

30ft + ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
% 
ft 
ft 


7ft 

9% 

17%- ft 
6%- ft 
19ft + ft 

lft 

lift 

■5% 86% 

84% 86ft + 1ft 


8% 

11% 

18 

50% 

7% 

8% 

14ft 

41ft 

6 

25ft 

«Z% 

9% 

TA 


28% 11% TafIBrd JO 
4U 3% Tafoott Nat 
5 Talley JO 
7% TbHevpfB 1 
9% TanetE1 1.04 
11% Tandy Cora 

4 Tappan JO 
4% TccMcolr 

5 Tedwtlcon 
18ft Tektranx JO 
2% Trteoor JS 
9ft Trtedyn J2t 

41% Tctedyn pf 6 
lft T rtec r mp t 
% Tetex Cp 
27% 19% Taretca 1.76 
aft % TrtXKP wt A 
20% 13ft TesoraP JO 
38% 21% Texaco 2a 
40 28ft TexCom .90 
39% 25ft TexETr 1.70 

28 26 TXET pf2J7 

33% 23ft TexGdT 1 JO 
36% 23ft TexHif 1 JO 
14 8% Teuslnd lb 

119% 61 Toxirtrt l 
10% . 6% Texas Int! 

73 TexOGs Jib 
16% Texlif 1J4 
2ft Texfi ind 
12% Textron 1.10 
20% TaxtrpfLOB 
T5 Textr pfl JO 
9% Thlakal .70 
46ft 3% Thom Set .76 
II 5 Thom In JOb 
1% 4ft ThonUW JO 
6% 4ft Thrill Do JO 
19% 10ft T1 Corn 1 
42% 30ft TldwatM .70 

16ft 7% TToeriid AO 
61 24% Time Inc 2 

19ft 10ft TlmtMlr JO 


12 301 16% 16ft 16% - 
7 128 11% 10% Wi- 
ll 51 16ft 36% 16ft + 

7 2 23% 22% 23%.. 

6 X4B IS 17% 17%- 
... yM> 11 11 II + 

10 6 58% 5Cft 58ft- 

3 1 11% 11% 11%- 

5 0 17% 16% 17%+ 

29 13ft 13 13 - 

17 9% 9ft 9ft.. 

4 34% 34% 34% - 
22 26 26 26 - 
26 2% 2% 2ft- 

3 14% 14% 14%... — 

5 8. 7ft 7ft- % 

11 lift Tift lift 

50 32ft 31% 32ft + % 

719 33% 33% 33 - % 

11 383 17% 17% 17% - % 

6 98 19% 17% 11% - 1 
39 13% 12% 12ft- .% 

1 23% 23% 23ft- '% 

6 189% 188 118-1% 

11 3% 3% 3ft- % 

1 13 13 13 ...... 

11 6% 6% 6%..T... 

35 17% 77% 17%+ % 

4 34ft 34 34 . - 1 

10 5ft 5% 5%- ft 

3 19% 19% 19%+ % 

23 3% 3% 3% 

a 7% 7 7 

2 10 9ft W 


31% 

25ft 

8% 

26 

33% 

24% 

17Y» 


9 

43 

14% 

14% 

14ft- 

ft 

11 

127 

39ft 


38% - 

% 

mmm 

38 

5% 

S 

5 .. 


6 

34 

6% 

6ft 

4%- 

ft 


4b 

Oft 

8ft 

Sft- 

ft 

12 

TO 

35 

35 

35 . 


5 

12 

4ft 

4% 

4%- 

% 

8 

34 

20 

19ft 

T9ft- 

ft 


1 

Mft 

58ft 

51ft + 

ft 



115 

6ft 

5% 

6 . 



9 

46 

2ft 

2% 

TV,. 


7 

153 

25ft 

25% 

25%. 



155 

lft 

1% 

1%+ 

% 

3 

90 

159, 

15% 

15% - 

% 

61013 

23ft. 

23% 

23%- 

ft 

11 

56 

34 

33% 

34 + 

ft 

8 

46 

30K 

29% 

30ft- 

ft 


41 

26ft 

26% 

»%- 

ft 

7 

U 

Mft 

21% 

28%- 

ft 

7 

71 

30% 

30% 

30%+ 

% 

10 

1 

12% 

tt% 

12%+ 

% 

33 

324 

93% 

92% 

91%+ 

% 

6 

54 

8% 

8 

8 - 

% 

7 

29 

15 

14% 

Mft- 

% 

91045 

17V, 

1/V. 

17%. . 




2 

MA 

5% 

ift.. 



9 

444 

71% 

21% 

21%+ 

% 

... 

7 

ZI 

2/ft 

38 - 

ft 



288 

TOft 

TO 

30ft- 

ft 

5 

7* 

13% 

17% 

U .. 

¥ 

2B 

34 

35ft 

35% 

0M + 

ft 

16 

36 

7% 

7% 

7ft + 

ft 

10 

35 

7 

7 

7 .. 

-9- 

12 

4 

5% 

5% 

5%- 

% 

TO 

44 

12ft 

12 

T2%- 

ft 

8 

14 

37 

36% 

34ft.. 

.... 

11 

» 

11% 

lift 

lift- 

ft 

12 

204 

57% 

56ft 

44ft- 

ft 

9 

32 

16 

15% 

IM- 

% 


Unless otherwise noted, rates of dMsfends In the fore- 
going table are annual rOshromtants bawd on tha Last 
Quarterly or semi-annual declaration. Sccdal or extra 
rtvldenat or payments not designated as. regular are 
Identified in the following footnotes, 
a— Also extra or extras, b— Annual rate plus stuck 
dvUend. c— UouidaUng dlvWrtxL e— Ordered or paid In 
preceding 12 months, n-hedared or paid after stock 
dividend or spilt up. k-Dcdored or part tins WV, 
accomuiaiive issue With divMtnds in arrears. n-New 
issue, p— Paid inis year, dvtdena omitted, deferred or no 
action taken at Iasi efivktond meetinp. r— Dad a red or paid 
In watKfino 12 months, estimated cash value on 

ex-divkfcstd or cx-distributiofl Ate. 

tid — Called. x-E* dividend. v-Ex dividend and sales in 
full, x-ffij— Ex distribution, w— Ex rWits. xw— Without 
warrants. wvr-WIth warrants. KS-WBen distributed. 
wt— When issued. nd-Nexl dav deiiwy. . 

vl— In Bankruptcy or receivarpup or being reorganized 
under the Bankruptcy Act, orsacurKiw assumed brsuch 
conwaniei. In-Forewn Iwie suteect to Tticres 
equalization ux. 

wi»e«‘»!lt gr slock divrtendametirdinqfo 25per Mrt 
or more has been paid the war's Wtfvfow range and- 

dividend are shown tor tee new Stack arty. 


1975 Stocks and Div. Sues - -Net 

Hi ah Low la Dollars P/E 100s ffirti Low Last Cho 


24% nmkn 2J0e 
9% Tfah RItv 
4% Todd Shlovd 
16% TotedoEd 2 
6% Tanka CD jo 
13% TraneCO .96 
39% 35ft TranUn 1 JO 
12% 5ft Trans W AIT 
7ft TrnnWF .16 
6 Transom .59 
17% Tralnc L83e 
7ft Transco .80 
5% Transcn JS 
4% TranOh JOr 
19% 12ft Tranwy 1.40 
28% 19% Travlrs 1.08 
28 Trawh- pf 2 
4ft TRE Corp 
16 TriCon 1.25c 
1% TrISou Mtge 
11% Trialnd .90a 
5% TrianPIt JO 
9% Trinltylnd 1 
13ft Troofcan JO 
14ft TRW In 1 JO 
40% TRW pf4J0 
41% TRW of 4 JO 

7% TucsonG .96 
5% TwenCen JO 
8% TycoLb .loe 


40 

13% 

9ft 

22ft 

12V, 

29% 


13% 

10ft 

21 % 

9% 

8ft 

7% 


36% 

11% 

22 % 

4% 

16 

13 

31 

26 

27 

62ft 

66 

12% 

15% 

19% 


24% 13% TylerCp JO 


6 19 36% 36% 36%- 

... 23 lift 11% mt- 
... 3 7ft 7ft 7ft- 

7 20 28% 20% 20% + 

10 3 8% 8ft Bft+ 

12 3 24ft 24ft 24ft + 

12 IB 27% 27ft 27V. + 

... 158 6% 6% 6%— 

7 2 10% 10% 10%- 

11 154 8 7ft 8 + 

... 29 28% 20% 20% - 

10 103 8% 8% «%- 

8 2 7 7 7 .. 

3 5 5ft 5% 5%- 

6 12 16% 16 16% + 

10 130 22 21% 22 .. 

... IB 30 29% 38 - 

... 40 6%. 6 6% 

... 66 18ft 11% 18%- % 
... 51 lft 1% lft+ % 

4 6 12% 12% 12ft + % 

... 1 10 10 10 

5 34 26ft 26% 26%+ % 

M 7 19ft 19ft 19ft 

7 54 20ft 28% 30%- ft 

... 2 51% 51 51 - % 

... 5 56ft SSft 55ft 

7 151 10ft 10% 10%+ ft 

7 92 14 13% 13ft - ft 

9 21 14% 13% 14 ...... 

1 20% 20% 20%+ % 


u— v— w-x— y — 2 


Uarco 1209 


82ft 

14% 

3ft 

10 


UnCom 1-33 


UnEI pf7J4 
UnEI pf4J0 


UQCa pf2JD 
61ft UPncCp 2.80 
10ft UnPac pf J7 
1ft Unions Inc 
fit unlroval .70 


81ft 66% Unlrval pf 8 


3% Unit Brands 
5% UnBrnd DfA 
6 UnllCO .70e 
4% U Fin Cal JO 
6% UnGasP J2 
7% Un Guamtv 
17% U Ilium 2.32 
6% Uidflnd JO 
0% Unlfln pf J2 
1% Unit Inn .10 
9ft UJerBk 1.04 
11% UirilMM JO 
8 Un Huclr 
1% unltPk Min 
6 units eta J8 
25% USRdG 2.48 
12ft U5Fo5 ljoe 
14% U5GVPS U8 
20 USGV pfl JB 
2% US Home 
2% US Ind JOr 
7>A USLeaso J8 
2 US Rllvlnv 
7% US Shoe .95 
38ft US Stl UO 
13ft USTobac .90 

31ft Unit Tech 2 

140% 86ft UnTech of 8 
16 12% UnTTel 1.12 

2 7-16 UnlTel wt 

20% 16% UnTI 2pfl JO 
9% 3% Unltrodo Cp 
16% Univar 1 JO 
25% UnLeaf 2J4 
lift UOP .90 
30 .Upiohn J6 
9ft USLtFE JO 
8% UslWeF .968 
12 USM StplJD 
19% USM pfl 10 
74% 39% Utahlnti 1 
28% 23% UfahPL 2J6 
28% 26% UtPLpflW 
25 17 UV Ind lb 

18% 6% Vartan JO 

27% 19% Veeder 1.72 
Sft 3 Vends Go 
■Aft 2 Venice JO 
14% 11 VestSe 1 J7e 
39% 21% VetCO Offrtl 
36ft 13% VF Cora 1 
10 2ft Viacom int 
7% 4 VtcCmo JOe 

•ft V8EPW 1.18 
6ff% VE 72 PT7.72 
41 VeEP Pf 5 
40 VaEP P14J0 
37 VhEP pt4J0 
3S% VaEP OtTM 
Sft vornedo Inc 


e 

8% 

12% 

12% 

23% 

12% 

7% 

5ft 

12ft 

15% 

20 

2% 

16 

36ft 

17ft 

21ft 

25% 

7% 

5% 

14 

4% 

12ft 

68ft 

22 

62% 


31 

41ft 

18 

53 

17% 

10% 

21ft 

27ft 


10 206 22% 21% 21% 

4 3 19% 19% 19% 

6 10 12% 12% 12%+ ft 

...un 25% 25% 25% 

7 4 » 9% 9%- ft 

... 39 lft. 1% 1%- ft 

3 4 8% 8ft Sft 

8 -29 40% 40 40 + ft 

8 80 9ft 9 9ft 

13 100 73 72% 72ft + % 

7 496 61ft 60ft 60%- lft 

9 39 18% 10ft 10%+ % 
TO 6 6ft ' Aft 6ft- ft 

8 60 12% 12ft 12ft- ft 

... 5 67 67 67' - 1 

...Z200 43% 43% 43%+ 1% 

... 9 25% 25ft 25ft- ft 

13 223 5ft 4% 5ft + ft 
6 67 46% 46 46 - ft 

... 17 60 59% 59% - Vi 

66ft 65% 66 - ft 

lift lift lift 

2ft 2ft 

• 8 - ft 

73% 74%+ I 

5ft Sft 

5% 5%- ft 
6% 6ft- 
6ft 6ft- 
11 llft+ 

7% 7ft- 


INTER-AMERICAN 

DEVELOPMENT 

BANK 




Net 

Low Last Cho* 


I Am SftsOS 8.9 18 96 96 96 - 2 

I Am aftsis 

SJ 25 77.16 97.16 97.16 +1.16 


WORLD BANK 


IntBk SJsSD 

BJ 28 99.7 99 99 • J 

IntBk 5% *93 BJ 5 71 71 71 - .16 
IntBk 4%S90 7.1 4 63 63 63.-2 


CORPORATION BONDS 


AtabtL 92599 9.2 
AbbtL nm sj 
A be* 8fta77 8.7 
AckKt 9ft95 12. 
AlrRe 3fti7 cv 


5 TOO 100 180 

5 88% 88% 88% 

1 100ft 100ft 100ft* % 

4 74% 74% 

5 79% 79% 19% 


AleB 10%99 ILL 53 100 100 100 + ft 

AlaP9fts04 10. 7 93 93 93 -2*/. 

AlaP 9S3800 10. 9 BTA 87 18 ..... 

AlaP 89003 10. 5 SSft 15% B5ft+ ft 

Alison 8ft79 16. 1 Sir. Sift 53ft- ft 

AlldCh 8ft83 BJ 12 98ft 98ft 9(P.i+ft 

AidCh 6JS93 8J 2 80% 80% 80% 

AlldSt 4%92 CV 12 87% 87 87 +1 ft 

AidSu S*&«7 cv 13 43ft 43% 43ft + lft 

Ale 9JSS200D 9 J 10 101% Wlft Ml ft 

Alcoa VS« 9J 30 9T* 96% 96% - 1% 

Alcoa 5fts9t cv IS «% 94ft OAVj+lft 

Alcoa 3ft*83 il 3 75V. 75V, 75% -ft 

AhrCa 9Vi9S 10. 8 94% 94% 94ft- ft 

AMAX 8*696 9 J 1 91 91 91-1 

AMAX 8s86 17 14 91 90 91 

AAlrin 11 sea 11. 30 W 96ft 98 +1 

AAirl ldftSS 11. 6 94% 94% 94% - ft 

ABmd 9ft 79 9.1 SJ 105 105 105 - ft 

ABrnd SViSS 8.3 45 77 96 97 

ABrnd 4%90 7J 8 62 62 62 + % 

AC*M 6W1 CV 5 30 30 30 +1% 

AFOTP 5530 11. 4 44% 44% 44% - % 

AFoP 4.8s87 8.0 5 59ft 59ft 59ft 

AHOflf 5* W3 CV 12 75 75 75 +1 

AHOSD 5ft99 cv 3 111 111 111 ..... 

Alnvt 9%s76 9J 10 99 99 99 - V* 

AMF 4'Asfll Cv 1 76ft 76ft 76»i 

AlWedcn 5S97 CV 26 44% 43ft 44%+ % 

AfTlMot 6388 CV 19 64ft 64 64 -1% 

ASmet 4ftS8 8-2 3 56 56 56 *1% 

ATT 8J0sO5 9.0 98% 97% 97%- % 
ATT 8ft2000 8J574 97% 97% 97ft- % 


FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 5,1975 
U.S.&WT- OtiwrQxn. Fornon 


TOMIAN 


Bonds 


PwiMm — ■ 
ItWVJIT 


Bondi 
tSIE I H) DM) 
,13760000 
i3SJ82aW» 
12.55t.r3z.an 


330080 

MWfl 

24J0SJH 

9.05U00 


Tarn Du S8J12J8B 

i»4 . - - 45J8SJ008 

t-hArt*t nwoBoMi 8n* M 

BONO ISSUES TRADED 

Advance! Ok tint! 

241 rs 

237 IS 

383 


SwiS ■ 

Sn*4 


luun 

-IM 

sn 


letl •** 


233 


srajw.wi 

1J.7W.CW 

ITSUTUN 

•sumato 


LOW! 

II 

to 

10 


Bond! 


CurientSaleshi I 

YlaW I1JM0 HWi Low Lett GhH. 


Dow 8^(3000 9.0 3 98 v i flft* WA- 

DPf VSb cv 1 S6ft Mft S6ft 

Dressr 9ft95 9J 1 99 99 99 

duPf 8J5S04 8-7 16 96% 96% 96% 

SJpcntMl 8,0 102 99% 90ft 99”*- * 

DukeP 1 3S 79 11. 15 1IO 109ft 107ft+ 1, 

OukeP 9ftM 10. 10 97V. 97% 97*- 1 ? 

DukeP 9%05 10. 13 *Pi» Mft 
Duoirt 5 ’t 94 cv 13 32% B 
Dug B^aooo 9J IS 91 91 

DUQL M 1 1“ W6 100 1-16 100 1-16- 1-16 
OuoL P*B8 6J 10 56ft 56ft S6ft- 

DuqL 2ft 79 X2 1 82 82 82 

EiJSlrSrta cv 41 36% 36% 36%..... 

EaAir 4ft93 cv 33 35ft 35% 35ft + ft 

EcDsEl Ss95 10. 2 48% -40% 48% + 

EGG V.01X7 cv I Soft SB SB - ft 

El Pas 6s93A cv 28 69 

El Paso 6tf3 cv 2 70 


Mft +2ft 
32 -I 
9t +2 


- ft 


Ength S*.'*97 cv 41 
viErl 4%l« cv S 
viEri 3* *901 .. 30 

Esfrt 12*«5 IX I 
Evans 6'4M cv 10 
Exxon 6%98 8.0 3S 
Exxon 6s97 7.9 1 


ATT I 7S02 
ATT Bftl07 


«-9 37 97% 
8-9243 96 


68 61 

70 70 

86% 06% 86% - ft 
23V* 23% 23% + 

14 14 U - ft 

90ft 90% 90ft- ft 
51 51 SI + ft 

81 ft 80% 81ft- ft 

75% 75% Mft....: 

ExxnP 9a04 9.0 10 100% lm 100 

Fairch 44W2 cv S 45% 45% 45% 

Far ah 5VM cv 8 50 SO 5D 

Feddr 8%94 13. 27 64 63% 64 + ft 

Feddri SsM cv II 40 « « 

FedN 4ft96 cv 77 73 72*A 72T»- ft 

Flnan 10**90 10. S 1D0% lOOVi 100% 

FsNBos 8s82 8.2 9 96% 96% 96%+ ft 

FNBo 7.6s«l 8.1 31 93% 93*.^ 93%+lft 

FjNBo6ft80 7J 58 92% « 92 -ft 

FsNBo 6ft79 7.0 10 94 93 94 +|t| 

FsPenn 7593 cv 4 61% 611* 61ft 

FfSec 10*.W9 10. 27 IDO 100 100 - % 
FIPLt lOftHI 10. 20 105ft 104% 104ft- V. 
FlaPL 9V484 9 A 55 100% 100% 100Vi 


tL.* S 1 FlaPL K482 8.7 8 100% 100% 100ft 

«% 95**+ to; FlaPL Bft» 8J 5 9*'% 94% 94% -5% 


FoodF 4s29 5.4 
Ford 9*-94 9.1 
Ford 8**90 8-7 

Ford 7.40*80 TJ 
Ford 6'. -79 
FrdC 9ftBl 


FrdC 9*/j95 9-5 30 100 
FrdC HftWA 9 J 5 96 
FrdC 8ftB3 8-7 5 99 


1 73% 73% 73%- ft 

10 101 V* 101 ‘A 101ft 

6 93 92% 92% - % 

10 98 96'A 98 +2% 

6.9 46 94 93% 94 +1 

9.3 11 104 103 10« +1 


ATT 7fts82 8.0117 96ft 96ft 96ft- FMC 4ft92 CV 2 56% 56 56 -1 

JTT 7.7K7 7.7 59 \Mo 100 100 - V* p££ F J»ft9A II. ZS 72ft 77ft Wft+ ft 

ATT 7ft*03 8J 8 82ft 81ft 82 ! — — - — 

ATT 7*01 BJ 63 81ft 81 81 

ATT 6%S79 6.9 20 94ft 94 94 - *4 

ATT 4ft»S5 6-0 17 72% 72ft 7214+ ft 

ATT 3fts90 6-3 8 61% 61% 61% - ft 

ATT 3*4*384 4.7 71 68ft 68 6*ft- ft 

ATT Zfts87 4J 7 61 60 60 -1 

AMF 10*85 10. 17 100 100 100 

AmfK 51*94 CV 113 61 SB'A 58% -2ft 

Ampx 5YW4 cv 66 45ft 45*<* 45ft 

Anfir 9.20S05 9.1 10 100% 100% 100%+ ft 

APOP lifts] 10. 2 102 102 102 + ft 

AOdP 11*82 la 5 101% 101% 101%- ft 

AdpP Bft*76 8J 5 100ft 100ft 10Oft+ ft , __ __ „ 

ARA 4ftj96 cv 85 67% 67% 67% - 2ft FrdC 4%96 cv 
ATCO 8.70*81 1.6 7 HJlVa 101V. Wlft- V. 1 FmL 

Ara>8fts83 8.4 93 98ft 9Bft 98ft 

ArizP 9-8*80 9.6 48 101"* 101'/* 101ft 

ATIZP 9%S82 9J 203 100ft 100 100%- ft 

ArmSt fl*/*75 

8.2 10 99 25-32 99 25-32 99 25-32 

ArRub 4%B7 CV ID 53 S3 53 

Ashio 41693 CV 10 60 60 60 

ADGC 8%83 8.9 2 98% 98% 98%+ % 

90% 90% 90% -n* 

96 96 96 - ft 


FrdC 8ft 76 
FrdC 7%91 
FrdC 7**79 
FrdC 6ft 78 
FrdC 4ft98 


8J 
8.7 
7J 10 94ft 


AsCO 9 ft 90 UL 2 
Aslnv 4%76 A6 12 
Asinv 4%83 7JJ 5 
At! CO 6ft82 16. 2 

AtRf nUDOO 9 JO 16 


7.1 1 
CV 10 
II 
5 
5 
7 
3 
30 


FOMCK 6*94 CV 
Frueh 5%94 cv 
FruF 7Ji7B 7J 
Fuqua 9% 98 13. 

GAC 5ft*94 cv 
GnATr 5ft99 cv 18 
GnEF 8%04 8.7 5 97Vtr 97% 
GnEI 6V.79 66 5 94 94 

GnEI 3%76 3J 10 97*A 
GnEI3% 76 rao .. 7 97 


100 100 

96 9k 

99 99 + % 

5 100ft 100ft 100ft+ % 
4 B5ft 85ft 8Sft*Zft 
94*'* MV, -lft 
96ft 96ft* ft 
67 67 - % 

60ft 60ft- ’i 
67% 67%+ % 
57*A 57V. 

97 97 +1% 
49 
22 
72 


96ft 

67 

61 

67% 

57V* 

97 

70 

23 

72 


69 -1 
23 +1 

72 

97% 

94 + Vi 

77ft. 97ft...... 

97 97 


on . ,. I GEC 865*84 8-5 10 100ft 100ft 100ft- ft 
63K 63ft GEICB.6S85 8.7 19 98ft 98ft 9«ft- ft 


41 41 41 

95% 95% 95%+lV.- 


17 1« 

... I 
... 19 

I 83 
... Z40 
... 34 
... 1 
... 88 

5 I 

18 50 
14 18 

5 I 

6 12 
... I 
... 2 

I V 

6 7 

43 133 
... 8 

5 IS 
11 38 
... 14 

16 81 
... 8 


2ft 

BUi 

74% 

Sft 

5ft 

6ft 

6ft 

lift 

I 

21ft 

10ft 

Aft 

4ft 

lift 

lift 

14ft 

lft 

9ft 

28ft 

Mft 

17% 


21ft 2lft+ 
10ft 10V«- 


6ft 

4ft 

11 

lift 

13ft 

lft 

9ft 

28 

14ft 

16ft 


21ft Zlft 


6ft- 
4ft + 

II - 

lift 

13ft- % 
lft- 
9% + 
28ft- 
14ft + 
16ft.- 
21ft- 


AttRleJl 7*76 7 J 42 99ft 99 99 - ft 

ATO 4ft*S7 cv 31 SBft Sift 52ft + lft 

AvcoC 7*693 IX 2 54% 54% 54% 

AvGOC 5%93 CV 4 45V, 45ft 45ft 

AvCDF 11*90 11. IS 100% 100 W0 -lft 

AvcoF 9*A8S 9 J 5 99ft 99ft 99ft 

AvtsF 7%92 10. 10 76% 76% 76%+ ft 

AVCOF Oft 77 8.B 14 99ft 99*4 9Mk 

BnKrE 10*82 93 3 107 M6ft 106ft- ft 
BalGE 9ft05 9.9 102 99ft 99ft 99ft- ft 
B&O 11*77 10. 26 100ft 103ft 103ft- ft 

B&O 4fts9S BJ 6 495k 49% 49%+ ft 

BangP Bft94 cv 7 54 54 54 

Banka 8ftQ5 9J 17 Mft 94ft 94ft + ft 

BnkTr 8%99 9.9 2 82% 82 12 -5*4 

BectD 5*89 CV 10 74ft 74*k 74ft + >.* 

BecD 4*iSS8 Cv 22 91 91 91 -2ft 

BeeCA 4ft 93 cv SO 57 *a 57*., SP-» + ft 

BelLPa 9W4 9J 35 102ft 102% 10Z>* 

BeliPa 8V415 9.1 13 95ft 95ft 05ft..— 
BelIPe 6%79 6.8 4 93% 93% 93VT+lft 

Beml6%92 7J 5 10ft 80ft 80ft 

BettCD 9ft79 VJ'45 103 103 103 -ft 

BcnCo 7%96 9 J 5 80ft 80ft 80ft- ft 


BenCp 7Vs02 9 J 
BenftF 5*77 5J 


79ft 79% 
93 93 


44 

81 

J1 

63% 

99 

54% 

72% 

72ft 


44 

II 

71 

63% 

99 


79% - lft 
93 


Beoft 

Berfcy 5ft» cv 
BeltiSt 6ft99 SJ 
BrthS 5.4*92 7J 
BethSt 4%90 7.0 
BlkD 8.45*85 BJ 
BflbbB 5*481 CV 
Bordn 5ft97 7.9 15 

BOTW5*«92 7J 10 - 

VIBOM 6*7Df .. 10 67ft 67ft 67ft +lft 

„ , vlB« 4%70f .. 16 24V* 24*4 24% 

% BOSE 12V: 7? 11. II 101 107% 107%+lft 

% , BrkUn 9ft»S 9.7 1 IWA 100*4 100ft+ ft 

Y, BrkUn 9%95 10. 5 88ft 88ft 88ft- 1% 

«A ! Btrdd 5%94 cv l 
Burl Ind 5*91 cv 7 


81 -lft 

71 + % 

63% 

99 

54% 54% 

72% 72*% -lft 
72% 72ft- 3% 


13ft 

77 

S3 

47% 

45 

2714 

7ft 


36% 23% VuJJMat U0 


2S% 12*4 wactwva .76 
47a 2% WachRf -04p 

10 Walgraen l 
Mft WallBus JS 
6 WallMur JO 
lift WiiMarf J6 
6ft WangL. .10 
4ft ward Foods 
7*4 Wamaco JO 
Ki WmCom JO 
40 WrnC pf4JS 
77 wmC pflJS 
35 Warner!. .92 
13ft Warns 1JD 
.. _ 9% WartiNat Jd 

29ft 23% WasN pDJO 
15ft 12ft WartiSH la 
19ft 16% WaSWat 1 J2 
4 waste Mont 
lift wetklnJ JD 
3 WayGos JO 
10% WavG sflJO 
3% Wean Unit 
2ft Webb Del E 
6ft WdtMcL JO 
ft Waft lit Cora 
12ft WrtlFoo J6 
3ft WrtIFM .10D 
8ft WescoF JO 


13 

25% 

10ft 

12% 

161ft 

lift 

lift 

22ft 

76 

44% 

38ft 

22ft 

13ft 


lift 

38ft 

5‘ 

76ft 

7ft 

5ft 

9% 

lft 

20% 

8ft 

12 

52 

39 

9ft 

27ft 

19 

Sft 

15K 

60 



66 

Sft 

J% 

5ft+ ft 


IS 

4% 

4 

4 

ft 

6 

148 

7ft 

7% 

7ft. 


... 

26 

2% 

2 

2 . 


7 

10 

lift 

11% 

l!ft+ % 

5 

429 

69% 

68 

48%+ % 

11 

31 

19ft 

19 

Wft+ ft 

8 

339 

S/% 

56% 

56%+ ft 


SB 

131ft 

130ft 

130%+lft 

8 

107 

13% 

13 

13% - 

ft 



3 

1% 

1% 

1%. 


v _ 

8 

1/ft 

1/ft 

T7ft+ ft 

9 

31 

5% 

4% 

5%. 


4 

88 

30ft 

29% 

30 ■ 

ft 

7 

6 

37% 

37% 

37% - 

% 

7 

175 

12ft 

12% 

17% - 

% 

16 

296 

34% 

34ft 

35% - 

% 

■ 5 

Z/i 

10% 

TO 

Mft- 

ft 

TO 

T3 

9% 

9ft 

Oft. 


4 

HO 

11% 

17% 

ll%+ % 


1 

23% 

23% 

23% - 

% 

ii 

536 

4H% 

47% 

47ft- 

* 

8 

19 

26% 

26% 

76% - 

ft 

• T-. 

3V 

27 

26ft 

27 ■ 

% 

3 

26 

19 

18ft 

19 ■ 

ft 

12 

104 

14% 

13% 

13%- 

ft 

6 

6 

19ft 

19ft 

19ft. 




r 

4% 

4% 

4%- 

ft 

25 

14 

5 

4% 

S - 

% 


22 

12ft 

11% 

11%- 

V. 

U 

217 

35% 

35 

35ft- 

ft 

/ 

22. 

IV 

18% 

18% - 

% 

10 

78 

8f% 

8% 

*%- 

ft 

... 

112 

4% 

4% 

4%. 


63383 

12ft 

1? 

12ft. 


... Z12D 

71 

71 

71 . 


...2210 

46 

45ft 

45ft- 

1% 


z20 

45 

44 

45 1 

lft 



ZTO 

38% 

38% 

3S%- 

1 

_. . 

IJ 

26% 

26% 

26ft- 

ft 

tv 

4 V 

5% 

1 

5 . 


4. 

..1 

33%_ 

B% 

,31ft- 

. » 

8 

40 

19ft 

19ft 

19ft- 

ft 


II 

3ft 

3% 

3%- 

% 

9 

17 

12 

lift 

12 i 

ft 

7 

77 

16ft 

to 

16ft- 

% 

4 

J 

m 

9% 

9ft. 


25 

133 

13 

12% 

12%+ ft 

IS 

1+ 

12 

11% 

12 H 

ft 

23 

51 

Sft 

8ft 

Sft. 

Mts 

17 

6 

•ft 

8% 

8%- 

ft 

/ 

49 

11% 

17ft 

17ft- 

1 



1 

63 

43 

63 -i 

% 

... 

1 

37 

37 

37 -< 

1 

15 

322 

31% 

31% 

31%- 

% 

/ 

4 

17% 

l/% 

77ft+ ft 

5 

4 

lift 

lift 

lift- 

■ ft 


1 

24ft 

25ft 

35 Vi- 

% 

5 

1 

13% 

13% 

13%. 


9 

13 

18ft 

18ft 

Ilfty- % 

8 

12 

7 ft 

7% 

7ft- 

ft 

IS 

4 

27% 

27% 

27% — 

% 


X 

4% 

4 

4ft. 




1 

14 

14 

14 -1 

% 

S 

17 

6% 

A 

6ft+ ft 

13 

33 

4% 

4ft 

4ft+ % 


26 6ft 
7 lft 
40 15ft 
23 6ft 
2 9ft 


6% 

I 

15ft 

6ft 

9ft 


6%- ft 
lft+ ft 

15%+ ft 
6ft- ft 
9ft- ft 


3U 

17ft 

25 

17ft 

29 

Aft 

65 

Sft 

4ft 


46 WtPP Pf4J0 ...2150 49ft 48*4 48ft- ft 
TBft W*tPtPCp2 S 6 37ft 37% 37ft...... 

' • " 0 80 7% 714 7ft- ft 

J n m m w% 

6 69 15% Mft 14ft- ft 

9 a 6 6 6 - % 

46 123 13 12ft 13 ...... 

... 1 50% 50% 50% - ft 

... 1 40 40 40 + % 

33 524 15% 15% 15ft- % 

6 30 28ft 38% 2Bft+ % 

7 2 14ft Mft 14ft- ft, 

25 168 39ft 38ft 31ft- % 

II 16 19 18ft Mft- ft 

I 35 19% 18ft 18%+ ft 

39 459 24ft 24 24 - ft 

A 29 17ft 19% Mft- % 

... 4 35 35 35 

24 8% 8% Sft- ft 

6 3% 3% 3% 

71 10% 10ft 10% - % 
6 3ft 3ft 3ft + % 

232 30% 29*4 30 + % 
47 39% m 39%+ ft 

44 40U 40%. 40ft. 

3 50ft 50ft 50ft- ft 

... 31 4% 4% 4% 

10 45 26% 26% 25%+ ft 

...2190 95ft 94% 95 + % 

7 45 77% 16% Mft. 

9 19 — “ 

6 7 

14 55 

J 11 

9 26 

7 85 
... 2 

7 5 


5% WnAIrL JOa 
15% WnBnc l jo 
7ft WnNOA J5r 
5ft wnPactref 
9% WUnlon 1 JO 
42 WirtJn pf 6 
44% 30 WnUnnMJO 
20 Oft WOstoEi .97 

31 19% WslvCO 1 JO 

17 12 Weytrp i jo 

43ft 27ft Weyertr JO 
23% My, WhelFrv JO 
31% 16% WhdP IJSb 
29ft 15% WWrtDol JO 
23% 8ft WWtCon JO 
35% 29 WltltC DfC 3 
12% 7ft WhlteM -lft> 
4ft lft wwtteker 

IS 7% Wleke* .HD 
4ft 2% wiebdtst M 
37% sft wnmsco jo 

54 29ft wilmsCo wt 
40ft 27V, WIrrDx 1.44 
51 37 WlimDiX B 

6% 3% Winnebago 
28% 22% Wtac£l 1J2 
KB 09ft WISE DfSJO 
19% 15% WbGea 1.70 
16ft 11% WbePS 1 JB 
27% 17% WltCO 1J0 
lft WDIvrw -Q5e 
6ft Wbrnehn J6 
7 WoodsCp JB 
9ft Wrtwth 1J0 
Zi woiwpOJO 
2ft World Alrw 
41% wriohr 2J0e 
3% Wurtitzer 
lft Wyly Cora 

07ft 50ft XeroxCp 1 
12% 7ft xtra 2J7I 
13 9% YnpSDr JOa 

20% 9ft ZileOorp JO 
16ft 13 Zaoete JO 
6% 2ft Zayre Cora 
am 10 IHMRlRBd 1 
12ft 4%ZumindJ2 


16% 15% U - 
20% 20% 20% - 

3 2ft 2ft- 

14% 14% 14%+ 

10 17% . 17%- 

15% 15% 15ft- 

26% 26% 26% 

4 4 4 - %. 

10 B 58 56% 51 +2 

... 26 5% 5% 5% 

... a 3% 3% 3% 

171147 Sft 54% 54ft- 1 

6 51 9ft 1% lft- % 

4 4 10ft 10 TO - ft 

I A 18% 11% 108b- Vt 

24 U 15ft 15ft- ft 

57 6 5ft Sft 

47 23ft 2 lft 23ft..;... 
38 9% 9% 9ft...... 


59 59 

75ft 77 


+1% 


65 79*i 

79 

79 

- ft 

35 50 

40 

40 

-9 

22 « 

XI 

83 

+ % 

50 46 

46 

46 

+ % 

5 W% 

76% 

76% 

+ % 

12 69 

69 

69 

-1% 

5 97ft 

0 /ft 

97ft 

-2ft 

10 99% 

99% 

99%+ ft 

96 105ft 

105 

105 

- ft 

14 55% 

54% 

54% 

-1% 

B 65 

65 

*5 


30 98% 

VB% 

9JF5 


SB 74ft 

74% 

74 ft 

- % 

50 51 

48% 

4V 

-2 . 

115 34% 

33% 

34% 

- ft 

3 57 

5/ 

57 


3 54% 

54% 

54% 


10 95% 

95% 

95%+ ft 

4 42 

42 

47 

+ % 

1 35% 

35% 

35% 


5 27 

27 

27 

-2% 

6 50 

47 

iu 

+Jft 

9 72 

71% 

72 


36 64 

64 

64 


18 99% 99 1-32 

99% 


9 71% 

71% 

71% 


6 64% 

63ft 

64% +lft 

3 84% 

84 

84 


1 86% 

86% 

86% 

+ % 

5 100 

too 

TOO 


17 101 

99V. 

101 


TO 98 

TO 

TO 

- % 

176 98% 

98% 

96% 


8 91% 

0t% 

Vl% 


43 94 

97% 

93ft 

- ft 

1 94 

94 

94 


5 101 

101 

101 

+ ft 

4 8% 

1% 

8% 


23 IDO 

100 

100 


2 81 

81 

81 

- ft 

6 3* 

37% 

37V, 

- ft 

1 74 

74 

74 

+1% 

5 99% 

99% 

99%+ % 

2 52% 

52% 

52% 

- V, 

21 90% 

98 

96% 


18 99-* 

99% 

99ft 


36 39 

35% 

35% 

+ % 

5 87ft 

87ft 

I7'A 

- % 


Caesr 12* :W 15. 
CPC4S pen* 8.7 
CaroT 5ftB8 cv 
CaaflC 5% M cv 
CatTr 8ft99 8.9 
CalTr 8ftB2 BJ 


ChsBk 4%93 cv 


CISC 6VJ96 cv 
ChMIa 7ft 78 16. 


C&O 4VS92 7J 


CAE II I 5*5«t .. 
CGtW 4*88 II. 
CTH rfZft94 10. 
ChrCft 6*09 cv 
Oxvsi 8Ve9S 12. 


ChF 8J5S91 11. 
ChrsF 7%86 11. 
ChrvsF 7579 8.3 
artG* 7ft 7* 3J 
CIT F-9YS95 9J 
CIT 8.85*82 8.7 


Citicra 6ft80 7J 
Cltierp 5ft00 cv 
atSv 3*77 3.1 

OkEa 9*82 8.9 
v|CSL4%77T .. 
CIvE 9.85*10 9J 
ClevEt 7VM0 8.7 
CMi 4ft*92 cv 
CNA B%95 IT. 
CoiUG 9H89 9J 
ColuP 5ftM CV 


Cohvt 8.2*80 ZL 
CmlCr 84191 ID. 

Cornier Ml 13 to 95%«>9S% 95%+ ft 
CmlCr 7%78 &J 11 Mft Mft Mft -3ft 

CmlCr 7*79 7.5 1 92% 92% 92% 

CmwE 9*79 8.7 25 103% 103% 103%+ ft 
CmwE ffftOS 9 J 22 94 M « + % 
CmwE 8ft»8J 10 100% 100% 100ft- lft 
CmwE 8*03 9 J ID 87 87 87 +1 

CmwE 7ft 76. 7.7 10 100% 100% 100%+ ft 

CmE 7%03F 9.0 2 04 84 84 

CmwE 7ft78 7J 6 97% 97% 97ft +1 
CmwE 3*77 3J 10 93ft 93% 93ft- % 
CmwO 4ft92 cv 10 48ft 48ft 48ft- ft 
CmpSCf 6*94 CV 25 46ft 46ft 46V- ft 

ConEd 9ft* IX 20 77ft 77ft 77ft 

Con Ed 9VTO4 IX 71 75ft 74% 75ft + ft 
CnEd 8J*a IX 76 68% 68% 68%+ ft 
CoEd 7.9*01 11. 52 66ft 65% 66ft + Vi 
CoEd 7.9*02 11. 41 66% 64% 66%+Zft 
ConEd 7ft03 IX 23 64 63% 63%+ % 

ConEd 5*87 9J 18 55% 51ft 55% 

ConEd 5*87r .. 4 54 54 54 

CEd 4ftd2V 9.9 35 44% 44 44 - % 

C Ed 4%9ZVreo . 10 44% 44%. 44%.. 
ConEd 4%86 XI 3 5Z% 52% 52ft- ft 
ConEd 4*88 BJ 7 47 47 47 -2 

ConEd 3ft£3 6.0 21 57ft 57ft 57ft- lft 
ConEd 3%82 5J 10 S?v, 59ft S9ft-1% 
ConEd 3%84 6.1 6 54% 54V, 54ft+l% 


ConEd 3%85 6.8 24 
ConEd 3%81 4.9 4 
ConEd 2ftS 4.7 7 
ConEd 2%77 X9 27 
COnG* ZHS1 4 j 0 6 
CnNG 9%95 9.4 5 
OiNG 7%9S 9.1 1 

CnNG 7ft94 9J 5 
CnNG 7ft9A 93 1 
CnNG Aft92 8J 
CnPW llVsOOll. 


49% 49% 49V. 

65% 65% *Sft- ft 
51 58 SB -1 

89 89 . 89 - ft 

71 71 71 + % 

97V, 97ft 97%+ ft 
86ft 86% 86ft-..., 
84ft 84ft 84ft + ft 
83ft 83% 83ft..... 
73% 73% 73% 


4 102% 102V* 102ft 

CnPw 11*(J2 10. 18 104ft 104 104ft + V, 

CnPW 9V80 9.7 M 100% 100% 100%- ft 
CPw 7VH2J 10. 4 70 70 70 +2 

CnPw 41WP 0.9 1 51% 51% Sl%-7 
CtllC 7JS*89 10. 85 98% 98 98 - *4 

Ctllll 6%79 7.0 5 93ft 93% 93%+lft 

C11IIIR 7%79 15. 13 51% SO 50-1% 
aiOII9ftsm9J 20 98% 98ft -2 

CM Oil 4%91 6.8 4 65% 65% 65% - % 
CtTCal 10*82 9.9 8 100ft 100ft 100ft - lft 
aiTI I0VJ3 10. 10 103% 103% 103%+ ft 
CoaL'7%91 cv 4 55 55 55 +2 

CooL 4%92 cv 10 34 34 34 - % 

CcwdSt 5*79 cv 49 143ft Ulft 14lft-2ft 
Crane 7593 9J 15 75% 75% 75ft- % 

Crane 7SM 9J 12 71>A 71 71-1 

crane A%92 BJ 50 78 7B 78 

Ci'ocN 10504 10. 61 99% 99 99 - % 

CracN Sft 96 cv 59 70 69% 70 

CrZaVUDOO 9J T 94% 94% «%- % 

Dart 4ft97 cv 45 80 79 79 

Dave Aft96 cv 7 64ft 64% 64ft 

DavtH 7ftM 9.7 10 79% 79% 79% - % 

DavP 10%81 9.7 45 103% 103% 118%+ ft 
Deed- BftTS 8.7 10 100 % 100 % 100 %„... 

DceCr 8ftC 8.7 21 100% 700% 100% 

DeiMO 5V494 cv 5 75 75 75 

DetE 13ft82 11. 45 110 109 109 -1 

OetE 12* 579 11. 27 108% I07ft 108% +1% 
DrtEd 9V«04 IT. 15 87% 87% 87% 
DrtEd 9S99 II. 

DIEd 6.4*98 II. 

DrtEd 3ftB0 4J 
DIlDnp 5%M cv 
DfllSAlr 5*78 5J 
Dow 8.9 2000 9 J 




78 
56% -lft 
75% +1% 
SB + % 
Wt + % 
98% t ft 


GEtCT Sft 76 SJ 25 100ft 100% 100%+ ft 

GEIC8JS81 8J 1 99% 99ft 99% 

GEICr 7*-Tl7B 7.4 7 96 95ft 96 + ft 

GEICr 7*80 7J- 5 93ft 93ft 93ft 

GFood BftTOX7 12 101 100% 100ft- % 

GFood 3ft76 3J 4 96% 96% 96% 

GHost 7594 IX 40 55% 55% 55% 

Gnlnstr 5*92 cv 11 56 55% 5S%- V* 

GMIHs 8*99 BJ J 90 90 90 ,+lft 

GMA 8ftW 9 j 0 15 98% 98% .98%+ % 
GMA Ift77 SJ 10 102 101ft Mlft-1% 

GMA 8.70*83 8J 65 101% 100ft 100ft- ft 
GMA 8*93 8.9 6 89 88% 89 


GMA TWM 9.1 3 

GMA 7%92 8J 15 
GMA 6* *88 
GMA 5*77 
GMA 5*80 
GMA 5*81 
GMA 4*582 
GMA 4ftB3 
GMA 4ft 83 reg 
GMAJftSA 6.7 


L0. I 
5.2 25 
5.7 8 

5.9 7 

5.9 27 

5.9 51 
7 
6 


85% 85% 85ft- ft 
82 82 ‘ 82 +Vi 

71 78 70 -I 

95% 94ft 95*6 + -% 

86% 85% 86% 

84% .84% 

78 78 

76ft 77t>+ ft 
77 77 .. 


GMA 4*79 4J 28 
GMSftsOS BJ 45 
GM 8.05385 8.2 35 
GPUt 10% 80 IX 38 102 
GTC 9662000 9.8 28. 99*. 
GTeiE 9ft9S 9.8 l’ 99 


84% 

re 

77% 

77 

69 

87VJ 

901* 

97% 


87% + "ft 
97V, -lft 
97**5+ ft 

101% 101% 

99 99 - ft 

99 99 


69 

86% 

97% 

97% 


GTeiE 8ft76 X7 1 100% 100% 100% 

GTeiE 6*496 Cv 30 73% 73% 73%+ % 

GTeiE 5*2 cv 48 60ft 60 60 

Genes 9% 76 9J 31 95ft 95 95ft 

GaPec SftM cv 5 114ft 114ft 114%- ft 
GaPaC 5ft96 cv 25 101 100t» 10O*/*- ft 

GaPw 11*79 10. 39 103% 102% 103%+ ft 
GPw 8ft2000 10. 5 81 II 81 + ft 

GaPWffWM 11. 5 76ft 76ft 74ft- >• 

GaPw 8%01 11. 7 73 72% 72% 

GaPwTftOJ 11. 5 71 71 71 

GIdLw 4ft87 cv ID 54 54 54 

Gdrdl 9*4*2 9.5 16 101ft 101ft 10lft+ ft 

Grace6'.l96 CV 26 93% 93% 93% 

Grace 4*490 cv 3 62 A2 62 

Grant 4ft« cv 78 24% 23ft 23ft 

GtNoN 4ft91 CV 35 81% 11% 81V:- ft 

GtNor 4%76 4 J 4 97* « 97*4 97*A+ v. 

GtNor '2ftB2 4.0 "12 68% 61% 68% +3% 

Gray *%90 cv 24 80 79 80 +1 

Grater 9%91 17. 16 54ft 52 54ft +lft 

Grater 4*487 cv 15 35*^ 35% 35*^1+ ft 

Grumm 8*99 cv 3- 96% 96% 96V*+ % 

Gram 4’_92 cv 20 50ft 50V* 5Ci- ft 

GuaM 7*^79 26. 29 27% 27 27?*+ ft 

GlfOlt 8%95 X7 20 97 97 97 

GlfWn 7*Q3A 11. 29 63% 63*A 63% 

GltW 5**93 cv 138 79 77 79 +1 

GifW 5*487 cv 35 97*% 94% 97%+ 1 

GifW 5"4*7A cv 22 96ft 96Vj 96% -2% 

Harr* 7.2*80 7 J ' 10 92 71% 91%- ft 

Hawn I1V.04 TO. 4 105 105 105 -1 

Haw 8.35*03 9 J 5 85 85 85 +3% 

Hercui 8ft83 8.7 15 99ft 99% 99% 

Heubn 4%97 cv 15 72 71% 71%-1 

HiltnH 5%?5 CV 1 47% 47% 62% -1 

MoerW 5*94 cv 10 82*i 82% K%+1 

Hdnvl 5J592 8J 20 67% 47% 47*^i-l«i 

HOP 9.65*81 VJ 12 100*% 100 100% 

HosAIT 10*99 IX 1 74% 74% 74%+% 
HOUSCF 9*76 8.8 81 101% 101V. 101% -1% 
HOUSE 51*85 cv 37 70 77ft 77ft + ft 

IIIPW 10%O4 9.9 5 104 ' 106 104 

Ind Bel 10*14 9J 10 106% 106 104 + ft 

InpR SftsSS 0J 5 101 101 181 - 1% 

imdSH 8ft 95 8.8 10 98% 98** 98%+ % 
Ins? too 9ft 99 cv 16 91 90** 9f + % 

Inslnv 7ft0O IX 57 51 50% 50%+ % 

InfHrv 4*198 8J- 6 72 72 72 +3*4 

InHrv 4 J*9I 7J 3 63ft 43ft 43ft+ ft 
lKvC 9.15*82 9 J 35 101% 101*4 101%- % 
InHvC 84181 8.7 85 100% 100 100 - % 

InMInC 4*91 cv 5 111 111 111 - % 

I Pap 8J5S95 8J 25 100ft 100 100 - ft 

InPao 4V.96 cv 28 40ft 60ft 60ft + ft 
IntSilvr 5*93 cv 9 55V* 

IntTT 11582 10. 45 104 


1nTT8%2000cv 45 
ltd 1*96 cv 10 
Jlmwal 8*90 IX 5 
JImW 5ft91 cv 20 
JoneL 6>-M 10. 10 
KerrMc 8*83 M 4 
Krrnoe 6a99 cv 
vILkS 31497 


55ft 

SSft. 


105ft 

105ft. 

... 

lUOft 

lOO'/i 

ft 

95% 

95ft- 

ft 

71 

71 

2 - 

80 

» . 


95% 

9515- 

ft 

62 

62 . 



Litton 8ft 76 8.1 10 99 
Uften 3%87 Cv 3 42% 
LMI bfts82 2X 70 30% 
Lockh 4U92 Cv 17 38 
LBBM 6ft93 IX 34 42% 
LOmN 5%91 CV 13 51% 


96 
72 
80 
95% 

42 

98% 98% 98%+IU 
8 106% 105% IQS'/!- ft 
2 13V+ 73% 13ft- ft 


98ft 98ft- ft 

42% 42% 

38 30 

37% 38 + % 

61% 62% 

51% 51% - % 


UiS ltmoooo IX 5 101% 101% Wl% 

LonS I 5ft93 cv 15 68% 68 68 ..... 

LSIsLt 9%B3 9.1 10 101 101 101 

LOriUd 4ft93 IX 6 64% 44% 64% 

LTV 7%*77 CV 70 136% 133 135*4 -2ft 

LTV 5*88 IX 34 48 47ft 47ft- ft 

LUCS 6ft2M0 cv 5 107 107 107 

Lyle 11*2000 IX 10 90% 90 . 90 + ft 

LvkeY 7**94 IX 24 63% 62 62%+ *4 
LyfcY 7%94n IX 66 62% 62% 62%+ % 


47 

97*/, 

53 

83 

72ft 


47- 

97ft + ft 
S3 -7 

83 

72ft- ft 


Macke 41*92 cv 3 
McvC 7ft*77 7 J 8 
MadS 6*487 cv 11 
MeCe 5ft 78 Xi 5 
Marco 6%83 9.0 16 
MaMu 5'A 91 cv 1 
May C 8ft 76 B-7 4 101 
MCCr 10% 85 IS. 10 66 

McCro 71495 IX 75 42 

(AcCro 7%97 19. 86 40 

McCro 7%94 19. 91 38% 37ft 38%+ ft 

McCro 5% 76 3.9 31 93 90 93 +5 

McCro 5% 76 reg 17 90 98 90 

McCror 5*81 IX 9 47 46% 47 + % 

Mellon 10*89 IX 45 100 in 100 - V. 
Merck TftBS X0 10 97ft 97ft 97ft- ft 


47 
97ft 
53 
83 
73 

61ft 61ft 61ft- ft 
101 101 + % 
45% 46 +1 
39 41 +1% 

38 39% 


MGM9S92 IX 2 83ft 
MGIC SftM 11. 41 75 
MGIC 5*93 CV 74 S 
MIChB A'A78 6.6 S 93ft 
MIdMf 8*80 IB. 6 43** 

MMMJJDs XI 17 100% 100% 100%+ % 
MRvCp 8*14 CV 11 
MKTex 4*90 11. 1 
M Fee 4K05 9 J 3 
Mob O 7ft01 8J 2 


83ft 83ft -2% 
73% 73% -lft 
49% 49%. U 
93ft 93ft +1% 
43% 43% 


Meh D SftM CV 77 


88 

33ft 

43 

85 

27% 


+2 

33% 33** -2ft 

43 43 

85 15 

27 27% 


Monsan9%s9.1 29 101 100 100 

Mflnsan SSSS 8.1 - 5 97ft 97ft 97ft + ft 

Mnt W 9% 90 la 5 91 91 91-3 

Mont W 9*89 9 J 10 Mft 93 Mft+7% 

MnfW7ft88 9J 22 79ft 79% 79% 

MntW-tftBOS.9 5 81% «m 81 'A 

MonvM 7990 CV 4 73 73 73 -2 

Moron 44498 CV 10 84ft 84ft 14% - % 

vIMTESftW.. 3 14% 14% 14*4+ <4 
MtSTI 9ft 129 J 102 MOft 102 102 -lft 

MISTI 9*10 9.1 25 98ft 97ft 98ft + ft 
MISTI 7ftl3 9.1 5 14% Mft 84%+% 

MtS T1 7ft 11 X0 25 82 82 82 +lft 

NarE KJftSO 10. 5 103% 1(0% 103%+ ft 

N Cash 6995 cv 20 72 71 72 


NCastl 4ft87 AJ 77 W 
N CHv 6**91 CV 5 53 
N Dirt 4%92 cv II 64 
NHorn 4ft96 cv 3 31% 

N Ind 10S99 IX 1 79 
Ntrt G 64477 7J 2 95*4 
NCHG 7ft97 lft 5 75 . 

NCR 9*85 9J 26 100 
NEWI7WM 5 77% 

N EnT 9**10 9J 58 99 
N.EnT Bft09 9J 1 93 
NJBI9.3SSMTJ 23 101% 101% 101% - % 
NJBTI 7ftl3 9.0 5 IS 1 .'. 85ft 85ft -1% 


67 -1 

53 

66 

31 

79 -1 

9Sft+ % 
. 75 - ft 

99ft 100 - ft 
77% 77%+ % 
98ft 99 - ft 
93 93 +1 




53 

6** 

5 

A', 

%P- 

B’t 


00 » - • 
C9V. CV.- •* 

S3 53 ..... 

4ft Aft + lft 
4>: i*»- 1 

6*. 4ft 

17% IT’s 

8% r* 

105 10$ - lft 

91 TO - 


NJBTI 7* «H M * « 

NYBS 10*81 IX » ”■» 
v|NYC 4*90f * 

vINICC S»13f . ■ 10 

vINVCiftlJ ■■ * 

V NVC4S98* - 'J 
viNYC Jft97 .. * 

NYE^lOJlE IX .0$ 

KffJS : 1 r «’=-r- 

HY Te? teOO 0.2 lo 87*, »% « 

NY Trt 8*83 8,1 
NY Ti riO* 9J 
N1M12 Js81 11. 

NIM 1X2*05 IX 
NOW X 85*15 IX 
Norlin 9*88 IX 
NOA Ptl 4*92 CV 
Not MG I* :83 XS 
No NG VW0 9.6 
NONG* 9*85 X9 
NO PBC 3S*7 9.3 

Nwst I 7ft « 10- 


as ca 9 Ft M 

5 84 84 84 -lft- 

20 109 TOS'Z IBf -a- ;* 
13 97*. : 97 97 - ft 

2 47 47 47 -3ft 

7 74'vi 74 74 -1 

10 51% 51 ft 31ft +1* ■ 
5 100 99 99 -1% 

5 99 99 99 

9 100*, 100-'. 100*. 

.5 32ft »'■* 32'*+ ft 
Nun 5 74' > 74'; ff!- * 
NwnBI 10*14 9.3 10 104% 106* i IMftt *9 
NwnBI 7ft!l 9.1 25 » 86 » 

NwnBI 6ft79 7.1 10 M 

NwnBI 3*496 6.7 12 48 


94ft 94'*+ ft 

OhBIT 7W3 9J 25 85ft Mft Wi* " 

rnoiS s f: i-i 

OilP ir.«t II. 9 107 107 107 

OhP 10*%82 9.9 6 102 102 102 

OkIGE 4ft93 7J 3 » » * 

OtisEI 6' rfS cv 15 79ft 79 
PGE 9.85582 9.4 11 104*1 104 


PGE9*»06 9.8 99 98 
PGE VasOA 9J 5 
PGE 8r«s02 9J 1 91ft 
PGE 8*2003 9.4 19 Mft 
PGE 7*.'zs03 9J 5 T9 1 1 
PGE 5*89 7J 2J « 

PGE 5s91 7.6 2 65 2 

PGE 5s 91 reo .. 2 eS'.i 
PG 4ft*96JJ 7.7 IS 58 
PG 4%*6KK 7.9 5 36% 

PGE »iS7B 4 J 14 M 
PGE 3*77 3.3 7 90ft 

PGE 3*79 3.6 4 83 

PGE 3*83 4.4 1 67ft 

PGE 2?tsB0 XB 27 76 
PeCL5 9s85 9.1 IS »'« 

PNwT BftlO 9.2 3 92ft 

PacTT 9*511 9J 25 101 

PacTT 9*‘JM 9.J 23 90', 

PaCTT 9S81 8.8 15 102' • «M J » 1C’ 
PacTT 8V4J6 9J 67 93 «. « 

PTT 8.65*05 9.3 15 92ft W » 
PacTT 7* ,08 9.1 5 

10 
6 
5 
1 

19 


+l'j 
-1 

79ft- ft 
IW-+ ' 
9# .... 

95ft.... 
91ft- 2 
Mft- 1 
79ft + : 
68 - 
65’.-.... 
65* 

58 -V 
56ft+ ' 
88 .... 
90-ft- ■ 
83 - 1 

67ft- I' 
75*1- 1 
98 -T 
«ft- ' 

100‘s 101 +1% 

97J, 9/ s 1- ft 


97', 

9r, 

91 ft 
84 
79* 1 
68 
65't 
65ft 
58 

56ft 

87 

90 

U 
67ft 
75* s 
98 
92ft 


79 

9Zft 

53'. 

764, 

es 

ma 

58 

2944 

39 


PacTT 6ft7» 7.1 
PacTT 3ft91 6.8 
PacTT 3* :8I 4j 
PacTT 3‘ J3 4J 
PAA 11%s86 14. 

PAA 7%59S CV 46 
PAA 5*',sB9 cv 134 
PAA aftiM cv. l 
PAA 4%*86 cv 55 28 
PaCCtt 5V«94 CV - 1 59ft 
ParklH 4592 cv 8 56 
Penn D 5*82 cv 10 78 
PenvF 7ft91 9J 5 81% 
Pennzl 7%88 9.4 11 80 
peraxzi 74*68 9 J 5 79 
Pennzl 5*«96 cv 28 69 
Pepsic 44496 cv 50 I03 Vj 103 
PereM 3%so 4j 10 77T. rr.t 
Pfizer 9*i00 9.1 40 101 100 


79 

92*-: 

53ft 

74>, 

48 

77 
57ft 
29ft 
39 
27% 
59! ■ 
56 

78 
Sift 
79ft 

79 
69 


- ft 

92ft 

79 

07 1 r- 1* 1 
Hft- ft 
7a*,+2ft 

68 

rev,- ft 
57‘,-l’a 

29* a 

39 

2 r.- ■■ 

59ft + ft 

56 

70 

81", 

79*3 

79 

69 - ft 
103 - ft 

7Tb 

101 


Pfizer 8?M5 X7 20 lOl’i 101ft 101ft- ft 
Pfizer 4*97 cv 196 69ft 68*: «ft - ft 
PhllE 124481 11. 14 107* 1 107 107ft + ft 

PtiJEl 11H00 11. 25 1Q3V* 10^. 103ft 

PhllEI 11*80 10. 35 103ft HD’s 103V, - % 
PftllaEI 9*95 9.6 10 9344 93ft «ft+2ft 
PhllEI 8ft76 X4 1 100*a 100ft 100ft- ■« 
PhllEI t%0< IX 10 81 80-ft Mft -2 


61 

2 61 
15 99ft 
5 94 
2 84*.- 
7 50's 
5 100ft 100 
5 95* . 95 
10 93*. i 93 


PhllEI 4ft87 7J 
PhllEI 4^M6 7.1 
PhltM 8*>85 8J 
Philip 10*77 10. 

PhlllP 7»«01 9.0 
PlttShl 4*97 cv 
PorG 10*82 9.9 
PrucG 8‘U15 X6. 

PCOi 8ft200X9.4 
PSEG 12*04 IX 
PSEG* 9*95 9.6 
PSEG 4ft77 4.8 
PS ind 9%8l 9.2 
RCA 9V*S90 9J 
RCA 4%S92 cv 20 58 
Ram in Ss96 cv 112 43ft 
R8PA 7%*B5 IX 129 44'- 
RUA69 7*94 IX 74 38 
RaoA72 7S94 IX 191 
RapAm 4*88 1 7.204 
ReiGD «W9 16. 1 

Rep Mr, 90 cv 7 
RepST a.9*95 9.3 1 
RevrC 5* s92 cv 4 
Revl 8.45*85 X6 18 
Rev M 4*201 Cv 38 
ROChT 4J'rf4 CV 16 
Rocln 4- ,87 cv 5 
Rocln 4 *.,91 cv 20 
Rohr 5*i86 Cv 25 
Ryder 9ft$2 10. 12 
Ryder 8!'i92 11. 2 
5tt_ 5F 55061 . . 10 
SfRP* 4'V77 cw 25 


61 

61 

99ft 

94 

84ft 

50* * 


61 

61 

99ft + ft 
94 +2 

B4'? 

50*4- *7 
100% - ft 
95! ■ + 

93 -2 


SanD 10.7 82 10. 2 103 103 

Saner* 12*92 cv 13 105ft 105 
SaF In e',98 cv 39 87 84' 

SaulRI BftM IX 0 65ft 


4 110ft 110*'* 110*4+1*- 

8 93 93 93 

7 94ft 94'? 94* i+ ft 

3 104 104 104 -1 

5 98*i 98'* 98ft 

57 
43*4 
41', 

35*4 
35ft 
32ft 
ST: 

59ft 
95 

54 

98 
55': 

62 
63 

55 
59 
89 

49*2 
44 

99 


38 
35ft 
W: 
59' ■ 
95 

54 
98 
5* 

42 

43 

55 

40*: 

89 

69*4 

44', 

99*j 


SCM 5* iS88 Cv 
Scaur 7Vjs78 7.7 
Searl 0.7*95 9J 
Scarle 8*81 8.1 


63 

96% 

92 

98 


57 

43* ft 
44", +2% 
37'i+r. 
38 +2ft 
35'. +2*i 
59%+ 1 
59'.+ ft 

95 

M - ft 
98 
55' 

42 
63 

55 + *, 
» -1 
89 .. .. 

69*.; 

44-1, 
99*2+ ft 
103 - ft 
105 + ft 
86' ?+ ft 
65ft 65ft + '« 
62ft 62 s ,- ft 
96% 96% -l 
92 92 -4 

98 98 


: - T 
-1 


Sear R 8* ■,76 X0 26 101"? 100'- 10P-+ % 
Sear R 7ft85 XI 30 95ft 95 95ft + ft 

sear R 4*43 6.0 a 79% 79 79 - % 

Sear A 8ft86 8J 25 Wtc 99’, 997. + lft 

Seatrin 6*94 cv 32 35ft 35 35ft- % 


CurreidSaieiie 

YteWllJto 


ShrtlO ItJi X9 15 f 
Sited X 85*94 IX S 1 

Smcir 41^6 CV } 14 

Singer 8ft 76 12 5 * 
Singer 8s» 11. IS ; 
SmK LI 5*84 XJ 12 • 
SoCBIl 10114 9J jo W 
SbCBi 9Jslg 93 37 1 
5oC 61 8* ,04 0 1 2 t 
SoC Bl 7ft07 8.9 I | 
SAC Bl 7ft12 9.2 s | 
SoeStB 10*83 «J 3 li 
SBtT 9.05*03 9J 1) { 
SoOrtT 8*14 9.1 *J | 
SeBlT THU 9.2 TO ; 
SoBrtT 3)79 ]J 10 ; 
SoCEd VOX cv « 

S CG 8.85*95 9.7 lo 1 

SoNG* 9*.»76 

9.0 a 100 iT-33 

5NET PM 9J 5 l 

SPae a-.-toi 6.0 r 

SPacO 4%7» 4.7 • ■ 

Sw B 9.25*15 9.3 119 H 
Sw BT B^-07 9.1 24 
SwBT B.21E2 X2 3 1 
SwBT 7+aP> 9.1 
Sw BT 7i»12 BJ 
Sw BIT h?8 7.2 
Scrag 4'. 92 cv 
SauiQO *1*5 XI 
S OGal 8‘Jt5 9.0 
5 tO Cal 5194 ■ J 
S OCal 4ftS3 5 J 
StOin 9.2*04 9.1 
StOln 7.1*89 7.1 1« 
SIO In 3' 02 4.1 | 

ST PLO 5' .90 cv 4 
SI Pru *Vi90 cv 47 
SfaMuT 9*80 IX S 
StBUfC 4t?91 Cv 34 1 
Suave 5*97 ev (4 


M 
TO 
9 
5 
5 
M 
» 
IS 
15 I 


Sutro 6ft 82 10. 
Swift 7ftre ;* 
Svbrn 9 1 . ii) X9 
Svbrn 4 ' :*7 Cv 
To left 9ft 76 10. 
Taktl 5'.-M 90 50 
TalCNTI 4594 cv SI 
Tandy 10*94 It. 
Tanb Sft*94 cv 
Teledv 10*04 IX 
Trtedy 7»V9 11. 
Teledv 4' 392 ML 
Teledv I' m cv 
Tclev 9s«6 21. 

TennCo 9*78 8.9 
TenCn 8ft75 83 
TennCO 7*93 9.2 
TenCp 6* *92 cv 35 
Tcnlnc 9fts 9.8 
Tenlnc 9*94 9.4 
TenlncB’,91 9.2 
TViA 8.10*79 XO 
TVA B 05*99 8.6 
TV 71.S98C Xi 
TVA 7.759* X7 
TVA 7JS97 8.5 
TV 7.35597B La 
TV 7 35S97C BJ 29 
TVA r,*7a 7.2 6 

TVA 7597 8.5 11 

Tesoro 5* J9 cv 22 

Tc*oo8-J»S L9 X 
TetCO 7*J)1 8 9 15 
Tte ind J 1 ,?' II. 10 
TOXfl 4ft» cv 5 
TiddM S’ *91 cv 
TWA 11*86 12. 

TWA 10*85 
TWA 6':7W 
TWA 5594 
TWA 4*92 
TranF 10*77 9.8 10 
TranF T.9T IX 10 
TriSM Tft80 25. 32 
TRW 9*85 9.1 5 

UGi 11*90 10. 10 

UnEI 10’ jOS IX U 
U 0<IC X’rtC X4 2 
U OUC 0ft 76 

8.1 TO 101 
UP Cp 4ft99 cv 20 
UPRR SftBS 8.7 15 
U Tank 5*06 7.4 5 
Unlrvl 5* :9fl Cv 
UnAirL 5*91 cv 
UnAL 4' ,92 cv 
UBmd 9* ,91 IX 
UBrnd 5* :94 CV 
Un Mer 4*90 cv 
US Ho Sftte cv 
US Stl Vt9b 7 .5 57 
UnTec 9s85 9.0 TO 
UnTec 5»«91 cv TO 
UnTec 4* ;92 cv 95 
Un Util 5*93 cv II 
UVind 5* ,93 cv 7 
UVInd y»95 10. 3 

Ver P 8'. :98 9 5 10 
WaRR 7ft77 7.9 2 

Wag E 6-t8b 9.1 2 

W8lMt 6* ri*5 cv 
Water 5* .-91 cv 


5 
13 

3 
TO 
10 

6 

4 

19 1 

I 


5 
11 
4 

.. 97 
cv 293 
CV 184 


11 . 


Well F 7>«97 9 1 

1 

A'nACC 9* ;79 9.4' 

5 

WAlrL 5*493 cv 

10 

WEICC VMS 8.8 

7 

NUC 1IF,97 14. 

23 

NUT X45S96 12. 

2 

WUT 7.90*97 IX 

2 

WU TI 6%69 11. 

7 

Nn UTI Ss92 10. 

7 

WstoE l*MS 9 5 
woyhr 8* .76 X0 

• 

5 

Wevfir 8SB5 8.2 

10 

//tilt c S' :92 cv 

5 

Ml Mt 5' ,93 CV 

1 

Wlckes wv cv 

5 

Wleke S’ cv 

11 

Mm* 11*81 10 . 

32 1 

Wirt* 10' ,83 10. 

61 1 

(VOOlWti 9*TO 9 9 

3 

WOOlw F»96 9.6 

10 

v'omr 5* ?94 cv 

25 

,YvIv 7', *95 cv 

49 

kero* 8>rt9 B.9 

3 

Kero* 6s95 cv 

04 

Z«Mt 4 J J8 Cv 

10 

Zap! 4 3 ,S88 cv 

1 

Zavre 8*96 12. 

2 

Zayre 5^.94 cv 

13 


FOREIGl* 


Austin BftB3 8.7 TO 
BanqF 9- ,80 9.0 8 > 
Chile 3*93f 3-5 9 

ItalPUt 3*77 3.0 1 

JaunO 8* jBO BJ 1 
Men CO 10580 9.9 20 1 


American Exchange Bond T: 


Atask 69as87 cv 

1 76V, 

76% 76% +1% 

AIlegA 5%87 11. 

19 47 

46 

46 

-2 

Argent 10*84 IX 

33 73 

71ft 

72 


Bell In 6ftS4 cv 

J 66% 

6891 

68% 


Sencf 6%*91 cv 

10 35% 

35% 

35% 

- V, 

Butto S%*88 cv 

30 93ft 

92% 

92% 

-2 

Cable 6%*9fl cv 

12 65**5 

*1% 

64% 

- % 

Cabot 6fts9i cv 

2 44% 

44% 44%+ ft 

CaCmp 7s92 cv 

19 50% 

49% 

49% 

-2ft 

ClttzM 8%80 25. 

16 35 

34 

34 

- ft 

Condec 5*93 cv 

3 41 

41 

41 


ConOG 9*88 IX 

7 re 

re 

73 

+1 

DPF 5fts87 Cv 

4 SB 

58 

SB 

+1% 

ElAuD 6*88 cv 

4 55 

55 

55 


Elgin 6 1 — *88 cv 

67 62% 

61% 

sail 

+1% 

FIVa 8-12*80 23. 

10 38 

38 

38 

- ft 

FI sell 5% *87 cv 

2 67 

69 

69 

+ % 

GrantM 6s87 cv 

19 35 

34* 

35 


GIlMt 7.7*a0 .. 

10 39 

39 

39 


Heltm 71592 cv 

2 51 

51 

51 


HuskO 6ft97 cv 

5 96% 

96% 

96% 

- ft 

InstSv 6*77 cv 

1 89 

89 

89 


JonsLl 6ft94 li 

26 53ft 

53 

53 


Komaf 7*A90 cv 

7 1B5 

105 

10S 

+3 

LHsT 6*w96 Of 

5 27ft 


LundE cv 

2 40 

40 

40 




McCul Uf a cv 145 
McCuil 5*97 cv* 2 
MCCP9%76 9J 7 
McCP 7.7882 TO. 6 
McKe 5%*97 cv 15 
NVF 10*2003 IX 5 
NVF 5*1994 11. 
Offshre 5*92 cv 
Purtn 6%*81 9.6 
Real In 8s9i cv 
ReoN 5fts97 cv 
RDblln 12*89 15. 

Sat Air <087 cv 
Sbd W 5*84 cv 
Sec Mt 7* ,82 IX 
SCE9S81 EE 8.8 
&CE 4ta*82J 6 J 
SCE 41,g2H SJ 
SCE 3ft78 E 4.0 10 
Tyco 5'^S8S cv 
Unfmx 7*^92 cv 
verntn Sft82 cv 
Ware 7ft*94 IX 
WeilR 10*84 IX 
wkwr 4ft85 cv 
■WvtLD 5*188 cv TO i 


TO - 
2 

6 ■ 
5 

10 ■ 

3 

10 . 
5 • 
5 ti 

4 ; 

5 

1 

10 - 
5 1 
1 c 
5 < 

4 


Vj— In Bankruptcy or reccirershio or beln| roorcanUed ureter 
Kcurtttewnwnod by Mch compoales *1— S* interest, el— Cortffi 
f—Otait In flat. *— Matured bond*, necofiabilily impaired by mah 
deliver). >•--£* warrants. fn— Toraign issue sublect to tater 
c* — Convertible bond. 


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l - . ~ THE -NEW YORK TIMES i SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6 197S 

'Jon Cites' IHBBHMfflD E. I. da Pent iy*„ 


K L dn Pont Sets Iran Fiber Venture BDY1N6 IS ACTIVE 
Em «v.^l!i IHSIJGAKT8ADIN6 

our capaity C ° nneot,cut Cerrte '' >s Aiding site lor the plant. 26 miles dsely wh?fe to w SShS 1 . dralill £ 3 “ _ . 7 . 


-ca uul omit our canajtv -newmiMi i»Aigm?»u« ror me plant 26 miles tiselv mhn * n _ z wiT? , - . 

WOrJs_toth f Th0Se Not SIJ "* at Birth SSLS.“£“: - At P™* » .®? the reaifider^r Z ^Zh ^P. 


Open Interest 


„ ftiUr. 5*4. 5. 1575 

(In boOnon, oca wnlttrt) Thor. 

Frt. Ovm 
S ate Interest 


Prices Move Up by Limit xw 


Bo water Lags 


WEST HAVEN, Conn. (AP)— 

t thft VofUM.. a-j ■ ■ . . 


* SSK 55- to have°KUd for Some Contracts fl 

covered With arev dust Tam- All told, the «i an t IT „n e J^ dtha£ . sfriflgent aim- Tor uoniracts m» 


[covered with gfay dust W All told, the pto feevent-' Snita eS5.2 in|ent 

A??™*** “Ploy 2,000 SbL-S S aT“S?„i r t t0 sSfi 


Ssrtiun ail 3J2* 

(in aatraett) 

Stttr (No. IT QMitndt 


V Bowater 0^0^ one ^ ^ GpSo^anT^ » r ^ ^Sh, ^ ^ ELIZABETH M. FOWLER E®? »» -- ^ 

id the world's who «2-5 SST^ Jj earnest be trained in the UniSi T^iSi^SB :••••••••••.:..•" V.: SS 

st^'T’S^RJ^oatoa to CSS "n taies two to five years to , ^ KWTtP ^ Jffifir'fii'SVrtaiSB? 1 '"" - M 

for the quarter Convertii "SLiing * tbt t*,^**^* *. ^ 7 whit * “ SSd.""" “ deSert ” h » ^ I ^ ‘ ' M MTlJI^ ~ ' " 

in. or 76 cents r *® of S2.ll ■ to the ound. Said George Gillespie, which is used m dou- acted to do much of . in recent weeks from the 50 

rom S9-milljonJne income was SlS.B-miion, £?. ie J ot hospital’s Es^ern ar ? d otl J“' fabrics, poly- on the huge *J e 3^° expressed concernjeents to the 15-cem-EDound moved U P a Htt,e on Chica- 

share, in the|dora from $23.4-mi2iion ntte ^ J Rehabilitation Center. He f^fr staple, which is used In *““ *» be bui]t liSL? , f 0 f nt 7 0rkers might range, were at bare^n kvels S u B oard °LT? de ‘ December 

i nrj. — 1 12 _ r . haC Kaon VilixJ -* - w. , . CETDEtf Drill in rmtom 11IM |U« “* tnambahar On tfl* (inoct nf r contribute fn fhfi mnmdM. :_ . . UOTglUIl JcV CIS Q.U... nf ti 5V It * hitohal ■•■.I. 


New sh-1 w ■ 

r vT ‘ Oran#* I nice 
r EX- PUMnuni . . 


vere S217^-mil-|agc 


for the “adventitious*'— 

.1 those vhn Tram kl.'.J _x u “ socks. 


lie company said it xpects JJ®* who were not blind at . ... .. 

months to July thee will be a “sigificant blrth - that . jbe»c 

/•s net income shotfall of income” fun its The initial problems to be fae J? n ! ed - by 

or S2.01 a ooe»tin*>c in mrar overcome hv tht* nanrrf.. pVCk— perhaps 3. truck fleet 


But even though the number mey become like ajeountiy and in European: very 

ofnon-Jraman who are to be . ne . observed. "I [favorable because of the much 2 cents ‘ 


ex B^ ct f d that these deployed is limited, DuPont *bf* is going io disturb larger acreage planted this After lh ^ close the Canadian 
products will be earned by pans to take pains in screen- * 9^* We have so many year. Government estimated the Can- 


May delivery sugar closed ai *fan wheat crop at 595 million 
15.50 cents a pound, up bushels this year, compared 
im 14.50. with 488.5 million a year ago. 

As they have so often in Sorae analysts were surprised 


duck in North Ameca, but habilitation cannot even be ~ ai ? a .5 >f I T sfah . an ’ Ion B a 1 *2? ua 8f' 71,6 hope is Prefabricated housing to Iran the past two weeks, potato at the relatively high figure 

;h airman, said that it “remains confient" for considered. cen ter o f the Iranian, textile “at the fiber pant can be con- «*■ their workers, that would futures prices jumped the daily since they had felt the crop 

order backlog the bnger term, j At a live-in center the patient mdust17 ' struoted and: operated with few- bdp us m many ways." 50-point limit, wjth Mayclosing would be about 530 million. 

/ is around other people with 40 ***■ Cent Share £n l ,2! n * ll i. S’ 111 , a ^epaarte. interne w a at 16.78 cents a pound, up A bujing rush at the end 


ther Company Report 


tod July 31 
I Indicated. 

1775 1574 

DY CO RP. 


.100008 S 1 
IZ1.3M 
lie 


| HUGHES X yCHEF 

Ofr. nb dg^jnjjo j i *,5002300 

}W 7 H2.tr MoS 

"na, I 3C ncj 

* HHB. UlE PSJOOIOO 33AHMB0 

»w mem }9VU 

Mfto. f * 24c 


At a live-in center (lip patient 

is around other people with 40 *** Cent Share f 1- ! In , a se P aart ® interview aft 16.78 cents a pound, up I A buying rush at the end 

similar problems and cannot Forty per cent Polyacryl Iran K - by PI® i r-r ient , arcbitec t Nader from 1628. on theNewYork of trading pushed hog futures 

fall back on a family. £ is owned by .the Duft)i^parent r°Tn ha f faeen working MercantBe Exchange. _ (up quite sharply on the Chicago 


“I was mol ^ shahr Industries Development nrAhT«t,c 7’ wuna - a nope now that m tr>-- hundredweight last year. The The buying of hogs also helped 

1" Corporation and memb^^f ^ 2? Zt**,™** precast was the lowest inmore in fiuence. higher prices for pork 


37MDQ a?. I 5ffi ::::::/ 4I2 12 bIuB eyes trying to focus on his Z ?? d1 ' Americarl 

aoaSS amZlttf* / 2S *%2® . listener. “I was disappointed 1?^, .™ *^i_ ha Y e |breught h 

JOO^JOO Ijoaooo Shr. m 
97C ' un A— IM 


listener - “I was disappointed 7^7*“ °r* KS have brought here by Bell Helicon ter. 

Shr. eamt'7 ill “"A ?? I.’ couldn’t worker these precautions,- 

rfraanfburv of That was .the bSSm* toSS+ IsftuiP's acting mayor, Reza 

oorp. hardest thing at first.” 1977 ^ ^ S ^ ut produ 1:11015 m Azraayesh, a London-trained 

ffl”'^SJS 9 “ . »UB*TT ?"**.*■ inllff “> busia “ s Sg hfrT^^S; 

t the rata Of 1B.11 fflr. am i2i9,7oaooo :i774oojm 111 final stages of his informants in Teheran, various reservations about the current! 

:::: 7 ' 467 -™ at the he is|i nvestors including DuPo nt have project in an interview in his 

4 co. ltd.-a 0VBr feeling sorry for myself.’ .* , 

nuioo »49&ooojne i u f r I£ E J' GACe investors His advice to other blind people vm in Trim*-.**. — I 

SSS JOBS S' ££" * » 14HH * • Am KO DUMPING FOUND DuaI Purpose Funds 

ms«£a uujk, ^’tfiohomeandsitdown.l A,U - l,U1 U r rI"UrUUlllJ| 

tmradid ftam ra- a». — 1.74 KC 


in tran, notably the Isfhan wHl not lose the true! than 10 years. bellies 

one 11131 {t uscd 10 he -" * Wheat, corn and soybeans bacon. 


bellies, the raw material for 


Listing of Prices of Commodity Futures 


SAGE INVESTORS 


scomm mm- 
first router of 


a " Don ’ t & home and sit down, « V JJUOll XIIU Jl 1 VUlW 

- 3SS «0F foreign autos 


D INDUSTRIES 


Ofr. sties .. 
Net Inarnia 
Shr. earn. . 


people think you can.” 

njfoJfo s 7UMJ.732 The first lesson in the 18- 
iMr iee course is "how to get 


Continued From Page 27 


Dual Purpose Funds 

Week uM Sgpt. S. 1575 jB| 

Followiag Is i waofclr lisllw of fht tm- . 
audited not a not vahre uvHcabto to ttu 
apHU dum ot doa Impost ftnmtnenf 
cow oantos at dou of business Friotoy. Also £** 
shown m doslna listed marM prices of **■>' 
but (w-thfrownter dostar-tiHlultr mad Jul 
mfees for ttw cooltel shares ot each camcanr 


Friday, So*f. 5 . I57J 
CHICAGO GRAINS 
WHEAT 


4.17 4.15 4.i4Vi 4.lsii 4.17 !Mav 

4 JO 4.34Ji 4JS 4J7V: 4 J2 Jul 

4.40 AM 4.40 AUS 4-44Vc!5e> 

4.43 4.47 4^2 4 M 4.4AVi I D®C 

4J5 4J? 4J4 4JJ 429 SJ 


ORANGE JUICE {Frozen Ctacmfralcd! 


ISep 

59 M 

59.95 

59 JO 


M JS Sep 

5? JO 

60.00 

59 JO 

b60J0 

039 JO 


52.70 

5235 

5155 

51U 

53.40 Hoy 

6 US 

*2.1 D 

61J5 

06100 

osua 

.U&ar 

SO-SO 

50J0 

-19 JO 

49.55 

SILAS J*» 

63.45 

64.05 

63.15 

63.10 

63.40 

! Mil'/ 

49.10 

AfJO 

4A.90 

48.95 

47.80 “«r 

64^0 

64.90 

64 JO 

064.90 

64J0 


2 4 “°5.j»*tos'!!!!! w£i \95sr\A5v from the bed to the bathroom,” - «*ft .**, pw^toai diHwum onscooni or 

^ :::::: ^ said Mr. GSIespie. Then to^y eign autos had 17.9 per cent ST'S SST* Z SuTSuS.” ^ 


„ - ..-.Jgffi.'SZS? :::::: ^ 4m ^\ sa fi ”*• Gaiespie. Then they eign autos had 17.9 per cent, ft7m»i iE SttaTSuST ^ 
39 AW "gS usi^n re 1 ?*™ to use the telephone, Import sales slipped 4 per cent) MJLVlI om 

* * Ofr. atos .... ^Jmombo % 3 uoa.m 311(1 learn how to use Jyl y- but domestic sales . . _ , wa QoTshrk Jl " 

nh toenme ! i iwjBo T46amo the long cane, the most valuable plunged 16 per cent. Iftggj yJjtf. S — g-J , 

hdustries 5 1 Jlo2f r Si^ it^ to'jmiw tocI available to the blind. "Ihere is no reasonable mdl- Sfirtim^. oS ♦ 4W.I SK 

Mtt'SBS.'Sr “^S TI I en «» tbe Simple com- catiw ttatto United State. fatSSS :::::: S & -ttft 

S9,ooo 15464400 mumcations devices such as automobile industry is being nr I ft? sv5 im + hjIju- 

StV-iwre r«r to j^ L S» WR FJ,C,AL BnuUe, typing, longhand and is likely to be injured, or is sS 2* = S« ISL 

' S£i£s J " * ... 5 duto A J6.7W4M tape recorder. . prevented from being estab- ^ “ ** -»jH 

■rtlt in 1575 and Net toss 2,931 34004100 trn lished bv rpflcnn nf tV,o i MM . Prlcis bv Lipacr Analytics 1 Distributors. 

many ctawd its a — R estated. when a person -comes to the i_v._ ’ ~y IB#SOfl OI me impor- . lSw 

30 «0d In 15741 center he ^ goes through a Passenger automobiles \oa 

:essorics pA tji'WI 5S^5g£-.£gg£Si2gg!7 -Ji°J, ^ * 

S , .. ^ ^ [f t pmQn ■?V e °^ g n f%7f ContinutdFroin Page 27 g 

« — ii- '*3 f rtias-M g r ““ * 

"5? * ‘“■8 tor /.I::::. “SJB «■ T Bectnmic Aids TOO te^ nI ^S n c d onS." ^iS 


— g-J Jul 

- iwP* 


CORN -wui am* umuoH 

SJOVi 347 3.00% 246VS 342 FRD2EN P 

*■«% =-W 2-Wh 2 .5»fc Feb 05.15 9 

3.05% 348% 3431% 349 346 Mar 8L25 0 

XM 310 345% 3-09H 3.00 May loo s 

34715 345% 345$ 3fl% 340 El KM S 

oats «< jo » 

147 1jS W IW* i-g* 1 Iw “P” W 

1 SAW. o J’fJu. JiT J ™ May »»; July 1470; 
J44V5TS IJ4 h T J| 1-55=4 b— Bid; •— Askad;' 

,s, -i-jE 

544“, 5JB JJ" “0 

p ffliiJT't!! i-Bn.te M iljj 

tB isniMS 64B i 


FROZEN PORK BELLIES 


■4J2V: 4 42 Jul 41.15 4945 48-55 4145 ay^> May 65 JO 65.50 65.45 hdi.NJ b55.45 

445 444V. <5w 48.70 48.70 48J0 4SJ0 4M0 Jul 66.00 6740 6640 67.00 b6645 

446 4.46 Vi Doc 49.10 43.10 47-55 47-55 4845 *■> 6740 6740 6740 06740 66-94 

441 4.29 Sales: 775. Sales: 350. 

Spot Accra unauotod. b-bld. 

24614 342 FRDZEN PORK BELLIES COFFEE 

2.99% 2.9*1— FpIi 0915 919n none m mi # 0 un ^ 9140 91.70 91.15 BUS 9143 

3JV, 3 M h 5* 23 Sn MM MM Mjr “- 70 «■» *110 *1-30 

iwo m SMS «« «2 2-S 5^5 **« si jo > 1.75 «ij» hjd wi.» 

«Ki8 £!’ £S as its as Eg ru. V M "* WJ " 

An# 84 JO 86.20 8440 bS6J0 bS4_70 pS™ sort D-5UV- 

7.62V, ,44% J"' ^ ™ 

{j® Feb 6257; MM. 2, ID; LIVE BEEF CATTLE 

1 M .tL Miy 7a0; JdJ 7 1*70; Auo HO. Oct 46.25 46.90 46.70 4645 46.40 

i u H? 1 b — Bid; a— Askad; n-Nomlnal. Dec 45 JO 46JS 45J0 4t25 45.70 

,J6 l- 54 pnriynpc Feb 44.70 45JS 44JO 45^1 45.10 

POTATOES [ Aar 44 JO 11 K //jfl 44 K me 

CM Now Yoik Morcantito Exd»n» lj U n 44JO 45 70 44.30 asm San 


Open HloJi Low time Prw. |*W , 
no M u 840 Sales: 


LIVE BEEF CATTLE 
46.25 46.50 46.70 4645 46.40 

45J0 46JS 45J0 4US 4SL70 

44.70 45 JS 44JO 45.3) 45.10 

44 JO 44.85 44.40 4445 44J5 

44.90 45.70 4440 4540 45.40 

4540 45.70 44.95 4S40 4SJS 

Oct 3024; Dk 3704; Feb 1235; 


1240 12.70 KM ,140 1245 April 360; Jim 260; Au# 22. 

1M0 14.52 1JJ5 14.92 1442, 0»« lntwest: Oct II7M: Dec 11214; 


Continued From Page 27 


| SOYBEAN OIL PLATINUM |*P 

ig si st MUraBBEpwufc — _ 

! jcCKtt s | i 1 1 i H 

ft 3 t» flu 343 — I g II g JBS 

' SO^EAN^L^ W1 |jS: jl ^ ^ >M H “sates: Oct" 

140.50 i4i jo 139 jo vn^woj 1 oijjf; 3Sa un Awti 440; Jun* «. J“'» n * *■ 1 ’ 

M 0 J 0 14240 139 J0 Ul J0 141 -M : Mg 3 JO 6 3J47 3J7aO 3J|S Ml_. .. w 443 ,; Dk 7*11; Feb 

1SS3 iWJSaPlMiSffl™- » ^ iSWW65a - s#l “* 55 4^A» i 0 ^n.Tzi7; July 690; 
1S0JW 150^ 749.10 150J0 I504» ow,rt *- «■ 


16J5 14.52 14^2 . Own Interest: Oct 11759: Dk 11714; 
,6-45 16.78 16JS Feb 9209; April 2000: June 1674; An 209. 

I FEEDER CATTLE 

UM I SeP 35-00 35J5 35.00 b35J5 35.25 

HU Fyrhan-p l° a 34J2 35.00 ZA.t5 35.00 34 J5 




\ PUEBLO IHreATOAL I 

■AGE INVESTORS gj- ;;; ] j; ; | J j" J MS 

d .000 a 1696^8 i hr r ^ , 3i a 2sscw 

— „« |M toss 28,497 A «W“ 

T14JOO A3OTJ.M0 sSf.Sras" - 1* 

“ . . „ A — Nut Income, 

jsny Hid (he Ihlrd 

of an Incrws* Pi ROB INTECH HC. 


While the center emphasizes Following the € ®^S¥ l3 '9 n .,^l at T ? accept-te 

le use of nonraechanical de- gaso line pric« in 1974. tt » 

ices by bUcd people, r«earch States ^.manutoeto^ > c-M-dj" 


56JO 57 JO 56-05 WJ0 56-ffi 

Sis 57.75 5540 S7J5 56J0 

ttffl 55.55 SL25 SSJ0 54J0 

f^VD HJS 51J0 52-35 51J7 

51.7? 52.10 5140 5, JM Ml JS 

51 J5 53.30 51 JS 5M0 B52.10 
MJ5 49-70 bSCJS A45J5 
49J0 48-50 -ttJB Ata — - 


145 JO 147J0 145.00 liMJO 146^1 
150 JO 1SOJO 149.10 1S0J0 13J0 1 aw™*- 


market/ the council of abort- Wm^n hrWj KVXK; lJ7V ife 
caid^^nee most imports are national Harvester, including j extra iwn ■ |JR 

in ’these categories, they gained provision for operating! oss es ] ^STrato! " 1 , . ' I 5 *?. 


RP. I SAGErALu* ro. i +s««. 5 q a cam in’these categories, they gained provision for J^ ,ei ? tin ®!? SS 1 ^ ^STrat?" 

*um obr. »i« * XQZ* * 7sa, S For example there is a cam- JJ'wi s volumes. expected to be incurred by __ m 

,7omo 9A\o.m MJ4J.2 era that magnifies reading ma- ra °^ yJLikrt stare^creased thedSrision under current busi- 

moxoo N«t ion 1 ® ,4C 7 Vr tend up to 60 times its normal faster this year the coun- ness conditions during the pe- 

^ SH0NEY.5 bis if W&i size, primarily for use by -to- JSl* riod pending 

SCO*, ’ '*%£ K °i^5 SS10nalS wh ° d0 a f^ere advan^d:^ scheduled for January of 

■s 5 ™ ^ “*!?-• or am 1 19 ^ w<* m n < 

stirji wss. .... to^^asoyh people are “low viaon be- ig74 to ^ g ^ ^ the first in SouthChi cago an ann ^ 

If “®s -ft - f ^ I i 

si -ls| fcr- .!^4 c - ti fte 8f ASarsJSUB b^ SffiffgSJgg ^ * 

“ E SST. ::::: : SoKch coouiressors Md de- Sis olace incrastoe. Steel Cosl Mtos, 

srjst-^ritaffl ’stfflvicj 
“fg fclgMi:-:: mJ*' 4«»i" 


rr 152JJ 155 JO 152-00 355.00 152-M I 

I 756.00 159J0 154J0 15JU»7S7JO :Sw 

n 156 JO 152JD 156 .08 159J0 159.00. 

CHICAGO CASH GRAIH5 |pK 

|M?r 


*55.00 152-50 1 COPPER ICED BROILERS 

5U0 75 7.00 r-_ 54JD 54.50 56-30 56.90 56JD -.tow* Baird at Traifc 

1S9J0 159.001 gg S5a 57.10 56 JO B.I0 57.00 CWosa BMrt Of 

,s £ g£ ff if If if 2b 

; r 8 'BBB tafe as g g g 

“■ l», S.a _«* “ *“ & £H £3 ££ £S ££ 

: toad. 2J0-I SalB * : e*H mated HJJ9. b-BJc*; a-Askad; B-NomlnaL 

I GOLD LUMBER 

! New fork aHmwamv EiuJunae CNU90 MeronHto Ejcdwioo 

100 hw outw wnlrids 125JB 12 6J0 ,25.10 126J0 W4.M 

Sw 152.70 152-70 JgJJ SiS? lej'on Mv 131 JO 133J0 131 JO U3JJ0 131J0 

Inn i Q « 153.80 *153.10 1SL8QS T5Z.V0 BW i<mcd 119a Q110 13?«SD .137JD 

| Dec " ISSiO 15WJ0 25!"SS Hrca Mar 10 147^0 1^6.10 U7.20 14&M 

15 JO 74-64 Oct !»■» Ig-* ’S'S 1 i7?'fSt 17l5 PLYWOOD 

1SJ0 14-50 IW 177 JO 177 JO W1J0 172.10S 4/l-W Trad. 

il5J8 sites: csHmited 975. 12SJ0 7 77 JO 125 JO 127 JO 774.00 

15.10 74-20 s- sett line. Sw <i^SB TI^M T7P.OT I mIu 

1SJ0 74.04 N.Y. SILVER 15J09 trw «1 Jw k|jo mSt W0 1» J# 

Hew Yurt Commodity E*dianw JJJ. {^3 136J0 13J JO 135.10 133J0 

Open HHlh Low awu ^TV. 736J0 13 9.00 136J0 1MJ0 725.00 

450 JW 451 JO 447-00 4S0J0 450J3 7 39 JO 736-00 

b»n» cS 45ZOO 452J0 452.00 452J0 ^ 140J0 U7J0 

55 JS 55.75, Sc 460.00 461.70 456 JO 460J0 460J0 g vqpk COTTON EXCHANGE 


to bTta5A«i by JS - W 3J03J*, to* —r—. =* *u 

the division under currenl ttafr Ufc—t ! New m c^medity em 

ness conditions during the pe- SJJ6AR 100 ^ «mco «^wi* 

riod pending cpmptettm of the CBfltrid Ho> Tl igg gg .]£» S3£ IkJo g 

Kde, scheduled for January of Sk " ikjo isjjb ih-£ ]“ “? «r r 

1 Q 7 C Raw aiisar saot 19-25. S lSSJO *59 JO 157 JO 75BJOS 157-50 

19 1 6 - ■„ c* M l wort.; Cnrtract No. 11 E 4 167JB 161.10 1W-7D 167 JOs MM Mw 


dh Speech compressors and de- ^ b^un to plate ot ^rr, Han/ester's 

bw view that convert printed ma- emphasis on fuel economy m g f- . 

tonal into either sounds or n- h {c F decision to purchase an interests m the Marquene iron ^ 

= Z&Stm availabie. StJSSPlh. S P 

. a little more sp»ce-e*e ere It cited eovtammentd ?■« Iron ^Dnn|0)mp 


ic Suppressorof Pairi 
Week's Pateited Idas 


EGGS lOwfll L 

ChJaoo MmtunHIo Exchsnw jod 

59 JO 55.90 55 JO 55 JS 55.75, 
55.00 55.10 54.H S4J0 54.85 | Jln 
SfJS 59.90 59J5 59.W 59-™: Mar 
62J5 62J5 61 JS £■" «■’* »» 
59.U 59.99 59M 55.90 M5.BS j W 

— — — n5S -S2 S-ttis® 1 * 

n5SJ0 55 -»|Dk 

: s» 105; Oc± 30; No* 43; D« Jan 


95.70 16J0 1JJ0 76.45 15.45 Jun 763 

WJ0 15.70 14J5 15J6 14.64 Od 1* 

UJ5 7SJ8 14 JO 15J0 14-50 |w 171 

llS 14.40 615-30 UM “fttes: efl 
14-25 1540 UM blS. 10 74-20 s-seltllrto. 

14.10 ,SJ» 14J5 15J0 14-04 N.Y. 


PLYWOOD 

Oikifo Beard of Trad* 

12SJ0 177M 7M-00 WJ0 724,00 
127 JO 727.90 127 JO 125-90 1 26J0 
1MLM 133JO 130 JO 132JD 125 JO 
3M 136J0 133 JO 135.10 132J0 
13*3l3E00 136J01WJ0 12iM 

7 39 JO 736J0 

140 JO 737.00 


Pit 


m Page 27 

the Balti- 
n interna- 

384, granted 
iui J. Queen- 
stems marva- 
mtrol from a 
ft. The mis- 
/ be a free- 
ropped from 
may be self- 
i reefed at a 
target by ra- 

ing vehicle 
ange to both 
l the missile 
between the 
to both of 
,.r caiculatiops 
'mnt the mis- 
i and speed, 
r-e sent to its 
[ting it bow to 
fig fins if cor- 
ssary. 

fystem is de-. 
Require fewer 
• than are tak- 

arrangeiiients, 
the complex- 
jf the missile, 
t has not yet 


* 

eed Mice 
ring technician 
lal Center for 
Research in 
i., has devised 
r feeding mice 
penmen tal ani- 

i the study of 

Ser Jr. was 
it 3,902.459 this 
ng it to the De- 
Health, Educa- 
lfare. The mice 
ves to feed sup- 
ntainer, and are 
.m defecating in- 
s misleading' the 

ter designed two 
; feeder. One is 
and hangs from 
cage. The other 


is cylisdreal and 
through a iage top. 

In eithe- form, thi 
flows dowi to an outli 
a small quantity collec 
screen -covired trouf 
pan. The mouse fe« 
passing its tongue t 
the screer. A deflecto 
prevents r. from geftin 
than its bead ova* the 
portion o f the troughJ 

Several thousand 
feeders are m use by 
ment units, and other 
order. ^ 

Sunburn Doses Meaff 

The ; Amefican C 
Company, ■ Stamford 
recaved a patent t 
for a sunburn dosin 
tended to let people 
the effects of the s 
on their skin hi tim€ 
over-exoosure. 

Artold Zweig of 
Conm, was grante 
3,903,423 for a t 
device m which a 
of plastic contains 
that show irrevers 
changes when wra 
the sunbum-causir 
Near it is a color u 
in the shade to i 
same chemicals chi 

a predetermined 


S a 

^ ate between a man and a fj^ n 23 d ^|j es whi Je aH imports — — 

by ^ of tH- course. S ot * “ 24 mfles ’ **“ 0 W5T‘ "vTl 

caU^SaptiJe Education” is councHraid. _ ag-..* n-wj 5 . 

„ a 2 aimed at improving mobility. Pf)] f)RAI)AN DENIED «cb* ” « » m ■ 

-pp- It includes working out on D |^ri TT /\j|w appyw hr* AmTBi' S -to 1 ?*. » : 

16611 punching bags and rowing ma- RlGHTTOMARRl NAu Am r*i 50 w wu 

BOI MOLC^ Wl-a “I:;," H 

reon bUiid “ nfid ““ “ rt°S a tt e 7 Sunty 1 clerk?’office. J™ J “ ^ 

, P «^sai^g££;-s r te , jars ri f 

S^nd^on tL^hted^ Sfr. Sie^here to persons- of the ^ S 1 | i; 


n 464J0 464.70 461 JO 464.70 464 JO 

ar JttjS 474.00 4 59 JO 473 JO 4H.00 

„ «gu a n M 47SJ0 481.60 41139 Od 

V Soo «QJ0 4*6-20 489.70 497 JO DK 

i WM 457.90 4^J0 m.n 497 JO tor 

•c 507 JO 570.00 507.00 509.90 2W.40 tor 

* 5VL50 514.50 513.50 S 73.90 57150 Jul 

Sties: estimated 4.458. g" 

WOOL Sa 

No tndos. w 


NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE 
Contract No. 2 

1 SVE5 £7.25 5V.6S 55-OS 51.75 

K 5116 52-10 52-01 52J0 52.40 

S E.85 BJ0 52.61 S3 ITS 

» “J* 5X70 h«.M 

I k54J0 0500 

■c 54J5 54.70 54J5 b54-50 U5.63 

Sain: 2JSB. 

Mid. 


Chicago Board Options Exchange 


FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 5, 1975 


Alcoa ..40 
Alcoa .. 45 
Alcoa .. 50 
Am Tel 45 
Am Tel 50 


-Oct- . 
Vet. Last 

T7,12*fc 
7 7V4 

29 31* 
9 15-16 
46 2*. 
B * 
49 TTi 
297 » 

227 2 W 

*T 7Vb 
SS '47* 

311 

221 11-16 
136 'A 


- Jan - 
Wrt-Lasl 


6 2 V* 
2S 3to 
1*711-16 
b b 
33 107b 
75 5W 
b b 
« • 
153 M 
TO 2 5-1* 
106 1 
b 6 


S *!5i e STi-r know how ^ Tboy can marry a boy ®.vS 


tui t, perauu wi'w ; ~ XL ir 

tent and do evjytbing a sighted said^ were r^ons; g^S » 

able person might _ h ’ ad Xa3ifm no blood test, |« « 

wine ‘The most onpor^nt pwt is horse, which was only &» m w 

making your own decisions. g y^. ^ couldn’t prove |^SiS 
, ?_ — — parental consent Exxon ..to- 

Also, the clerk, Clela Rorex, &««. .m 
E Money Mid, the District Attorney's Of- 

jard “» int-prnretod state law on f n m 20 


that show irrevers raivi ‘ parental consent ^ Exxon ..to- 

changes when wra ted an F AIs0 the clerk, Clela Rorex, Exxon .jo 

the sunburn-caiisu range. Money said, the District Attorney's Of- ^,",5 

Near it is a color indard lVlUllcy ^ interpreted state law on mm f 

in the shade to 1 * marriage licenses to refer. to ^ ;;;^ 

same chemicals «u s aner HEW ^ {AP) _ mm*, rate te pe0 nJe only. . 

a predetermined hation rw^. * Three marriage licenses have » » — j* 

exposure. The user n pares ^ teen issued in recent weeks got e".^ 

the test zone U the ^rar c ouptes and one to og 0 « 

standard, to judge v Jiff to mw m dm fmgXe couple. Miss Rorex I! so 

protect his skm fro urfher MP#f ^ br flB «» has said state law does not gif mu* 

rays. . ■■ a yy ui all '^ tS f t ‘^t<-*« | « i i>- deny persons of the same sex Gn ^ , r4 

Mr. Zwoc provide bkh» 7 . tiift rtoht to marry. ctfwn 20 

testZOnesTorpereo rfec- am ** ngWtomarry to 

S«n£ Bg^bMMVj "kSSKSIw SS 

sasr^iT st.-^-b^sstaisa 31 

To set a copy of onxsnt, — yesterday plans to change Its Hemstfc » 

smStteJWinterJutfW COU) to Ensearch Corporation 1*^ J, 

L t he Patent and Trofark By n» AisocWrf !to take into account its busi- ism w 

Office. WoshmgtoivvEC. gigM iS?5s «^ 4 25 , ! ness diversification. 1 e *a 

■>nv2i Design pctents^r® sijio- iauw fixtnj 1 1 53. 2 s. w »o»M*9Mi. i ^ , • u , 1 m a .jo 

20 ^nts^L Threat on p«£ m Leave the Dnvmg to Him ; « a .. g 

inventor or asrigne^J ' MgaM gflJffijhSS. PETALUMA, Calif. fAP^J { ^ ? "jj 5 

address given. is insufffnt; ^ ^California hitchiker was seen 

TuWto him care of the fmt Kandy 1 Hinna n^. Jbwt. prtte, ** w ‘ naT-rviHE a sign which read: IF in M«r ,J 0 

Offtor. K^e to d* 1 * «" A rLL KtlVE.” «■ ^ » 

pltent nmrtber. ’biSS - ctentoi. ‘ 


exposure. The user In pares 
the test zone 'h the 
standard, to judge vlthff to 
protect his skin froiuitner 

.rays. . ..L^ 

Mr. Zwoc providewiOM 
test zones for persoi elec- 
tion. The company Man- 
ning either to m ®3®^ ire 
the dosimeter or lk*te>ro- 
duction- 1 

To get a copy ofdpent \ 
send the number andi D ws 
fo the Patent and TroMorte 
Office, Wasfungton, !E U 

. '■ -A f ra^* 4HNt H?l W 


645 

4 

162 

5 

1017 

1ft 

3002 3-16 

35 

1ft 

31 2 1-16 

65 

ft 

28 

9-16 

46 

2 

■27 

3ft 

17 

ft 

63 1 7-16 

12 

ft 

50 

ft 

2B 

7ft 

b 

b 

9 

2ft 

22 

5ft 

111 

1ft 

17 

ZVk 

19 

ft 

M 

1 

13 

33 

b 

b 

25 

23ft 

b 

b. 

92 

T3 

60 

15ft 

248 

5ft 

131 

7ft 

13 

31ft 

b 

b 

26 

21ft 

b 

b 

114 

12 

b 

b 

156 

4ft 

26 

7ft 

116 

1ft 

61 

3ft 

12 

16ft 

b 

b 

31 

7ft 

6 

alii 

6515-16 

5« 

2ft 

140 

ft 

116 15-16 

32 

1-16 

41 

ft 

32 

4ft 

i 

6'i 

101 1 7-16 

43 

2ft 

41 

9ft 

b 

b 

165 

5ft 

111 

6ft 

300 

2 

1B4 

3ft 

5D 

111* 

b 

- b 

87 

6ft 

8 

7 


in: ivrcmaap — 1 — •■r^z ■ ^ . _ . , . 

jtsfazmsB ntoTtaf «wtattBn L eave the Driving to Him 


PETALUMA, Calif. 

. ^ California hitchiker 1 was seen . 

icarryingasign which read: IF1 


INA .JO 
I N A ..40 
I ri A ..35 
I T T .. 15 
1 T T .Jtt 
I TT ..25 
in Her .JO 
in Mar S 


65 2ft 
77 MB 
II Bft 
K 6ft 
m 4ft 
253 2ft 
6 3ft 
45 7-76 

10 ft 
10 » 
20 10 
33 1ft 
259 2ft 
29* 1 

218 ft 
b b 
64 24ft 
677 9ft 
540 2ft 
562 ft 

«a 1 15-io 
25 M* 
b b 
1 5 

« 1 1-16 
48 ai6 
29 4ft 
114 - 1 


35 4ft 
135 3ft 


- AST - Stock Option inb ■ 
VM.Lllt QMS PftCP 
b b 47ft In HST 30 

b b 40ft In Min 35 

• , 47ft |n Min 40 

2 3ft 47ft n £«n 45 

10 4ft 47ft |n P» 

35 1 5-16 47ft n W 

b b «k " P» « 

b b 95ft " P» » 

2B 9 95ft in Pa p » 

b b 37ft Jejm J -2? 

25 » 37ft J*n J « 

30 4ft 37ft John J I TO 

,05 2ft 37ft K«in C 30 

17 2ft 37ft K«W C 35 

1 5ft Sft kS?M ™ 

792tM6 39ft KWT M ® 

90 2ft lift 

59 13-16 lift Kress* -JO 

5 4ft 30ft Krw 

n » >K £«* 5 ■ 

■ a 30ft , Kre ^ e * 

b b 32ft }J>w» 

■ a 32ft 

25 3ft 32ft M IW M 45 

: isKa-s 

’ tSSBE 

b b 91ft MC Don 40 

b S 51ft Me Don ^ 

50 9ft 91ft Me Don -SO 
65 k 91ft MfD» » 
b b toft Merck -.60 
S 1* toft Marck ..70 

4” SSta ■■» 

10017-1* 13ft * 

is 9-16 13ft Mflram M 
4 6ft 38ft Monsan 70 

2 3ft 38ft NwAIr ” 

b b 49ft NW » 

-n «£ 45ft Nw Air 25 
M 

b b 46ft H 

« • 46ft gyu 

1 4ft 46ft ggar .. is 

2* 2ft toft rotor •• » 

b b 2lft rojar .. » 

b b 2lft rojar .. » 
b b 21ft g"tor - ■ 
64 3ft 21ft "tor 

■K a m RCA ..10 

2« lft 73ft RCA ..15 

■ « 13ft RCA .A 

b b MA Sew* .. SO 
T 16 TO sem .. 60 

2 B 166 Smr .. 30 

90 5ft 3» SDWTV -M 

72 3ft 38ft Sooty .JS 


- Oct - - Jen - - Apr - "SAxic 

■ vd. Lest vol. Last VelLss»C)«e 


Option and 
PrKe 


-OcT- -Jan- - Apr - stock 
Vol. Last VoL Last VBI Last CkttP 


42 3-16 
97 7ft 
376 3ft 
412 lft 
6 24ft 
4 19ft 

4 15 
95 10ft 
82 3ft 

2 6ft 
9 1ft 
26 ft 
53 «• 
15511M6 
80 ft 

5 1M4 
24 B 
31 2ft 
» ll 
X 6ft 

106 2ft 
70 ft 
4721-16 
55 ft 
11 9ft 

24 5ft 
65 2ft 
-72 ft 
4 ft 
7S 14*4 
X lift 
333 " 7*4 
749 3ft 


,7 31ft 
71 lift 
389 3*« 

• 7 4ft 
106 1 
55 ft 
IS 6 
234 1 9-1* ’ 
47 ft 
4 ms 
15 14ft 
127 9ft 
624 5ft 

916 -2ft 
70113-16 
12 7ft 
147 2ft 
215 ft 
46 14V» 


156 4ft 
IX 2 ft 


9 1 3-16 24ft UP[«5» £ 

18 9ft 43 UPMhn 40 

34 5ft 43 UrtOtm 45 

43 3ft 43 Wevertt » 

b b 60ft weverh 35 

b b 60ft Weverh « 


a 84ft 

4ft Sft A E p •■ 1S 
9ft 34ft A E p .JO 
2,4 Am Hns 25 
° Am Hns X 

Tto «« SSlS*.^ 

, 32? Baxter ..to 
* *2 Baxter ..*5 

2ft JW Bw1 51 **?r 

2? 5S MX Dk .,25 




2ft 

120 

3ft 

32 

5 

35ft 


2B1 

ft 

*5 

W. 

21 

2ft 

35ft 


767 

3-16 

41 

ft 





12 

9 

b 

b 

b 




24 

4ft 

2 

5ft 

a 


38ft 


4517-1* 

7 

2ft 

a 




165 

6ft 

26 

9 

34 

TOft 

54^4 



270 

4ft 

130 


54ft 


582 

7-16 

413 1 15-16 

159 


54ft 



•fa 

3M 

ft 

b 



.50 

56 

VI* 

82 

ft . 

b 


54ft 


- Now - 
II 3ft 
182 H 


- FM» - 
14 3ft 
53 11-16 
5 5ft 


* 2ft 30ft Bw1 Sl 

* S5 BS-S 

a>«‘ ** BlkDk .M 

? 2 BoOno 

l *b S pff 

* ^ « cSI::ss 

K h Mft Cmw Ed » 

k b iuh Cmw ed S 
h . ,?S! Cmw Ed M 
9 11 46 “t rote 70 

14 7ft 46ft ,J0 

M 5ft 46ft 9fl 

M “to ..TO 

5 J? 5!S Cotoat ..25 


; 4V ? S£ M 

s £ m? CMo#t -.35 

£ b ^ * Gen F d X 

b b Gen Fd 25 

* " Gen Fd X 

5 “IS Mewlet ..50 

* ! IS Hewtoto WO 
J J IS M rwlel 720 

* s ttonwli is 

HiSl H»nwll » 

241 5-14 s: Honwii .js 

h h aS: HftWlf 
P P 22? j mws » 

« to 32* J M»« as 

lm "* 3fl* J Walt - 3S 
Ul 4ft 34ft J W,n -■* 
“I K J Waft -to 

x 4ft 17ft JjJJgj 

n tft *4ft RYnWs ,J0 
a E Rwlds 60 
£ h 3to Skylin -IS 
5 ? 5? Scylin X 

* J* Skvlln ..25 
® ** StOmb ..70 

f J 25 Siumb .JO 

I <£ 3S STS-Jf. 

5J S.S-.3 

n ir! iS Tx Gtt ..» 
5,S m! Utah ...JO 
3 h l h 9to Utoh ...JO 

* a 9Jft Total volur 

a a 93ft a-Nottrw 

43 • 35ft Sates in 10 


127 1 7-16 
1* 6ft 
b b 
38 15ft 
IX 7ft 
339 Zft 
7 2ft 
9 7-1* 
SB 1 
b h 
TO1 13-16 
111 ft 
b b 
77 21-1* 


129 2ft 38ft Sperry ..# 

1 7ft 38ft Sporty .A5 

b b 180 Scarry .JD 

17 21ft 180 Syntax -JO 

» « too g™ 1 *” ■* 

b b 180 s yntax 

D b 31ft gvntax ..4S 

a a 31ft Tesoro ..15 

a a 31ft I««v -» 

b b l«. Tex n 

73 2ft 19ft Tex n 

44 l 15ft Tex In 100 

b b 24ft Tex In 120 

22 2ft 24ft Uplohn 30 


14 3-IA 
188 3»i 


60 lft 
127 3-16 


93 AT* 
110 Zft 


19 23-16 
2 ft 
b & 
76 2ft 
41 It 
b b 
b b 
b b 
54 7ft 
215 4ft 
228215-16 
b b 
51 - 3ft 
31411-16 
b b 
15 7ft 
V » 
& b 
b b 
48 3ft 
15 1ft 
24 ft 
66 4ft 
166 3ft 
126 1ft 

*7 5-16 
*5 2ft 
47 ft 
b b 
2 10ft 

ao 6 
8 1ft 

252 6ft 


55 15-16 
12 5-16 
1 3 

46 13-16 
28 2ft 
15 1 

1 5-16 
17 3ft 
35 13-16 
I 5-16 
8 6 

26 T 
31 2ft 
83 n-16 
24 3-16 
• 7ft 
66 2ft 
7 ft 

14 2ft 
7 11-16 
.. 58 18a 

- 12 9 - 1 * 
2D 3ft 
41 ft 
*8 'ja 


TO 1ft 
20 ft 


10 I 

a m 

16115-16 
46 ft 
7 7Vi 
13 1 15-16 
76 3Va 
82 1ft 
10 9-16 


• Bit'- 
ll W » 

35 15-16 19 

a a 2ift 

2 3ft 38ft 
b «» 28ft 
a a 35 

1* 2ft 35 
b b 35 
b b 3$ 
a m 36ft 
a a 26ft 
b b 36ft 
5 5ft 25ft 

3 3 2M 

a a 4» 
b b 43% 

• a 27ft 

a a 27V* 
b b 27ft 
a a 73ft 
a a 73ft' 
b b 73ft 
b b 73ft 
a a 25ft 
9 2ft 25ft 
b b 25* 
ib eft 2ri« 
21 7^z 21ft 

b b 24ft 
a a BSft 

• 6 854* 

b b 89?* 

19 7ft 25ft 
31 4ft 29ft 

b b 29ft 
b b 391* 

1 4Vz 22ft 
29 21-16 22ft 
5 Aft 35ft 
b b 35ft 
b b 35ft 
I Si 42V* 
5 *ft toft 

b b 42ft 
a a S» 
a a 5» 

1 4 16ft 

29113-16 16ft 
b b l*ft 
« a 75ft 
1 7 75ft 

b b 75ft 
36 4ft 45 

20 3ft « 
a * 30ft 

7 lft 30ft 
14 Aft 47ft 
a a 47ft 
b b 47ft- 


Taial volume sued. Open Intererf 97UB7. 

a-Hot traded. b-Mo option offe red. 

Sates, in 100s. Last b oremhim tfwoias* wicu. 


TT ■ 


y 

/ 


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32 


c \ the new y o *g t/mes. SATURDAY, septej .Eg^jg? - ^fY^pterday *s Trading 

American Stock Exchange Transactions: Complete Price — ». f grew" ^‘ae gvgg 
American oiuu^u*u — 5 . **«•-*■ ■■>; 

0 s 3 * Jft £ TV, PeerTu J 0 e 

1 6 * 2 * - 5 3 * m p«wi Dfc »* 

T 12 13 % 1 » !»■* Mft 14 
,. 18 Sft 5 % p»- % iflft 4 % PeoCm - 40 b 

S * 21 % 1 *■ » w. 5 m Permaner 




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19 / S SMCB* 4 ntS Dgtr a San® Net 

High Low li* DoiUrs P/E ICPs Hfri L 6 ri t-« CM 


A — fi — C — D 

flfa 3 % AAV Co* Jt < 1 * «» ?*■■■■" 

2 % Acme Free Mil * a + £ 

4 ltt Action inef s « a * t ” 

14 6 AdofccO .Ite 11 28 11 % lHfc 1 «*+ £ 

3 p/k 2 -A&EPtut P 4 4 3 % 3 % 3 %- % 

A 


1 ft ft Aegis Cars 
3 ft 1 ft AtfOACl inc 
7 ft 5 ft AW Pub JO ; 
2 S. 13 % AtoHWd JSo 2 

4 ft 2 ft Alaska Airt 5 
3 ft ft Alba Waldn 23 
lift 5 ft Alcaic . 12 * 5 

5 ft 3 ft Altetfnr AM ... 
2 ft 1 % AtlesA lfriO ... 


2 ft lftAfledArt 
15 ft 13 % AlldThr fJO 
4 ft' ltt AlUmU CO 
Uft 9-16 Altec Carp 
■l«ft Aft AlterFds JO 
13 % 3 ft AMAX Wt 


SB 1 ft 1 ft 1 ft- ,** 

* .2 2 2 - ft 

2 4 ft 4 ft 4 ft 

2 14 ft 14 ft lift- ft 

42 5 ft- 5 5 ...... 

1 1 ft 1 ft 1 ft- ft 

3 8 TV, ».....■ 
IS 3 ft 3 ft ' 3 ft- JJ 

7 Hk Ilk. Itt- ft 
18 2 ft 2 2 ft ...... 

1 15 ft 14 ft «**- ft 

3 4 ft 4 ft 4 ft 

2 S 1 M 4 1 W 4 IMS— " 
24 13 >ft 13 ft 13 %+ ft 
TO lift 11 I' 


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 5 . 1*75 


Day's Y « r “°" w 

BiM Ihndtf YarAgo IP 5 

' 1 , 2373*0 13273*6 4 ( 8 , 723 , 7 * 


1*14 

123 . 42 U 77 




Netl 4 


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2 ft 1 LOOM S . 13 * 
15 ft 7 ft Loftmn 30 a 
Sft 2 ft LoewTherit 
3 ft 1 ft LootsHc . 12 r 
ta LaGensv -JO 


1 ft LTVCCTO — 


3 ft 2 % ESV\ “5 
7 ft 3 % Enn*PJ> .10 
3 ft 1 ft El«r aim - 
«ft m El HO" ■* 
3 % lft ElAudD Jit 
lift lft Etednw JO 


... TO lift 11 I' — ■” 
Afe Vii Amca lnd * 4 £ 3 Z va va- 2 

5 ft lft AH«oU_ Wt .... fl » ** “ 

7 ft 3 ft Am ACTW 1 C 5 * 

lift 9 AmBirsP J* 10 

ft 3-14 ACenMtg wt 


5'A 2 ft Am FkWh 

13-16 Vi Am Fitch wt 
1 SVk *ft A GarPd J * 
■ 7 ft'. 3 ft Am mu PW 
5 ft 3 ft A Israel JAr 
19 ft 7 ft AMalzeA JO 
t lft AmiUat inns' 
34 ft 27 ft AmPetrof 2 


4 3 ft 3 ft 3 ft- ft 

3 9 % **+ * 

1 W 6 3-16 M 4 ...... 

2 ^ 

a-?. *«r:s 

5 4 ft 4 ft 4 ft...... 

3 15 ft 15 ft 15 ft--" 

II- 4 ft 4 ■*%+ ft 

14 sift 31 31 f ft 

aft - 4 ft 4 ft- 'A 


3 7 3 ft 3 3 - ft 

t - •» 4 *t 1 Afa St lft ft Micrrid It* , 

*'“S 5ft sft s%!!”" itft S;55i25 r 1, w k 

7 S ■ lft , Tft lft Sft 391 {“SsTVa! J 

..„ „ rlr - „ 7 1 10 ft 10 ft TOft* ft 30 14 ft 5 l! 2 Sl*lS 

m rBsrs«* ^ » j* ^ ^ 

yJSSSM 14 » S » lft;- ft » 

^ SftSfec^ 4 t s js ss; ft i^- rs*° 3 o 

t 2 % Essfv iMfl 2 ® * + «. i.a mtVpm On 

4 ft 2 ft Esc^ 2 ’i 7 * ^ 7 ^ lift aft MeaiU PW 1 ' 4 

£ Isss i i ~ « *TS i i 

* 5 »jl 4 «« 4 ^ 7 tB 01 s 


1 3 “ JT id 12 3 2 ft 2 ft- '■«& i lft Mkh Genl 


8 lft lft lft-..— 
* 3 ft 31 ft 3 ft- ft 
3 lVfc lft lft...... 

i aft aft *ft- ft 

9 7 ft 7 ft 7 ft+ ft 


4 lft Atfcen . 03 * 
7 ft 2 ft Anttuxrv J 0 t 
8 ft. 4 ft Artr O- . 10 * 
21 ft ** ArminCD .12 
T*, Anmdel - 49 t 
9 ft 4 ft Atwood . 30 * 
12 4 ft Asamera JS 
9 ft 5 ft Ash rail Can 
Jft Aft Amro JOB 
!>■ 1 Astrex Inc 


: ^ jaxa 8 B&% v- .1 M 4 s A-w 

IV: 11 A Am wereet -- 

4 ft 2 ASafEc.lU 19 

4 lft AmTraln Sjt ... 

10 ft 7 ft AmUtHS .72 . ■ - 

lift 4 ft AMIC CP 7 ; — . „r ^ 

4 ft lft AndreR Mo 18 M Mk 3 ft+ J? 

3 ft lft Anglo C . 12 * * * ** ft 

13 ft 4 ft Anhdcrjfc f ^ SS Sb Si- ft 

7 14 4 ft 4 ft 4 ft+ ft 

... 13 M 5 5 ft- ft 

5 28 17 ft 14 ft lift- ft 

... ID 3 ft 3 *A 3 ft- ft 

3 10 Aft Aft 4ft •*■ ft 

7 it aft »i Wi- }J 

;:sii a;-s 

’2 L‘S? :: ; 3 » a S:.." 

,sI*!£iS^;s -ii '« 5 

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a S»V ; ij * at 
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^ ” " i « * «' ’* 

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94 k 3 ft BataTM -TS 8 4 
14 ft lift BanFd 1 . 12 * ... 

15 -M ftBangPunwt ... 

Iffft 4 ft BanstrCtl Ut ... 

3 ft lft Banner J* 4 
5 \k 2 Barnes Eno ... 


2 Aft 5 ft Sft- ft' 

2 Aft 5 ft 4 ft 

39 13 ft 13 ft 13 ft-*- ft 

50 11-16 9-14 1 M*+ * 

i s rs*:.s 

Iffii 4 ft SSlM - 21 W£ WA 10 ft- 

1 2ft 2ft 2ft- ft 1 


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3 W 7 ft Jft ■*■ ft 7 ft lft pgrtec Coro 
48 Zft Jft .»—,•• I 10 ft 4 ft Petro Lewis 
' 7 ft 4 ‘A Ptlll IJ) JW-- 

,ES£ 333 K 

»{ J ^ 5 JB ’IS, ’* ; * m - 


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5 4 T 9 10 ft 1 E£- ft 
5 4 Jft 9 * 1 * T 1 ** ” 

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, 25 «V| 

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* 1 15-14 15 - 1 * 13 *J 4 — 


4 

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22 

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aft sft Polvrtr Mt 
Sf: 2 ft PraWe OB 
W. 3 ft Pratt Rd JO 


6 ft *ft - - „ 

2 2 2 + ft 

7 5 ft 5 * - ft 

I* 9 aft aft- ft 

4 wa io i«a+ ft 

4 iSl i»k u&; ftl 9 ft SKiSup 
25 14 ft . 1 W» 7 + ft j 2 Vi 1 ft Prod PW " 1 

I. ^ 1 ^ 4 »* ft m KBsaara 


ia 4 ft 4 ft *ft- ’> 

i 3 tv. lft i'» 

3 - 1 * >14 38 *...... 


v“ 5 ¥ 1 ss»| » s ist 42 
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7 14 4 ft 4 ft 4 ft* ft 

tn a»» n b.i , n, s * Vi 

4 ft 1 %a PreshwCM w 5 « w 

3 V, 1 ft PrtmMt.™ 79 1 s; Aft- ft 

■ 1 2 V» 2 ft 2 ft 

“ 1 2 Vi 2 ft 5 i,- 

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10 'A O'ASWTtJn JO * 
15 >i 71 /, Sl fCPlnd Jg -f 
3ft 2ft sim«s J» * 

7 ii 5 ft HmkHW JO 7 
PA lft SUWjtaf -l« •■; 
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6 i, Sontns* .06 -■■ 

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25 1 '* 24 U SC| P» 7 » ■” 

W-S 76 SCE^;-* ■" 

14 >w Ifi SC A 30 f ‘- 0 * ■■• 
12ft 10ft SCAIW '■ (a 


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lit TO 1 - a 20 V»- V# 
y?A aw- ft 
ta lVa 1 JJ* ft 

h » T: 5 

14 ft 

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2 ft 2 ft—*.- 
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A'.i A 1 - ♦ ft 
9 V. 9 Vs+ Vi 
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10 ft MV*..- 


I ISEs “ S £-5 a™ £ |sf HS*?-:a S ?SS 5 . -■* - a: 

-S ^BS 5 S 5 ” j "f 52 ssr S V& '? ■* 5 £ Sj ; ■ q-r-s-t 

£ I^BSs i 1 « $ . 4 ^ « IS i 1 i i l---' K =1 B-C 6 

3 ft 2 SSSsfjS "i 5 7 «A *ft+ ft Sft 2 Vi« Modern Md 12 2 *ft 5 ift ift IU* ft 

lift *•_ ... li lft lft' lft+ ft 1V ft 6 Mol^rp wt ... 10 7 ft 52 ft lft ’ 5 SX ** 1 •■* 2 3 ft 3 ft 3 ft 

xy, TV. FiimwaVi^ * !£ S? L- £«,I ’lit -jr. MtoGtti J 0 « ... 1 S sft W, RS Indust 6 ? fit ift''”" 


aZ 5ft BHW«> - 

V, ft Fst Deny wt ... 

lft *-p*K i 2 : , Er *•* 

9 ft 5 ft FStSL 3 « .12 *■« 
25 F 5 I V 4 M» ... 

7 ft 3 ftgW»rt 6 

14 ft 4 ft FisebrP - 4 W 7 


St pSj 4 b W M Sb «*' «ta"E '-lft kaMtoGth -Me 

7 ft 3 ft.Fbie«ljW* « “ M w bix 5 2 ft Morton S . 3 * 

9 ft MftFsrComiJ.. 7 3 2 ft 2 ft 2 ft 4 '* 3 ft Mow Star JO 

2 ft ft ft lft 

? Sfc ft ft 14 ft 4 ft MPB Co .70 

5 5 ft 5 ft 5 ft 4 ft 1 MPOVtdeo 

7 lft lft m+ Vb lft ft MPS l ntt ® 

2 4 ft 4 ft 4 ft Sft 2 ft MaMtAmJB 16 


, ST u TSa* ft Sft W* ““hi pK * — z 

l 3 ft 3 ft * 2 ft lft Reading Ind ... 


2 Hft lift lift- J ift REDM CD 7 11 

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* 2 J S flA- ft 2 ft i R« Houwg ... s 
Aft Aft Aft- » . 17 ft Reo NY J8 


2 iVk 4 ft 4 ft 

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12 rTriMMir -« \ * ’E* *L 

y-a TVT uBoaMw ' S £ 

94 TUfMdVnt 5 * *** « 

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L' — V— W— X— Tf —2 

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K. 2 Vi«»A*ei*» 

15-14 ftJnBTBRd Wt 
2 ft lft W Foods 
2 9 -unNtt Coro . - - ^ 

7 »i JttaWfTJta ** ** • 

5-16 VaMlirrwt ... - * ft 

9 SV, ft Baft TfJ ... 6 .£> 

1 « K 8 FWJI 10 1 » lift l 

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12 ft lava.... 

31 3 ft 3 ft* ft 
7 Vi 7 ft* V« 
3 M 3 ft 3 R 4 — ft 
15 ft IS 5 ** ft 
13-14 .ft...— 

» ioiwaOft 20 ft- ft 

3 u stwhrt 2 | n 111 ^ 

%% Start Electr — » 


23 'i !*!■• 


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TV, Hi Frt er ■— 

13 V. Aft Printrrc - 3 S 
I 5 Vi Aft prig! Ironic 
5 ft 3 ft PronhfT ' 

2 ft lft Front Air 

7ft 4'A Gaorlef jot ! f E JE Jh'.'.i is” 5ft NUioRv M 

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7 VJ “t 57 33 31 ft 32 - lft 4 Vi lft Nortok Inc 

wft 14 ftGwt«rt ^- • * „ .„ « at 9 b.ia NorOfci OU 


7 ft 4 ft Barnnwr -£ a 

S lft aSSchRKt 11 li lft {ft Jt 

£ aasMS-t i c s 

■■■ * * 2 --i 

*14 lft Benrus Crp « 7 L f* J - 3 

8 ft. 2 Vi Bare Brum 13 « ^ 7 _ ™ 

2 ft lft BennOmat ... V Wb J* 

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3 ft 11-16 BfdDort lnd 17 3 *£ *£ Vht ft 

i» i ssks * » » 55 55 :... . 

- - 3 L l^SSSS-wL-’^ ^ ns*. lU^Tm .;.*c 

14 ft Sft Bimslut JO 9 II lift 11 lift* ft 
7 3 ft Bush UnJv I* 29 A Sft 4 * ft 

Ijfb A Butt dint JB 3 9 aft Ift 8 ft* ft 

23 V, 14 ft Butte G 011 4 44 17 ft 17 ft 17 ft- ft 

7 ft lft Cabtam Gn ' * '' 3 Aft 4 VT" 4 ft 

14 Aft Caldor . 15 b' 8 4 lift lift lift* ft 

7 ft 3 ft Cakxxnp ' ... 40 4 ft ■ 3 ft 4 

3 ft 2 ft Cal Ufa Co 4 I 2 ft 2 ft 2 ft- ft 

9 ft 5 Cameo Inc 8 11 8 ft Aft aft* ft 

. 4 9-14 Zft CaChbA J 2 Sc 4 44 4 4 4 + 1-14 

- 20 U Sft Campln . 40 b 4 10 16 ft 15 ft 15 ft- ft 

3 15-16 lft Cdn&CD GO 12 6 711-14 2 ft 2 ll-IA+ 1-14 

Sft 2 ft Ofci Homstd 24 1 4 11 - 16411-144 11 - 16 - 1-14 

4 tt > 13-14 GMVUrc JO 6 1 3 ft 3 ft 3 ft 

« 11 > 14 Cdn Merrill 45 3 , 5 ft 5 5 

73 ft Aft CtinOcc J 5 r 7 ID loVa 10 ft Mft 

2 fft lft Cmea'.lOa t a 2 ft 2 ft 2 ft* ft 

3 ta 1 Capehart Cp ... 1 lft lft lft* ft 

2 ft 1 ft CapItIFd .16 i 9 2 ft 2 ft 2 ft 

THb 16 Carbonlrtd n 5 62 19 ft Wb lift- ft 

83 57 Carnal 1 JOb II * 71 77 ft . 77 ft- ft 

54 47 ft CaroPLpT 5 ... MO 54 53 53 -2 

* ““ ... 14 ft ft ft* ft 

... * 2 ft 2 ft 2 ft* ft 

3 I Mft 16 ft Uft* ft 

.. Xl 15 ft 15 ft 15 ft- ft 

• a vaaiiwa ini 6 11 6 6 4 — .ft 

MV? * 1.4 Cavltron CP H 8 lift' lift lift 

Kb ft CatluCrart l| I lft lft lft* V, 

5 2 V» Chamo Horn ... 200 3 ft 3 ft 3 ft- ft 

Aft lft Chartr Med A 3 4 ft 4 ft 4 ft- ft 

T 2 ft 8 Va CHB Fd J 7 t 3 3 10 Sft Sft- ft 

■Sft 2 ft CHC Cp . 30 t 4 2 4 ft 4 ft 4 ft+ ft. 

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10 ft Aft .dilcTtn Oev 102 ? 7 >k 7 V« 7 ft- ft 

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8 5 7 ft 7 Vi ■ 7 ft 


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20 ft IS^Gin^ 5 ^ 5 
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4 ft ift Gen Resrch ... 
lft Gen Rtsrcs ... 
7 ft 2 ft G«wrta Cp ■ II 
3 ft lft Geonlnd ... 
4 ft lft Cffbjr Sd ... 

14 ft' Bft GlantFd .» 7 


* I** J L. £ 

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54 141 IZft 12 * 

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* 2 ft 7 ft 2 ft* ft Sft lft Nudear Oft 


T lft lft lft- ft 13 ft 

2 3 ft 3 ft 3 ft- Vi 7 ft ' 31 % Oaicwd Horn 3 5 >ft 4 ft 

2 ft ft »..»■• 34 ft ISA omtwni Co S 4 T 7 Vi im ™- ft 

8 Sft 5 ft Sft- ft 4 3 ONO Art J 4 ... 2 3 3 3 "■'" 

■12 2 ft 2 ft 2 ft* ft 33 ft 16 OWoBrs 1.48 3 5 25 ft 25 ft 3 Sft+ ft 

24 3 2 ft 3 * ft 10 4 Oh Sealv JO 

1 14 ft 14 ft 14 ft aft lft Oha lnd 

B‘ 8 'SB£ ^ H Si k V* ft XM 12 S&% 

5 ft 2 ft GIT RB ^ . * * i 2 2 j Affft 37 ft OOklco Cop 

1 2 ft 2 ft 2 ft...... 2 ft. ft Ortfnala 

S am 21 ft Mft* ft Jft 3 ft OrtoleH&» 

2 7 ft 7 ft 7 ft* ft lft 1 V« Orrnand lnd 

3 ■ 10 ft 10 ft Wft Aft 4 'A OSullvan J 8 

S' SflSwinc 9 10 5 ft Sft .Sft- ft 5 ft 2 ft Outdr Sport 

S ^ rJdbtatt J 4 29 3 3 ft 3 * 3 ft* ? 9>A M OvertlDr .40 

■iSt S*d 2 Tdrrt M B 19 ft lift Hft- 1 * 2 ft l Qxfcrd F* 

^S SnSSfidS ... » * “ *■ ““***"■ 

3 3 Vk 3 ft ■ Sft 1 ft ft P«= I"***' 

2 15 15 15 - ft lift M PGEAPJ 1 J 1 

10 2 ft 2 ft 2 ft- ft 14 ft lift PGRd OHM 

1 AVz 4 ft 4 ft+ ft 14 ft 12 ft PG PtAt -25 

27 . « 7 ft 7 ft* ft 13 ft 12 ft PG 4 JglJ 8 

a 4 ft 4 4 ft* ft 13 ft lift PG AJpfl.tZ 

A 3 ft 3 ft 3 ft+ ft 24 ft 21 PGIWZ.M 

Ha ^fjgM n ^ 4 st B ? IsSs^ ::: MO 4 * 

k 7 -i » » ....... 41 ft. » PA 03 B( 4 J 0 -TWO ^ 

Wi 3 ftGRElTJ 0 ... 

TVi 1 ft Greytjd C 22 


2 ft lft GMdtSng Cp "... 
Aft 1 ft Gjasrock R- ... 
34 ft lift Gtatfemr 2 3 

9 ft 4 ft Gtosser Ji * 

lift 4 ft Gkwestr Eit 4 


3 ft lft OoodLS , .10 ... 

XV, Th Goodrich wt ... 
17 ft 10 GormR - 90 a 7 

3 ft lft GoukUnc wt ... 
W . MbGomdlTjae .19 
8 ft A GrandCH JO I 
5>U 7-14 Granite WA —- 
a 2 ft Gt Am lnd 4 
4 ft 2 ft Gt Basin Pel 38 


7 17 7 9 

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8 3 13 ft 13 ft 13 ft-. ft 

7 2 2 fift 24 ft 24 ft 

5 ISB 41 ft 41 ft 41 ft+ V. 

... 2 lft lft lft* ft 

2 2 Sft W 5 ft 

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7 1 Sft 5 ft Sft- W 

7 1 4 4 4 - ft 

V 2 Aft «6 4 ft 

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... 4 16 ft 14 ft l«ft 

"* 1 13 ft 13 ft 13 ft 

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::: * w* ™ ™+ * 

.. 1 12 ,12 '12 + ft 

’ 4 21 ft 21 ft 21 ft...'... 

3 21 ft 20 ft 21 ft + ft 
2 4 ft 4 ft 4 ft+ ft 
45 ft 45 ft— ft 

, 3 E ..ii s»i-«| S' S fSJSS :::ss S S ;’S 

? » » !* naaw t « a 3 ? » 


22 ft lllk Rvan'HO JD 13 IK 19 1 ^ 19 

3 ft Ryersn Hav 37 1 lft I I la 

17 -A TV Salem 11 » » 4 ‘ ^ 

20 'm TA Sambos . 10 e 14 111 17 16 ft IP- 

inAb ■ 7 ft sCarto IJta ... 1 9 *b 9 ft 9 ft— /• 

VP* J-gBUff ...zioo 2 i ft 2 H, 2 ift..... 

“ 1 5v,HSn D SSr 10 2 «b f. ^ 

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4 ft 2 ft Sears lnd 5 5 2 ft S* Sft- 5 b 


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lft lft...... 


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3 ft lft SuP«r£_.«S 4 « Jg R 52 *' ft 

10 2 r 2 - ft 

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8 ‘10 15 ft 15 ft W** V> 

27 11 13-16 1 M 41 MI 

A 4 2 lft' W*..... 


IP#, * 9 >.V TastvBk .96 
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2 Vi ft Techd Tap* 

1 ft Technitrol 
3 ft TWTWCmO 
1 ft 5-16 Tetax Co wrt 

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il * 4 sft tS^i me ‘ii 9 ir >4 lift lift ft 

14 >-b lev* T erraC J Oe 3 » 12 l^b lift .4 

nft s^Tss^Vl? li St & S£:s 

2 Tewtar .151 4 

16 7 ft Textron wt ... 

3 IV, TF I CO lnc a 
10 ft 3 ft Tiffany JD I 

its lJ-lfiTHWlnti wt ... 

■ 4 ft 2 *-a Tlmpte lnd 4 
14 V* 4 v* Tqkiwlm M » 

•*ft 1 Toichln I rest 6 
9 ■ 41 * TodpsGu .20 8 

«■/» 3 15-1 6 Total PH NA 23 
1 * s*i Total pf.JO ••• 

4 Vm Town Cntrv ... 

Tl, ir. Tracer lnc 
318 1 M Train Lux .119 


5 2 2 >i Ti\ 2 ft.... 

i 1 M 3 ft\MJ ft 

... 21 IMA ft \ ft 

U » 2 ft 2 ft. \*b ft 


35 7 i 2 ft Mb- ft 

2 lift HV, lffa.tfi 

1 18a lft lft... 

11 9 8 ft Ift -ft 

1 ft 13-16 13 - 14 ... 

3 3 ft Ift 3 ft+. 

10 ID 10 18 - 4 b 

29 lft I'a Ift... 

7 7 ft 7 ft 7 ft-b 

8 * Sft Sft-H 

2 12 12 13 *1* 

2 2 ft Sft 2 ft — 
S Aft Aft 6 ft-- 

3 2 ft Va 2 ft 4 i 


5 lift 1 
1 7ft 
4 14 %* \ 
4 1 

9 5 
.1 Sft 
is s 

1 3 ft- 

4 14 ft 

5 3 ft 
W 15 ft 

4 13 ft 
32 3 ft 
45 5 V 
21 4 ft 

1 71 b 
1 11 * 

2 9 ft 
15 3 ft 

1 11* 

2 3 U 
la l'a 

i m 

3 V., 

1 AH 

2 lift 
'1 * 4 ' 
IS 9 ft 

a jft 

129-14 

4 14 ft 
7 Hb 

11 Ift 

4 15 ft 
1 1 ft 
13 7 

5 


almac . 60 * 

,r71 5 a< iihotf J 4 

4 ' i tanOom .34 4 

V, faro lnc * 

A’, /eecolns. J 2 * 

" /arlt 1 Jd •-: 

a> varmfA .400 * 

1 -i 

j,;, it vtkoa IK 
3 >* id vlntaiw EnJ ... 

-I 1 * ifl VUhav mtrt 5 

I ad vale Ik JO. 4 

12 T, 9 ] Vulclncpf 1 ... 

cii 2 ^ WabMO . 10 a 7 

ll 1 » 4 Wadcnt . 21 a » 

?a |wrta.M 7 

4 ft fc wamoco W 12 
18 13 . WalcoN . 40 b 5 

Ift War^dJ. wt — 

«_ X. WorC DfC-OS ... 

16 If* WastiRI 1-28 12 
2 >i Pi WHrrwn Co ... 

9 6 k WddTu Am- 2 
. westOiP .40 11 

U KwSSTwi um»i 

1 (a* WHiby Flh ■ •■ ro A 

ilk tmWstDMl.lO 12 1 S' 

«I fi»* wstn FW .10 5 2 AH 

Vs I ft WsfPac I wt 
3 ^ piiWWtahal Cp 
17 ft Ilk WWflno 1 
Si ■ ft WhlttoKr wt 
jT, -lft Wield ta lnd 
*», I 4 ', WHIdirO . 05 r 
3 .- ' 2 *; Wllsonar .30 
4 V 11 -lb VrtiaSon MU 
48 i WiS P Pf 4 J 8 
5 l 2 »* Wood lnd 

T:: 5 

,a ,, ,”wrSr >»■> 

3 ft 2 ft WTCAIT .18 5 4 2 ! 

IP. J'rtWUllBCJO * 
yv 3 ft WYleLAb M ‘ 

Hi, s Wvwiin - 10 a 1 

lift 4 ftWVmB)n.-» • 

4 ft lft wvomhmn 10 

22 ft i 2 ftXontalne 5/ 

4 ft IT, YaaHoo .«* 10 
7 Jk AV* ZcruMto J 4 * 

4 ft lft ZinHiir Horn 


27 15*14 

4 1 m 

5 5 15 V. 

.. « V-J 

I I Hi 

K 31 Sft 
7 2 3 W 

.. 1 Vi 

.. tx 4in 
a y- 
j 1 * p. 
s 1 P 

6 A 


I IK 
14 4 ! 
» 7 V 

II IP 

4 31 


Other U.S. Stock Exchang 


Friday, Sept. 5, 1975 


MIDWEST 


Met. 


Sale* Stock 
hM CarsPlr Sc 
100 Chedcr Mt 
2 B 0 Fst Midi 
0800 Grail jm» 
380 Hein Wern 
400 Holhmtc 
400 Hadmm 


Him Low dost Qbl| Sales »«* 
IV. lft lft— Vb 400 S CsIGi at. 
3 g 3 ft 3 ft+ft 4 «ai,w 00 A 
2ft 
lft 


IV 


; 2 ft 

lft- 


Szln Stock 

IjM 13 H 13 ft- ••■! 300 CaoSoo Pet 

■£ ■» 'SZ ... -i JSSL"! 

? I s ft si sagasa.? i *'* 


a MK y-'s. ’ is* % T«a 5 » r s i» * -isi a 

a y ? Bgjg ij .a 4 a 


32 V, 23 ft GIKMICan 1 
9 ft 4 ft Glfatrm LD 


1 Kft 28 ft 20 ft** 
S 5 ft S 5 - 


’ lft IT -14 Hak» Prod 
4 ft 2 VS HampD - 15 e 
4 ft lVb Hamptn lnd 


.. * lft lft lft... 

3 3 3 ft 3 ft 3 ft... 

4 ft ivy H«nvm ma ... S 3 ft 3 3 - ft 

’2J? 13 33 10 ft 10 ft Mft- ft 

8 ft Aft HanvrSti .55 5 4 7 ft 7 ft 7 ft- ft 

Aft 39 * HanvSa J 3 ft 3 7 4 4 4 .. 

29 ft 19 ft Norland -22 14 2 22 ft 22 ft 22 ft + ft 

20 ft 5 ft Harmn JOb S 17 ISA IS IS - ft 

2 ft 11-16 Hrtnldc Inst 29 1 . lft lft lft...” 

3 ft lft HeJtmn . 15 o ... 15 lft lft lft... 

73 ft 5 ft Her Ma| -41 A ~ ~ — — 

4 


1 U ft Carr wt 
3 ft 1 !i Camus Dev 
1 Mb 10 ft Castle AM i 
15 ft lift CaiFd IJOa 
.8 2 ft Castlwd lot 


12 ft 3 Ii Child World 
- 2 ft 11-74 ChrtsN an Co 
Sft 2 ft Cinema Fly 
*9 5 ft Oncte K JO 

-l'b ft an* fw 

Tn 4 ft CltvGaFI JO 
UVb 8 ft CK Petraim 
3 Vb lft CUrkC - 05 e 
10 ft 4 Clark Gc .JO 
» 2 ft Clarkson .16 


30 2 ft Clarkson .16 7 4 8 7 ft S 

4 ft 1 % CM! Coro ■ 7 IS 3 ft 3 ft 3 ft 

■7 IftCMflnvwt ... 6 2 lft 1 ft- H 

17 ft 3 Goadim.lte 11 44 15 tt 14 ft 15 ft* ft 

4 ft 4 V* CoffMat . 2 fr 11 28 5 ft Sft 5 ft 

3 ft 1>4 Csfol In . 1 ST 37 4 . 2 ft 2 ft 2 ft+ ft 

15 Stt COIeman .44 21 71 lift 10 ft ioft...._ 

Mb 2 ft Colon Com! ... 2 2 ft 2 ft 2 H+ ft 

, 5 U 9m CotwellC JS ... 1 4 ft 4 ft 4 ft _ . 

•lie 7 - 16 CBiwMfB wt ... 2 9-16 9-16 9 - 16 - ft 4 2 M IntPral JS> ... 2 

21 7 Cmbustn Eq 10 458 16 ft 15 ft 15 ft- ft 4 ft lft intSeawyTr ... 1 

34 Vb 2 P.ii Com Inca 3 # 7 1 31 ft W* 33 ft* ft 3 ft 13-16 Int MrS&t ...' 3 

® Co mlAIH J * 1 HU 10 ft 10 ft- ft mb in* intSvCon JS 11 X 1490 


W ™ 17 * ...... 

2 9 ft 9 ft 9 ft* ft 

14-4 4 .... 

« lft lft lft 

I 3 ft 3 ft 3 ft- . VB 

1 14 ft 14 ft 14 ft+ ft 

I 2ft 2ft 2ft- ft 

1 2ft 2ft 2ft- ft 

t 15 ft 15 ft 15 ft 

1 Aft 6 ft Aft* VI 

3 Sft 5 ft Sft 

1 Aft Aft Aft- ft 

7 9 ft . 9 ft 9 ft* ft 


Aetna .. 30 
Am Cya 30 
Am Cya 25 
Am Cva 30 
Am Horn 3 D 
Am Horn 35 
Am Horn 40 
Am Horn 45 
Beat F 2 D 
Beet F 25 
Burr ah ..70 
Hurrah .JO 
Hurrah 90 
Burrell 100 
Burrgh 120 
Owe ..38 
Chase 35 
Chase ..48 

Doer* ..as 
Deere ..48 
Deere ..45 
DM Cq 58 
Die Eq 80 
Die Eg 98 
Die Eq 100 
Drs Eq 7 M 
Disney .JS 
Disney .JO 
Disney .JS 
Disney .JO 
Disney .>5 
Disney .JB 
Disney .JO 

□u Pnt in 

in ivnmin w»»» » ■f» i «» iti nil Pnt im 

ft insfrvm Sts 16 4 lft lft lft- ft du SS T« 


5 ft 2 ft HIG Ik .lit 
2 ft lft Hlehtnd Cap ... 

5 , 3 ft Hlltttvn . 11 # a 
21 ft . a Hlptmlc JO 11 
3 ft lft Hofmn Ind a 
Sft lft Holly Carp * 

17 t/« 15 ft HonnelG SI 5 

aft 3 >A Horn Hardrr ... 

7 3 ft HoepM JOe 7 

lift 3 ft Hdsp Mtr In 17 

12 ft PA Hotel 1 1 . 74 * l / v+* yya y«* v» 

Aft 3 ft House VI J 2 7 12 Sft Sft Sft- ft 

29 ft 19 ft Houston JO- II 34 21 ft 22 ft 23 ft* ft 

4 ft ft Howell lnd 4 5 2 ft 2 ft 2 ft...... 

»ft JS!? I - 40 , 9 1 30 ft 30 ft 30 ft* ft 

34 10 ft HUMIB 1.40 10 4 32 ft ■ 31 ft 32 ft* ft 

34 ft lAftHildBOlJO 9 T 29 ft 29 ft 39 ft- ft 

2 Mh imHuskyOJB 5 5 18 ft lift lift* ft 

49 b 2 Hycel Ik 42 115 4 fti 4 ft 4 ft* ft 

24 ft IMA HVWdPd M 4 11 20 ft 20 ft 20 ft 

1 -J-K-L 

12 ft 7 ftlCMRlJ 9 * 4 2 8 ft lft Mb.. 


lift 4 1 MC MO Me 
Aft lft rnnoo Gale 
7 2 ft impCti J 4 e 
4 ft 2 ft mtoer lnd 


W« lift CamlMtl .to 1 * 14 i 3 ft 14 * ft 

5 ft lft Comdor BM ... 24 3 ft 3 ft 3 ft* ft 

10 4 V« COPSVCC .20 b I P 4 7 ft 7 ft* ft 

* 9 ft Wj ComPS 1 J 2 4 S IP* 14 ft 16 ft- ft 

wTV*. an Comee lnd ... 14 4 3 ft 4 * ft 

Me 9 -l 4 CompuDvn 11 l lft lft lft...... 

-Wi 744 Commit Inst 43 2 ft ft ft- ft 

lft ft Gomput Inv ... 13 ft 9-14 ft 

8 ft' Sft Conchcm .49 39 7 Mb Aft 4 ft* ft 

• 4 ft IV* Concrd Fab 7 IS 3 ft 3 ft Sft* ft 

TTrn 2 Condee Cro 3 7 4 ft 4 ft 4 ft* ft 

Me 7 Vi Cbnrodc JO 5 24 Sft Mb Ift* ft 

ISi - - — 


17 , warn -w a *n •>-* mr * 

Vk 1 Conrov Ik ... 1 lft lft lft* ft 

9 ft 5*6 Coo OK Gas 18 47 7 ft AT* 7 ft*- ft 

9 ft Ri Cm Rer .60 ID I 7 ft 7 ft 7 ft- ft 

- 4 ft 3 Vi Consyne CO 8 . 8 39 b 3 ft 3 ft- ft 

ill ft Cant Meter .... 8 1 15-16 1 *vi« 

1 li Cent Tel wt ... s ft ft ft+r -14 

Kb 10 Cook lnd JO. 4 TO 19 V, 1 Mb Wb* lft 


— 1 Mb Wi* lft 
7 15 Tift II lift* ft 
« 3 ■ a 3 - ft 


- 4 ft 3 ft Cons yne Q» 

1 ** 

nib iBM SBivI 

4 ft 2 ft Coop or Jar ... « 3 ■ 3 3 - ft 

TA 2 ft Coruon lnt| ... 34 . 1*6 4 U 4 ft- ft 

10 ft lift Cars tab* 7 3 13 ft 12 ft 12 ft* ft 

32 ft 121 * Cannes JO 4 2 I 3 V« 73 ft 13 ft* ft 

Zli 1 Coll Coro -u 1 2 2 .2 

- 3 Le IV* Courltd .lie . . . 200 2 9-14 * 9-16 2 M 4 - 1 -M 

IP* 4 ft CaxCU Com 21 3 13 13 13 

- 7 ft 3 Craig Coro 6 IS 5 fr 3 ft M 

S** TA CramrE .lit 13 S 4 ft 4 ft 4 ft* ft 

36 ft 19 ft Cross AT .14 12 2 3 Sft 2 SVb 28 Vi- Vj 

Jlft Mft CwnCPT JBr 3 I 17 ft 17 ft 17 ft 

Aft 3 ft Own in JO 5 3 4 ft 4 ft ift* ft 

lift 3 CRSOes .12 7 19 « lft Sft- ft 

- Mb 3 ft CruttR JS# 13 137 7 ft 7 7 ft* ft 

1 Kb 8 <i CnnttO JOe 5 22 10 ft 10 ft 1 M 6 * ft 

•ft Aft CSe Co JO 4 2 7 Vb 7 Vb 7 ft* ft 

lft 3 U CuWcCp JO ... 4 Aft Aft Aft- ft 

4*6 '«S Damson Ml 24 ' K 446 4*6 4 ft- ft 

37 ft 2 D DanMl Jib 8 - 1 30 ft SPA 30 ft* ft 
Aft 2 ft Datspred 4 29 346 3 ft 3 ft- ft 

r 5 ft DavMin .Me ... 21 Aft Aft Aft...... 

ft >6 DO. IK ... 7 ft ft ft...... 

Vi 5 -U DettaCB Am ... 35 1 1 1 + 1-14 

M 46 ' 7 ft DTalEz JOe a H 9 ft fft 9 - ft 

- 7 ft V* DeRiae Ind ... l lft lft lft-i ft 

lft 1 . Des&na’Jw ... 7 lft ift. lft+ ft 

Aft 2 V, Dev Cp Am ... 17 Sft 3 ft 3 ft...... 

Mft lift DiamM Dra 4 3 Ifft Ifft im+ ' ft 
3 Vi 116 DteboW VC ... 28 TA Sft 3 ft- He 

: .* 4 *' Aft Dicta* Inc 7 u I » • + -ft 

lft MADtadesInc ... 11 15 -t* 15-16 15 - 16 - 1-14 

;, 3 ft' Ift'Discant Pab 4 1 Ift Ift lft 

38 ft 1246 Dtvenev .70 10 41 31 ft 30 ft 3016 + Vk 
snft » Dlxlfyn Or 4579 Ift f + ft 

. 33 ft 17 ft. Dome fleW II 43 29 ft 29 ft 29 ft- ft 

,U lift Domtar 1 JO 4 if 22 ft- 22 ft 22 ft + ft 

• f «4 rVA DeMieySJO 4 ' .f * 1 , 5 ! + ■> 

17 1 12 DraW! TJ 9 ,.. 47 ISVb 15 1 Mb* ft 

'Tift 4 li Driver Hire S ~ *" - 

lift 7 JM, OrgFalr 3 
'•lft ft Dunlap J 4 e 5 
35 Tift DivlxPd JO 2 
«6 4 ft DurTst JS» 7 
ifft lftDvnfda.Be J 

3 g CblJii flflHl 9 ) * . . r „ 

J tiB - 3 ft ErfStwb JA 25 U 8 ft «6 PA+ ft 
W MhS 1 4 -* 13 ft. W* »*- Jb 

' : - t E— F— < 5 — H 

:>ft lift Easano A* 12 ’ 22 2 Mb 2 Mb 2 M 6 +- ft 

T tsa -ft Edcmar O) 137 4 lft .-lft ift 

J 'W 3 ft Ecodyne ID tt 746 ^746 7 ft- ft 

..«« WWW*.. 3 3 14 ft Mft 74 ft- ft 


4 2 Aft PA Aft* ft 

7 1 Aft Aft Aft 

A 10 Aft 6 4 ft + ft 

•TO TO >•••» •■« 4 I 2 ft 2 ft 2 ft- ft 

29 ft 22 imoOfl A .H> 13 384 24 ft 24 24 - ft 

3 >.b 15-16 Inara, .... I 2 ft Sft 2 H 

12 ft 2 Incoterm A 10 24 Mft 9 ft 9 ft- ft 

45 40 IndpIPL DM ... ZltO 42 40 ft 42+1 

2 ft 9 - 14 lidHBhf SVC 4 3 lft lft lft 

2 ft lft inetex Carp — 1 lft. lft lft 

lft ft listrum sp it 4 1 ft lft lft- ft 

3 *. 13 -T 6 Intrmadoo 12 7 - 3 ft 3 ft 3 ft...... 

lft 5-16 Inti Benknot 19 548 lft 1 lft* ft 

1 M 6 AH int cour J 4 7 * II 11 18 18 + ft' 

Sft V* intPOodsvc ... 5 2 ft 2 2 ft...... 

12 ft 6 'Z IntGenln .70 3 1 Mb M 4 IH-. ft 

— 2 2ft 2ft 2ft + ft 

444 ...... 

m w*ie inr misbi ... * lft lft lft* ft 

36 V. lev. IntSvCon JS 1 >XIA» 30 ft 29 ft 29 ft- ft 
18 ft 8 V> Internal 6 158 Mft 14 ft 1 SH+ ft 

lift Sft Udenmy Co 3 ' 3 6 Sft ■ 5 ft- ft 

3 ft 1 Investm Fla 58 T 9 Ift 1 ft lft* ft 

22 9 ft InDtvA . 90 p 4 20 10 ft 9 ft 9 ft- ft 

Me' 2 ft inDhr B J 2 o 4 " ” “ 

7 - 4 ft InvRttT JOp V 

19 ft 7 Ionics Ik 18 

10 3 ft IrooBrd .14 « 

TA lft Irvin Indust 5 

Jft 4 ISC PM JO 9 


Ift 3 ft Jadvn J 4 e 5 
lift Sft Jacm Ena 5 
Sft Sft Jciieiel . 22 f 5 

2 ft lft jetronlc Ind 5 
28 1 IV 6 John Pd JS 14 
5 pa Junto or Pet la 
4 ft 2 ft Jupiter Ind 3 

3 'IftKTellnif ... 5 2 ft' 2 ft 2 ftV ft 
lift 4 ft Kalsrlnd J 6 S 101 9 ft 9 « 

IV* ft Kahrex IK ... 9 I ft 1 1 

I , Sft KaneMilt wt 
27 ft 17 KaMbSv .90 
51 42 KnGE o( 4 J 8 

4 ft 3 KanwfnA J 4 


10 Vk lft 2 ft- VW 

3 4 ft 46 b ift 

4 15 ft 75 ft 15 ft- 16 

4 9 Ift Mi- ft 

2 4 ft 4 ft 4 ft 

4 4 *4 '4 - ft 

70 AM Aft Aft 

3 9 ft 9 ft. 9 ft 

3 7 ft 7 ft 7 ft- ft 

1 1 ft lft lft 

2 lift lift 1 lift 

2 3 ft 3 ft 3 ft- ft 

1 2ft 2ft 2ft 


1 _ 5 > _*ft jwb+"'ft| £J[“r -M 


Vn 1 KhwOptlci ... 

39 . 25 ft Klrbylnd JO 8 

4 IH Klefnsrb 

14 ft 4 *. KnKhcr Toy 4 

79 ft 7 ft Kalmore JO 7 

SV. 2 ft Kutai&tr M 5 

Kb ■ 7 V, LaBares J 4 ‘ 3 

8 ft 3 ft LatvRed Jb 7 

4 ft PA Lake Share 1 

5 ft. 2 ft Lirtaur JB 19 

1 ft ft LaTour Bek 14 

Sft 1 ft Laneco -Ota 5 

•ft 4 ft UCA CP .45 IS _ 

9 ft Sft LeaRen Jte A 2 

7 ft Kb Loath 00 J 4 9 7 


too Wtaq 1 BC ,300 lft Must 

■ — I 2400 MlHilU Pt 
PACIFIC * I 50t McCulbT „ 

PAUI Het 100 Metfieli C# 


! 5 S='i 


ift ift ■ iw^-.S 


iSiSc.S'V a s 

400 AmFhil pffD ^ 


, pe- >. ft. ... 'uaftCVrvr bop h j iOiw ii i - w 

IQS 19 ft 1 Mb— ft! \U7i KVF Co wt 
KB Open Rd In 
1209 P«c& Tran, 


- • — ■• "™— kw it. i*y i+ n w/urnii pru 1 1 an ract, iran, mt iu mb 

: = T .K .14 7 H 7 15 - 14 + I-M 4300 taina Fn. 2 K 2 ft SiL ft I 

— 500 Am Pactael lb H H-M 6 100 Saw 01 | Co F& 9 % 9 ftV„ 

American Exchange Options 14MABrfac ^ ****** 1WS11 «" & % ™ 

in m ■ : T-R • r%. 9 TTR te 


ft j Vr*’ 1 - 

\* 

» 3 J 6 + 

as 1*. _ 

45 45 4 SV +2 

% ft ft..... 
ni 6 10 low* 

2ft 2ft 2ft 
^ 7 -^ W 


(In Irlllsti 
Iaac 
AAI 

AlMOld 

Iks? 

iMcc 

Midi Low Ohm Oil.. BaXs 0 ” 

1 * U M I Botcwana 

.1 1 1 .... | Bmrater 
d MH W 6 j Mft-; BriCkto 

^ SS“\i 4 - “l-l 1 


700 Sundance 
200 SntnMte 




Salta 


Slack 


17 ft 17 ft 17 ft— ViiButttb 
Cable 

hw (CadSdiwp 

BW Mrt ! Owner COW 

High Law Clow Chg.jDm W 


lag uh GE »* *?• 


490 pm Brew , , . - .. 
12 D 0 WllUawi f* 14 ,3 

Trill Mbs sharwi 


700 Am 5 d a 
WEtac «IM^ 
200 SFM Care 
300 Tan, Am 


TpW nit, *0 rium. 


"fR! PAYrSEPTEMBER 


■ ... _ ^ - Oct - -Jin- -apt- Stock 

OpJWi 8 Bice Vof. Lest vw. Lut VW. Lari Ctoe 1 
Aetna ..20 « a 30 3 ft 2 S 4 ft 2 lu 

Aeln. .. 25 15 . 7-16 49 lft. “ — 


t 

Foreign Stock Exchange* 


10 3-76 
8 4 ft 

51 % 

41 ft 

15 3 ft 
74 ft 
90 ft 
110 1*16 
21 ft 

2 ft 
2 22 

16 lift 

50 5 ft 
82 lft 
10 ft 
28 2 
71 ft 
.49 3-16 
26 8 

129 3 ft 
198 Ift 

3 A 3 
7 33 ft 

a aft 
61 15 ft 
730 4 

IS lift 
27 13 ft 

51 9 
TOO 5 ft 
172 2 ft 
709 1544 

9 3-14 
27 24 ft 
54 7 ft 
90 T 3-16 


14 7-16 
b b 
34 lft 
58 ft 
« a 

22 2ft 
20 ft 

■ 8 
42 1 ft 

23 ft 
b b 
b b 

23 9 

27 4 ft 
6 15-14 
26 2 ft 


4 lft 2116 | 
*» h 21ft 


b b 
» Sft 
b b 

a a 


* 

2 

b 

19 

b 

b 

b 


44 

4 

b 

40 

49 

b 

b 

b 


lft 

ft 

b 

5 

2ft 

b 

b 

b 


1 21ft 
15 8 ft 
b b 
b b 
b -b 
44 7 ft 
47 4 ft 

41 Sft 
21 13-14 
4 .26 

12 Tift 
8 Sft 


Merrif .JD 
Men P 15 
Mesa p 20 
Mean P 35 

Mm p 30 

Mobia .JS 
Motrt* ..40 
Motrin .. 45 . 
Mafrte .JO 


11 

a 

a 

211514 

14 

2 % 

..IS 

a 

a 

11 

ft 

4 

ltt 

.. 15 

> 

«ft 

a 

a 

b 

b 


X 

2 

X 

2 % 

56 

3 % 

..25 

2(6 

346 

a 

9-16 

7 

1516 

. X 

1 

4 % 

b 

b 

b 

b 

..75 

11 

TA 

3 

3 tt 

.3 

4 

.70 

73 

tt. 

M 

ltt 

17 

lft 

.X 

ia 

% 

31 

% 

b 

b 

IS 

10 

4 % 

10 

4 ft 

13 

4 ft 

X 

77 

ft 

47 

ltt 

3 * 111-14 

w 

' 2 

2 ft 

12 

3 % 

a 

a 

15 

TO 

tt 

IS 

ft 

4 

1 

..15 

2 

Sft 

a 

a 

b 

fa 

.M 

XT 5-14 

72 

lft 

54 

2 % 

-JS 

93 

3-16 

5t 

7-14 

37 

ft 

.JO 

a 

a 

6 

3 tt 

a 

a 

.-35 

a 

a 

X 

1 % 

b 

b 

..15 

89 

ZA 

IM 

av> 

X 

3 % 


3 ft 
2 

b 

2 19 ft 
b Mft 
b 90 
b 90 
12 lift 99 

1 4 ft 90 
b b 90 

39 3 ft 30 «W 
9 711-16 30 ft 
b b 30 ft 
b b 43 ft 
71 M 6 43 ft 
a 43 ft 
b 113 ft 
b 113 ft 
b 113 ft 
a 113 ft 

2 12 ft 113 ft 
b b .Oft 
b b 43 ft 
b b 4 lft 

34 Sft 43 ft 
44 4 43 ft 

26 3 ft 41 ft 
b b 43 ft 
b b 12 * 
12 14 ft la 
1 4 ft 124 


IV 

19 


TORONTO 

OualaKont to Canadian Hindi 
Quotations in rente unless marked S 

Net 

5 ales Slock KI>b Low Oese On, 
3 M 0 Abbt GMa 375 370 375 + 5 
1790 Ahlhbl SlOft 10 ft 10 ft 

5900 Addladi SUSi 13 ft 13 ft- ft 

MOAcrea Ltd . -S 8 ft 8 ft gft— ft 

750 A*ntco E S 5 ft 5 ft 5 ft 

JjMAare lnd S 5 ft 5 H. Sft- tt 

11*74 Alta Gas A 112 ft 12 ft 12 ft 
340 Alta Hal 121 % 21 ft 71 ft 
400 Alliance ■ 4 o 5 405 40 S + 3 

520 AJmlnaz S M Stt Sft* tt 

ZSAiwis X or *1236 32 ft 12 ft— ft 
400 Aten R S 9 ft 9 V 6 9 ft— ft 

" ”■ " S 12 lift 82 + tt 

* 4 % 4 ft £%-ft 
S« 44 ft 45 + ft 
STft 7 ft 7 ft— ft 
K 3 ft , 43 ft 43 ft 


rvMi ift 

3047 BP Cm 
«» B anister C 
545 Bank M .5 
200 Baton 8 
4000 tall canad 


Utah Law CTm» Oh I Sale, stock 
* 7 % 7 ft 7 ft ! 1200 Safaaas 
310 300 310 +10 lOOSiwia 
440 440 440 —10 ^iSXWKWt* 

18 7 ft * + ft. 300 Slnwson 5 


J* 7 T, 1 -Hi 

N r« • t e MumnM 3 U 10 T, Hit 10 ft— ft’ 

tPU. 7 ft 7 % iSnSSL* pfei »*6 M«— tt, Un Klttifl 

S 34 tt 33 ft Bft-tt, (MU B ftiMnW. 34 J 0 


Sates Hock 
2*0 Drill L A 
2412 East Mai 
200 Eiidro A 
500 Ernes 
1525 Falcon C 
•75 Falcon 

200 Fid Ind A Cft Sft 5 ft 

475 Frencana * 9 ft 9 ft 9 ft— ft 

130 G Dlshb A gft 4 % 4 %-ft 

7 H 0 GW Masd S 3 51 B 

* 5 % 5 ft Sft 

SSft 5 ft 5 ft 

S $ qtt 

190 185 19? 4 +15 


«t 


17 . lft 1 


13116 
OH 
!& 
2 * 46 * 
300 '., 
104 ft 

m 

“3 

is 

» 2 tt 
•AM 

■X 

law 

11 ! 
uvi 
1736 
1506 
2 I»V 

n 

1 

304 ' 

I OF.' 

M< 

11 
U* 

12 

IP 
3851 
:iii‘ 

a 

»« 4 U 

,8 a 

771 
tt 

_ I (Ron? 

,Trarn 71781 U 6 *i 

_.,CeM«liP« 917 ft 
H.W, law dose (K “ ,W< ** 

uni 10 ft 

& ». » -< AMST 


TON 
9 I'i 

\ P 

2 ft 2 V* 


.Cons Gold 
,■ iCwrrwWs 

iDtelfllers 

S 2 SS 

! EMI 

9 IFSGeduM 

J . jGEC 
: + ft! Con MM 

2 ft . ;sn» 

1GKN 
| Cold SA 
Giord 
Cos 

Hirrawry 
Harttei 
I Kagrimr 


5 ?ft 


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31 ft 




143 7-16 
2 IM 
11 3 ft 
39118-14 
9 *6 

21 11 
15 4 ft 
10 Sft 
26 766 
I ft 
48 lft 
« 7-14 
79 ft 


195 1 

2 left 

A 4*6 
45 3 

27 ]ft 
b b 


S 

2ft 


210 

47 

47 

47 

PtiMtf 4 

6 

fitt 

2 

4 

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Pti Mot 45 

47 

2 % 

31 

14 ft 

I*tt 

l*tt- ft 

Ph Mar 50 

19 

ft. 

3 

1 ft 

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Ph Mcr 60 

9 

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3 

Aft 

6 tt 

Aft* <A 

Hietai .JS 

4 

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1 ft 

T ft 


Ptfslm .j® 

4 

7-16 

5 

ltt 

lft 

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Prae G 80 

4 

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3 

37 ft 

37 ft 


Piuc O 90 

132 

1 

11 

3 

3 


Pnoc G MO 

59 

tt 

2 

12 

12 

tt 

SfC*l ..25 

W 

4 % 

1 

13 

13 

73 - tt 

St Cat 30 

22 

% 

t 

4 % 

4 ft 


» Cal .JS 

a 

% 





Texnca 20 

24 


« 

tr* 

3'6 

' 3 ft* ft 

Texaco 25 

113 

% 

I 

w. 

VU 

Sft* tt 

TejtSEB X 

50 

tt 

9 

2 % 2 7-14 2 714 

U Orb *5 

4 

16 

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4 

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10 

1 

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19 * 

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2 

4 

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199 11-16 


7 

7 

8 13-16 

43 3 

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19 ft 
« ■ 
31 4 ft 
55 2 ft 
3 11-14 
6 
1 


7419-16 16 ft 
b b 3516 

3 7 ft 2 Sft 
29 3*6 25 ft 
14 1 ft 25 ft 
b b 45 ft 
a a 45 ft 
<1 4 ft 45 ft 

4 3 ft 45 ft 
b b 45 ft 1 

9 Sft 25 ft I A/rUnuM. 


— mu mm uiuo Mm «n 

1000 Hock Bros" 310 305 310 —5 

ITIOBremalM 495 480 . 495 4-10 

3078 Brameda 17 34 14 — I 

100 Brenda M 410 410 4 T 0 —15 

2506 BC ForesT SWtt 16 % 15 % 

400 BC Phono 510 ft TOft 10 ft + ft 

I 2 »Brwwrt 405 405 405 —5 

200 Bums Fd* 99 9 9 

13100 Cad Fre Sllft 01 ft 11 ft+ ft 

45501 Pew A S 25 ft 25 ft 25 ft + ft 

2145 Qmfto Sllft II 11 —ft 

llliCaeipau .A 95 490 495 + 5 

2 D 00 C Pikn.C S 20 tt 20 ft 20 ft 

noocan Pare F 1446 Mft 14 ft- ft 

100 SC TUn, 305 305 305 

SDCdn 04 490 490 4 W -81 

2 SBCBE 925 25 25 — ft 

11100 C Im# Bank 52716 . 27 27 — tt 

. 4 M 2 C Hid Gw 95 % 4 ft 4 ft 

1260 dn Tiro A 548 ft 47 ft 47 ft— lft 
4977 C Ulllles 99 t% 9 +. ft 

100 Carters 250 250 2 S 0 

1255 CmM 011 113 12 ft la * ft 

4*50 tester 57 ft 7 ft 7 ft + ft 

100 Catenas* 490 490 410 +10 

2200 Qdiftan O 57 % 7 ft 7 ft- ft 

1916 Cedi Will 42 41 51 

100 C Holiday I 325 335 385 + S 

9100 CM BU, 275 270 270 —5 

1900 Dm Dlstrh 335 325 335 +W 

- 912 ft Mft 12 ft 

320 320 320 
480 47 S 480 + S 

959 ft 59 39 ft+ 1 

57 ft 7 7 ft 

m Wt 24 —ft 


11020 Coos Gu 
■200 C em re s t 
2790 Cra taut 
200 Donison 
490 Wcfcran 
43 JS Dolasco A 
310 Don Stare 
30 Du Pant 


9 I 7 ft 1 7 ft 17 ft 
Sllft 18 ft 1816—16 


100 Gibraltar 
100 Gt Oil Sds 
450 GL Paper 
TOO Gravhnd 
1248 Guar Tret 
750 Hamlin, C 

3685 Hawker 5 #n 

2000 Hares DA S 5 % 5 % . 

5150 Hoofton O 140 135 135 —4 

815 ft 14 ft T 4 ft 
923 % 21 21 — ft 

Sl «6 87 ft lift* ft 
Wta Ift M 6 - tt 

« » «-* 

SlSft 1 % 

245 241 34™— 5 

H2tt 12 12%+ ft 

S5 35S 3B • — 25 

SI Sft a«ft BBft— ft 
9 W».»ft at*— « 
335 MS 335 

150 iso no +io 

9 M 6 Sft Sft— ft 

^ 29 ?* V 9 ?”-* 
VTA 9 tt 9 ft+ ft 
*19 lift lift- ft 
515 % 15 % 15 %+ H 
914 14 14 — ft 

545 ft 45 ft 4 Aft— ft 

Wb&i* 

«Vi SA Sft+ft 
IS 490 J 
sisft 15 * a 


52 . « . * F 5 -* 25 zs 1 *-*- 

*• » iStt 8 % 16 + ft 

SmS 2 ? - 131 % 3116 31 li— ft 

SB as*.*. & 12 * 121-2 

msoo suiwate 0 K 5 % 5 % 

9* K V 310 310 +5 
^ B 90 350 250—10 

SJIS™ J * B% 12 ft Kft 
, 5 S^ 2 V 0 « . Bk Eft 41 ft 42 ft + u 
MOTradare A E I 2 tt 12 ft— ft 

SSte « b m « s-» 


475 H Bay Co 
300 Huron Eft 
56 I AC 

11 H Inland Go, 
8720 Inter Pip, 

cES! 1 ” < iT p A 

inoJannack 
71400 Kaiser Re 
500 Kv* Tran 
1375 K*rr a A 

. S Kohler A 
« 2 SUbrit A 
30 Lib Min 
» 0 UM Com 
400 LL Lac 
rate G> tt 
1 BOO Lot Co S 
800 Leeb M 
364 Mcten H A 
39115 MB Ltd 

no Ma lam I A - 

TOOMat Stare, 
2135 Moore 
7515 Horanda A 
.441 Hot Etoct 
M 00 OSF Ind 
ldBQshawa A 
7650 Pamour 
4 SW PanCan P 


WOTrCan PL 
R 4 Vn Cl rift 
JOOUCas A 
YAUnten Oil 
,51 0 Km 
l^U SIsqm 
«U p* Can 
^0 Voyawr P 
.•WaJdwad 
OWsttane 
taWM Min, 

3 Kuintet 
awMon 
■taWtlrey 
*Yk Bur 
2 Yuton C 1 , 
Tal sates ! , 377,225 


10 % lOtt 
21ft 21ft + ft 
TV: Vh 
.8% 8%— ft 

s: i 12 ute— 

* . 5 ft 6 ft+ tt 

II 115 115 - 1 

* 8 ft Itt 

S« Mft 10 ft— ft 
J 9 9 % fft+ ft 
219 227 237 -3 
820 2016 2016 — ft 

III 18 ft lift 

110 102 1 IO —7 

2*7 225 227 

101 101 101 + 1 

ares 


MONTREAL 

sssssraas 


laurtatf SL 


IU talino ' H v it a" 14 ™ il*+ % 


^k” Mont 8 ^ 17 * UttT". 7 * 

* 10 ft+ ft 


SOO Pembln A 
231 Pine Print 
650 Placer 

1 900 Oita Stan nu £mb 
WORra Orir A Sift . 5 ft 
.gDIteWteoICl 519 % 19 ft Wft— ft 

iSOO town Pre 84 « 84 + 2 1 

. 18860 Rrihnun 914 % 24 ft 14 ft 

334 ZSInmn K STlh 7 vb 7 %+ % 


275 275 275 

4 ft 


«s »te *_ . ..., .. .. 

iSfa 1 ^--. „ ajflw* . a«: 
im^I AS 

Srs* is 5 


i us. 



Amo/Ttatt Bank 7+40 
AmsMtitebar 143.80 
DU I Meats IXM 
Fokkar 35.80 

Hoi -Am Um a 6 J 0 
Hoofanw iOJO 
Ala Bank Nad 316 J 0 
c-ln per cant of no 


BRU! 

(in Brill 
.Arbeit 4 850 

Assure*™ 7 J» 
Etedrnbcl 6,290 
Ford 7 JOS 

GB Enterprises 1 .% 
Hobo km 3,839 


FRANI 
(to flwow 
AEG 7200 

BASF 134 J 0 

Bavar Motoren 223 J 0 
Ounmarzbank 2 Q 1 JB 
CdntiGonml 7 L 00 
Dal inter Benz 1 MJ 0 
Dautsc&o Bank 30 MO 
DresdnerBank 228 .M 
Farimi Barer 11190 
Farban Lieu Is *36 

HoedHtarFare I*U 0 
,Mannomann 261.10 
IMGesatichFt 2 * 7.00 


tw " P s 16 VS 4 14 ft JAft . . . 

Sj n Bririo, t 24 %) 24 24 ft 

M»CI C« Ms bS 145 +]* 

1 30 % 1*0 % —ft 

Tnrt 9 l^ll*^ 

jgg^*** * fig 5 S 

T »*>s*Iw 31 M 9 V — ‘ 


SYD 9 
(In Australian dri 


PARIS 


2ft 

ltt 


m rn* 71 

4 ft Aft Aft 

6 *a 6 ft 6 ft- % 


TO a -.3 kdOOin >~v .a® » /TO n In- ft 

1 W 9 12 LeeEfltr J 1 10 6 IVa 18 % lift*' ft 

396 21 a Lee Natl ... 20 2 % 2 % 2 %.. 

aft Aft Ldph Pr -40 4 1 7 ft 7 ft 7 ft- 


3 M 6 .lft M 6 + 46 

* «6 9 9 ft + % 

713-14 . lft'. 1 V 6 -T-M 

4 14 % 15 % 74 % - ft 

t M 6 4 V 6 +-V 6 

4 3 * 396 . 2 ft 

3 1 % R 6 1 %- % 


!XPA Wt Edoflon JBr 
,AVa 1 BWnos Q» 
TA » EdO Cate 
•IM 4 ftEdwrdsJ 0 * 


4 2 ft TA 2 ft + ft 
3 5 ft 5 ft- tt 

3 -mb Wtt Htt- tt 


U S St .JO 
U S St .JO 
O 5 St 
Wering 15 
Weeing 2 D 
Wm Lm » 
Wm Lm 3 S 

vvrn Lm 40 

.A M F 

Unless wnenfrise noted, rotes of wvMmds In .Hit: a S^jT Js 

— -- . after stock 

riwitanStn Mla ■" ac ' 

Itted, 


- TO w ■>, 

•tt 3 tt LesFay J 2 b 7 3 ! 6 tt Aft Aft- ft 

9 % 2 ft Ltvfllln -TO# 7 29 7 % 7 ft 7 %». ft 

9 ft' Sit LewfsBF J 4 - 3 3 Aft 4 416 + tt 

4 ft lft LBxrtV Feb, .12 3 4 ft 4 ft- 4 ft, 


134 18 ft 
525 Ift 
766 VA 

7A lft 

88 3-14 
3 2 tt 


49 3 ft 
18 116 
e « 
27 1 Tl -14 
n IMA 
36 4 Vi 
172 1 116 
32 ' tt 
■ b b 
1 13 ft 
107 Sft 
421 15-16 
b b 
b b 
557 10 ft 
388 4 ft 
104 2 

111 % 


Ukm ai lest dmdend mewing, r- Declared or p rid in 

i, months plus itock ovtoand. 1 -PM in stack in 

12 moans. esAmaud cast) value on ox-dhrtoana 
button dF 

-JW 3 T — — * 

SS ^^ '^Siyflw rP 11 " 11 ^Wrtb u t e a. ». 
wj-ln SSfiruoicy or rerehcretus.or bemo reoruniud 

ySits ht^and low ran!* doac rot bi£bde Wiente* in 


A S A „ 4 S 
ASA ..58 
Calero .JO 
Caterp .jo 
G race .. 25 
'Grace X 
Phil P . J 5 
PW! P - JS 
Settle 15 
seerle ..20 
Starte ..B 
Stario ..X 
Temeo 25 
Toiiko X 

Doer .. 1 * 
Tiger -.15 
Zenith .. 20 . 
Zenith ..25 

wm ..x 


21 74b 

57 3 tt 
229 1 % 
94 1+16 
10 7-14 
4 8 

8 2ft 

7 2 % 

120 M 6 

9 2 ft- 
X ft 

78 lft 
45 ft 


- 8113-16 
10 ft 

‘ w - 

4 ft 


13 lft 2 M 6 
b b 25 ft 
a a 44 % 
a a 44 ft 
8 ' 3 tt 44 ft 
b b 44 % 
a a 39 % 
b b 35 ft 
a a 84 

14 4 ft 84 

11 2 -84 

a a 29 % 
1 2 % 29 % 

34 1 29 % 

6 b 2M 

114 113-16 2 Jtt 
22 15-14 28 % 
b b Mft 

5 13 % 60 % 
X 7 40 ft 
b 40 ft 
b b 68 ft 
102 XU Altt 
558 1 lft AM 

35 Stt Mtt 

90 Sft 15 % 
<6 1 15 % 

» a 31 % 
• a 31 % 
b b 31 % 


tin Ft 

TO.. J 3 |^ 

Pip da Paris IT* JO 1 
tartiln 127 JO j 

CKrem 4 AJ 0 

CGE 3 CDJB 

Esso Standard 60 JH 
FranrehtPB 133 JD 
Machines Bull 34 . 2 # 
Ml dial In U 52 J 0 


S^S 

s:ssr ,w is 


BUENOS AIRES 

(In ArawdlM MK) 


Adndar “B" 
Ajpngatas 
AstanPtt 
Atongr 
Colriora Are 


1 . 12 ) Gw Fibril Fin 
i- 2 * ; Ha-Rmuft 
3 JB I MoHlWS Mo 
1 JO Stem 
1 J 7 ' Tonwolri "B ' 1 


1 J 0 

1 J 0 . 

0 J 0 

flJI 


Fdll SoJnrun, „ 

fa n Ph oto 313 

HltadU 139 

Kawasaki stari 97 
Matsustifla El ind 419 
Mfftu Msbf Own no 
MkhaMAI Eke . 90 

MHubiriUHyylnd 109 
lUbalMlnUmrit 104 


TOKYO 

(In Jimiwm ran 


Hippos Oil Til 

Nippon Start Con 136 
fwtep 34 W 

tatattonotepi m 
TokroUarCRrt 
Toshiba Etac 
Torinr 

Toyota Motar 
TereKom 


,ass 

E fiand Ptotrt 

bag™ 

Pres Stayn 


JOHANNESBURG 

(In Sonfb Afrireo mb} 


330 
7J5 
9 JO 
27 JW 
075 
15 JM 


9 H Motrin 
WeUBM 
WOrirtbntelB 
WHridlns 
W Dew 


330 

JS0 

aO.OD 

32 J 0 

W, 


ZURICH 1 

U» tafhs francs) | 

a "'ggg s * 4 "» 


AIWIUD 392 

JK " 

5ftjEtariran w 
,9rjHsdw- ■ 

— MotCrimL 
Kestteon. 

Reassuras 


MX 
3105 
1«790 
*7# 
910 
3 JW 
4 .350 


4K 

9 % 

2 JI 5 

37 ? 

I|480 


AWA 
ArtPOlPri 
ACI 

AugGymn 

tank HSw 
Bore! 

BHP 
Cotas 
CSR 
Icum 
I AC 

Hi Morris 
Uimr 


.97 

140 

l.W 

.10 

I.N 

AJS 

ua 

7J2 

LI 5 

4.15 

1J0 

M 

690 

U 7 


Foreign Sto 


■ gw» 9 H 

gretaAtai, soo 

SSidw ’ ’-a* 

Jgjo teu SS 
jtalcnnat mn 
Italus su 
,L» Centrak. ,S 

ItalsUte . 


MILAN 

(to Italian lira) 


Swiss Air ta, 

|SrttaKSl| jSSj Yestcr* Pi 

ss^ia. daL— . * 

Jrtnwli , ifflw' Anat * Td *H 91 ! 91 

Sandoe Pi Crt, 2 , 925 !*nissrtc 88 J 4 80 

'fttakfort 13 AJ 0 135 

mi 327 J 3*9 

flondan ( 501 ) 144.19 146 

■Milan I 2 JA 12 

fane 12 SJ 111 

Ww . 3 IB.I 1 W 
I tfTrtow (nl 2 MJJ 2 H. 

Cffcwioj 3487 J 93 J 49 . 
'Ikraato — its. 
wwl® 244 J 246 . 

(-Financial Times. HI 5 
tank Corewritao 
►Tokyo oW. « 


Pirelli Spe 
RJnaflceide 
Mavbeaa 

ant 

Ante 


24.300 

lefB 

7 M 

KT 

1 J 58 

1^30 

730 


1415-14 
■ 5-14 
X 2 
17 ft 
f 4 % 
S 1 % 
2 7 -U 


X 5 % 
» 3 

m 1 % 

99 IM* 

a a 

7 3ft 
a a 

8 . I 

• 4% 

2117-14 

IX 1 13-16 
71 16 

10 2ft 
15 I 

n * 2 

3 % 

42 2% 
56 13-14 

a e 

I 2ft 


a 17 ft 
017 - 1 * 17 ft 
a «6 36 

60 4 X 

b b 34 
b b 3 * 
67 
57 

. 26 % 
b b 24 ft 
J 5 ft Sift 
b b 54 ft 
119 2 ft 14 % 
b b 14 % 
19 Tb ltft 
12 1 ft 16 ft 
3 2 ft 25 % 



.. fivetrmesai ^veek The New York Times turns the spotlight You’ll 

1 ^ ^ ^rtanTa n noun ce ^ ' Sfesi 

Jrsa--'-* « 

m - Not traded, b- No option otima. 




- - Not troded. b- No cotton ortered. 

5* tea hi ink. Lari Is premium (purchase price). 


when you read PEOPLE AND BDSINE5 
a week, Tuesday through Saturday. Don’ 
ie Business/Finance Pages of 

WriuJJorkSmu* 




4 * r. 


2ft Schaefer 






L:. j2 



■M ■" 


3* 




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♦f 


.HditeaWi 









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■34 


THE NEW YORK TIMES. SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 6 , 297 5_ 


HiEHCH PROGRAM 
= WK APPLA USE 

European Partners Pleased 
fay Recovery Effort 


^.-PARIS, Sept 5 (Reuters)— 

' France’s SB-tiillioii economic re- 
| ’Qoveiy program was applauded 
' by her leading European part- 
ners today, but drew a mixed 
reaction at home because of 
doubts about her ability to 
check unemployment. 

On the European level, Presi 
dent Valery Giscard d’Estaing's 
move to stimulate the sagging 
French economy was generally 
viewed as an important contri- 
bution to the fight against re- 
cession throughout the Euro- 
pean Community. 

The West German Govern- 
ment and the E. E. C. Commis- 
sion in Brussels reacted enthu- 
siastically, supporting the 
French President's contention 
that the package announced 
last night was part of a Euro- 
pean plan to reinvigorate the 
E: C. economy. 

Public Works 
■ Finance Minister Jean Pierre 
Fourcade told a news confer- 
ence today that the recovery 
■program, including heavy funds 
for public works projects, cash 
hand outs to consumers and in- 
vestment and tax aid for in- 
dustry. would produce a budg- 
et deficit of some $8-biliion 
this year. 

He said there would have to 
be a tax increase next year to 
bring the 1976 budget into 
balance. He did not specify 
whether it would be a straight 
income tax increase, but he 
said the burden would be 
small. 

Leaders of French industry, 
alarmed by a 10 per cent drop 
in production over the past 
year, gave the Giscard d'Estaing 
plan a guarded welcome, but 
union leaders here were al- 
most unanimously hostile to it. 

Francois Ceyrac, head of the 
French Employers' Association 
called it coherent and positive 
; over-all, although he said the 
measures to help the cash posi 
tian. of -companies were disap- 
pointing. 

^; : j; Largest Slice 

^The largest slice of the re- 
covery funds, $2.6-billion, was 
"devoted to public works proj- 
ects that could soak up part of 
; France’s growing unemployed. 

The jobless figure now stands 
; at about one million and is ex- 
. peeled to rise to 1.3 million 
in the next few weeks. 

But the major unions said the 
measures were largely geared 
to helping companies and 
would do little to curb unem- 

- — • ue spltfc Tne- g g li c iany Tram i 
reception given to the program 
in newspapers, prices on. the 
Paris stock exchange fell to 
--day. Dealers said the market 
had discounted the measures in 
advance. 


Business Briefs 


Dividends 


Pa- 5fk.of.Pfr-, 

riod.. Rate ..Record, ah N 
INCREASED . . ... ... „ 
Canadian Util .. J1BSI.SS 
Dlvarsav Coni , . JO 9*15 9-30 

Gwrtwrt Omnlnd .. .1* 1033 IMS 

Utott, Join A •• M ’MS 

Lrtatt, Join ft -• ‘S 1 HS 12j 5 

Uncc Inc ..JO 9-1* JW 

Wtfnflf Cam .. .11 Ml IM 

STOCK 

' Divwsay Cor* x MS MM! 

x-J for 2 slock split. 

INITIAL 

Adi oa lodnst .. .OS M» GO-3 

' ' EXTRA 

Utah Ml .05 MS 10-15 

. _ REGULAR 

Aetna tncnStn M M MS 

Amoskeaa 0> Q 2 9-15 9-30 

AH P CW» Bottle . . JB M MS 

Azobr Car* . .15 1M 1M9 

Bute Inc Q .15 MS MO 

Centos Com Q JB 

Oty Gm Florid* 0 -IS 

QofMraMtT Q> S .15 
CMoriaf 0X5 W .. .15 

.'Otionial Into Fd AB 

Coming Glass Wks Q at 


Coast Test Set on Banking in Stores 

The Federal Home Loan Bank of San 
nounced yesterday that it would establish a pdot project 
enabling ^>osiu4 in three CaUforma savings end loan 
tTmake deposits and withdrawals through 

retail merchandise outlets. ■ 

The bank, which regulates savings and_toaiSoca- 
ttons said remote computer terminals would be estab lished 

t Ml ofets. endA^om- 
Ss toSraw money, for example, to pay 
cfcases The bank said it would serve as a clearmg house 
SfSfe aiociati«5end>Ifflg them to stare mmaJ. de- 
vir-K in the same locations. The California Federal Savings 
and Loan Association, Los Angeles; the 

and Loan Association. Beverly Hills and the Glendale Fed 
end Saving and Loan Association are mvolved, 

F.T.C. Expects Windfall Oil Profits 

WASHINGTON, Sept. 5 (Reuters>-OU 
reap pretax windfall profits of $ 12-billion to S18-b01»>a 
annually because of the expiration of oU-pnce controls, m> 
cording to a Federal Trade Commission srndy made pubhc 
SdayTThe study, presented at a Senate Interior Conmit- 
tee hearing, predicted that the price 
trolled at $5.25 a barrel, would nse to between $12.50 ana 

^ 1 3 ' Price* controls expired at the end of last month. Con- 
gresshas passed and sent to President Ford a bill extend- 
uigcontrolsfor six months, but Mr. Fond has P^mised to 
veto the measure. Strong efforts to override a veto are ex- 
pected in both houses. . . . 

Assistant Attorney General Thomas Kauper told the 
committee that the Justice Departmentwoidd watchthe 
situation and prosecute big companies that tried to drive 
small, independent refiners out of business through pnee- 
fixmg or other anti-competitive practices. 

Pipeline-Cargo Boats at Prudhoe 

SEATTLE. Sept. 5 (UPI>— Four tugboats carrying cargo 
for the Alaska pipeline zig-zagged around ice on 

the Beauford Sea and finally dropped anchor early today in 
Prudhoe Bay. Alaska. The tugs were part of a $50O-miUion 
sealift that had been waiting for the ice to break .The ice 
has cracked but is far from open, reports from Prudhoe Bay 

^^Five tugs and barge units were still trapped in. the ice 
near Smith Bay 120 miles west of Prudhoe last night. Five 
more tugs and barges that tried to round Point Barrow met 
heavy ice and were ordered to turn back There were an- 
other 16 tugboats and 35 barge-loads of equipment south 
of Barrow waiting to come to Prudhoe Bay. 

Gold Up for 3d Day; Dollar Advances 

BRUSSELS, Sept 5 (UP1) — The price of gold rose for 
the third consecutive day on European markets today, re- 
covering slightly from its lowest point in more than a year. 
The dollar also advanced, but closed largely unchanged 
from the previous week 

Gold rase 25 cents an ounce to $153.25 in both Lon- 
don Zurich. Dealers said the London gold market was 
in a subdued mood with little action after the hectic trad- 
ing of the last few days. On Tuesday, gold prices fell $10 
to less than $150 an ounce after the Internationa] Mone- 
tary Fund announced it planned to sell some of its gold 
stock to aid developing countries. 

In Paris, the dollar rose sharply after publication of 
the new French economic plan, whose heavy deficit spend- 
ing is expected to weaken the franc. The dollar closed at 
4.4125 francs, up from 4.4050 francs at yesterday’s close. 

In London, the pound fell against the dollar to $2.1095, 
down slightly from $2.1100. 

British Machine Tool Orders at a Low 

LO NDON, Sept 5 (Reuters)— Order books of Briti sh 
more than 20 years, Howard Barrett, director general of 
the Machine Toots Trade Association, said today. 

Over-all orders now stand at only six months' work 
and some companies are already building for stock be 
added. But the prospects of eafly orders from British Ley- 
land Motor Corporation before the end of September offers 
some hope of relief. 


2 RETAILERS DROP 
MAJ OR APPLIA MCES 

Continued From Fage 27 

a major national retailer that 
has been grappling with finan- 
cial problems, recently an- 
nounced that it was discon- 
tinuing its major appliance une 
of products, starting Sept. 15- 
Grant, which has been de- 
emphasizing its credit program, 
said that consumer-purchasing 
of appliances on credit had 
slowed. 

Impact on Other Stores 

Other major stores here, such 
as Macy and Abraham & 
Straus, said that they had no 
plans to drop any of their ap- 
pliance business. Executives at 
Macy and A. & S. said that 
they expected the Korvette and 
Gertz action would probably 
benefit them since as the area’s 
two largest retailers they would 
attract customers who had pre- 
viously chopped Korvette and 
Gertz for appliances.] 

Although Korvette is intensi- 
fying its shift to soft lines 
the company spokesman said 
that sales of television, radios 
and similar merchandise were 
strong and that this merchan- 
dise category remained profi- 
table. A spokesman at the 
Gertz stores also reported a 
similar situation. 

While the profit decline in 
“white" appliances was de- 
scribed as partly because of 
intense competition from dis- 
count and appliance stores, 
high handling costs also were 
a factor. Twenty per cent of 
all "white" appliance transac- 
tions require a second delivery 
because of the absence of the 
homeowner, Korvette said, 
while service costs and prob- 
lems are “burdensome.” 

And, in an effort to cut 
handling costs, Korvette said 
that it was emphasizing sales 
of portable “brown" appliances 
that the customer could carry 
out of the store and thus avoid 
the home-delivery. 


Closed-End Funds 

We* k ended Sari- 5. 1775 
DIVERSIFIED COMMON STOCK FUNDS 
Value Me* 


Dart Dr 
Fluor Car* 
GefcoJeW Car* 
'Gluiuaa Brewing 
ltalth>Mor Inc 
Houston Nat C*s 
Kmer-Rotti Core 
Lrhes Vwntstea 
Magi Bras Inc 


-0D3 

.10 

.ns 

.075 

as 

J5S 

.25 


S .OS 


0-12 W-V 
9-TV 1M 
no4 omi 
M2 Mr 
M2 9J0 
MS MO 
M2 0-2* 
M0 10-15 
1M 10-24 
MS 10-1 
MB 1U 
MS <100 
MB 103 
MV 10-15 
1017 1031 


Milton Bradlnr 

Q 

jy 

Mf 

10-15 

Minis Rfrer Ca 

a 

JO 

y-iii 

7-3C 


o 

J0 


7-» 

Mlto Core 

u 

JH 

9-28 

18-1! 

¥ix Css Tramm 

0 

■225 

7-75 

Mf 

Pacific Ftwtu 

Q 

^2S 

9J5 

10-11 

P^iham Imfeuf 

Q 

-IB 

MI 

7-Jt 

Penn Traffic 

Q 

as 

ln-ta 

70* 

Petnar Materials a 

.05 9-78 

Pratt £ Lambert 

Q 

as 

9-76 

10-1 

Sim kins Indus! 

a 

.15 


104 

Soutok lira 


.075 


10-11 


4 

-225 



-Stota Mull Stair 


-B875 

700 


SW* Mutt Secnr 


.0875 

10-3.1 

■71-11 



.07 



USLIFE Hx» Fd 

M 

.01 

7-15 

'44 

Utah Irtf 

Q 

as 

7-30 


Wenaca Inc 

a 

20 

9-15 

TO-l 


NOTICE 


■NOTICE, is hereby alwm that mo E3ee- 
jvmt fttfc Seweraw Authority will hold a 
nolle . hearing on on amendment la the 
sttdule of rates and chorees ar 8:00 PAR. 
an .September 22. I97S. at Hie Edgewator 
Park Township Municipal Banding, -00 
«hanco Road. Edourafer Pant Tonrishlp, 
Beverlr. New Jersey. 

_ At this hearing, any bondholder may aooear 
In oereon or by agent or attorney and any 
resident mar aouear In any obice- 

fions ha may haw to the final adoption 
ot it* amendment to ttw schedule of rates 
and charges. 

EDGEWATOR PARK SEWERAGE AUTHORITY 
BY tii George Gunn 
GEORGE GUNN, SECRETARY 


Contract Awards 


The Sperry Rand Corporation has received two Navy 
contracts totaling $26.9*million. One is for $17.9-mfllion 
for development and support of a data system, and $8.9-rail- 
Iion award for tracking equipment for missile fire-control 
•systems. 

The FMC Corporation received a $23 -2-million Navy 
contract for gun mounts. 


National Geodetic Survey 
ts Studying Alaska Pipeline 

WASHINGTON (AF) — The 
National Geodetic Survey has 
started a four-month, $170,000 
study of a 435-mile segment of 
the Alaska oil pipeline to detect! 
the results of seismic activity. 

The possibility that earth- 
quakes will disrupt the pipeline 
and cause catastrophic spills is 
one that environmentalists have 
raised since the project was 
first proposed. 

Hie survey method will be to 
establish a line of markers 
along the route so that, 
engineers can compare the 
elevation of bench marks before 
and after suspected mov ements 
of the earth. 


. WBOLE&ftte «>*&¥ . 

OFFERINGS 
TO BU YERS 


ATTENTION: EXPORTERS 
LE.D. WATCHES 

sfarjfTwieripa- 
ncwnHiicSb 


LONDON METAL MARKET 
(In reunds storting pot mottle fan) 


WIRE IMS 


COPPER 

Oosa 

Prev. do*r 

Sort .... 

570 

• 579 

» 9 587 
600 9 609 

Forward . 

400 

o «x% 

Sari .... 

174 

LEAD 

O 175 

1Z6 9 1761V 
1M 9 IMft 

Forward . 

ID 

« ID 


tut 

Spar . .1160 03,165 
Forward .3,222 OVOS 
ZINC 

tad .... S O » 
371ft* 372 


3,168 

1230 


356 

370 


Slk 

GenAdtaEn ... JJ-g ** 

Advance !®*S .??? 

Carrie 

canrve . - * 

CenAln* ,?£ 

IntIHold 
tatiswn . . 

Madsen Jig J* 

KlMJraSn 1** 

OsnS*c 3-S7 31% 

TrSoMf 3268 18ft 

Un£Sl ... »-34 6ft 

UttFor Wi 

SPECIALIZED EQUITY AND CONVERTIBLE 
FUNDS 

16.97 15ft — M 

loja ift —iu 

2U2 36 +07 

48.47 24 -50J 

18.11 13ft -2SJ 

17.45* 15ft* — 13A 


□IK. 
% 
-?4.1 
—36-4 
— 33.6 
— 38 J 
—2331 
— 12A 
— 19J) 
-30 JO 
+ U 

— 14J 
—19S 

—ara 

— 24.2 


Am6enCy 
AmUttlS 
ASA .. 

Baker Fan . 

BanooftCv 

Cast** 

OwstCyfts . 
CLIC ... . 

nidiBii . 

DO V AVI VIP 

J«ean 

KtnnOTC 

Na*IA»i* 

NwAmwftmd 

PrireCp 

RETlocC . 

S-GSecine . 

Soorte 

SMSh 

YlUiDvCe ... 


z 

(- 7 J 9 J ... 

M9 J!4 

w.u < -JiJ 

8J7 4ft —44.7 

170S lift — 3U 

. 11.93 8ft -30J 

. . 22.09 19ft —08 

. 1J2 1ft — 5 J 

1.07 1ft +16 8 

16. OB 8% — 4SA 

X.72 20ft -3tf 

. . . . 441 2 -£ 6 A 

BOND FUNDS 
AmGenBd 20 J 6 * 22 ft* + 7 J 


Bunker Hill 

OUlneSks 

OnrenH 

OrextlBtf ... . 

Exolslor 

FfOofrtnc 

Hatters* 

iNAIncSec 

IndSal* 

JHanl 

JHanStc 

MMIndnv 

MntoSt 

MuOnthdt 

PaeAol 

StPagIS 

Sta*«M Sk 

S/PIncSec 

USIIFE 

• EX-OlYIDEND 
Z NOT AVAILABLE. 


ZUC 17ft —12 
11.94 lift —13 
11.86 10ft —HU 
17 JB 16ft — 2.9 

20.09 19ft —44 

1444 14 - 3.0 

16-24 16ft 
1847 17ft —1.7 
17.16 17ft + 04 

20.10 19ft — OJ 
4540 16ft + 24 
1241 10ft -104 

z z z 

JAM 14ft + 13 
Z Z Z 
11.18 10ft -6.1 
1148 lift — 24 

z z z 

942 9ft + 24 


Weeden Registers Loss 

The Weeden Holding Cor- 
poration. parent of the Weeden 
securities organization, said 
yesterday it lost $271,000 last 
month against a $944,000 loss 
year earlier. Trading iq 
August stood at 13.4 million 
shares against 12.7 million a 
year earlier. 



CO. P.O, Bo* 127, 
21S423-4530 


-.-Starts Wednesday, Septem ber 1 0, 
in The New York Times 
Real Estate Pages 

New news column about 

the people and the 

T issues affecting the field of 

Commercial 
: Real Estate 

J. A midweek feature to help you 
iii keep on top of the news. Make 
I ri it a regular Wednesday reading 
'% ? habit, starting September 10, in 

JfeUr JJorlc $xm$ 


r r e r rr errreiiiiree 

THE DEMOCRATIC AND POPULAR 
REPUBLIC OF ALGERIA 
MINISTRY OF POWER AND INDUSTRY 
SONATRACH 

ADVICE OF JW HTHNATUNAL CAa FOR TBffiEft. 

An International call Is being made for tenders for the con- 
struction of a Research Laboratory in the field of lubricants. 
The project IdcMm: 

—thm tody and production of plans for««n*tnrctJc»n of tti* bBUjflno 
Sot ttw laboratory and mbtidtej «ftp*rtm*frt*. 

—Om supply otaqalpmontrsqalrod tor 
nnnng ttw tatboachw 

ptiy^al aid chwnicri mly*te of lubrieam products 
spamting thmaubaMary daptrfcnants. 

— ttwmWns of atalf In ebargs el th« Uborotory. 

Detailed specrlfeatfons {cahmr cfas charges) may be consulted on the 
opening day at the offices of SONATRACH representatives In the 
fcBdwing countries: 

ntANCE— ^ 105 Avenue Raymond Paincr* p*B|g 1S t. 

IUNICH80 


GERMANY— Maria 1 
ITALY— 19 Via Victor Pbanl. 
UAL- 3419 nr Street n.w. 
SPAIN— Greus Via Carloa in 


MILAN TF 

.WASHINGTON. D.C. 4 

hBARCELONE i 


»4 Terra Mr Ed»cia Trade 7* .... 

<nJ«*cyo. ShOwsawa Bldg. 1 Ban 21 

wichWiga Kden— Mmrto-Ku — TTTrYfl 

*nd In London, B Hyde Park Gale, SW 7 

Parties wishing to tender should send their offer to the TECHNICAL 
department of the AZREW Refinery. BJ>. 37. AZREW. (ALGERIA) in 
a double sealed envelope; the subject of ibe offer should be merited 
on uie extenor. 

pie lining date (or submission of offers is set at one month after 
publication of the advee. 

S.QMIU&J12. 

MANAfiBi FOR ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENr 
DffAffTlflfT OF KWK L/RES AND POSTAL 

2, Blvd. SALAH B0UAK0UIB 
ALGERIA 

[Lgretephonoi 64^82-60 Telex; 528-98 50NEGDG jl 


NOTICE 


NOTICE is hereby* sivm that the Edfle- 
ttjtti* Pari: Sewerw* Aottwrity will hold a 
BuWlc hearing on trig one rating budget for 
Hw tire* I rear December l r 1975 threwh 
November 31. 1976, at S;30 PM. nstem 

g rlraht time on S49t«T2)Cr 22, 1975, ar 
! Edgeiaater Park Toanstiin Municipal 
lulldlng, 4 DO DsUncn Road, Edgcwatcr Part; 
ownshlp, Beverly, New Jew. 

At tttij hearing, ary Uondholdsy may ap- 
aeer In eereao or by aBBtt or attorney and 
*dt resident may appear la exsress «nr 
objections be mar have to th* final adop- 
tion of tta uReadnsif to th» sdKduig of 
rates *nd charges. 

EDGElYAJEfi PARK SEWERAGE 
* AUTHORITY 

&T /S/ Ggaree C Gunn 
GEORGE C GUSN, SECRETARY 


Beal EsM« 


SfTlUfTtOPi. Choice 
Commercial Location at 2850 
Hempstead Turnpike. Levi (town, 
N:Y. in excess o! 56.Q0Q sq. feet 
with 200 ft. frontage. Twins 
Available. Cafi Hr. SGMridc cal- 
tat {385] 651-2530. 


HOUSES 

— IOC— 


fross-Hafatt* 


-m 


5TH AVE VIC 70 S 

GOOD FINAttCIwG AVAIL 

PAT PALMER 

2JE67 

'5TH AVENUE ICHOjretWSCi 


■vvM.A.syHiTE&sins 

mr-LGaRPIELP 




<nt p Tiranmx 4 rare nagem ttease. 


F 5-stv bmjtn **Bi4 ae?;r i j», 

raC& ?1r&VE ASSOCIATES 

82nd ST. TOWN HOUSE 
Off* M 4 d A Park 5 ilBries. sfrwl Hr 

»i4UnraK°B- — 

IQS 5 T V /. ott CPia . ACioiW rewrv - . 

ft wa-fcom 

low c£b.c*nw 994-35 77 
Smivew. Owner S84-M77 cr 733-31». 

PARKCHESTER 2 FAM BRK 

7*7 2 ' - Wtt «*w , J n»i ihnairt, hntVfn 


feates-Braa 


-1M 


iTiMBSSKicGe— ,w 

t_-r , iujc, securitv. U 00 oa reel De*>. w 

*1 3-UtfC*« _ 


Hoases-Emtie 


-IS 




foflSK-SttteskJand 


-I« 


oNNADALE. 12 vroW coScmbtt seUiti^- 

tl, nice arc*, sWi dose by. ULOOQ. 
Ctomr 272-354-2 14*. 


Sacrltke.1 


ANN AD ALE . - - - _ 

aoatoo, extras. Sacrltne. Oarer 
748-5467; 6BB6623 
BgLS HEAD 2 l«nc-5_8._4 


air. 




GRANT OTY. D?H». 3 t atna, ce ottit 

air. cam; ins. timucd basment, t'i 
hams. ejctr«5. Owng 977-4731 


GRANT CrtY-OWer 6 rm col. mil Lest, 

nice odctttvhO. comer, trams & «tns. 
Lotaa- AMwnetntog-7B7-n31. 

HIGH ROCK AREA 
1 "3 acre, nicetr tarebcaoeit in I me tea- 
lion, Qnrt 3 BR ranch, ttn osroni. excel 

cant. S8I JOB. 9B72»2 

TRAVIS Brnd nea modrn P*tm d2la m 6 
over 6 mer fin ond fir cert ^ 52000 Ik 
rebate STO-S 0W679-74I6 


goose teugg 


-111 


ASTORIA-2 FAMILY 
SALE OR RENTAL 

3 ^3. SSS^OOO or S450 pc OMnttl. 1 Wotfe 
SftBOfcASI 


owner. 


maOTto scMs A 


ASTORlA-BrandMW tolly towlatodj tom 

brk* tone. 2-6 arts * Xi m mlkriti. Gas 


House Sun 2-5PM. 


aft 6PA'i 932-91 18 

ASTORIA-Ort 6>.i, *■?. Thi bunt.S-S TO 

SLSSIXOO. Call 4-BPM 212-278-2179. 

ASTORI A-Oitmars vm. 2 (ant tax, 5, 3. 

ARM. beaut.^Ln^^SWO.. 


Call 


bctsIMsm 


BAVSI0E- ALLEY POND , 

txfalom rancM-t»tt«s,fnriid bswtt^ft 
beaut ernds. Tens of xtr as. Call anylone 
HAUSER HAS 'EA'. ir(l>rvyi 

16 1 -lBNorttieraMra . LE_WJ2jJ2 

.YSIDC-2 lam ttetadied toid- 6, 5*1 


BAYSIDC-7 lim oeraoiefl prj»- o. 


177-22 NorftteraBlrt 


MMItO 


JMSIDE..COZY.M»tCT<W,2W^ 

Bavside/Flusbo-X Ar 300 SI StoNO. 
side hall mod El Krt 7 rm CrtJsnil. 
WM Blafce 176-70 N Bud 3574380 
BAYSIDE HILL5-Gttm Morion Dttac &6 
n LR. 3 bills, fral. 


rms, mod. (arm Frendi ] 
fin Dsmt. garage. 225-7331 


BAYSJDE-Loveto older 5 BR home. (pOc. 
220W. 2 car gar. 00X100. S57.9W.Mc- 
KnlJlt-Owton 4004A BrilBlud BA9-3600 
BAYSIDE-Twnftse CeodoGBRs. 2 Whs. Hn 
banrt ^t^ wHc ^ a j t, new cot. nwny 


tousts-Queetd 


-111 


SiAdr-Vne' Ranch Birr.. 
XtTbrSk & atom vuttoM L* 
rwM* r nail aoeiOO ranch. 4 -ton AC. 

iriMirr KITOwn. cocktail aM dirune 
ptrett. 'Glamourous _ ???£ 

S^it. . wWIrealU 


V« 

iwe Hfflin Blv d, BAVSide 4-I0D0 


BAYSIDE SW.WO 

Loe l-tam w/fgrmal *««». «artOus Inr 
JSt x b»ms, medern htten & 
uroet. wall mtrrar. Se* to aocrtaMtr. 
Owner wain to sett 

morwni realty corp 

BAYStCE GABLES -- Graciou s ~LniW 
Ideal tor me ' LgS' 

+ -son c tfC ti LR- tri. (Aunts rm * ■». 

Hi«-**av cm w-Xiursoi* rtaw. 

•r.acal + l.Sacrt.SIOO's.wMrv 767*0500 

£llTli|g:30PM 

■ HAYStOE Oaks ■Quiet eleoMra*. Cent 
“411 cat. 3 8R. * dm. soac LR. fM,.eav» 


7ft7 -0500 call til* 


8B.LEB0S6-* tuo am •Wi 
cat ov cn unusually attr*cii*c 
sheet. All eonv. 
at vm BRUCE ROPER 


111 II dent 2- 


212 


CAMBRIA HTS (Hr PartotaW . yjJHt 

c55SiS riTS-S4I.W0. 5ffttd ork. Tudor J 

VgtfSo&e?* 

asOKln^alrt. CamOrU Hdghto 

CAAIBR1A HTS PROPER 




2lS» t jSaS*S^8H600 

CORONA — 2 tarn tee. S.vroltl. .5 1 .>, y /;T 

y : nm. bunt. nr. S*r <> v(L IT Leffak o- 

CORONA Z-FAM BR ICK 9-YHCJLD 

3'.;. a A 6 nns+ Hnbscnt rr suttwav 

DOUGLAS manor - exclusive wrtcrtroot 
ccnm ucuty. 3 BRs. ttn bsmt. mint and 
Prmciaais onto, sacrtltee. *2X779 


OOUGLA5TQN SEMI-OETCM) TWNHS& 


Smt Hill kl 1 


DQU 

7’r t 
bsmt 
puff* Agan 
35-3328 


Townttouse L 

central A>C. swim . 


iTON iu rart V .-fin 50X100 on 
irafen motber/dauwitcr. lyn 
143440 ; 


DOUGLASTON. 

Bov. idaal tr 

cld SB34004 

DOUGLASTON. wmiac 9 tmW ranrt^* 

BRs, 2 » I Ottiyeewtrilai sjre K PR. be^n 
£ Boating Mid Vv 420- 16 84 

OOUGLASTON-Brldtrandin 3 BR. 2 bttis, 

ea-. in tot. gar. Perfect condiHon. Call 

423Q146 

EAST ELMHURST 2-F»m 
6+6 rms. basement. garage< 
residential are*. 

LEWIS & MURPHY 




ELMHURST 

BUILDER’S CLOSEOUT 
LAST HOUSE 

§5,000 Price Reduction Plus 
$2,000 Tax Credit 

Alt Bride 6+6+X'Grraoe. Ml 
StsemeftbGts He*f, WafttoSulmup 

“ EU6HURST off Grand Are 

Gold Castle Homes 

New send detached A family brick 6+ 4ft, 
IV; bths +■ 3 A 2 rtn aotS- B^Mi les. Full 
basement,, garage* <* subw. 8416 56 Aye. 
Ooen Sat & Sun 12 to tom. Call Dirt OL 
1-M29 . 

t$tm art, cptw Loc. Owner 476-25H 
ETmhrtriZ taatflv OetdL hotharts 

S9JX0 . 

516295 


FLUSHIHG-Oooorhmih for limit/. 
Bndi attctxL excel cond. tin tanL2blks 
nfraho • 


FLUSHG-Briek Enottoh Tudor. 7 rms. 3 

double t ' ~ 

BLAKE. 


doubly bertm, nawm. 1 car, 14S400. 
. 196-10 NO Blvd. 357*0300. 


FLUSHING Si 

m o ve I n cm, 

4(75. A.M^INK. IN 34621/39 


3 BR bit townttse. 
Convenient Uguer 


FLUSHING. Uottier/i 
pvt entr. fully eoxl. 


•her/daurtifer. 
id. brine only. 
746-3312 


Cert air. 


NEW GARAGE 


RUSHING-BRICK 

SS00 Tax Credit 6/6/3 wrBwamt 

YORK 154-26 No.Btod.939-46QO-l. 



(^AtmaJssM 1 

SARDELL 253-2100 


AVE R ON E 22 ST 

Lowtodel J ram.tooiims tone ar/ tln bsmt 
♦ blnfli, Brtv dr y gar, move-ln ujikI 
. Immedpo®. Must sacril-ooreasonaWf 
otter refused. 336-1882 Bta- 


BAY RIDGE -P rotesslonal Comer 
4th Avc-ln 70s. raid* office , dr retlnng. 
better than new, extentlon & Inunwemcnt 
5Vn*go. ideal. Slone’s throw to sub tall 
bus routes. 7 rm office + oarage + 6 ng 
resitL Incredible extras, only SI 50400 
Z. L. POST 75245 Ave. SH 56400 


BAY RIDGE SHORE AREA 10 YEARS 

YOUNG ultra mod 2 tam brfc t bsmt, Ig 

rms. walk In dosets, gar & yard. MANY 

I nutted occupy mm ALPINE 




^lanru omMgC Many extras. $150000. 


BAY RIDGE hi 70's 

+ 3 0^09 50*100^1 
atos RHy 833-2700 1 


TBysslil 


l2*9SntST _ 
rtf, par. SCOOP. 


BAYPlDGE 

5 t ami tv. b rick w/vore.Good cotuBSon. 
7tti Are vie 48tti 5T. Call I564C22. 


BEDFORD Are^haaodid Bevbrk 

modem ivttoxMn* rertJH war ' 

Wasswmin WOlMc Donald Av Nl 


BERGEN BEACH 

WTO^A RK^tam Tull' 

BROOKLYWHTC4gRTGREEN*BE3T 

4 sty tcd'l brk on fine re- 
SI, wadous 4 br triplex/ 



_ _ I ynlls97Mwre9NL 

KLAHR Dania nr Arthur 


62M0B4 


BKLYN HTS BOERUM HLSErawnslaner. 
-2 tom. S65M/3SM down, hf income, 
talc, ream, brass rtunbg 


B 1 U-YN Htsvj c 
miiv.gdmadi's. 
Berman Rlty 


Boerajn jiM stor y. 2 to- 

IflS? Aue3Uvo633-8304 


2S l ^ ! 


bwnstne, Irve 

“ til ash or 


I riffs 4 

p Call, Mr. Xtoo 531-7406 lor an ai- 
I a u oolntnvnt. 

CANARtSE. Mill Basln-Bvy/Sel I thru 


a sm^Si 


Ouldc Action. 


857*4000 




Area -2 

Ceotnutt 
leaving for F 
price open 70avs/E*a 


,lto bThs^s^ETi /LA/ 
,+tull bsmtjcargar^wnr 


CAMAR5IE— ZJambrkh. 4 1 -:, 3ft, 2 a/C, 
Holly Htdj. aortone. 1 fare zone. Ex- 
iras. $45.700. 272-7674 oamg 

CHURCH Are BMT^eaui.l lam .BRICK 

home on owlet side rireef, Hn b>mL 2 car 
? baths. 4 bertTKi 22D wtriogj ? 


OWOR 21.- . 


I EH, me. 


CROWN HGTS-2 FAM BRK 

Two- 5 ro* arts . ,ire PPL ntrt xtcbAofc. 
Mod aih.«5J00 Owner 467-7 187 


833-2700 


EAST 2d Sf-Nr Cofon Av 

S9 


Mam jM brh..modn 7ftftin, J ft Mbs. 6il 


— — wartoo . M M>, 
ggs^rt, sdd* 


2 -c gar. 
Only. 


EAST _ _ 

modern ea'fto klkWl 
tlnuiid nikdub ban 
rewj tort. ONLY 
PACE 


.. 1 ton. 
ftbatokZ 

ww Uffi 

CL 2-5400 


E. 54 51. bet U i T, 3 family brick, sonf- 
drtl^old. 6/6 t 4 rm waft-ln & r ‘ 


338-1 


PWORICfc 


NneYsOr 
MM Monday 

253*7300 


FLATBUSH-TO ALL OUR CUBjTS- 

AH,,p Bawjw*“ 


FLATB-Ocean Parkway vie, widow must 
saaltlce her ultra modern detached 3 (am 
frame. Immediate mss of lioge modem art 
4 - tremendous income- Holly kitchens, col 
r carptg* oarages, walk sub- 


file bths. w/w i 
EjMEiROV LEHZ. LTO * 


542.750 
DE 6-3300 


FLAJBUSH-2 Fam conraleMv.Det. 64 5. 

Semi Fin Bsmt. Howe Llk* New, 2 Car 
Gar In residential area. Nr subway. sStr- 

5QQ, 

KIRK5TRAND REALTY 449-9100 1864 

wpffrand Areal Newtart Are 
FlatbustvMkhmod. detached niter Iran 

oossKfe 5, tot 30x100, 


Fort Green Porfc area 

4 Tot townhouse.ft/4/6 rm duplex. 

<212t96M6ifftroi!S7*^3aS‘6PNt 
Kings Plaza 1 fam brick 

' Larpe modern kitchen, all agplncs w/ren-- 
table. Own*. 24V7140 - 

Linden Blvd 2 Fam Semi Det- 

ft YH mod kit Ifn bsmt nr trens/ 
many other xtras. Call 


Arms 
shopg. _ 
owner aft 


MARINE Pk "Buy of Month 

!li magntt 1 ' 


must sei 

BEST 


lam 6 rm, 3 




SaSsyit hSS? New* rear to All — 

253-9600 


ugjjh bus 


MARINE PARK 1 lam t 
Ira toe rms. 3 bdrms, 
tamm a/c, excel cundtti 

W.L BURGESS 266-5800 

Ciron 40x100 lot D69-I3g 

MARINE PK 1 tom alwnitoiiia 220 wirh* 

med kit f bfhjBRs UZOOO 

Niftier 1 Real Estate 3J9-S111 

wtcends a?2»^-B46ur f20ncM^ 

pcey Ptaw Neck Rd. Bulldai daaatiidg 


OCEAN , 
gv.uMstyl 


Pj2 ton frame 684. 

^0. A-l tOC. 

852 446 1 


PARK SLOPE BROWN STONE 

XMHtfjUSMlIW" 1 ' 

20 * wide 2 torn 

A 70* ' 

N, 


PARTRIDGE 
Open 7 Dare 


I Wtth Od mechanics 
Estdiaut 


PARK SLOPE . GASLITE AREA 

Nr path Im posing 4 BR 1,1am tom cert 

P.GAy 1 7 7-7 Aw Bklvn 1 

HISTORIC LANDMARK 

1 22 7 AVE 638-7070 7 DAYS 

PARK SLOPE Detchd brk lovmitse SS 

Dark. Beaut remv Qiruout. Decor kit mi 
0ir ' S8M00 ’ 


parksl 

details. 

naidmh 

763-3QN 


dock 8, 

ood n- 
Owwr 


PARK 

PR PM 

S85NL 


HISESlf* 


»- 

Arl 


cond.S6M00.tema. Owner 7B3-UI0 


BsVriWdl'd 3 BR. 220W. 
stun. Owner. 091 . 702 / 


SHBEPSHD-Brkl lam 3*+** mud kit, 

wam-ln in. Fantastic vu of trues, water a 

arwjfBflgja* 




-1# 




tafitt-lfrecM 


-m 


FLUSHING-NEW 66 + 1. FULL BASEMT. 
GAR . S98JJ00 

42-33 147 St. PaitvbyaaR 
Open Sw2-6. FALCI tN«092 
FLUSHING. Setnl-att, vIc.Kissena Parte. 
Subway wik*g dirt. 10 vre old. 6 ms. w/w 
crat, tin bsmt. Ift bths. aoolncs. Pnnc on- 
ly. HI 540‘s. 939-7437. 


FLUSHING NORTH 

New 2 -Famny-Semi-AHoched 

nRteffiKM 

OnsiWeAentfs n-6 OrBvAoni 

LETA HOMES 

30-30 turn STREET 

BETKEE ft®Sl _ 

Wethw® or Eves: 465-707* 


3STH AVE 


FLUSHING N.-Oeloch Tudor 

S'5fe!"S&'£ 4 .5?W. , !S13fe 

rtWIB&0»r.S74.7W. 

OU-BTE REALTY 

2M* French tfwts W*d35Mia> 

KKsasas 

-HSENOFF- 

166.2 0 Umon. Tu rnpike. 3804710 

RUSHING NEW 2 FAM BRK 

Loc in I tamaraa. Two6 rm mis ♦ 3nw 

W1UlWiCall89S76W 

FLUSHING BOWNF PARK . _ 

12 It hi ranch. 55x100- all trL i 

oaf. (Mi 4 tfr. Pnncs Of vt Sire 
lum\arUS-VT24 

conics. 537X00 mortoege, o’* "a. A" 

m y ^feiNWtf 

:ation. He* 2 lamltv 


1 2 Carl 

OBHOPHOOHml. U 

Nr sctm-lmmcd occupancy 


FOREST HILLS 

HAPPY NEW YEAR 
HUB, 897-2700 

95-22 ouems BT»d BeooPyk 

FOREST HILLS— T'y im StdeW W» 3- 
2 ' * bths. main tt den, C*No» IF 


to immediate vs ir 


546X00 

3 b e rtm . 

ncwaU only. 


FOREST HILLS rijet, nr Ortjnentol Aw. 
3 bciim. Ig LR. DR. new told*. 1 bOi 
hall bths. bsckvrd. gar, JSgo mo 544 3704 
attcrS 8. wbenrt 

FOR H ILLS- South or-OnS.BIW- *5*5? 
Enol. Tor aft rm, mod 61 tut. Y.. bth. 
stirs. Exclusive: Try ion 457-3600 ; 

FRESH MEAPOWS557^P A-l Cnl.^rtt 

nor. ftrhfts 3 BR. tin b sirt, sun oerth. 
Sac. Millionaire- 297-5230 

HOLLIS HILLS-BTW antortratt ranch, 7 
rms. panelled den, 2 baltts 581000 

HARRY BROWN . . .GR 9-2400 

Happy Holiday— Ctnsad Sat * Sun. . 

xmtm 

RUTH COHEN 

189-15 UN ION TPKE W11B 

HOLLtS Col, snac easily c onverte d to j 

tom, do It youreett or as Is . 5 bdntn. Btft. Z 

MOLLIS HILLS -Tudrt.3 ( BR. LRaW. 
OR. 1ft Whs. new El kiteb. wnpwch, 
S68J00. owner. 4640386 

Holfiswood Ranch $65,250 
ESTATES REALTY 225-4B00 

47-37 BELL BLVO. BAY5IOE 
HOWARD BCH CM* 4 bf. 2 Mh. 18X20 den. 

to tow%5 a/c, nr kMs & tram many ex- 

tras. 558,700 64 TLS242 


HOWARD BEACH -2F«m Brt. 6*6 + tjn 

hjmt, pool, many extras. Reasonable, 
Owner Call 64T-&5S7 


SgsESwraSiSttx 


-I7B 


JACKSN HT5-2 tarn brk. cent Art, 663 
rnS3in hjijtt-15 vrs trortmic-' or 
oar-ad Income-many xtras. 4 S7-2657 
J?sAiurceT*m6+6+ 3ft.garagr9*n 
old. low down payment. Owner 21?- 

039-7231 

JKS HGTW: very Irtge 
bsmntJtrths. qhr's^-1 cond. 
owem&gailLaro 


nffs. Hn 


JACK SOM HEIGHTS 
Legal 3 family, semi-deichd, 
TW9-4085 


all brk. 
637-3486 


JAMAICA ESTATES 

■ 2-FAMlLY BRICK 

$ 89,900 

$2,000 TAX CREDIT 

6+6-rl Garage, Full Basement 
Gas Heal. WiHc to Subway 
. MARILU HOMES _ 
I67TH STREET T. HIGHLAND AVE. 
PHONE: 73F6330; 479-8419 

JAMAICA ESTATES NORTH 

Sidehall Engl TudorJ Up, BR's 
WteJra L-R- i O^R-AJJ ♦ dinette. 
nAHKt porch, fin bant/U8iOOO 

HOU.IS HILLS RLTY 776-6300 

323-22 UNION TPKE 

' JAMAICA ESTATES PROPER 
20 rnfns to dty. Ideal who oarerts. fBcnttV 

r*nwr COLONIAL. 3BR& 30(15 Ivg.'dng 

area, Ige den. 2 'f Whs, .maid's rtn, ovsa 


*■& 


JAMAICA E5TATE5 
6ft. 6ft “ 


New 2-Famlly. 
heal, all ap- 
’. Buy now 


rtiances. 2 neks BthAv Subway. Buy now 
B art SLOODm retale. Model corner M8 
Ptora^A Grthic 


JAMAICA, 2 lam + store,. 5 
3ft .-+ ttfl bsmt. " 

Good iratflc ru. — 

low dn paymni. Mrtte otter. 


+ store. 5 mold. Sft +■ 


l ftbtb i, edn. lhaaLwani. 
WESTWOOD REALTY 


S43.90D 
rms. 2 car gar. 


523-6015 


Closed 

Union 


, , JAMAICA EST 6 VIC 
l^^avL &TATES.187-24 


JAMA I 
oar, « 
Agency 




JAMAICA ESTATES L VIC 

Save Energy — Serve Time 

Let 5MrtcvT. Saizman. LlcREBkr 
HOUSE HUNT FOR YOU 
MORTGAGES AVAILABLE 

969-3545 


wad, gar A-l S52JOO. 380-3057 



LAURELTON ■ 

TAKE OVER 7% MORTGAGE 


K!1feK9k 

(212) 527-7101 


LITTLE NECK 

wnnrl mottwr/tta> 
• ttn bant, Florida 
V xtras. Aslcg mid 56 


ottis. tin bant, Florida rm. 
ooslty xtras. Ana mid 560s. 
(212)2250170 


all opines. 



MALBA-9 room colonial 


Malbo (Old)— C/H Colonial 

Cwnltv living within Iheeltv. ExecuthK 

fMLBA BCtotlre cwnnuauty flur seneffy 
cell cond. Mon 


torpeaihg. praoerlY, excel 



owe* Call 278-7371. 



sail 

ASCAN REALTY 

RL&OP«X. 


5914900 


3S 


RiCHMONt 

ROSEDALE-Ci>0l Tft 
ken u* rm w/TroL k 

^MeSMerlf 

tinishtiRe oam. tt» 

SPRINGFIELD — 

Mod del on 

wagsb 
5UMHYMDF 

roo m *. 2 Mi 

dniwrtUiMM 


CD 


WMITtSTOHE 



OPEI 

SEMf-DE 
ALL BRICK 
2 FA 
HO 
eh C 

Excitingly N 

PL 

Complete 

Iowa 

hospito 

From $92,0C 
Excdfenlmc 

While 

Pc 

Esfi 

Condc 

171b ML brt 
andFrano- 


Phone', 


DIRECTIONS: He 

Francis Lewis Bool 

cis Lewis BbuImw 
one block to irndd. . 
Lana Island Earn 
Boulevard, Nortti at 
vara to 17th Road; 

FROM BRONX TT 
Clearvtow Exore* 
nresswav to 2 rih t 
Avenue to Franclsj. 
on Franas Lewis ft 

Lei! one Nod. to me 

This •dvertlsemen- 
which can oc made 
ceCtul NT 661 

WHITES rDNE 
immaculate Brick 
residential area .- 
mshed basement, 
oordi L DON. Many 

ABATEl 

34-55 Francis Lewis 
WHtTESTONE— Nc 
bsmt. gar l-fC 


fflSP 


' WHITE STONE 40x1 
.bdrms 3btlts.mod 

^^toojamesp 

WHITE5T0NE If. 

tamLErtras.54^ 

WOOO&1DE 

GRAND 

New 3-familv solid I 
large a' .-rm owner 
arts, oaraae. Dadty 
low. low down pay 
table. 

Builder on min 
MODEL: 6S0 
Teiepiwn- 


NEAR HILLSIDE AV 
(JAMAICA) _ 

L0VEATF 
VA Mortgages 
Walk to subwav ‘ 

In a top notch H 
exlremely beautlluL 
shrubs and trees oni 
rms— 4 bertnts, 1 ft I 
aped grnas, r 


fcts 

iitltol 


all essenfialextres. 
■I68-2S Hillside Ave 


Kesbh- ferns 

BEECH HUR5T Soot 

TRuw, 4 BrtRis. 281 
Dame 147-55 M Are in 






ATLANTIC 

4 BR. ocean corner, 
seen. 575JXXL 212487- 

BABYLON 1 

BAYFR 

ige I amity rm, cnttykl 
nets, den, nlcefytood! 
Tgememkna vw. Prtnc 


: ye 1 * : ; ■ ' ■ - k ; ■ jl 


BALDWIN- Beaut 7 nn 
rm Me form dtnrm, E 

WILBUR LEW- . 

HIGHMORT0WE 

BALDWIN, NO. Wdt 
den. 2 Mb , oar. fin b 
prrtssnly Uvfecod. 2 zo 
svs. stereo Intercom, w 
^to^numerausk 

BALDWIN area S67,« 

SCiSlSSfi 

EaSK’AS 










Ctral’d Ml FoH« 













fc —U3 

^ceding Page 
YOUNG COL 

wenlxed wrote. 

WSdta'” 


51 6/TV 3-0620 

, Weadaw 

y .NORTH- 
SIAL 

NORTH, 

\Srta“at 

wry extra. Low 

ItOC 

oJSTsS: 




SftooKvuxe 


-113 

NORTH SHORE 

FAIL PREVIEW 


lAH 

Rm, 

Rm, _ 

esu 



HrvnrWP 

■lor 

tors To 

p5 rST & z 

iH.sia^eo 




parole Apt, 


sed rsnch. 4-5 I 

xtfrife 


■•-iag*" 

: - uw 

Call be» & 1P.M. 

NORTH SHORE 

k Location 
1° °*° & 
i Rm, EaWo- 


n Location 

-yuri 

ifis. Modern 



BUG-HOCK 


(51 6] OR 6-2230 

LOCUST VALLEY 


flaws- tera-Safiol; 


THE NEW Y ORK TIMES. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6. 1975 
toe-fassat-SaffA -1 13 

GLEN HEAD, 5EA CUFF 08 NEARBY 


MOD’ 


^SVSKffiS 


byraei, spies. 


owcfcor + l 


SEA CUFF 

nruriE^SM 

GLEN COVE 

Ahsrtnte cent onert 
tor YttMo'laraSfy'iwSo 


BcBsts-fcsa-SOfhfc 

HUNTINGTON 

6 Bedroom COLONIAL! 


Bares- fecaa -Srffafc 

HWTlNGTON 

ADVENTURE 
GENTLEMEN'S ESTATE! 


sra 


Home Icr&e*!^* tSmlr! to^sa 5 ST* T fPooW PaddoekI 

THE PERFECT RANCH! GUEST APARTMENT! 


LAW . 
banw, . 
acres, s 


MASSAPEQUA-BAR 
HARBOUR 


SPSS 


club 


51 £676-1430! 

212 Sea Olff Avenue, fcaCIfff 


^p^fjMacCRATE 

GAFFNEY 

Co. 

516/GE 74480 


»3HHFS"«IE! 

LLOYD HARBOR! 


The quiet 

•crew 


i ihrtmcrae 

lota, its.! 


flEwaiat*. 


GfL REALTY 516/671-1858 


jtna! DR 
nrtnconftr) 


I»LR^W, 

torww centra 

tobcSS 


Bkb.tuM 


wnac 


itovM GLENWOODLANDING 

M^^iayfgssfSSiS 


TOP VALUES 



GREAT KECK 

S| H.G. Simon-Sez 


576- 



BROOtCVOLE NasrOSSET 

2 ACRE C/H COLONIAL 

SMBi^naKfi 

MUTTONTOWN 
SS B, - SD '- 4 “S» K**- 2 

sa_ __ 

SCOTT 516364-0668 




' file Gem 

-.SAS3 


)INT 


^6110 

NORTH SHORE 

$117,500 
' < RANCH" 

EN UVRM W/ 

• • mm 

ISBSE 0 - 

' $69,990| 

ONIAL" 

MS 

Vf C/H entry. 

MLt 

tom. 

ALTY 

87 

BE. Harwich 

NORTH SHORE 

>RARY 


COPlAGUE-WATaRONT 

aSffiws'a’P* 


tot. 


UK 





Bushel! & Clous 


BUSHELL& CLOUS 


7BayvtewAvr 


TO SERVE' 


EVENINGS: 516/427-1 


ioversjed 

kt 


Huntington Exdtt 


. LJ0¥0MJ SSnrrivE TRANSFER 
Country tame an braamiefcino 4 acrex. 
Ew commute to N.Y.C. TO mtu. palf 
enne, tenusind salting elm. Mekto 
borfwud/Brtwte ttca*. * BRs. main 
, room, studte. LR. majH. CAC ton e- 
I dlale aSQBPOr. Sk&fflb 

SAMMIS 

sanmfs.smlfli&8nitii 
ColdSor.Ofc, 5 Main St 616692-9600 


LLOYD HARBOR 

l */c csbn rn*. buge tover, LR. 


-Haga-MKi — U 3 j 

PLAJNV1EW-OLD BETHPAGE 
tig* S“U« 5" w to*. 4/s Bt^ ft. 

shS&SSi^®- Wuil ® «W- StiC 


face! 


516433-23 W 



SAMMIS 


I HUNTINGTON 

WA 1 


, A Haeoy, 
"T5M) HW 2-7575 


FteEPOKT WATERFRONT} 

EASYUVING! 

UMURMCK 


•£^srg»i snsse* 

FREEDMAN 


OasafSatanfay 


5WHUMW 


I FREEPORT 3 

cedar to*. 


FBI 


iVAT* 


itok& 


.ScnrtieHIflfnwySW 


GARDEN CTTY 
4 MORE T-W EXCLUSIVES 
BUILDING LOT 

MM 


aWd 

Wtek gat a/camikM gmdsrftec gar 


SAMMIS 

asaggjiaaaaaBB |*«BraEfit&in 


LtordNedu- DU. #2 

Waterfront Contemporary 

egajS^sggagm SftMESaZ” ' 


LEWI 

j2 gSuBrltoHwySHS«7flMOil» yBWOO 

Massapequa &Vic 
CUSTOM RANCH $52,990 

WWrihw cn T/3 act Modem esl-itvC itch 
ftXTnal ifinlng rm. lae turn'ci Mu. Cent 
A/C, 2 or gar. S*l *2X income, 

MASSAPEQUA $89,990, 

P ntatlaf yaWff . Cefaw lal m 1 ear. 

YttwlTSecrooms. 3 tom*. 52400 S5S ,bb ***• One ssmdS 


SONNY LERNER 938 8700 


PLAiNViEW-weshnotn a v ^ etreiraaLS 

”” Tl-MU 01,1 0)01 “ra 

PT JEFF AREA-MILLER PL°« 


mother/ 
. Prime 


$180,000 

caril s. burr, jr., irtc 
Z5A,Himt. si&rsm«o 


BarrBodtow/ 


John H. Mullins 

| MASSAPEQUA - JUST REDUCED! 

C/H COL -LO $50‘S 

4 BDRMS -FAMILY RM 


57 1 i|. FF Jl5* t :»T n ram nr beaStasH*. 

UIWnwBB 

TROWHED MEADOW ‘ Ciaart-i 
PORT WASHINGTON A SAMOS POINT 7 


HUNTINGTON BAY 

Grad^g nJ^ to thl Queen An 


-.Beau- 


DAVID COLE 


;*#*»■*» ®S!= 


wMn^3 V Fui! l BATH? bHl5?^ . 


tSrym. 


3 Awssapeoua 

5^jg&^ £r odKt,aw > ip I NASSAU SHRS 


nu hiww 

■4222 Mcn-k* RoH, MamorouT 


SAMMIS 


2Mf 


573.000 


LONG BEACH!— 
let. 3 ben. tin bm.i 
<amtimamt I316T 


WATERFRONT 

$51,900 




SAMMIS 


Lynbrook Col 50x 1 30 
^Xl^ES + S lfe^o“ r ^ rt,lnD 


u* 


! GODRIDGE 


trsFhet 

516/482-1164 


LOCATION. Walk itaftoto 
— &ramHh 
l City. 53?^ 


GT NECK air Custom Bit 

Brfc & fldthb 3 B 
gn, grtdden. trnj 

Fu^SJe-Vnc^^ 


Hunt. 




VERNE 

serrnJ In patio, ne.. __ 
i » roqLWMk to seftfe/stog/ 
000. Princ only. 15161 LY 


jmehricx 

TUESDAY > Late Mdoel 4 bttnwTMMi 
batta, formal Hying rm 8 OtnlitB rm, Hoer 




MERRICK/ 


SPLAMCH 


LARGE COLONIAL 

IM/FRPLC. tflnr, cat to U 

aSa'^Uf 

EXPANDED RANCH 


GREAT NECK ESTATES 

Moit temTjwtSB R cal. Cn trl 
m^rjyJtul^fcJ, tthns. Just 


| OtX HILLS SD AS: 

REDUCED OVa? $7,000 

dime 



_j ktetm. 5 

CHARMING COLONIAL 

— ^ „j mod i 

SHSZt BKWnt ' r 


iJBe^ra^tg^C 


sasas ■ a &rm- 


$92^00 

carll s. burr jr., inc. 
“GALLERY OF HOMES" 

DIXH1U3 S-D.NO.5l 

COL-WDACRE 

Ma telle Center Hall ColantK. 

Wooded Acre, Country Kite* 

Otolng ret. Den. 4 soactata 
Baths, bunt a 2 car 
Value! Only 562,950 


or Warner 

waaaase: 


Great Nedc Estates-Unloue! S99.S30 

4 BR RANCH+2 DENS 

Great Buy! TOPSALL5TW«6-38» 


Closed Today dgrin HU2-43M;: 


rJMR 


GARDEN CITY 
SS7SO 


Todw aiiiim >40^59:2412 


I crenaeuTet e throuatoL — " — -- — = * 


.■fflR+malds 

Tra 


553,500 


COACH 


su%ooo 


AGELESS BEAUTY 
Oflnvtttng Engl Ut Charm 
to this pradocs Tudm. 

targe brlgbtl I ring rm& 

. dm (ng rev ultra modern’ 
kltdiM, icramed terrace, 

4 bdrms. 3Y> btf& Recrm. 
BtPAKDED. RANCH | 


GT NK— Yoo Ren* cent A/C 4 bedr, 
dais, on Id ptavrm, 2 car 551.500.. 
OcofidSdt. Bremlev 516^BG103 


GREAT NECK 


GREAT 

DAY 

GU 


EAT NECK-HAPPY fc HEAL 

■ Y-CL OSED SAr .DOLLY fc | 

ITTERMAN 4*7-1177 


.THY HOUl 

MATTHEW 


212/895-2T57 


SM/42TPIOO 


DR HILLS D IX HILLS 

brand new colonial 
|, wM a * m * 

A Aating I «e heavily twted nj 

x l $g 0 J%ih£ J * 

Huntington Homes 


MOLLOY 


GREAT NECK -Baker HIIL 6 rm Co/., 

rtrl air, burgtr alarm, wh everyth I 


’NT 


tome oo 
a fctou 
TOM C/H, 


uzfRMuamj 


5WW-2BK 


BAY 

550 

East Norwich 
HORE 

/N 


I DIX HILLS S.D.5 

Vanderbilt Area-Wded Ac 

; 3 IsHu 

mnv ne „ 

.■at is a 


hdrm hfd eaway Sait. O/S gar- 1/3 k fenced area, 

Es'MSaiitss^® 


Dix Hilb4 Bdrm Colorua! 

aaaaayg^M 

Dix Hills SD5, 4 Bdrm Ranch 

°sxms< ^aasadg*-’”* 1 
* BaBaa efe _ 


GARDEN CITY PHOTO FILES 

OUR EXCLUSIVE 
TRY THIS FOR STARTSiS 

TRUE DUTCH COLONIAL 

STUTZMANN 

1 73 NASSAU 8LVD 5WWMM 


HAMPTON BAYS-RAM 
PASTURE 

PytreaefthSdLjBJt Rmc^tfeTaSti 

otto LR, DR, cst-to lut. Fla rm, hpi. 


R REPLACE, 


.dOLbrn^ 


prto! 

BRESUN * 51 6/lV 9-3338 

333 HEMP TPICE WEST HEMP 


\N FAMILY 

lw/tb oan den- 
ar an nr+sen 

mM** 


DIX Hltol 
central air, tot 
500. Owner 516 


WT 


VILLAGE 

98 Sewcffa Sheet SWW7 HO] 

GARDEN CTTY 

YOUNG COLONIAL 


HEMPSTD W-Cathedral 
Gardens 

, 2 ^ cart 


STnnfS ifartoe; wnA SS 

MB fcatoras. nr schb 578JM. 516 


HEMPSTEAD (Hilton Ave] 

5 BJL 1L.Ylr.Old pd. on Ira pJot w/sel 


Call 

Hemp wcalti "gdn* todor, hod 


Catti.gdn todor, twee ran. Me, 

tom**MMimtoteajme mho. 

[SJoveas Av 


1-6104 


S12S<00Q 

Y RANCH" 

tpic. 2 or gar. 

.LOW 


NORTH SHORE 

EWS 

caste 1 

iv Harbor, Lt*/ 
aonlftconfM/a- 

jHow* all on 5 

SMITH 

*5164210111 


i ( 516 I 667-4296 

EAST HAMPTON S73U»i 

WALK TO WATER 
""^^^^^pJlJNRLTY 

JWBJUatoSt. 5I6/324-232S I 

EAST tSUP WATERFRONT 

CALCALDE 

/a^^sssffin'ass’ vaaa,te 5 

dmn. <M qaMflls ffiwuMfc 

ftoWI 51 i/ 5 »T- 437 S 

EAST ME 

aistnn li, 

j lr hM schools. 4 l 

u ultra moocifHfi k ttflv forml (fin on, 
Jlv rm. oar,_5jeyrenptL Taxes only 

1516) IV 7-8S00 


Wilson Realty 


HEWIETT-E Rock-46drm 

jtI.« 

n.iSi 
S 

&56M6S3 


1717 1bSfcPt6-1SOorNVCTW54jlj»_ . n ajncrT uj 14 

CENTRAL SECTION } Trabtoms + O ' 

i JSBffiTU 

BemWIulty K 


snuqo 


«r,«nu 

516-374-6756 


IRWIN REALTY 


HEWLETT 


CEDARHU* 


“MOVE-IN SHAPE' 

_ '114 


Hcw l^5To»n* fc i ylC. ' 


HICKSVILLE $35,000 


rm, • 


awp* 1 


74S FRAN KLIN AVE 
GARDEN CITY 

TAPESTRY COLONIAL I ^ 

I ROWAN REALTY mi 122 


**»®SSfWE 


Hubbell-Klapper 


ene pea ce f ul 

fABSfc SF 


HTTtpn & 7lti SI. 


5M/34MV0Q 


I Th btb cm, 

1540s Princ 516 


VIGILANT 


: QAICfc RANCH 
^ut Uv rtn, torml do, 

isiaga-siitoaKHMo 


2239 mm 
state nony 


SMEMSrif'i'iSpJ K .z;:-™---"® SM^BSliSSUSU S 

ff5!£PJSffW! nd taxcs “Y TWO- Jw* | LONE OAK I toevoYthlng. pricedtojeli ....TSlSOO I blS 

steal rr 


HP 

aaqriai 
er? u 

al'&r 1 

SAMMIS 


SALONS* [ 


MAHHASSET MUNSEY PARK 

A MUSEUM MASTERPIECE 

Built when Mutsev Pa* t 
the Me ti uuuHim MusEom. T7nsi 


THOUSANDS 

JtltdKO. ■ 

SKALKY 868-5573! 

MERRICK BPATFOX BLVD 
jffiRRici 


1 215 E. Mein ST. Hunt 


516/549.5900 


Npt.Ofc. 


Samn*. Smith*. Brash 
433 Rial. Rd. 


516-757-4100 


| Eog garden tr/gazebnon acre ♦. 

SAMMIS 

„ Sammls. Smith*. Brush 
Cnenlaim Otce^ ltn Bro adway 516* 


show lace forever. Immediate occinwxv 

Estate request all otters ^ 

WALKER 


flceto Almnsr t Acre I .. 

landscaped Grounds Loaded. 

SEEING IS BELIEVING 

PINE HILL 

534 E. Jericho H*e 516/5479100 


HUNTINGTON 

VILLAGE TREAT* 


lOOPtandaneRd 


516 MA 73100 


HUNTINGTON/LLOYD HARBOR 

4 ACRES-POND & STREAM 

HKcffiJBiMrs 

dlo. Asking em.mn 

DANia GALE AGENCY 

516/692-6770 516/4Z7-6600 1 


HUNTING! 


SJ7.N1, 


bub Exclusive) 

MINI— ESTATE 

Find Showing like new home w/9 nra, 

— " amis, C/H. avtnr kit*. 

7ft bthSi den wtm wTw 

- gar on rtel'g heevftv 

Wott Whitman 516/271-1100 1 


Shgtaste attftti 1 

groomed yoimg community. 

picard realty ltd. 

HUNT/DIX HILLS SD«S) 

VANDERBILTAREA 
RANCH-CENTRAL AIR 

BsSiQnfEMtt 

den. Pole, 7 Vj btos, 2 car. Fto 
S65.900 

516/427-8888 


MAHHASSET 

NEW LISTING 

I WATERFRONT COLONY 

COUNTRY FARMHOUSE 
ACRE OF PRIVACY 
FAMILY RM. w;FPL4 ON 
__ 5 BD. RMS. 4^ BATHS 
CALL FOR APPOINTMENT 


FREE 


Inmt+mSdiinore. 

BENTLY 


BROCHURE & AREA TOUR 
CALL FOR APPOINTMENT 


HOUSE & HOME 


HUNT BAY ISP WATERFRONT I 

RESTORED VICTORIAN 


75 FLAM DOME RD. 


516365-8266 


HUNT/DIX HILLS STB, 990 1 

’FIRST SHOWING' 

tha/nTo FBfiri Ran* In mojdpr 


SPECIALS 


HANLEY & WRIGHT 


ME. 

MANARAS 


HUNTINGTON 

OPEN HOUSE 


dAmvCeixt. 

MaP 1 * 


HU NT. Me Ivl Treed Acre 

5 -^g” l gaafifiin ysesyn 

NORTHPORT| tots; rustic entry seto. RedoaS S4 &£. 

RNEST 870 W Jer 367-3222 


HUNTINGTON 


HD PM 

I OPEN HOUSE 


soutkOown I 


than new 4 h 




Estate' an pn .acre *. Custom bui 


gage, exod^ml andtiw 1 ^ 

WM. SCHEFFLER 

152 East Main it I2SA) 516/HA3-1T2D 


Road to Marie. 
Mini 


Plan. State Bride Nnrmwrly. 
mncSUs. BJ 6 tokCTqjr 
oar. w/apt. Just rmrasl . cSCrao 

rm, low Du. J7tfs 

MILLANG 

Z7PlandDmeRpad 51607430 4 j 

MANHASSET IL I _ 

SPACE PROBLEMS'' 

S LISTED— 7 rats, 2 MIe. rec rm. B I 
to everything .TbM.900 



MERRICK-Lovely 4 be*,oom, 2 bath 
home, Ifvlncrm, formal dining rm, den 
wilh (rale, our exciiisive seers 

CLAIRE SOBELMA 3-1200 

12 Aterrick Ave at Merrick R R Sla 


car Bjr. many extras. >51 APO tlrm. Owner 

MERRICK, Ideal family home on deao- 
eta st. LR, OR, kith, 4 BR, Ui wh. Fla 

S3f6ffs^‘wata. , w 

S63-402I by aoot only 

MERRICK HAPPY NEW YEAR 

^ c aOSEDFORHOL SmiwQ 

MERRICK NO. Custom centr hall srttt. 

me RH'CK NO.^bar 5PJ1M bth. family 
rm, gar. Med S40s. 

Owner 516-378-0936 

MERRICK WOODS. Custom designed, H 

's^jSSsxiStRgt 

a/c, alarm systems, 2 cor qwaoe. Lowed 
■/extras, can bo convt (or prop) use. 
Pflra^rg^d lor immed sale. saaoDQ. 

MILLER. PLACE WATERFRONT 

Sieetecular view ' of Ll. Sound from your 
glmed lly im w/frpL 2 Irg bdmis, den w/ 
•d bar,Esclu&h9ty.y]UtL 

MILLER PLAC&Walk to bea* 

Loe «ec hmw w/tobulou* gourmet kit* 
M BR, 3Vi Whs, Lftftnil. Wtmal DS s»L> 
riurn, semi fin twnLdarmtfed 2d tir W 2 
Car BBT, S66J00 5164736083 



»EW HYDE PK-Brldt M/D: huge. country 

Srawafrasr- 


O'ROURKE 

PRESENTS 

THREE TOP VALUES - 
SPACIOUS COLONIAL 

An older tame wtlh I rm taxes In ■ 
quiet reeldeniifll area with weatr-Tn- 
injiflrralBce. bla formal dmina rm, 

^agwr"* 

Owner Is Asking.,.,. ,*S 

MODERN SPLIT LEVEL 

K driving needed'! Walk to station, 
in ana , setw ets . from tots 4-becroan 

GEORGIAN HOME 

flax ! er «PpiWy..& charm ‘Bo 

a inrw tot wiih ten tree* near 

Owner Is asking 5BMM0 

[ OPEN SUNDAY 10 A.M. 

FOR DETAILS CALL • 

O'ROURKE 

516944-UOO ■< 

370 PORT WASHINGTON BLVD _ 
Memccr Port Wjshlngion R.E. BP^ 31 
Pori Wosningtan “ 

ON THE BORDER 

Adlotolna lush Sands Point, charming 
J wm ’hath bcautv with sunken Bv- ; 
Inarm fc hgic valued at SfrLSOO I 

CELEBRATE CENTENNIAL- 

ststonijw piriars on two story bbreti 
riarter olo Colonial duulex. Live rent 
tree, down 510.000 to 56 M 00 

A MINI HOTEL 

Would you believe 3 bdrm 2 -Mil I 
ranch house, plus studio art, pto*4 

SALEM CONTEWORARY 

Soabous entertaining areas Include ] 
wet bar to Iwmiv room. 3 tOffliv 
bdrms yet totally private. Dtfcrs^jr. | 

0gen7davs IOIo5at277MalnSt;' 



HUNTTKGTOH SCHL DI5T5, Wheafley 
HtS 

MUST SACR1RCE $51 ,990 

«tot S 16643-7746; wtutrrs 


Beautltol, Homes to the Huntington Area. 
■YaiPd like Service WlmrartiraraM 


HUWTINGTON-II You’d .LBie To 

fitt] 

vriit wKKrYi 

LONE OAK 

E. Main St- Hunt jjjgggj 


ducedtoS71.nOL51i 

.1 

■ | 

- fwnrm/tpl, huge nHectub tomt/heatf yret 

: feaaSsii^ ,u, ?5 


Slt/271-560 


Fumlihed Rental-Estate 

4 Bedroom*, s'toSta. 51600 

O'CONNELL 

249 Ptandnne Rd. 516/627-2450 


IMS®* 


A S mile; Jys l 

RfiAilrRniTitSf 

You Call 


MfiKsbdjmFa^SISu^n 1 
rm, mn kf*. Htojrgir oar, many ex- 
tras. soil D« 6,50,700 

ORCA. 516 757-7200 

T016Rte2SA. Northport 


HUNTINGTON EAST NORTHPORT 

'SEPTEMBER SPECIAL' _ 

<M featuring 4 bdrms. LR, DR, 
_ n/tplc, tin bsmt,!4 acre-f . 2 na- . 
2 car gar UmsSVi I 

Country Squire 516/864-4500 1 


HUNTINGTON-NORTHPORT 


HUNTINGTON LLOYD NECK | 

ARCHITECTS OWN DESIGN 

wg^MffBSia l 

Huntington — Desirable Sec 

SD 6. Claswc brick 2 story home, 2-or ] 

• 4b ^ 2 eS5ifif^wg: 

eled rec rm w/3raMn, 
r 516 649-9470. 582,90b 


Manhasset 


Our Exclusive 


New Hyde Park 8t Vic 

$69,990 

‘ old. Ranch. 
_ -ln-X.. 
grads. 

LAKEVILLE EST $59,990 

Palatial wldeitoe brick & fMdslone. 4 

ia^4»raJP5ki33: 

John H. Mullins 

i®5iW DEAVE - .!.£!£« 


Uhl Ran* on 
Jng room wlih 
fireplace, dtofng 


be an wd celling ana tired. ace, uming 

room, 2 bedrooms, lTfetoathspiia sun- 

ny basement with VS baht, 2 car oa- 
raoe and pteyroom . leading to lowrr 
pj u to. Many gosslbi lilies For eyan- 


BLAICH 


WffiSSKS 9S@kABA| Huntington-Attrac Split 

Sitrt state. »rm rallt. *| gar. ,« l»n sjtf ■ |so 6,7m«.3bdrp«5. 1i6 tote . famr m, to r 

w/tplc bijm, land*aw In-grnd pool, 
polio, j 


[ntenen ce 
togrnd_PL- 

msr * Sirfr1 




MANHASSET5 INDEPENDENT OFFICE 
321 Ptepdeme Rood awwan 
MANHASSET 7 veer old Colonial 

IDEAL LAYOUT 

the 




mtgj *47 


SKTUSifflt 

‘ sy 

•M 


a bdr TJt .tot 


kh 

5ff 


on oeo llr. Lg C/H. DR, eot-to 
L All this wtth ]r poot. 


HUNT^CS-Harbort-J 

S HSc 




tuition. In &J>. tlh* 0 ' 1 R 

SenniTa towhr 
s. wtm .room * 

._ j 5. to mteae tec* 

Ave. A2SA. Huntington. HA. 3-6172 


-. Todw'llaratof- Large Jo* 

ssa’sfjyisssSi" 

2 hath* on Sid Mr. Cenl A/ 
rm, patio, ortra!! 




room te amed 


lichen, lr 
JUR be 

C. 2 car garage. Rec ret, pa..„ 

Very Hi lump m*o A mod lines. See tt 
"Ungoofy sUUOOl 


now. Asking oofy 61 

WILE, Inc. 


Jent cpnd hf on a hDI O'loqta 


Sld/MA 7-4455 


<5 Ptaodorne Rd. 


YOUNGS AND GARNER 

172 Mato St S16/HA 7-^7 1 


Sines. 



i Ran*. 3 bdrms, 

■wrao e. Low 

51»4B6a33 


dais houses & apt*. 

HAZEL SMYTHE 

GARDEN OTY-Eost Section 


T^SWONTUSm^ 

Custom raised Rmh- B rm. 3-4BR-S, 2 



HUimMGTMi. SD I 

tam. 6 [ ovir 6 lritti 4 : 


r Brine op- 


ila!5bdnra 

r 4 bdrms 


l HAILE 516746-7: 

245 Htitslde Are. WUU»ton Park 


< car garage, w/ 

""’Vffiife 


' WILLISTON-tge 4 BR Co),2yRrtfc, 
'^s. Conti air. ‘ ‘ 

I w/Hdras. 


i uths. rami alr.^e^gi/^pMto^^ I dnentrasT 


6PM. lU day 

STUDWELL REALTY 
«£? 

aet 


« BfiUff 

ml soling wS 3.bedroore_ and boh, I 




Atr. Gar. Loir tnes 5900. U7M. site 
368-8288. 






HIRJT-NgW-WA 




TINGTON/ELWOOM BR, farn rm, 

1 acre wded, asking 


GARDEN CITY. 


+ SrmL 

vac. 516 746-5517 


lam; 7 1 

1 1/3 1 


'RPORT OWNEf, 

JES. Must saotj 
le In im area. 2W 
coroar-WATER^Vj^ 

5W26V8900 Evw 516^574)995 


i^sjourai 

fc Huntington MalL Ex- 1 


MNHST REAL EST BD EXCLUSI VE 

JUST LISTED 
BR!CK COLON I Al 
STRATHMORE VT " 
tin. 


iBTiSPWlrad 

Beartltul C e nterpart 


- ajssmsi 

Hnor. SUW Tjg | 

MBvrt<aBe‘‘feiclnsIw ML~ 


auKnlnp New &gia«ler w/teads tflh? B 1617110 nfl 
— — — (in bsmt* a- 

M*4*s 


Charming New En^andgr m/\ 


mJW*"* 


isasaBB M Caajs wmszm 


£T New home, SMO tax rebate 

9J100 Crew 516-MA7-540D 


don't 

ot bdrms. 
Riper 516- , 


a^aSTlS&y 2 ' 

Print only 516 SiHWW 


JERICHO 

MODELS OPEN 


4- S rms. 7b bits., 
suiuer*. Mod 


ox-3 .bdrms>2vy 


NEW HYDE PK -Custom Bleb's Own 
Home, Wide Line Brk Cane, 2te .ovenzd 
oarage. 4 tanra 2 ige Whs. ivmol dining 
rm. eaf-ln- kllch. exclont loatn. many «- 
traS99,f00 (516)775-4151 

NEWHYDE, PARK- Brk Jtodvj 1 bdnra 2 
Whs Hrtwml 80*100 gur HI S60V 
GRAHAM 51&/352-660D 

NORTH VACLEY CTREAM-New hlgn 

ran*, efciRoss fflgther/dauoMer, excel 
vmcMrt locarttei, wo^edarca, 
mW HOT. Call days 576-4670739 or 
wkends and after 6PM 516-77S-W17. Buil- 
der. 


NPT E-Sooftess 3 bdrm Ranctofln temt, 

SIckISagenc? iiXr7sr-SSS» 

SgSMaaiw 

PgrmwnaWe tS&LTO ZE- 
atEYER RLTY (516>5B9-5IS3 

NEWMAM-LUTIYY 516536-8908 

DCEanside-To All Our Friends & Custo- 

Baldwin 452 Merrick Rd 56516 678 4980 

OCEAN5IDE-7 room HI Ran*. 2 baths. 

150 n -* e0 - Property, excellent 

DORIS WA^RElJ^^'^'^krtMUWA-; 

DOCP .BriTer Thou New Cul 842,990 

3 WWSSBS!»* D " 1 ' 8 S?' 

KLE INMAN 2786 Lo Bcti Rd RO 6-3388 


OLD WESTBURY-Wheatiey 
Schls 

nmgf %jmpi l£5"Sl, “ m wfc 

Lg, jMUnoi, trnte, s i car gar. cent 

tfe UffAhwgtor alarms, 2 acres sia,- 



mTER BAY-4 BR COI. nr Sthl/PR. 2V; 

» 5 ^ f wi rm, torml dr. llvrmrirol, full 




OWIMT 


16-266-2554 


eriras 


MAN H ASSET -2 BEDRM CAPE 

gar oar. ShlfltL Nr RRShrfc Shopg 639/ 

500. Owner S16627TG1D-N0 Sun 


r sCT<^ 


MOTHER/DAUGHTR 




Col In rtnecond^l 
jb gem art, all i 
l tor oral or exec 
M0. Owner 516 1 

toritlJb^ 

REALTY 

5I6.T2T-84C0 
iiownl-Woedtepd 
•t*. Perfect Fw 

it ttac, LR. DR. FARMIHGvq 
ll nwWn tflHr 


•E4ra: SeowH e^bricki I 

■ ran* sol on Un so tt. 




Hi 


( __rE DE 

1 7m, WHC6D AT CLOSE TP 6 DIGITS 


Elmont Colonial-Good Value 

j Mb Mir 

. 01k«T 





Svmsel tv 

i/m-ibU 


GOLDBERG BR05 


T-j Hit J175JOp| 


JOBS IN 
THE MEDICAL 
FIELD 


To place youx advertising, write or call 
Nick Preziotti, Tie New York Times, 
Emp lnyment Advertising Department, 
229 West 43d Street New York, N. Y. 
10036; Tel. (212) S56-7226. 


IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY 

l lull ’4 acre sites In the Heart of Nassau 
Kcludeg WesTBIraiwtnL Only 10 re- 
malnlr«. Oioose torn 2 beautltol models. 

Birch wood Splonch $69,990 
Nassau Colonial $67,990 
Galaxy Hi-Raneh $64^00 

ssmsisssr 1 

‘amJiepest Itoht to loos 


HARBOUR GREEN 
.....y-torm DR. mao Jilt 


CHOICE REALTY 


About V/1Q« 

JERICHO ESTATES 

(516} 935-9775/822-1025 


Nass Shrs 


516-826-2121 
VALUE EXPERTS 

Wlrfnit $55,990 

— IVbBafhCW. 

STEUA REALTY 


PLAINEDGE 

BRKRNCH 75x100 

^ssiafefciwte!® 

■■ . wwopi 

iManyortras - *eredal fc 

(PrlnclPBlsonly. 669,990 

CONVENSHOPNG&URR 

(516)796-3286 




JERICHO -Showolace W^SAPEQUA3 bdrm Ranch 

JtWV - nV onowpiace |U ate. dlnrm, «t InklLflu bsmt or, D^fiSIl^SntSRtaJSS 
Bri* * flanstene, B.ims. 3 wm, rnalifs W eatras. Princtoah. jfe- A. FRANCES hYaT^ 


Brick * flagstend 
rm.Datlo, sundtopi 
Mellywakftefi. ster 
immed ocamcY, 5161 


sprinklrs, brk ubrbpaie.' 


Jfw's largest moan The Ririera-5 BR 3 1 


I JERICHOCape Cud. 3 BR, den, comer 1 

Wseto01,, * e ' 


SspOA weft 

tlrementv i 


tPAGE. A Quality 
ige tognidBou 


MA55APEGUA BEAUTIFUL 

NEW HIGH RANCH 

Ideal Mrther/Ddrter/rtiaR 516485099 1 
IF 6 YRCOL.4 


^WY^bw^riiawPTcSnruT 




FRAN 




PAGE-7 rm 
uVdKac, ow 
fsj 16-034)648 


(516)883-6300 - 

Member Port wash Real Estate Bd. 

$58,500 [ 

BEACH/MOORING RTS 

ll$64,ODO{ 

ffl^L,^S^ D K ,N C ® 
KEV^RAg^'CH^l 

1ST SHOWING $76,500) 

jgpwm 

Sandspoif 

iKlffSEvV- w - l! - E ' M ‘ ,iD! g^S f | 

516-883-8757 


PT WASHINGTON 


SANDS POINT 



EXPANDED. RANCH-4 
Baths, Good Area 




COLONIAL-Large Rambling Older CoF, j 

rtiST&iSs 6 "! “ .TSj^o 


51 6/767-3870; 

7 DAY5 BETWEEN 9 AM & 9 PM-‘> 



413 Main Sf., Pt. Washfngfen 

PORT WASHINGTON £EAl$jk 

BRAND NEW USTINGS;' 

Colonial In wolerfronl colony wtm natcr- 
vlew living non w/ttieglace. amtiQ 

Rb'»Mnussa 

mold's room. Every aggoimmenL 

B72S4XW 

Colonial In woodsy orlvate settlng-Estatas 
yw: 3.b«PWnL,r > .t .barbs, large iivin- 
gyjrr^tojecloce, den , lamilv no. 

Crtnnlal wlllt large orhiBte gtof In 
area. 4 bertoems. unique charm n 
crannies. 


HE6EMAN : 


1B5MA1NST. 516-767-3124 

Member Port Washington R.E- BoarU 
PORT WASHINGTON 

HIGH LIVING 

rAJess&naru 

Youtrj area. Try 574^00 

MacCRATE 

516-767-3320 

939 Pori Weshlnoton Bcmteuerd 



PtWoshington-3 Bdrm Cape 
Stores*!? plrtlwit fi'Ssdi IfcOTJaD 1 ^ 

Princ Only Eves<wfcends r 


£168*32898 


PT WASH-New Salem Col 3 to#- lit Wh, 

iu S ^ r . 5 S s1 6*S- n ^ W Mi > 



Cant’d on Following Pa&i 










— — THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6. 1975 


Dayan Captures Lecture Audience ! Shipping/Mails > 

Incoming 


^flattened From First Page, 
Second Section 

jaid fee sought college a>i- 
•diences because “I like fcht 
" students and 1 am usually 
®uprised at how much tiwv 
..-know about the issue." 

- t ‘“They knew about the Gidi 
;- : 4nd Mttia Passes before they 
...became fashionable." he said. 
^ Blow many Israelis would. 

the name of wadis 
■ 'tdry river beds] in Vietnam?" 

He is usually accompanied 
.’by a wave of security offi- 
. dais, some Israeli and some 
^‘American. “I don’t ask for 
it,” "Mr. Dayan insisted, "but 

-my government says I am 

an attractive target. The lo- 
cal police also help and in 
...some small towns it becomes 
^ ^uite a holiday with the si- 
rens and walie- talkies and 
so forth." 

The israeli, who said that 
.taxes, commissions and his 


one," Mr. Dayan said, ‘-when 
I left while the Knesset (par- 
liament) was still in session. 
Now I am awsy out?,' when 
they are.” 

Mr. Dayan began lecturing 
after he had left government 
service. *T also signed a 
$460,000 contract for a book 
the day I left the govern- 
ment," be said. "It wiH be 
a memoir, but it will span 
the bistory of Israel and its 
wars because that has also 
been my life,” he said. 

Mr. Dayan recalled an in- 


put pressure on your friend 
because you can't put it on 
your enemy.” 

Repeatedly, he said, Amer- 
ican Presidents have sought 
"to play the role of- police- 
men in the Middle East but 
at the same time avoid direct 
involvement." He recalled a 
message from the late Pres- 
ident Johnson that came to 
the Israeli Cabinet on June 
4. 1967. 

"The late President Nasser 
had blocked the Straits of 
Than, as he had a decade 


tident that trill probably ap-. earlier," Mr. Dayan recalled, 
pear m the book as he sought “ President Johnson’s mes- 


last night to describe to a 
largely sympathetic audience 
at Fairfield what he felt was 
a flaw in American pokey 
in the Middle East. 

“On the one band, you 
don’t want to get hi. a war 
in the Middle East and an 
the other hand you want 
to have things ouret," he 
said. $ “The result is, you 


expenses reduce his fees by • = -- — - 

BOYS’ HUB PLANNED J**T*.*.?*S*. t * ■ i 

of money especially in Israe- __ . °E } « sby acd 1113 colleagues r - i 

li pounds"-Sakei only ft OUTSIDE OF ST. LOUIS bop* to have their road, water . - w j 

Few demands of Mr. Walker, and sewer system, the nucleus PreSSUfe Or RUDOing On oMil 

who has arranged two pcevi- ST. LOUIS (AP)— A -Boys' of a staff, the first of many Afe Called Causes Of A C fie! 

gg tours last spring and ^ being built an a 400- buildings and the first six boys. — 

«. ■ acre farm some 63 miles south Ultimately, according to the PHILADELPHIA (UPI) — Pres-j 

‘First-Class HotMs st_ Louis. present plans, there will be sure or rubbing by turtleneck j 

■ *T insist that I not speak Welcomed to the ranch will room for 192 boys with their sweaters, football helmets and; 


sage was this: He was sorry 
but he could not, repeat, no 
commit American forces to 
break the blockade^ but at 
the same time he warned 
us -that the country' that 
shoots first will be branded 
the aggressor." 

■■We thought about that,” 
Mr. Dayan said, ‘‘and tie 
next day we attacked-" 


TODAY, SEPT. 6 

AUEP.lKArfIS, Co*. Left awm-ieu, SeU 1 
4; A* S .IK. * W. SSfti Sf. 

DORIC, How*. LBfr fcmsCi. Se*. *1 , 

trt : aju. st vr. san si. 

OCEANIC, Hm latt Tfcssa:.'. S«r. < 

i<x s »ji it w. a5A a. 

ROTTERDAM, Ho:;.-A.ner. Lilt 
Seat. *, due Z AJA. *1 U. S5tti J. 
STATEXDAM, Htfl.-Amw. Ln+ 3*-Tiuia 
Sol. Owe 8 A.M. « Y.’. 5 5ft Sr- 

Outgoing 

SAILING TODAY 
Tn&JWnt} c 

AFRICAN DAWN rR*rr%i:j, Dator Sef- 
14, Monroes 17. AbWbn 21. Teffli 3. 
Lome 27 snd AtaMI Od. 1j alia 
joralman St., Bimovn. 

ELBE EXPRESS tMaaeJJMg. KkO> 
hero Swt. IS; alls frotn Ell&tethr H.I. 

Sooffi AJftrfta, West Indies. Etc. J 
AHEdso tPKUSAI. Sin Jran Setf. 11.* j 
ijlts trsm ElTabetti, NJ. 

DORIC (Hone), Berenrfa, Seat. 8; =a<£ I 

4 ML from V/, SSBi S. _ - 

OCEANIC (Horae), Nsswe. Sect. 9; snL 
4 P..VL frwn K. SSft St. 

STATEMDAM JHoSj.-A-w.). Bernuii. 
5 e7f. a; Mifa * P-«. frera W. S»fi .s. 

SAILING TOMORROW 

Tfans-Mtantlc . 

DART EUROPE (Dsrtl. Anlifa SjBf.Sf- 
■SadtfcsmwDn IP, Cottrtwat 9 •£« 
Otfi-’in 21 1 salts from aoeoi f.<arir-t • 
Terminal, HJ. 

■ LASH ESPANA tPmde/rtall. *■*« 
C-i. 2: sails trom tto-fteasaai Tenant*, 
BitoWya. ! 


TONIGHT— First of three one-hour telecasts 



Johnny Cash and June Csner 


Qrff Banov. 5 Geo. 


J 


: Few demands of Mr. Walker, 
who has arranged two prei i- 


‘First-Class Hotels' 

**I insist that I not speak 







^SST^bSSL 1 C h?. !b® the deserted, neglected and own school, gymnasium, swim- bras can cause acne, say re- 1 
hrrng my _wi_fe. Rachel be- i _„ r . _ ' “ irrf,P« at the University of 


oauis Idon’t like to be alone i unwanted as well as minor of- ming pool and nondenoraina-i searchers at the University of 

■*nd that I stay in first-class fenders. tional chapel. tents at’ 

boteb he said. He also ap- T h e prime mover of the proj- AIr oclesbv esamates theLv 0 ^!? 11 ^ ai 

nears at Israeli fund-raisme s. j- «. l ilr * °S lest> V e^unates toe i the medical school here. Dr. AI- 


rHJLCja. DC Miu, «5 v Tne prime mover or ine proj- 1 ■»,_ /vip<bv Krimatfs *h*c. ' , . , ‘ „ .. 

pears at Israeli fund-raising ^ ia r 1 ™., Oelesbv who savs 08 y e * amates [the medical school here. Dr. AI- ( 

■Stherin«s, but accepts no , . *? tl ^_ cost of the project at more i bert Kligman and Otto H. Mils i 

fcesthSr ras m€St m les l fortu “ t£ th-n *400 000 He hones to tot nervous nibbing of! 

Historative lecture tours youths stems from the two fos- “f* tQ the skin or the chafing of tight 

have been criticized in Israel, tor children once taken care of ra '' s « of tc through dona- ! appare ] caused eruptions or the. 
‘ “It was because of the first Sfcy his parents. tions. 'skin ailment. 

*1 

Weather Reports and Forecast f 



EIM Vfalsrs 


Summary 

*•— Rain' accompanied by cool 
temperatures is forecast to- 
day for Metropolitan New 
York and most of the North- 
east. Scattered showers and 
thundershowers are expected 
from the North Atlantic 
States, through Appalachians 
and lower Mississippi Valley 
to the Gulf States. Warm 
temperatures will be found 
from the Middle and South 
Atlanta States to the eastern 
Gulf States, while mild tem- 
peratures are expected else- 
where. There will be a chanc* 
of shower* in the western 
lake region, as well as in 
higher elevations of southern 
Nevada. Arizona. New Mexico 
and eastern California. 

Sunny, skies and pleasant 
temperature occurred yester- 
day in the Metropolitan New 
^rk area and the Northeast. 
Mostly sunny skies with 

. . _ . , _ ■ - * ■ ■ ■ *\ r . 

temperatures prevailed from 
the North and Middle Atlan- 
tic States to -the Appala- 
chians. Thundershowers and 
occasional thunderstorms 
covered most of ibe lake 
region, portions of the Ohio 
Valley, the middle Mississippi 
Valley and the Gulf States. 
Temperatures in the South- 
west continued to be above 
normal, while cool temper- 
atures mnained in the Pacific 
Northwest. Low clouds and 
patches of fog were reported 
along the southern Cali- 
fornia Coast. 


rf; Forecast 

fcicnal V.’eitrtf Esr.'.c* tee; 11 f^.L'i 

t^rioffiil VSatW Snr. la (is c.‘ S f.lt l 
BEW YORK onr— Raio iw-v. «Khs la- 
:;1c»j Web icuUv »Po.r.i 7C. toff t"r'prt 
Nptfa Itfj# 60's. lYinis Carn«e.T !o isirft 

■8-tB 29 Oltei.wi h:»r !e*v crafts 

t> fo m.Tlnid 10 *5 15 wild ift 

tcnlflW. P&rn” iw.r-,- fils 
aa aw ai . Prsp^Iiaiton snAalilt/, to 
«r not trfi? 1152 4# C9T fflr.t t02.gg. 
NMTNESB NEW JERSEY MO IjW- 
LAND AKD WEVTCH ESTER CflUNnEJ- 
iuln t#ar» endUro larJahl; huft Wav 
Ufj-vi 70. low fcahM In Ihowwj’ 50s 
!o lew £0s. Mlly Sircir usd mlli l> 
;rorrovf. 

LONG ISLAND AND LONG. ISLAND 
SOUND— Min nst/i ending tenrahr; 
ta»y Brarnd TtL low wilsw Mr it* Im> 
ii' a. Wines souibert ul-Di 10 ta .8 
-JU3 an Iwjt tad*-- drawaln? lo «tt: 
ta nsrttVMEt 10 to 15 mlln an hrar K- 
:de». Party saiw mlM foewm.-. 
visibility an Am 5ound 1 ts 3 nMes in 
itn tooirr Inenoslns to S miles looljhr. 
SOUTHERN NEW JERSEY. AND EAST- 
ERN PENKSYLVAHIA— Clc^r bh y jilft 
a. few Remn or ISAisdnean. hish 
ia fee «J 2 -nrc; dearin s tocWK loir ;.» 
I.* u»w 5Ts to lew 6Vi. Party sonny 
and warm tom arrow 

CORNECrt CUT. RHOOe ISLAND AND 
MASSACHUSETTS— F.jtn li-elr toca-; and 
-.ITieMi hint; In tt* lt*j NTs. low K 
Ifo UMor Si's. Beaming party dJuir 

TtelWOtf, 

IUTERION EASTERN NEW YORK AND 
VERMONT— Clse*/ fcoav ullfi m'lt Wir- 
trt Wflh In tt» KI2-60 3. cxrtii^.iSU; 
uMvdines lanlctit 'vlfS o etunen of 
rAowefS, low In tt.s mlJ-SCn. Canrftr- 
aa-'e emlitioi ro.iwrrcw vift a din* 
« steftera. 


Rguiw besKie Stairtr. 
Ctfde OtErnDeranjre. 

Cold frent a bounda^r 
behA-een cold air end 
wanner air. under *.-Nch 
r 0* ihecrfdarsir pusfte: lfte 
■wedge, usuany samh and 



■ T t- Ay ml 

■a. WSxm 

Bob and Jane Henley 

Cliff Barrows and the 4000 voice choir; Geo. Beverly Shea. Gospel 
singer; Tecfd Smith, pianist: John innes. organist; Special guests 
appearing on the series: Johnny Cash and June Carter: Ethel 
Waters: Myrtle Hall: Bob and Jane Henley. 


Sun., Sept 7, 9:38 P.M. 


SUBJECT 


Sal, Sept 6, 10:00 ?& Sun. Sept 7, 9:30 P.M. Mon., Sept 8, 9:00 P.M. 

SUBJECT SUBJECT SUBJECT l&'k 

The Second Coming" "Knocking at the Door" ‘Things God Canm m;. 

WOR-TV CH9 % 

BEAD BILLY GRAHAM'S MEW BOOK "ANGELS: GOG'S SECRET AGENTS"- - - NOW AVAILABLE AT BOOXSTOB f 




Don’t miss ^Londu Eagles’.’ A dedication to the 
World IVar H black comb 
country with distinction. 


NE.Y HAAIPSNiRE AND MAIMS— Pair. 
'ii^ly t=<TiV. Ms.*! in tte nle-W’s, nln 
■ '■Hr nsrrr. irjJ e>st skHc-is tcnlehf erth 
* di*r.w ci s^ArefS srJftwea mttcH. 

- In ft* Party aiutv sovtl) 

secHon hmsTTuvi and mcstly els j*/ v?ift 
a cfwiu* of s^Mtri rerti secMor. 
V/E5TtRN SEW YORK — iric.-.n-; ah; 
: -.jrdsnncm:; endlm wrtv Tads; - . aJ - 
lri*J cl^.rl'T ■ hlfh ;0 <3 

7S: OiiTIV iouf ■/ tar.aHt, lew -Mr fo. 
Party Ljrr./ and :::1 leniT;^, 


Extended Forecast 


(■‘Aandjv throuon Wcdneday) 
METROPOUTAN NEW YORK, LONG 
ISLAND AND NORTHERN NEW JERSEY 
—Fair ATondav j dionco of sJ<4gn«a Tok- 
■Ikr; fair '.VVfnosdsv. Dayilm* hlalis r-'ill 
■vptmo in tno low to mii-To's, vrtillc 
o nnrioM Iw5 win avrraso In I'm op- 
oer 50's to law 60s. 


Yesterday's Xftcardi 


SjsJkti DavIJsfct Tlir* 



It-np. THI 

VJir.da 

14'. 

It A.U.. 

“ 1 

53 

« 

t IW * 

2 D.I0 

Ni-.j.... 

.. 75 

*7 

70 

l.'.V 6 

iC.W 

1 PAL. 

. 77 

j; 

7; 

N 5 

30- Cl 

•: PM.. 

. 7! 

*1 

u 

NW 4 

‘jO.K 

7 PA.. 

. 76 

4S 

:■} 

S.Y 6 

50-W 

i p.r.L. 

. c3 

71 

72 

N * 

33 . 0 a 

?PXL. 

. 73 

3S 

71 

?4<V 6 

3101 

h P-’.L. 

. :s 

C7 

69 

:;tj i 

30.01 

7 P..V 1 .. 

0 . *3 

■« 

OO 

nu 6 

33.01 

8 P./.L. 

.. 6B 

4? 

oS 

sv; 4 

30.0 



Ter* Horn. 

V.lirts 

Bar 

1AM 

64 

‘J 

i3 


<5 

31CH 

.-KM... 

tj 

13 

6- 

N 

i 

31 06 

3 AJVL. 

. 62 

75 

61 

tra 

3 

20.07 

4 A.M.. 

0 

to 

60 

r.v: 

4 

31« 

5 A M.. 

. M 

75 

<0 

n 

4 

=307 

S AJA. 

. 

:s 

I? 

r: 

J 

30 £9 

- 4-7.1. 

. M 

O 

>’? 

6 

i 

33.' 9 

1 

. 60 

75 

5* 

nii 

5 

33.1t 


. f.' 


ri 

‘.C’ 


31V. 

'J A.B. 

. 67 

63 

4/ 

tic 

!» 

33.11 


TemperAtore Date 

( If -ftrjr strtod onded 7 PJILJ 
Lsuest, 60 Of *30 AJA. 

Hlsbesr, 30ar3:45 PJ£. 

Mud, TO. • 

NoraJ cn this date. 71. 

Dtwwwtresn nereui,— 1 . 

Depurfuro mis nosh, -C<. 

Dmrturo fills yaw, +136. 

Lowest fins Note last year. 57. 

Hiswst Ms turn las? year. 67. 

Main ttlsdtfe Us yeor i 62. 

L rarest bki this dole, 57 In >5o3. 
KlsbeWmeu this fete, C4 b> 1961. 
Lsacstemoeniiyn Nils 6efe> 51 In 1K3. 
{HAVest wnaefiftj* ffris date, » f.i Ipdl. 
Hlsnea Tenpenfiere-Huoilcfiy Index »«- 
rrtar. 72. 

“The TecisKaftre-H.TaiCly index de- 
serves. flsiaorbaliy, hsowr. dlscea^ 
tsr? res-lifia train Jemtmfim end 
noKiir*. It U cs.T«.1cd by adding the 
dry erd ssf bub remnmmre nedlnrs, 
ftvfiiohrins ho am by ft4 aao eaim 
li avaacr rStesates iriTcate about 10 
w cm? or the oooolaea are uraaforf- 
*1*0 be?Mi P* Index ;wa 70. oiva- 
nun tetf i.ier •» pjjsa >1. end a'mesr 
all a? SO cr eio-.y. 


PreeqiitetUm Dftte 

, USWwcr oerfod ended 7 PJM.i 
Trfllva hoots ended 7 AJUL .0. 
TA-ehre hoars ended 7 P.M., .0. 

Tsfil this month to dale, trace 
Total diva January 1, 40.73. 

Nofirif ttilS monfii 3.27. 

Dayi precJoDatfin this dale 3) 

dm 1869. 

Least amount fids month .71 In »S4. 
Creates* amount this month 16.85 in 1883. 

Sun and Moon 

(So soiled by the Hayden Planetarium) 
Thu sun rises today at 6:26 AJA.; sets 
a! 7:» PAL; end will rise loreorrnw 
at 6:27 AJA. 

Tne mum rtnss today et r.2S KM.; 
sofa at 7J5 P JA-; an« will rte tcroofv 
rear at 8u* AJA. 



iTHE ANNUAL REPORT 

Men l.r iti :lirV yoir 
• 'J sv.THJble al i:, pr . 
cretin* dj.l'is roTvla. 
any dtlttn yn-> routs' ’ • 
ait;* th< d.'.t« of tins - 
ui *t r.-c Few t 
.'73 3rJ l it., f.>.y YaH 


^•T- V*' 







Abroad 


Aoseroe . 

A AJMruu 
Aaicara . . 
Mfsn .... 
Ajumot, ... 
•VMM .... 

mrt.ia.Td ... 

Ifartln 

Beint 

A.'tmina.'ucu . 

Eon.1 ....... 

Erases .... 

lttenmi Ains 

Cairo 

c*s^i*rts . 
Cmentaces . 


Lc.u : me I or. n. i 

1 PAL i* 

. ... 1 PM 66 
.... .TM 8T 
.. BM 79 
.. 8 *« ;» 
.... 'PTA S3 
. . . SA 

.. ? P« «S 
.. I P/A 34 

.... i p:a 6 * 

. . . I WA 66 
... I PM Ad 

3 AM 57 

L'BM J3 

. ... Nson 75 
. . . TPS'. 63 


Dbj!u'. 

Cent.* ■ 
Ki-1 Kwi 
lt.r.d .. 
U:2o: 
lirza- . . 
VuCri: 

.Vj'ra . . 
.Manila ... 
Montevideo 
..... 

K*t0 DcHu 

Nice 

CJo 

Paris 

JWu'fS .• . 


Lora' Tin* Te.Ti*. 
. . J PM. 61 
. : p:a T2 
8 PAX K 
. . 7N\ &7 

. Nocr .9 
. . 1 PM 66 
.... I PM *9 

' PM 82 

. . * PAL 77 

9A.M. 61 

3 PJA. 75 

5 P.M. 82 

IPA 73 

I P-M. S 

... . 1 PJIL 61 
SP.NL iS 


Z:a it wa.lt. 
Rrraa . .. 

5 . .. 
5r*:l .... 
voifa — 

' StecLholm 
S-tfli* - 
Tito*; ... 
Twsran 

f AVI'.* . 


'f.-.wta .... 
tta read ... 
LrUtno 2 PJ 
t*heurn 


Auru’Lo ... 


Uial T-aeTetfo. Coocrtiw 
n ... 9 A^U. 72 Car 
. } PJ4. 79 Oar 

. S PJK n Oovdy 

. . 9 PAL 77 O w 

7 P JX 77 Oear 

. . J fiJA. 65 Pt. dcV. 

. .10 OJL. S2 Pt. dd. 

... . 8 P.U. 81 Mar# 

... 3PJX 91 Qear 

2 PJX 88 Clear 

9 PJ.L 1 i Ttfrmj. 

-.•.... 1 PAL 90 Clear 

1 P.W. « C'caflY 

.-■■ ■■ 1 PM. 72 Da; 

.*. . fjiest tsmoerarvres fit Usf 
eSsd, Notet te^oon.tQr-3 
w 244)au’ rerfed. 

lew Meh ciaditian 
77 86 Pt. clCT. 


Manets 

New Ycrt: Cty 
(ToRomw. E. D. T.) 
yenu^-rtic, 5:21 A.M.; sets S:59 PJt. 
ftare-rtses 11:16 PAL;-sWs 2:0* P.LL 
JupMar — ftsos t: J? PM.i ia!5 P.i4 AAL 
Sahjrn-rtseo 2:38 AM.; sets 5:15 P.M. 

Planets rise In lt» Eifi and ret In tl.a 
vtejt. rtaefticM Ihftr hloheif oolnt on Ihs 
i.jrth-Muth mendlara midway betureo 
Itelr times of rislna and sethr.T. 


Eareaooi . 
derrajaa . . 
Bcsva ... 
Cdiacan ... 
C-uadalalara 
Hanna .. 
King-Jo.) .. 
Maatian ... 
Merida ... 
/.UxiaCiiy 
Aftentarrey . 
San Jan . . 
St.Kltb ... 
TrsudsaJw 
Trinidad ... 
Vera Cnc . 


A Special Presentation of WABOT\/ 


Tonight at 10:00 ^ 


Commercial Neticn 


SHIP YOt 

TO CALI?„ FLA., ALL 
UC ICC OFFICES IN 1 

AAACON AUTO ; 

£2i2) 3S4-7777 N.Y.C.: 

(2DI1 420.113b NE.V JES 
<:>?] 793^300 QUEEN! 
15161 WM-311 1 LI HEMI 
1914) 761-700!, WESTCF 


SHIP YOUR CAR 
Overseas $10,000 
i.c.c. gas paid : 

DRIVER'S EXCHANGE 
450 7Hl AVE N.Y, 


WORLD WIDE INVESnC 

J oan xlve aacnalir. 
I may have imrtd Bride, if 
| L indry, 43r^ Hyde St., 

I cisco, CA 94109. 


DRIVE MY EMPTY. ■« f 
COLORADO. EXCHANGE . 
CALL 25141603. 



Where does ci 

Mm Rewew, Soctien 4, rvctt Sunday. Ami 

nursing director 

lookforajob? 


American Issues 
Radio Forum 

A National Dialogue on the 
American Experience- 
A Nation of Nations 
From the Mayflower to Ellis island 

11 am to 2 pm 

Produced by National Public Radio 
made possible by a grant from the 
National Endowment for the 
Humanities. 

WNYC-AM 830 


m 


ai! the time 

If you ever wished 
for a machine to toss 
salads for you, wish no 
more. A mechanical 
salad-tosser has been 
patented. 

Saturdays, in the 
Business-Financial 
Pages, interesting new 
inventions are described 
in the Patents of the 
Week column. They all 
make life easier for some- 
body. Your turn is com- 
ing. 

Read Patents of the Weak 
Satertfapn 

§bc^ctirJ3orkSimcs 


I CHARLES LEVIES WHi- 
■i.nc larvtn u.-.r.w. Ps.-h’ 
;i>Krr-. 625.0, 26315 TIA\ 


! INSURED AUT( 

, IN5USED FOR COLLISI 

'TO CALIF., FLORH, 
ALL GAS PAID— 9-e 

DLPcKIMBLC CAP TRA' 
NEW JERSE-i CALL: 


MSTA?nn 

5103-Slf 


PLATINUM bracelet sot » 
In Wl 7:30 P.M., 5-Yi. 3- 
■ttn c:«h Jnd 21 Ouj. 1 
9 In 5. 

I - - - 

I LOST: Fcnuta Gentian 5- 

I t:r, tire tfi \ nj {j* Lsh* 

| l.chr. kg'.MRO. Co" 5 

SLACK Allow GM-Sc 
'.v’splfti F.rr.'j.J far :»nl> 
C.1I LJBf. oilwr EJ-153 


PCtYARD— dnam briofay 
"ml on Rcrtw Si. xubtf- 
uiil 356-3365 

i "HELTI E-Biiren tcmalr Iff 

: Aita :i Vi. H'.tn I7-IK. 






























n ^ 



thr Vl , 

0/V: 








«* 

fr 
< k 


“ “ - ■■ ■■ ■ rg£ NBW Y0RK TIME S , SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6. 1975 

i o-tf^ ^ olvak* Aspires to Simple Decency i 

J. O’CONNOR out exposed navel, and anr^ I Ali 


Tipi 

van;* 


* : 



J. O’CONNOR 
parts goodness 
Waltons," one 
:s from "Little 

! ■ Prairie,” shake 
nd the product 
fairly close to 
Holvak.” which 
I on. NBC tomor- 
SP.M, The com- 
1 pushed heavily 
-virtue, which 
attractive when 
on consists of 
with or with- 


lines are easily discernible. 
The Reverend, of course, is a 
natural candidate for canon- 
ization. He visits the sick, 
calms the hysterical and 
sprays everyone in the im- 

madfato. wm-h.. _ 







• V; 
** * 


\k ./ /**\ fi y 

or :• • 

-«*S G-li. iC\. 


• JxMartin...asa 
IjtHdub' 
jwietop ■■ j 
va i 

i/tasefor I 
lat ion's I 
young ; I 
;edy stars! \ 

’ : UHe q uests: 

5 Dickinson 
■T^rtMitchum 
'ier Governor 1 
„ iid Reagan I 
;5 - ; vife Nancy I 

. 1 Jeffersons' " I 
nan Hemsfeyi 
v-;,..pei Sanford. 

— lithe 

lUb staffers.- 

->r Brooks 
:-.v^ ^ssidy 


$ 6-MiIhon Man” and Ms ‘ gets SroSed^Ta t c^S disceraible - 

computenzed- violence. , Un- ■ S'Ste Si!!?™* 5?* 3116 R * verand * <* cowse. is a 

fortunately, the basic .Tam- -vak home.- waP+S candidate for canon- 

] iy Holvak" -vehicle gets off immersed ization. He visits the sick, 

to a weak start. £J£Pg F °t ^ tte ***** and 

• “u. 1 * P*. sprays everyone in the im- 

- The place is a country vil- Sir LflSJWS-St - medlate vicmity with warm 
Iage in. Tennessee7ne?tim e P°^y understanding. He tells his 

is 1533, the Great DenressTon 55r^£. Tu °® m next Sunday children things like, "Don't 
•Reverend HbJVak (cg^nn *&? look down, honey— things al- 

ami hb wife tfSfe St’S 2S TV* lwk l betti WheTy^u 

Harris) have two youngS ■ best a man 

dren (Lance Kerwfri and Eliz- F® 8 ?.!”* WTd > un Iess by keep- 

aheth Chesire.). The son, for ivtonwhi^'ih^ ^ 1118 wordi he hurts some- 

_ y up son, j or Meanwhile, the over-all p lot one” With a husband like 

:: • ,;•/ /• . that Mrs. Holvak has little 

, .I more to do than keep remind- 
ing the children what a won- 
derful father they have. 

. Jhe convict in the first two 
episodes is called Caw, which 
‘ may sound like a character 
out Of a Phyllis DiUer routine' 
hut turns out to be David 
Carradine. free at last from 
the violent serenity of “Kung 
Fu.” Actually, his perform- 
ance is good, although he 
v would appear to be miscast 
■ . 1 . Mr. Carradine looks to be 

; • < - around 30 yeas old whfle the 

' JHMB . . ] character would be more be- 

. T lievable around 20. 

- IV O ■■ But the casting of 'The 

;■ W -. family Holvak” is far from 

' - { being unassailably loglcaL ' 

‘ Glenn Ford, a solid and at- 

- . tractive actor, uses a new 

W- hair styling for a more youth- 

- ful look, bat he still seems a 

bit old as the father of the 

a two children. But Julie Harris 

a BBMnnH^B manages to mine the cliche 

' of devoted wife for more af- 

feet in g moments than would 
seem possible. 

*Tb e Family Holvak” as- 
K: . P^cs to simple decency. It 

• .* would be nice to see it suc- 

* ceed. futnre scripts willing. 


Television 


Morning 



IfciO (4) Modern Fanner 
(4) Agriculture, U.SJL 
(*) Patterns for Living 
630 (5) News 
fc30 (2) Summer Semester 

(4) Across the Fence 

(5) Hucklebeny Hound 
7: ®° J2) Patchwork Family 

(4)Zoorana Cfi) 

(J) Underdog 

7:11 atbcU! ' ■ 

7:M j5J5? r - Magoo iR) 
(SlCasper 

«>d GoHath 

(9)News 
(H)vaia' Alegre 
&00 (2) Pebbles and ^anuji 
Banna 

*4) Emergency p]u£ 

Animated 

(^IFllntstones 

jJJHong Kong Phooey 
(S) Newark and Reality 

JiI} A R renda In fil“ 

5t-*n l &X ihli ^ eRrc 
®30 (2}Bugs Bunny: Roadrun- 
ner 

f 4) Sigmund and the Sea 
Monster 
(5} Bags Bunny 
}J?I oin . and Jerry CP) 
(9)Connecticut Report 
jjljfaends of Man 
„ „„ Rogers 

9:00 (4) Secret Lives of Wa/do 



_ A j 

Bert Parks and Shirts j? Cothran, Miss America of 1975, 
appear on “Miss America Pcgeant." Ch. 4 at 10P.M . 

3:00 P.M. U.S. Open Tennis ( 

7:30 P.M. Agronsky and Company (1 

10:00 P.M. Dick Cavett ( 

10:00 P.M. News Special ( 

11:30 P.M. Don Kirshner*s Rock Concert (, 


Kitty rpT * " 

fSJMjnie: “Causht hr the 
Draft" 0041). Bob Hope, 
Dorothy Lamour. Eddie 
9° od - typical 


#^111 

m:um 


JUSflCBmOPPEDrlpsT. 
PROS i CBS SHOW 'few 

CerUlo. Not Cone; 

my 

Continued From Page 1. CoL 3 5!I 1The Ai 

. — • ■ »I3'The Electric C 

terday that advertisers began r® 5 ®® f4)Run, Joe. Run 
leaving the nmomm »rlu «h»l Animal World 


■ "uiu U| LUC 

_ 11? ’Sesame Street 

B30 (Z)Scoobv-Doo 

(I’Pjnh Panther Show 
f7)7he Lost Saucer 
(9)That They Mf^ht See: 
Gosfwl Association for the 
B'xrd 

'HHt Is Written 
IlflO f2)Shazam! 

51? Land of Lost 
friNew Adventures of 
Gallium 

C9> Movie: "Horror Island” 
^94IL Dick Foran. Leo 
Carillo. Not Coney. Crum- 
my 

(l'l)The Ebony Affair 
m-m Company 


(leaving the program early this (TiiindTc^s Block (P1 
Jweek and that other prospec- (IMPartv 

tive sponsors had lost interest JH)a f f iiF®i K r^l ue ^ Maib ^ 

=, r™. J* ,l!W i?'f ar Oat Space Nuts 


' ' • ... r v 

V-: v 1 nt Gardenia ; 

|| r^"Tl ’ ■ ■'"■■■" lewGolddiggers 


“ HIM * r I 

(P)The 0dd 81,1 Coup,e 


qua 





* 4- 


w. •- - --ft :• 

r v -2^ & 

i : ■ i ■ ' '• 'll. 






mwm 




t. 




a , ^ 

' * ■ *- ^ 


j*.;;-. .r : • " 4 


•• e'r*t jvi 


r 




r 




"in a wave" the to few days. it.’W S'^S'e, 
As a result, as broadcast time J^ 0 ? 8 ' p > 
wroachet only me adver- (J!^,T r f:. n Gmi!a Din .. 

User, Block Drugs — using two flP3«n. Orv Grant, 
30-second spots— remained in. *- 

the program. The 16 other com- Mth ^riJd^ Pn ' P enty of 

mercial half-minutes were used fUJMwfr: “Th- r,]^ in 

' b L the ork . for Promotional cJn^S® 4 ViSSI ’* mb 

and pubhc service spots. v-d, A ' nn ^ Mott 

Advertismg agencres, on can- whodunit 

celing their purenases, told the (I?*^ 9E ' ,D, “ Street 
network that top officers of the ,1:S ® <] P) 

sponsoring companies had been r7)The Odd'aS* rm.ni. 

spoken ta by gun and hunting <p) ° dfl 8311 Coup,e 

groins from Atlanta, Denver, _ 

Cincinnati and other, cities. . ... 

Thomas Hodges, director of Altemoon 

public relations for the National ~ „ — - 

Rifle Association, said in a tele- 12:00 °f the Dinosaurs 

phone interview, that he had rp> JCI ® e ““ ^ Pussycat 
-taxflSen^VnfimBw of adver- (S)MoSe: 'Terror in the 
Dsers wnen he learned Tuesday Haunted House” (1958). 
that they had scheduled spots ^^' .\WnhT, Cuthy 

in the telecast : irDpnaid.- Young marrieds: 

*MaruM ■ SS 8 ?' H 

SgSV 

policy for news, documentaries! 1 N ?* 

But be was aWk id -jSH* a sfeet^^. W™pole 
closed-circuit screening for af- (IS)TheElectrtc Company 
; nlurtes^on Tuesday, and there *2^6 (2) Fat Albert 
; * PP a list of the sched- f41Gol The origins and 
\ uled advertisers. growth of, the : United 

“I don't think a simple phone „ . 

: ss wo - bave f»)S3S^s?LSis? ■■ 

theS SgiSSrrSF t V tar in 1:00 (2) °» Sadren?Film 

withdrawal frcjm the pro- FestivaU. »On the Snow- 
® ram ? ^°^ges said. He white.” From Czechos- 

surmised that they probably had Jo^'da (Seaspn PremiiT) 

“various reasons of their own" (4)5peakfag with Your 
for dropping out. 
g protect hfa client,, the 
CTS sales executive declined to 
any of them or to esti- 


Afternoon 


}p\ . Ul ° ^ussycai 

(5) Movie:’ 'Terror in the 
Haunted House” (1958). 
Gerald; ; \MnhT; Cathy 
LTDottald.- Young marrieds: 
no dream cottage ■ 

(7) Speedy Buggy 
•(ll)Movta "Zombies of 
Mora Tau” (1957). Gregg 
Palmer. Allison Hayes. Not 
the .Barrets o£ Wlmpole 
street- 

(IS) The Electric Company 
(2)Fat Albert 

(4) Go! The origins and 
growth of, the : United 


Festival: "On the Snow- 
white. 1 From Czechos- 
loim’ria (Seaspn ?>remii»r) 
(4)Speaktng with Your 
Hands (R) 

ffissspiiiirTB 


Orchid” (19571. Ronald 
Howard. Mary Laura Wood 
( 1 3 ) Carrasco lendas 
ISO (4)Medbc “If Your Child 
Were Deaf* 

(5) Movie: "The Monster” 
(1962). Peter Dyneley, 
Jane Hylton 
(7) Like It Js 
• (II )NFL Action 
( IS) Villa Alesre 

2^0 12) Channel 2 Eve On: 
“Little League— What's the 
Name of the Game? - ' fR) 

14 ) O BASEBALL: Boston 
Red Sox at -Milwaukee 
Brew-rs 

(9) eBASEBALL: Meta vs. 
St Louis Cardinals 
(Il)Movie: "Kid Dvna- 
mite" (1943). The East 
Side Kids. A wet fire- 
cracker 

, (13) Sesame Street 
230 (2)N.Y. Board of Educa- 
tion 

(7)Iasiglit: Tom Slade, 
guest 

3:00 (2)*UA OPEN: Tennis 
championships. Women's 
singles. Live from Forest 
Hills 

(5)Bowerv Bo^-s: “Let's 
Go Navy-' (1951). Hooray 
for Army 

(7) Movie: “Bikini Bearh” 
(1964). Frankie Avalon, 
Annette Funicello. Martha 
Hyer. Don Rickies. Ghastly 
( fl) Pr.My j 
(131 Mister Rogers 
3^0 (MiMaeilla Gorilla 
Al»gre 

4d>9 (5) Alfred Hitchcock 

(P > r, -'Jtman 

(13) Sesame Street 
(31 IThe Creative Facultv 
4d9 (lDSuperman 
•Sri Rook R*»at 
4:49 (9)Kiner’sKorner 
5*0 (4)1975 World Series or 
Golf (Live). From Akron, 
Ohio 

(5) Mission: Impossible 
(7)W*de World of Sports: 
World Professional Karate 
Championships from Nas- 
, sau Cojiseum; U-S-SJL 

— Gymnastics ■ Exhibition * 

from Salt Lake Citv; 1975 
^-CA-A. Football Preview 
(9) The Avengers ' 
fit >Th“ Lo^ Ranger 
. f IS IMteter Rogers 

[31) In and Out of Focus ■ 

6^9 (11)1 Dream of Jeannfe H 
(I3)The Electric Company i 
(31) Consumer Survival Kit . 


Evening 


6.D9 f.?)S25.noO pv-nnid 
■ (5) Movie: 'Task Force” 
(1949). (ian- Cooper. 
Jane .Wyatt. Walter Bren- 
nan. All right of this kind 
(9) Racing from Belmont: 

Futuritv 
(IDS tar Trek 
(13) Nova (R) 

(21) Consumer Suniral 

Kit 

(31) Wall Street Week 
(41) La Factoria De La 
Risa 


(47) Tribuna Del Pueblo 
(50) Ex press Yourself 
6.30 (2) CBS News 
(4) NBC News 
(7) ABC News with Ted 
Koppel 

(9) Movie: "The Lion and 
the Horse” (1952). Steve 
Cochran, Sherry Jackson. 
Ray Teal. Harmless yarn 
of cowpoke stallion 
(21) Black Perspective on 
the News (R) 

(31 > Washington Week In 
Review 

(47) De Santiago GrevI 
' (50) Man Builds, Man De- 
stroys 

7*0 (2) News 

(4)The World of Uberace 
(R) 

(7) •FOOTBALL: SL 

Louis Cardinals vs. Min- 
nesota Vikings (Pre-Sea- 
. son) (Live) 

( 1 1 )Tbe Ebonv Affair 
(13) Dateline New Jerspy 
(21) Washington Week in 

Review 

(31) On the Job 
(47) Movie: "Sc Anno' E! 
Belen” (1970). Tran Eroy. 
Paco Martinez Sorio 
(50) Firing Line 

7:30 (2)The New Candid Cam- 
era 

(4) The Price Ts Right (R) 
(ID »B ASEBALL: New 
York Yankees 1 vs. Balti- 
more Orioles 

03) •AGRONSKY AND 
■ COMPANY 
(21) Wall StreetWcek 
(SDBest of Pops 
&00 (2)AB in the Familv (R) 

(4l Emergency: Keenan 
Wynn, guest (R> 

(5) Oral Roberts iu Alaska 
(9) Movie: “Scene of the 

■■■awnwiwiBi 

lene DahL Mild but genial 
whodumt, form - fitted 
around young Van 
*13) • FIRING LINE: WU- 
bam F. Buckley j r , host. 
“Who Killed Bobby Ken- 
nedy?” (R) 

(21) Woman 

(4DTeatro De La Famllia 
(50)No, Honestly... 

9d0 <2)Big Eddie: Sheldon 
Leonard, Sheree North. 
Comedy. Jack Carter, 
guest 

(2 1) Theatre in America 
(31,50)Jean Shepherd’s 
America 

9d» (2)Mary Tyler Moore 
ShowtRl 

(4) Dean’s Place: Comedv- 
Variety. Robert Mitch urn, 
Angie Dickinson, former 
Gov. Ronald Reagan, 
guests 

(5) Thc Fugitive 

(13) Hollywood Television 
Theatre:. "The Ladies of 


f5%n" 

i & 


V . 7 . ' 

i? .■ 

• • J 

6* 


•j? . 

*k-rfA 




f l - ig\ 

?■ 


S'. 

■f -A ' . <<■ f-. 


TwjL' LWre . • 

W: * 

-V- _ _ 

€ M 



N» 4 

‘x~Tr > y 

R^iv^-Sr' 



the ■ Corridor." . Ctoti 
Leach m a n . Jane Wyatt. 
Lives of women living jn 
email residential hotels 
‘(31) FI ring Line * 

mi ■ (-IDAmaras aTuProjimo 
— (47) star Monomane Lita- 

gassen < 

1 50) Theatre in America' 1 
fcSfi (2) Bob Ncwhart Show (R) 
(4 7) Dj Ikon-Ho-Hana 
lftOO (2)*DICK CAVETT 
SHOW: Cher. Steve Alfcit. 
Barry Monilow, Slydlni. 
guesls 

(4)«I\nsS AMERICA 
PAGEANT: Live from ‘At- 
lantic Cltv, NJ. 

(5,11) News 

(7)*NEWS SPECIAL' 
"The Lonely Eagles.” 
Fourth annual meeting; of 
the Tuskegee Airmen's 
Assn. 

(9)Billy Graham Crusade 
(3DAI1 About TV . 

( 4 1) Noches Tapatias 
10^0 (5) Black News 

(ll)Hee Haw: Tommy 
Overstreet and LiwanHa 
Lindsey, guests 
(4DBoxeo ■' 

(47) News 

(M)Hockfns Valley Blue* 

grass *. 

, I03S (4D News from Japan -- 
10:50 (47)New Golf Lesson 
IId» (2,7>News 
* (5> Best of Groucho - 

(9)Wanted: Dead or Aina 
‘ ( 13) Family at War f R) - 

(47)Jlrocho Sangokushl • 
11^0 (5) •DON KIRSHNKRS 
ROCK CONCERT: Rolling 
' Stones, Ike Sc Tina Turner 

Revue, the late Jim Croce 
(7) • MOVIE: “Heller in 
Pink Tights” (1960). An- 
thony Quinn. Sophia ^a- 
ren. Stylish, cheerful a^d 
charming romantic comedy 
of theatrical troupe, in Old ; 
WesL A George Cukor ■ 
special : 

(9) Racing from Roosevelt r 
(lI)TfaeHoneymooners . i 
.11:40 (2)Mtnie: “While jtbe Cfty j 
Sleeps” U956). Dana An- > 
drew*. Ida Lupino, Rhonda j 
Fleming. George SandeFS. ’ 
Middling good melodrama, 
nice cast a j 

12d» (4) News j 

(5) Police Surgeon l,j 

(9)Int'l. CIumpionship“» 
Wrestling ‘ *' 

(ID Perry Mason 
(13)Tbe Captioned FeclDfg 
Good 

12^0 (4)The Weekend Tonight 
Show: Johnny Carson, 

host. Charlton Heston, 

Dick Shawn, Maxine W&- 
don, Ashley Montagu lR> 

(131 Yoga for Health 

1^0 (5)Movie: "Gentlemen 

Marry Brunettes" (1955). 

Jane Russell; Jeanne Crain, 
Scott Brady, Alan Young-. 

An okay musical, with. a 
good, curious grabbag-ef 
tunes. Best number: “?-Jy 
Funny Valentine” in She 
Rodin Museum, of ;ajl 
places , 

(9}Movie: "Untamed 

Woman" (1952). .Doris 
Merrick. Mikel Conrad^ 

Carol Brewster. From htin- < 

, ser 

IdO (7) -MOVIE: “Destination 
Gobi" (1953). RichSfd 
Widmaric, Don Taylor, CaJ 
sey Adams. Navy men. fe- 
mnfe . n^nrher. iwrt Ait 
original as It is amusing' 

1^0 (2) News . 7 

W5 (2) Movie: “Branded^ 

(1950). Alan Ladd, Mona 
Freeman, Charles Blt3> 
ford. Ladd at home, dr 
. just plain indifferent, bn 
the range ' • ■ 

2j98 (4)Movi« "Wild SeeH’* 
(1965). Michael Parks. Ct^ 
lia Kaye. Two young ifctfH- 
erants. Thoughtful,- often 
sensitive, but doesn't mate 
the grade . 

2S0 ,(9)Newc 

S20 (7) News s; 

3^5 (2)»MOWE: “The Strangs 
Love of Martha .Ives* 

(1946). Kirk Douglas, Bar- 
bara Stanwyck, Van Hef- 
lin. Liaabeth Scott. Siz- 
zling. taut melodrama with 
grand ploLTha early, key 
seeqe that will haunt yomi 
the stairway 


Radio 


program, he said. 


?o- hhhhhhh 

J? e* AJ*? WOXR: Breakfast 5ym- 
“7 Symphony No. 56,- Haydn: 

at violin Concerto No. 2. c Lini- 
ng Overture No. 7, Arne; Oboe Cor? 
;ijl 5 HaL Albinoni:- Sym- 

nt £. hon ?.P C. Wagner; Overture to 
nt The Old Maid- and. .The Thief. 

Menottk. Concerto de Man Tor . 
IW Guitar and Orchestra, Bondon; 
ns Trojan- March from The Trojans 
at Carthage. 

er M#-lf WKCR, Piano Sonata 
No. 15; Piano Concerto Ncl 26; 
Adagio in B minor;, Piano Trio 
No. 5: Symphony No. 39; Adagio 
a- and Fugue in C minor for String 
IS Quartet; Piano Trio No. 6, 
a Mozart 

9:06-10. WQXR: Piano Pereonali- 
ties. Jean and Kenneth Went- 
worth and Richard and John 
t- Co n ti gu E H a. Sonata No. 2 for 

0 Piano Four Hands, Mozart; La 
Sonnambnla Fantasy for Piano 

p Four Hands, Liszt 
ii 10-2 PJVL, WKCR. Symphony 
j No. 40; Symphony No. 4J; 
fl Canons; Divertimento in E flap 
[{ for String Trio; German Dan- 
s ces J Piano Sonata No. 18; String 
Quartet No. 21; Plano Sonata 
, « 0 . 19; Clarinet Qulnlat, Mozart. 

: J(k66-Noon, WQXR: Saturday 
, Pope Cmmert. Violin Concerto m 
< A minor, Glazunov; La Gian, 

1 ballet suite, Casella. 

t lOsM-lfcBS, WNYC-FM: Most-' 
cale. Alban Berg Quartet. 

, 1M130, WNYC-FIVk Young 
, American Artists. Peter Serkin, 


Bergmann; Arpiade for Soprano, 
Speaking Chorus and Five In- 
struments. Vogel; The Crow and 
the Nightingale for Speaking 
Chorus. Percussion and Insiru- 
2™ 15 ; Hochmaun: Antigone, Two 
Choral Excerpts. Vogel; Death of 
a Tyrant for Speaking Chorus, 
Instruments and Percussion. Mil- 
haud; I ncontri Brevi for Flute 
and Clarinet, Kelterborxu 
6:19-7, WQXR: Music from Ger- 
many. David Berger, host. 

8:06-9, WQXR: Adventures In 
Sound. Larry Zide. host. 

8-9J0, WNYC-FM. Norfolk Rhap- 


Vaughan Will lams. " 

9:06-11, WQXR: New York Times 
Festival of Music. Funeral and 
Triumphal Symphony, Berlioz. 
11-555 AM- WNYC-FM: While 


pianist. 

1:362-2. 


1:362-2, WQXR: Frontiers ' of 

A Higher Connecticut Rate Recording corarto^tS^uth 
On Bonds Laid to Crisis Here SS. G vSS^. 0 g5fS, ^ 

Mozart 

2dK-3, WQXR: Panorama: Opera 
Highlights. Tannhauser Excerpts, 
Wagner. 


3&6S, WQXR: Panorama^ Sym- 
phony No. 2, Boyce; Sinfonietta, 
Poulenc La Cetra: Violin Con- 


wmm 


certo No. 7, Vivaldi; Flute Con- 
certo. Szemnszky. 

4-4^a. ■ WNYC-FM: -Key. 

board Artists. Iran Moravec. 
6-7:55. WNYC-FM; European 
Concert Hall. Geographical ensue 
for Speaking Chorus.- Waltz, 
Toch; Four Hangman's Songs, 


Ravel; EUu Hddenleben, Strauss! 
12:08-1 AM. WQXR: Midnight 
with Music. Symphony in C, Sam- 
martini; Metamorphose n, Strauss; 
Concertino for Trumpet, Strings 
and Piano, Jolivet. 

Talks, Sports, Events 

5- 7 AJl, WBAL The Morning 
After the ■ .veht Before. With 
ijary FriftL Talk: r.icsic. 

TilS-ia. WOR-AT-I: John Gam- 
bling. .Variety. 

6- 10, WMCA: Keu Fairchild. CaU- 
in show, 

8- SAO, WNYC-FM: Stories From 

Many Lands. With Diane Wolk- 
stein. + 

830-8£5 WNYC: The Wonderful 
World of PJLL Kitty Kirby, 
host. 

9- Noon,. WB At Grow Your Own. 
Gardening program with the 
Green Guerrillas. ■ ■ 

. 9-10, WKVR: The Apartment Gar- 
deqers. Floss and Stan Dworirin. 
hosts. “Avoradoes.” 

10- 1 P.M, WEVD: Rosh h*-Sb« 
na High Holy -Day Services. 
From Tempi- B'mi Jwhurun. 
16-Noon, WTKCA: Merrie Spaeth. 

Call-in' show. 


IMI, WRVR: Body and SonL 
With Jim D'Anna. Interviews. 
KhI5-Noori. WOR-AM: What's 
Your Problem? Bernard Meltzer. 
host. Call-in show, (real estate, 
finance). 

10:30-10:55. WN\’C-AM: Teen- 
age Book Talk. With Ruth Ran- 
sen ■ ] 

11-2, WNYC-AM: American Is- ■ 

sues Forum. From National Pub- ' 

lie Radio, featuring Robert 
Cromie and Dr. David Kennedy, 1 

associate prof, of hlstorv at Stan- 1 

ford University. National call-in J 

show. Topic. ”A Nation or Na- > 

rions—From the Mayflower to 
Ellis Island.” 1 

11*0-12:39. WNYC-AM: First t 

• Chapter. Richard Pyatt reads the 1 

first cnapter of “Reality Police” 1 

by Anthonv Brandt. Ii 

Noon-3 P.M, WMCA: Leon Lew- - 

is. Call-in. 

Noon-2, WBAI: LuuehpaiL Talk 
call-in. 

Noon-1, WNYC-FM: Monthly A 

Arts Forum. Alvin Reiss, host. H 

Kent Barwick, director of the Vi 

New York State Council on the V 
Arts, guest. ■ „ 

2:10, WNEW-AM: BasebaD. Mets 7- 
and SL Louis Cardinals. h? 

3-7:10, WMCA: John SterHne, ™ 
Call-in show. ^ 

330-5:55, WNYC-FM: Speaking ™ 
of Dance. With Lee Edward 
Stem. Erik Bmhn. dancer, guest. t 
4 «MsKL WNYC-TO-TTie Young J 
JfiBteianL With Sahan AnnunK . 2. 
Presentrtion rf Part ■ ' Of “A * 
Notebook for Ann:. Magrdalena VA 

■'**cn. Ufa 

5:3P-5:55, TVNTC-.WI: Lm m 

rrahaci Ictrr’iews. Lswrea'-' wa 

Fr-'.nr.dlich. ■ disir-m-chl^f of 25 

Harper's Press, -aes 4 wr 

***, WVYC-A3!: ,\ccent oii wo 

Haiti. With S» ,- w 3<?s'j1!eu. Dr. S' 

Junius Bird, curator emeritus. w. 

South Amoriea- arrhcology at Wo 

the American of Natural we 

Historv, -ucsi 

' GKJ5-8.' WOR-AM: What'e Your v?fJ 
Problem? (see 10:15 A.M.). WPi 

7 -8. WBA fc The Third World 
pnaarnnicotion Vanguard News- wf! 
bent. News, interviews, consum. wei 
er information, wn 

735, WMCA: BasebaH.- Yankees 
and Baltimore Orioles. Hf 

7-J0. WYNC-AM: Footbafl. Penn WHl 
State and Temple. whc 

WEVD; Rosh ha-Sfauu High wn 
Ho|y Day Services. From Temple vSS 

B nai Jrsbunin. wio 

IMftMp WNT’C-FM: Kaleido- *"?' 
jcope. Andre Bernard, hmu. 


Judith Raskin, opera singer, dts^ 
Closes ^conisrts at the' 92n^ 

10-Midnight, WMCA: Best <4 
Barry Gray. (R). 

Midnight-1 AJUL. WOR-AM: 
BETWEEN THE COVERS. Hey- 
wood Hale Broun, host - Jim 
Hightower, founder and former 
director of the Agribusiness A& 
countability Protect, discos s& 
"How Food Profiteers Victimize 
the Consumer.” « 

Midnight- 6 AJtf, WMCA: Wg 
John Nebet and Candy Jone£ 
With Burt Bacharach, author of 
“How to do Almost Anything^r : 
Mldnighl-5 AJVL, WBAI: Beyoi^ 
tiie Unnameable. With Bob. Fass: 
Talk, music, call-in, interviews.' 
1-5 A.M, WOR-AM: Barty Far- 
her. Discussion. " 

News Broadcasts -■ 

— — \u 

All News: WCBS, WINS, WNWS.’ ■ 
Homly on the Hour: WQXR, 

■Fhw Bfimites to the Hour: WAB(L 
(also five minutes to the halP " 
hog)^ WNYC, WPDC. WQIV. f 

FtFteea Minutes Past the Hour 
WPLJ. WRVR. 

the Half Hour. WPAt; 
WWDJ. WLiB, WNBC. • 
WMCA. WNJ. . ■ 

6-^0 only: WBAI. . * ' 


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OVER THERE 


What's happening on foreign stock 
markets? You’ll find -dosing prices of 
the most important slocks traded in 
London, Frankfurt, Milan, Zurich. 
Paris and Amsterdam , . , regularlyin 
ihe Business/Finance Pages of Tne 
New York Times. 















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iVr" Because 8 of the depressed economy; 
f '* Some book companies are in financial trou- 
X] Me- The Webster’s Dictionary Company is 
?•. no exception. And just as the major auto 
companies have takes drastic steps to im- 
v.' jkotc sales, we hereby announce an incredi- 
V Me price dash on the 1,.454-page, eight* 
|? pound, 158^000- definition, 300-page- 
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: If you’ve ever wanted“£o buy this one* 

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In case you’re unfamiliar with The lav* 

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* Iianguage, let us explain that its 
compilers are a group of 100 lexicographers,, 
etymologists, philolo®sts,orthographe?s,re- 

■ searchers, and editois known collectively as . 

* , Xhe English Language Institute-Theyworkin 
the tradition of Noah Webster (1758—18433, 
the father of American lexicography and 
•aspiration for the founding of our compa- 
By. Millions of literate Americans refer to; 
The living Webster Encyclopedic Diction* 
ary of the English Language every day. 

They rely on it for authoritative answers 
fd their questions about word definition, 
spelling, pronunciation, hyphenation, origin 
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- The work itself is divided into 22 sec* 
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3,100 pages given over to an A-Z vocabulary 
—Updated to include dang expressions of , 
the very year. The section is supplemented 
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abbreviations, eta 

' Other sections include: _ . 


• A 51,000-word Thesaurus of Syno- 
nyms and Antonyms, with more than 4,000 
cross-references. This section alone consti- 
tutes an impressive reference work. 

• A Conspectus of Foreign Words and 
Phrases. The equivalent of a two-way English 
dictionary into and out of French, Spanish, 
Italian, and Germanr-with some Latter and 
Greek. 

• Table of Abbreviations. 3,800 contrac- 
tions commonly used in business, engineer* 
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• Musical Signs and Symbols. A primer 
On notation of the art. 

• Compendium of Quotations. Thou- 
sands of aphorisms distilling the wit and 
wisdom of the world. Invaluable for compos- 
ing letters, preparing speeches, writing term 
papers.' It even makes diverting reading, 
(How about this gem from Lincoln : “My otd 
father used to have a saying: If youmakea 
had bargain, hug it all the tighter.”) 

• Students’ and Writers 3 Guide. A shore- 
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punctuation, italics, capitalization, foot- 
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• Perpetual Calendar. Enables you to 
pinpoint the day of week of any date in the 
two centuries from 1901 to 2100. 

• Table of Metric Equivalents. Over/? 
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• Occupational Guide. Detailed descrip- 
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• Dictionary of Mythology. An indis- 

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literature from Homer's Hied to Tolkien's 
The Hobbit. 


• Manual of Office Procedure. Every- 
thing from how to mail packages and letters 
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